National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fb uufiles tar

  1. Centrifuge treatment of coal tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.A. Kazak; V.Z. Kaidalov; L.F. Syrova; O.S. Miroshnichenko; A.S. Minakov

    2009-07-15

    New technology is required for the removal of water and heavy fractions from regular coal tar. Centrifuges offer the best option. Purification of coal tar by means of centrifuges at OAO NLMK permits the production of pitch coke or electrode pitch that complies with current standards.

  2. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  3. GJO-2000-183-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3 2,000 4,000DOEK83-TAR

  4. Tar Sands | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborg BrakesOTags HomeTar

  5. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  6. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  7. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  8. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul criteria, will be stated at the beginning of lecture #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2 · Muscle Physiology · Heart and circulatory functions · Neuroethology #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www

  9. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014%) written exam (60%) journal (20%) Preparation of course work (20%) #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www · Antioxidants #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014

  10. Investigation of coal tar mobility at a former MGP site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moo-Young, H.K.; Mo, X.H.; Waterman, R.; Coleman, A.; Saroff, S.

    2009-11-15

    The presence of coal tar in the subsurface of former manufactured gas plant sites poses an environmental hazard and a potential threat to public health. Coal tar can release various chemical compounds that are transported into the groundwater. Before any efforts can be made to remove coal tar from contaminated subsurface soils, it is recommended to characterize coal tar properties and composition and to delineate the residual saturation point between mobile and immobile coal tar. This paper presents a new innovative field device, the Res-SAT field tool, and laboratory procedures that can be used to determine the saturation-capillary pressure relationship for a soil-water coal-tar system and the critical pressure for coal tar mobility.

  11. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Klausur (50%) Protokolle Grundkurs (50%) written exam (50%) journal (50%) #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www

  12. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Modulprüfung (MP) / Assessment of module (MP) or submodule (TP) Klausur written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie

  13. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014) / Assessment of module (MP) or submodule (TP) Klausur written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www

  14. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014-up to the tutorial protocol corrections communication with lecturers and students #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www

  15. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 protocols. #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 of the lecture #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014

  16. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 of lecture #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 functions · Learning, memory, sleep #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO

  17. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Lerntagebuches Journal #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd the different taxa #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd

  18. Nigeria to step up tar sands activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    The Nigerian government has directed its Ministry of Mines, Power and Steel to assume responsibility for the exploration and exploitation of tar sands deposits in Bendel, Ondo and Oyo States. The directive resulted from a survey report by the University of Ife's geological consultancy unit on bituminous sand deposits in the area. The statement said the government was satisfied that there were large commercial quantities of the sands in the three states. The survey had reported that Nigeria could recover between 31 and 40 billion barrels of heavy crude from the tar sand deposits. Exploration for hydrocarbons is currently going on in Anambra and Lake Chad basins as well as the Benue Trough. Apart from the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, Shell Petroleum and Gulf Oil have begun exploration activities in the Ondo area. Meanwhile, Nigeria has had to import heavy crude from Venezuela, for processing at the Kaduna refinery.

  19. Aspects of tar sands development in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewusi, V.A. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (NG))

    1992-07-01

    Development of Nigerian massive reserves of crude bitumen and associated heavy oil is imminent in view of the impacts that the huge importation of these materials and their products have on the nation's economy, coupled with the depleting reserves of Nigeria and highlights the appropriate production technology options and their environmental implications. The utilization potentials of these resources are also enumerated, as well as the government's role in achieving accelerated, long-term tar sands development in the country.

  20. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 presentation #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014

  1. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 of module (MP) or submodule (TP) Klausur written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2 Rechenmethoden in den Naturwissenschaften für Studierende der Chemie und Biologie B Calculus for the Natural

  2. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014%) presentation (30%) oral exam (70%) #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO

  3. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul

  4. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Mentorenprogramm statt. The oral exam is part of the mentoring. #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2

  5. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 (20%) report (80%) Presentation (20%) #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni

  6. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Modulprüfung (MP) / Assessment of module (MP) or submodule (TP) Klausur written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie of brains are included. Diseases and etiologies are also presented. #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www

  7. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd

  8. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014%) presentation (20%) #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd

  9. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014%) Protokolle (70%) presentation (30%) journal (70%) #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni

  10. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Biology" . #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014

  11. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 percent) and computational tasks (80 percent). #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni

  12. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Abschluss der Module Chemie 1, Bio 2. MBW 1. Studienvarianten /The module / submodule is part exam exclusively based on lecture #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO

  13. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Chemie 1, Bio 2 Studienvarianten /The module / submodule is part of the following study types Vollfach) or submodule (TP) Klausur written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO

  14. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Biochemistry". #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014

  15. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 and to evalute the own level of knowledge through feedbacks. #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2

  16. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014: Erfolgreicher Abschluss der Module Chemie 1, Bio 2. MBW 1. Studienvarianten /The module / submodule is part work (not graded) #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011

  17. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014: Erfolgreicher Abschluss der Module Chemie 1, Bio 2. MBW 1. Studienvarianten /The module / submodule is part (MP) or submodule (TP) Klausur written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni

  18. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Modulprüfung (MP) / Assessment of module (MP) or submodule (TP) Klausur written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie, interference) #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.

  19. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014, Kleingruppenpräsentation presentation script and presentation #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni

  20. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 (30%) report (70%) presentation (30%) #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni

  1. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014: Marine invertrebrates alternating with Marine Algae. #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2

  2. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014: Erfolgreicher Abschluss der Module Chemie 1, Bio 2. MBW 1. Studienvarianten /The module / submodule is part knowledge of genetics is relevant. #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO

  3. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014) or submodule (TP) Klausur written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO

  4. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 hours #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014

  5. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 geregelt (§ 7). #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd

  6. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Modulprüfung (MP) / Assessment of module (MP) or submodule (TP) Klausur written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie Kernphysik - Aufbau der Materie (Kernteilchen) - Radioaktivität content #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www

  7. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd

  8. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  9. Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

  10. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  11. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  12. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

    2009-12-22

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  13. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul / module their function. #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014

  14. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul / module code Bio 6 of vertebrates #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014

  15. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 of the exam is 50% of each submodule #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul / module

  16. Grandparents Oppose Tar Sands Alberta tar sands are estimated to be 240 GtC (gigatons of carbon); see Intergovernmental Panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    was 28% of global oil use for the cumulative amounts over the past 200 years. So Alberta tar sands would lead eventually to ways of cooking the oil out of most of the tar sands. Moreover, these numbersGrandparents Oppose Tar Sands Alberta tar sands are estimated to be 240 GtC (gigatons of carbon

  17. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Westhoff, James D. (Laramie, WY); Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000.degree. F. in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs.

  18. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

    1988-05-04

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000/degree/F in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Art der Prüfung / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul / module code Bio 4

  20. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Tanioka, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Sakaide (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  1. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul / module

  2. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014: Erfolgreicher Abschluss der Module Chemie 1, Bio 2. MBW 1. Studienvarianten /The module / submodule is part Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Art der Prüfung

  3. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul) / Assessment of module (MP) or submodule (TP) Klausur written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www

  4. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 Abschluss der Module Chemie 1, Bio 2. MBW 1. Studienvarianten /The module / submodule is part Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Art der Prüfung

  5. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 20142 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul

  6. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014: Erfolgreicher Abschluss der Module Chemie 1, Bio 2. MBW 1. Studienvarianten /The module / submodule is part Modulprüfung (MP) / Assessment of module (MP) or submodule (TP) Klausur written exam #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie

  7. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul / module code FD 1 6

  8. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014, Chemisches Grundpraktikum/ P Allgemeine Chemie für den Teil Biochemie-Praktikum Unterrichtssprache / language) or submodule (TP) entspricht Studienleistung (unbenotet) course work (not graded) #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www

  9. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul / module code Gentec

  10. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 learning outcome Domain I

  11. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modul / module code PM 1

  12. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014 insbesondere der Biologie und in Teilen der naturwissenschaftlicher Fächer Physik und Chemie an Beispielen- und situationsgerechten Einsatz nennen und erläutern (2.1 + 2.2) #12;FB2 Biologie / Chemie www

  13. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-03-16

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  14. Biodegradation of naphthalene from coal tar. Research progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoshal, S.; Ramaswami, A.; Luthy, R.G.

    1994-02-07

    Biodegradation experiments were conducted to evaluate the mineralization of naphthalene released from coal tar entrapped in microporous silica media. Tests were performed with two coal tars recovered from former manufactured gas plant sites. Results from these tests showed that the degradation end point for naphthalene was significantly lower than the total amount of naphthalene present in coal tar. The role of physico-chemical and biological processes on the rate of biotransformation of naphthalene was evaluated. Mass transfer rates for dissolution of naphthalene from entrapped coal tar were measured in batch, flow-through systems. The rate of naphthalene mass transfer from the coal tar was found to be significantly greater than the rate of naphthalene biomineralization in batch slurry reactors. This implied that the rate acting factor for the biodegradation process was related to biokinetic phenomena rather than mass transfer processes. Further tests indicated that conditions inhibitory to bacteria limited the biodegradation of naphthalene, and in some cases the inhibition was reversible upon dilution of the reactor contents.

  15. $A^t_{FB}$ Meets LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, JoAnne L.; /SLAC; Shelton, Jessie; /Yale U.; Spannowsky, Michael; /Oregon U.; Tait, Tim M.P.; /UC, Irvine; Takeuchi, Michihisa; /Heidelberg U.

    2012-02-14

    The recent Tevatron measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of the top quark shows an intriguing discrepancy with Standard Model expectations, particularly at large t{bar t} invariant masses. Measurements of this quantity are subtle at the LHC, due to its pp initial state, however, one can define a forward-central-charge asymmetry which captures the physics. We study the capability of the LHC to measure this asymmetry and find that within the SM a measurement at the 5{sigma} level is possible with roughly 60 fb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 14 TeV. If nature realizes a model which enhances the asymmetry (as is necessary to explain the Tevatron measurements), a significant difference from zero can be observed much earlier, perhaps even during early LHC running at {radical}s = 7 TeV. We further explore the capabilities of the 7 TeV LHC to discover resonances or contact interactions which modify the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution using recent boosted top tagging techniques. We find that TeV-scale color octet resonances can be discovered, even with small coupling strengths and that contact interactions can be probed at scales exceeding 6 TeV. Overall, the LHC has good potential to clarify the situation with regards to the Tevatron forward-backward measurement.

  16. Heavy liquid beneficiation developed for Alabama tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The tar sand deposits in the State of Alabama contain about 1.8 billion barrels of measured and more than 4 billion barrels of speculative in-place bitumen. A comprehensive research program is in progress for the separation of bitumen from these deposits. In general, Alabama tar sands are oil wetted, low grade and highly viscous in nature. In view of these facts, a beneficiation strategy has been developed to recover bitumen enriched concentrate which can be used as a feed material for further processing. Heavy liquid separation tests and results are discussed. A 77% zinc bromide solution, specific gravity of 2.4, was used for the tests. 2 figures.

  17. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modulbeschreibung / Module Description Modul / module code Che 2 6 ECTS-Punkte / credit points Chemie-Praktika Lab, Chemisches Grundpraktikum/ P Allgemeine Chemie für den Teil Biochemie-Praktikum Unterrichtssprache / language

  18. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de www.fb2.uni-bremen.de BPO Biologie 2011 / MEd 2014/15 Modulbeschreibung / Module Description Modul / module code Che 1 9 ECTS-Punkte / credit points Allgemeine Chemie Moduls ist, allen Studierenden der Biologie und Geologie Einblick in wesentliche Grundlagen der Chemie

  19. In situ recovery of oil from Utah tar sand: a summary of tar sand research at the Laramie Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchant, L.C.; Westhoff, J.D.

    1985-10-01

    This report describes work done by the United States Department of Energy's Laramie Energy Technology Center from 1971 through 1982 to develop technology for future recovery of oil from US tar sands. Work was concentrated on major US tar sand deposits that are found in Utah. Major objectives of the program were as follows: determine the feasibility of in situ recovery methods applied to tar sand deposits; and establish a system for classifying tar sand deposits relative to those characteristics that would affect the design and operation of various in situ recovery processes. Contents of this report include: (1) characterization of Utah tar sand; (2) laboratory extraction studies relative to Utah tar sand in situ methods; (3) geological site evaluation; (4) environmental assessments and water availability; (5) reverse combustion field experiment, TS-1C; (6) a reverse combustion followed by forward combustion field experiment, TS-2C; (7) tar sand permeability enhancement studies; (8) two-well steam injection experiment; (9) in situ steam-flood experiment, TS-1S; (10) design of a tar sand field experiment for air-stream co-injection, TS-4; (11) wastewater treatment and oil analyses; (12) economic evaluation of an in situ tar sand recovery process; and (13) appendix I (extraction studies involving Utah tar sands, surface methods). 70 figs., 68 tabs.

  20. Effect of ozonation on the composition of crude coal-tar benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semenova, S.A.; Patrakov, Y.F.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of ozonation on the composition of crude benzene produced by the coal-tar chemical industry was studied.

  1. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 VOCsVOCs,, PAHsPAHs, soot, tar, CO, soot, tar, CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    of tar (from biomass gasificationbiomass gasification)) ·· COCO see: www.hut.fi/~see: www, TOCEmission standards: CO and THC, TOC Power plant Finland (1990+) MSW incinerator Finland (1994) MSW incinerator EU (2000) Power plant Germany (1999) MSW incinerator Germany (1999) Hazardou s waste incinerator

  2. Joint Inference of Multiple Label Types in Large Networks Deepayan Chakrabarti DEEPAY@FB.COM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @FB.COM Stanislav Funiak SFUNIAK@FB.COM Jonathan Chang JONCHANG@FB.COM Sofus A. Macskassy SOFMAC@FB.COM Facebook Inc-passing architecture. On a billion-node subset of the Facebook social network, EDGEEXPLAIN signif- icantly outperforms the group from u's actual current city C, causing label propagation to infer C for u. However, our proposed

  3. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  4. Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2009-07-21

    A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

  5. MODELLING THE LOW-TAR BIG GASIFICATION CONCEPT Lars Andersen, Brian Elmegaard, Bjrn Qvale, Ulrik Henriksen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -tar, high-efficient biomass gasification concept for medium- to large-scale power plants has been designed that will lead to a breakthrough of gasification technology. Keywords: Biomass, Gasification, Tar, Steam drying Value DNA Dynamic Network Analysis INTRODUCTION In order to introduce biomass gasification technol- ogy

  6. Beach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luyendyk, Bruce

    quantification was used at Coal Oil Point (COP), California to study the mechanisms transporting oil/tar fromBeach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point, California Tonya S. Del Sontro a,*, Ira Leifer a , Bruce P. Luyendyk b , Bernardo R. Broitman c a Marine

  7. Closing the Wedge with 300 fb^-1 and 3000 fb^-1 at the LHC: A Snowmass White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian M. Lewis

    2013-08-08

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at the LHC begins the era of directly measuring the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). Searching for extensions of the Standard Model (SM) EWSB sector at the LHC is of vital importance. An important extension of the SM with an extended EWSB sector is the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). In this white paper, we extend current ATLAS and CMS bounds on direct searches for the heavy MSSM neutral Higgs bosons to 300 fb^-1 and 3000 fb^-1 of data at the LHC. In particular we focus on the \\tau^+\\tau^- channel and the pseudoscalar decay to light Higgs boson and Z, with additional discussion on how to further close the wedge.

  8. Compressed supersymmetry after 1 fb?¹ at the Large Hadron Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LeCompte, Thomas J.; Martin, Stephen P.

    2012-02-01

    We study the reach of the Large Hadron Collider with 1 fb?¹ of data at ?s=7 TeV for several classes of supersymmetric models with compressed mass spectra, using jets and missing transverse energy cuts like those employed by ATLAS for summer 2011 data. In the limit of extreme compression, the best limits come from signal regions that do not require more than 2 or 3 jets and that remove backgrounds by requiring more missing energy rather than a higher effective mass.

  9. Blackening Character, Imagining Race, and Mapping Morality: Tarring and Feathering in Nineteenth Century American Literature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trninic, Marina

    2013-08-05

    This study examines the ritual of tarring and feathering within specific American cultural contexts and literary works of the nineteenth-century to show how the discourse surrounding the actual and figurative practice ...

  10. NREL Patents a Catalyst that Removes Syngas Tar, Boosting the Economics of Biofuels (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    NREL has patented a catalyst that reforms tar into syngas, a breakthrough that can accelerate the process of getting biomass ready for fuel synthesis and use as a drop-in fuel.

  11. Application of multidimensional analytical transport models to coal-tar derivatives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Youn

    1992-01-01

    APPLICATION OF MULTIDIMENSIONAL ANALYTICAL TRANSPORT MODELS TO COAL-TAR DERIVATIVES A Thesis by YOUN SIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Geology APPLICATION OF MULTIDIMENSIONAL ANALYTICAL TRANSPORT MODELS TO COAL-TAR DERIVATIVES A Thesis by YOUN SIM Approved as to style and content by: Patrick A. Domenico (Chair of Committee) N man...

  12. Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-11

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future projectspecific analyses. Additional information about the PEIS can be found at http://ostseis.anl.gov.

  13. Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

    2011-05-28

    Biomass gasification is a flexible and efficient way of utilizing widely available domestic renewable resources. Syngas from biomass has the potential for biofuels production, which will enhance energy security and environmental benefits. Additionally, with the successful development of low Btu fuel engines (e.g. GE Jenbacher engines), syngas from biomass can be efficiently used for power/heat co-generation. However, biomass gasification has not been widely commercialized because of a number of technical/economic issues related to gasifier design and syngas cleanup. Biomass gasification, due to its scale limitation, cannot afford to use pure oxygen as the gasification agent that used in coal gasification. Because, it uses air instead of oxygen, the biomass gasification temperature is much lower than well-understood coal gasification. The low temperature leads to a lot of tar formation and the tar can gum up the downstream equipment. Thus, the biomass gasification tar removal is a critical technology challenge for all types of biomass gasifiers. This USDA/DOE funded program (award number: DE-FG36-O8GO18085) aims to develop an advanced catalytic tar conversion system that can economically and efficiently convert tar into useful light gases (such as syngas) for downstream fuel synthesis or power generation. This program has been executed by GE Global Research in Irvine, CA, in collaboration with Professor Lanny Schmidt's group at the University of Minnesota (UoMn). Biomass gasification produces a raw syngas stream containing H2, CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other hydrocarbons, tars, char, and ash. Tars are defined as organic compounds that are condensable at room temperature and are assumed to be largely aromatic. Downstream units in biomass gasification such as gas engine, turbine or fuel synthesis reactors require stringent control in syngas quality, especially tar content to avoid plugging (gum) of downstream equipment. Tar- and ash-free syngas streams are a critical requirement for commercial deployment of biomass-based power/heat co-generation and biofuels production. There are several commonly used syngas clean-up technologies: (1) Syngas cooling and water scrubbing has been commercially proven but efficiency is low and it is only effective at small scales. This route is accompanied with troublesome wastewater treatment. (2) The tar filtration method requires frequent filter replacement and solid residue treatment, leading to high operation and capital costs. (3) Thermal destruction typically operates at temperatures higher than 1000oC. It has slow kinetics and potential soot formation issues. The system is expensive and materials are not reliable at high temperatures. (4) In-bed cracking catalysts show rapid deactivation, with durability to be demonstrated. (5) External catalytic cracking or steam reforming has low thermal efficiency and is faced with problematic catalyst coking. Under this program, catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) is being evaluated for syngas tar clean-up in biomass gasification. The CPO reaction is exothermic, implying that no external heat is needed and the system is of high thermal efficiency. CPO is capable of processing large gas volume, indicating a very compact catalyst bed and a low reactor cost. Instead of traditional physical removal of tar, the CPO concept converts tar into useful light gases (eg. CO, H2, CH4). This eliminates waste treatment and disposal requirements. All those advantages make the CPO catalytic tar conversion system a viable solution for biomass gasification downstream gas clean-up. This program was conducted from October 1 2008 to February 28 2011 and divided into five major tasks. - Task A: Perform conceptual design and conduct preliminary system and economic analysis (Q1 2009 ~ Q2 2009) - Task B: Biomass gasification tests, product characterization, and CPO tar conversion catalyst preparation. This task will be conducted after completing process design and system economics analysis. Major milestones include identification of syngas cleaning requirements for proposed system

  14. PAHs and organic matter partitioning and mass transfer from coal tar particles to water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karim Benhabib; Marie-Odile Simonnot; Michel Sardin [LSGC - Laboratory of Chemical Engineering Science, Nancy (France)

    2006-10-01

    The coal tar found in contaminated soils of former manufactured gas plants and coking plants acts as a long-term source of PAHs. Organic carbon and PAH transfer from coal tar particles to water was investigated with closed-looped laboratory column experiments run at various particle sizes and temperatures. Two models were derived. The first one represented the extraction process at equilibrium and was based on a linear partitioning of TOC and PAHs between coal tar and water. The partition coefficient was derived as well as the mass of extractable organic matter in the particles. The second model dealt with mass transfer. Particle diffusion was the limiting step; organic matter diffusivity in the coal tar was then computed in the different conditions. A good consistency was obtained between experimental and computed results. Hence, the modeling of PAH migration in contaminated soils at the field scale requires taking into account coal tar as the source-term for PAH release. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Catalyst specificities in high pressure hydroprocessing of pyrolysis and gasification tars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soltes, E.J.; Lin, S.C.K.; Sheu, Y.H.E.

    1987-04-01

    Over a period of several years, the Department of Forest Science at Texas A and M University has been conducting studies in the hydroprocessing (catalytic high pressure hydrotreating or hydrodeoxygenation accompanied by hydrocracking) of pyrolytic tars produced in biomass pyrolysis and gasification. Upgrading through hydroprocessing results in good yields of volatile hydrocarbon and phenolic products. This paper compares the performance of twenty different catalysts selected for hydroprocessing of a pine pyrolysis oil, describes the use of noble metal catalysts with tars produced from nine different biomass feedstocks (oil from pine pyrolysis and the tars from pine wood chip, pine plywood trim, pecan shell, peanut shell, sugarcane bagasse, corncob, rice hull, and cottonseed hull gasification), and compares the use of several catalysts in a trickle bed reactor for kinetic studies of the hyroprocessing reaction.

  16. Request received (from Norway, regarding e-mail titled "Grandparents Oppose Tar Sands"): Thanks. I have seen them in the news here in Norway as well about the Tar Sands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Request received (from Norway, regarding e-mail titled "Grandparents Oppose Tar Sands"): Thanks. I have seen them in the news here in Norway as well about the Tar Sands. Question: When you send us by Anne Dalberg, chair of the Sami Church Council. Norway's First Nation - the Sami - showing solidarity

  17. In situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation after drive process treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Stanecki, John (Blanco, TX)

    2010-09-21

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing a drive fluid to a hydrocarbon containing layer of the tar sands formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the layer. At least some first hydrocarbons from the layer are produced. Heat is provided to the layer from one or more heaters located in the formation. At least some second hydrocarbons are produced from the layer of the formation. The second hydrocarbons include at least some hydrocarbons that are upgraded compared to the first hydrocarbons produced by using the drive fluid.

  18. Detailed kinetic study of anisole pyrolysis and oxidation to understand tar formation during biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    biomass combustion and gasification Milena Nowakowska, Olivier Herbinet, Anthony Dufour, Pierre. Methoxyphenols are one of the main precursors of PAH and soot in biomass combustion and gasification. Lignocellulosic biomass may be a promising feedstock through the gasification processes [1] and [2], but tar

  19. Numerical Simulation of Vortex Pyrolysis Reactors for Condensable Tar Production from Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Richard S.

    Numerical Simulation of Vortex Pyrolysis Reactors for Condensable Tar Production from Biomass R. S is performed in order to evaluate the performance and optimal operating conditions of vortex pyrolysis reactors particle pyrolysis is coupled with a compressible Reynolds stress transport model for the turbulent reactor

  20. Norway, Canada, the United States, and the Tar Sands James Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Norway, Canada, the United States, and the Tar Sands 9 May 2013 James Hansen Today 36 Norwegian development, given the fact that Norway saves much of its oil earnings for future generations and given the fact that Norway is not likely among the nations that will suffer most from climate change. I wonder

  1. FIELD DESCRIPTION Water Oil/Tar Sediment Tissue STUDYNAME Study Name X X X X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIELD DESCRIPTION Water Oil/Tar Sediment Tissue STUDYNAME Study Name X X X X QCBATCH Laboratory than the MDL, however, peak height is greater than 3 times the noise level and ID criteria are met. FJ Alpha Analytical Found. Analyte detected at less than the MDL, however, peak height is greater than 3

  2. THE EFFECT OF PRESSURE ON OXIDATION KINETICS OF TAR FROM A TARMAT RESERVOIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    -peak temperatures and activation energies above 500 ºC and 100 kJ/mol, respectively, the tar is not expected-peak temperatures, higher apparent H/C ratio of fuel, and lower HTO activation energy. All these effects

  3. Quinoline and derivatives at a tar oil contaminated site: hydroxylated products as indicator for natural attenuation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne-Kirsten Reineke; Thomas Goeen; Alfred Preiss; Juliane Hollender [RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany). Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine

    2007-08-01

    LC-MS-MS analysis of groundwater of a tar oil contaminated site (a former coal mine and coking plant in Castrop-Rauxel, Germany) showed the occurrence of the N-heterocycles quinoline and isoquinoline as well as their hydroxylated and hydrogenated metabolites. The concentrations of the hydroxylated compounds, 2(1H)-quinolinone and 1(2H)-isoquinolinone, were significantly higher than those of the nonsubstituted parent compounds. Therefore, exclusive quantification of the parent compounds leads to an underestimation of the amount of N-heterocycles present in the groundwater. Microbial degradation experiments of quinoline and isoquinoline with aquifer material of the site as inocculum showed the formation of hydroxylated and hydrogenated products under sulfate-reducing conditions, the prevailing conditions in the field. However, since analyses of seven tar products showed that these compounds are also primary constituents, their detection in groundwater is found to be a nonsufficient indicator for the occurrence of biological natural attenuation processes. Instead, the ratio of hydroxylated to parent compound (R{sub metabolite}) is proposed as a useful indicator. We found that 65-83% of all groundwater samples showed R{sub metabolite} for 2(1H)-quinolinone, 1(2H)-isoquinolinone, 3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone, and 3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, which was higher than the highest ratio found in tar products. With respect to the observed partition coefficient between tar oil and water of 3.5 for quinoline and isoquinoline and 0.3 for 2(1H)-quinolinone and 1(2H)-isoquinolinone, the ratio in groundwater would be approximately 10 times higher than the ratio in tar oil. When paying attention to these two parameters, 19-31% of groundwater samples exceed the highest tar oil ratio. This indicates that biological processes take place in the aquifer of the site and R{sub metabolite} is an applicable indicator for natural attenuation. 42 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Method of producing drive fluid in situ in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mudunuri, Ramesh Raju (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-23

    Methods of treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. The heat may be allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation such that a drive fluid is produced in situ in the formation. The drive fluid may move at least some mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons from a first portion of the formation to a second portion of the formation. At least some of the mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons may be produced from the formation.

  5. Third international conference on heavy crude and tar sands. Part II. Highlights on cooperations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-28

    Oversupplies of conventional light petroleum worldwide have all but eclipsed the importance of heavy crude and tar sands where near-term market prospects are concerned. However, ongoing investments in productivity of heavy oil projects, from high-tech California to underdeveloped Guatemala, will hopefully continue at a pace that will assure uninterrupted advances. This issue continues ED's coverage of the Third International Conference on Heavy Crude and Tar Sands. A graph shows the results of Guatemala's efforts to attract foreign investment in its crude oil production. This issue also contains: (1) the refining netback data for the US Gulf and West Coast, Singapore, and Rotterdam as of Aug. 27, 1985; and (2) the fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices as of July 1985 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  6. Controlling and assessing pressure conditions during treatment of tar sands formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Etuan; Beer, Gary Lee

    2015-11-10

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the tar sands formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A pressure in the portion of the formation is controlled such that the pressure remains below a fracture pressure of the formation overburden while allowing the portion of the formation to heat to a selected average temperature of at least about 280.degree. C. and at most about 300.degree. C. The pressure in the portion of the formation is reduced to a selected pressure after the portion of the formation reaches the selected average temperature.

  7. Filamentous carbon catalytic deposition of coal-tar pitch fraction on corundum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martynkova, G.S.; Supova, M.

    2007-01-15

    Our work was focused on deposition of volatile hydrocarbons of carbonaceous precursor on corundum wafer, taking advantage of a metallic catalyst incorporated in precursor. Coal tar-pitch, namely a fraction soluble in toluene, served as precursor material for deposition of filamentous material. The toluene-soluble fraction of tar-pitch originally contained metallic particles of iron and nickel. During heat treatment up to 1000{sup o}C, metallic particles accompanied the volatile hydrocarbons conducive to forming a filamentous deposit. The deposit obtained demonstrates a semicrystalline material that has an irregular filamentous structure with an average filament diameter of 30 {mu}m. The presence of catalysts after the deposition process was proved in the deposit but catalysts were not found in the residuum.

  8. Relationship of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide yield of cigarettes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Sherrill, D.L.; Paoletti, P.; Lebowitz, M.D. )

    1991-02-01

    The data from consecutive surveys of the Tucson Epidemiologic Study (1981-1988) were used to evaluate the relationship in cigarette smokers of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide (CO) yields of the cigarette. There were 690 subjects who reported smoking regularly in at least one survey, over age 15. After adjustment for intensity and duration of smoking and for depth of inhalation, the risk of chronic phlegm, cough, and dyspnea were not related to the tar and nicotine yields. In 414 subjects with pulmonary function tested in at least one of the three surveys the spirometric indices used were significantly related to the daily dose of tar, nicotine, and CO (product of the cigarette yield and daily number of cigarettes smoked). The effects were more pronounced for past than for current doses. However, the differentiation of pulmonary function due to various yields of cigarettes was small in comparison to the difference in pulmonary function between smokers and nonsmokers.

  9. Class I cultural resource overview for oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rourke, D.; Kullen, D.; Gierek, L.; Wescott, K.; Greby, M.; Anast, G.; Nesta, M.; Walston, L.; Tate, R.; Azzarello, A.; Vinikour, B.; Van Lonkhuyzen, B.; Quinn, J.; Yuen, R.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-01

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the 'Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005', Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is developing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to evaluate alternatives for establishing commercial oil shale and tar sands leasing programs in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah. This PEIS evaluates the potential impacts of alternatives identifying BLM-administered lands as available for application for commercial leasing of oil shale resources within the three states and of tar sands resources within Utah. The scope of the analysis of the PEIS also includes an assessment of the potential effects of future commercial leasing. This Class I cultural resources study is in support of the Draft Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and is an attempt to synthesize archaeological data covering the most geologically prospective lands for oil shale and tar sands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. This report is based solely on geographic information system (GIS) data held by the Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs). The GIS data include the information that the BLM has provided to the SHPOs. The primary purpose of the Class I cultural resources overview is to provide information on the affected environment for the PEIS. Furthermore, this report provides recommendations to support planning decisions and the management of cultural resources that could be impacted by future oil shale and tar sands resource development.

  10. Carcinogenic effects in A/J mice of particulate of a coal-tar paint used in potable water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, M.; Laurie, R.D.; Bull, R.J.; Stober, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Coal-tar paints are among the products used as inside coatings for water pipes and storage tanks to retard corrosion in potable water-supply systems. Four different formulations of these paints were tested in earlier work by this laboratory in the Ames mutagenesis and the mouse skin carcinogenesis bioassays(6). The paint most active in these assays was then tested in a particulate form in the lung adenoma assay with A/J mice. The paint was applied to clean glass plates, cured, collected and homogenized in 2% Emulphor. Doses of this coal-tar suspension were administered by gavage at 1.0, 10.0, and 55.0 mg in 0.2 ml per mouse 3 x weekly for 8 weeks. The total doses of coal-tar paint were 24, 240, and 1320 mg/mouse. Benzo(a)pyrene, administered in a parallel schedule to a total dose of 6 mg/mouse, served as positive control. A negative control group received an equivalent volume of 2% Emulphor. Animals were sacrificed at 9 months of age (8 months after first dose) and lung adenomas counted. A dose-related response, in the average number of lung tumors per mouse, was observed with the coal-tar particulate. There were also squamous-cell tumors of the forestomach in 42% of the mice receiving 55.0 mg coal tar paint per application.

  11. Biomass waste gasification - Can be the two stage process suitable for tar reduction and power generation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulc, Jindrich; Stojdl, Jiri; Richter, Miroslav; Popelka, Jan [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Svoboda, Karel, E-mail: svoboda@icpf.cas.cz [Faculty of the Environment, Jan Evangelista Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, Kralova Vysina 7, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the ASCR, v.v.i., Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Smetana, Jiri; Vacek, Jiri [D.S.K. Ltd., Ujezdecek - Dukla 264, 415 01 Teplice I (Czech Republic); Skoblja, Siarhei; Buryan, Petr [Dept. of Gas, Coke and Air protection, Institute of Chemical Technol., Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of one stage (co-current) and two stage gasification of wood pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Original arrangement with grate-less reactor and upward moving bed of the pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two stage gasification leads to drastic reduction of tar content in gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One stage gasification produces gas with higher LHV at lower overall ER. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Content of ammonia in gas is lower in two stage moving bed gasification. - Abstract: A pilot scale gasification unit with novel co-current, updraft arrangement in the first stage and counter-current downdraft in the second stage was developed and exploited for studying effects of two stage gasification in comparison with one stage gasification of biomass (wood pellets) on fuel gas composition and attainable gas purity. Significant producer gas parameters (gas composition, heating value, content of tar compounds, content of inorganic gas impurities) were compared for the two stage and the one stage method of the gasification arrangement with only the upward moving bed (co-current updraft). The main novel features of the gasifier conception include grate-less reactor, upward moving bed of biomass particles (e.g. pellets) by means of a screw elevator with changeable rotational speed and gradual expanding diameter of the cylindrical reactor in the part above the upper end of the screw. The gasifier concept and arrangement are considered convenient for thermal power range 100-350 kW{sub th}. The second stage of the gasifier served mainly for tar compounds destruction/reforming by increased temperature (around 950 Degree-Sign C) and for gasification reaction of the fuel gas with char. The second stage used additional combustion of the fuel gas by preheated secondary air for attaining higher temperature and faster gasification of the remaining char from the first stage. The measurements of gas composition and tar compound contents confirmed superiority of the two stage gasification system, drastic decrease of aromatic compounds with two and higher number of benzene rings by 1-2 orders. On the other hand the two stage gasification (with overall ER = 0.71) led to substantial reduction of gas heating value (LHV = 3.15 MJ/Nm{sup 3}), elevation of gas volume and increase of nitrogen content in fuel gas. The increased temperature (>950 Degree-Sign C) at the entrance to the char bed caused also substantial decrease of ammonia content in fuel gas. The char with higher content of ash leaving the second stage presented only few mass% of the inlet biomass stream.

  12. Method of condensing vaporized water in situ to treat tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-Fu (Rijswijk, NL)

    2010-03-16

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat may be allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a first portion of the formation. Conditions may be controlled in the formation so that water vaporized by the heaters in the first portion is selectively condensed in a second portion of the formation. At least some of the fluids may be produced from the formation.

  13. In situ heat treatment from multiple layers of a tar sands formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-11-30

    A method for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. The method includes providing a drive fluid to a first hydrocarbon containing layer of the formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the first layer. At least some of the mobilized hydrocarbons are allowed to flow into a second hydrocarbon containing layer of the formation. Heat is provided to the second layer from one or more heaters located in the second layer. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the second layer of the formation.

  14. Naturalness Under Stress: SUSY after 5 fb-1 West Coast LHC Meeting, December, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Naturalness Under Stress: SUSY after 5 fb-1 West Coast LHC Meeting, December, 2011 Michael Dine of us in some productive, new directions. Some of the arguments will be bottom up, some top down scale in the TeV MZ energy range. Possibly within two weeks and almost certainly within a year, we

  15. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

  16. Epoxy-borax-coal tar composition for a radiation protective, burn resistant drum liner and centrifugal casting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Boyer, Norman W. (Livermore, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A boron containing burn resistant, low level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source. The material is basically composed of Borax in the range of 25-50%, coal tar in the range of 25-37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% Borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  17. Decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from HISQ simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab Lattice; MILC Collaborations; :; A. Bazavov; C. Bernard; C. Bouchard; N. Brown; C. DeTar; D. Du; A. X. El-Khadra; E. D. Freeland; E. Gámiz; Steven Gottlieb; U. M. Heller; J. Komijani; A. S. Kronfeld; J. Laiho; L. Levkova; P. B. Mackenzie; C. Monahan; T. Primer; Heechang Na; E. T. Neil; J. N. Simone; R. L. Sugar; D. Toussaint; R. S. Van de Water; R. Zhou

    2015-11-07

    We give a progress report on a project aimed at a high-precision calculation of the decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from simulations with HISQ heavy and light valence and sea quarks. Calculations are carried out with several heavy valence-quark masses on ensembles with 2+1+1 flavors of HISQ sea quarks at five lattice spacings and several light sea-quark mass ratios $m_{ud}/m_s$, including approximately physical sea-quark masses. This range of parameters provides excellent control of the continuum limit and of heavy-quark discretization errors. We present a preliminary error budget with projected uncertainties of 2.2~MeV and 1.5~MeV for $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$, respectively.

  18. Decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from HISQ simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lattice, Fermilab; Bazavov, A; Bernard, C; Bouchard, C; Brown, N; DeTar, C; Du, D; El-Khadra, A X; Freeland, E D; Gámiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Komijani, J; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Mackenzie, P B; Monahan, C; Primer, T; Na, Heechang; Neil, E T; Simone, J N; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2015-01-01

    We give a progress report on a project aimed at a high-precision calculation of the decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from simulations with HISQ heavy and light valence and sea quarks. Calculations are carried out with several heavy valence-quark masses on ensembles with 2+1+1 flavors of HISQ sea quarks at five lattice spacings and several light sea-quark mass ratios $m_{ud}/m_s$, including approximately physical sea-quark masses. This range of parameters provides excellent control of the continuum limit and of heavy-quark discretization errors. We present a preliminary error budget with projected uncertainties of 2.2~MeV and 1.5~MeV for $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$, respectively.

  19. Environ. Sci. Technol. 1993, 27, 2831-2843 Coal Tar Dissolution in Water-Miscible Solvents: Experimental Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    Environ. Sci. Technol. 1993, 27, 2831-2843 Coal Tar Dissolution in Water-Miscible Solvents remediationtechnology is water-miscible solvent extraction, which requires un- derstandingof the effectof water data and Raoult's law assumption for aqueous solubility. For three solvents, n-butylamine,acetone,and 2

  20. Mass transfer and biodegradation of PAH compounds from coal tar. Quarterly technical report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramaswami, A.; Ghoshal, S.; Luthy, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    This study examines the role of physico-chemical mass transfer processes on the rate of biotransformation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds released from non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) coal tar present at residual saturation within a microporous medium. A simplified coupled dissolution-degradation model is developed that describes the concurrent mass transfer and biokinetic processes occurring in the system. Model results indicate that a dimensionless Damkohler number can be utilized to distinguish between systems that are mass transfer limited, and those that are limited by biological phenomena. The Damkohler number is estimated from independent laboratory experiments that measure the rates of aqueous phase dissolution and biodegradation of naphthalene from coal tar. Experimental data for Stroudsburg coal tar imbibed within 236 {mu}m diameter silica particles yield Damkohler numbers smaller than unity, indicating, for the particular system under study, that the overall rate of biotransformation of naphthalene is not limited by the mass transfer of naphthalene from coal tar to the bulk aqueous phase. There is a need for investigation of mass transfer for larger particles and/or other PAH compounds, and study of microbial rate-limiting phenomena including toxicity, inhibition and competitive substrate utilization.

  1. Varying properties of in situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation based on assessed viscosities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2014-03-04

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A viscosity of one or more zones of the hydrocarbon layer is assessed. The heating rates in the zones are varied based on the assessed viscosities. The heating rate in a first zone of the formation is greater than the heating rate in a second zone of the formation if the viscosity in the first zone is greater than the viscosity in the second zone. Fluids are produced from the formation through the production wells.

  2. Moving hydrocarbons through portions of tar sands formations with a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Mudunuri, Ramesh Raju; Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael; Jaiswal, Namit; Mo, Weijian

    2010-05-18

    A method for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. The method includes heating a first portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the first portion. The heat is controlled to increase a fluid injectivity of the first portion. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid is injected and/or created in the first portion to cause at least some hydrocarbons to move from a second portion of the hydrocarbon layer to a third portion of the hydrocarbon layer. The second portion is between the first portion and the third portion. The first, second, and third portions are horizontally displaced from each other. The third portion is heated from one or more heaters located in the third portion. Hydrocarbons are produced from the third portion of the formation. The hydrocarbons include at least some hydrocarbons from the second portion of the formation.

  3. Investigation of bonding mechanism of coking on semi-coke from lignite with pitch and tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vedat Arslan [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Engineering Faculty

    2006-10-15

    In coking, the bonding ability of inert macerals by reactive macerals is dependent on various parameters and also is related to the wettability of the inert macerals. In this study, the effect of carbonization temperature on the wettability of semi-cokes produced at various temperatures has been investigated. Soma and Yatagan semicokes represent inert macerals, and pitch was used as a reactive structure in the experiments. The briquetted pitch blocks were located on the semi-cokes and heated from the softening temperature of pitch (60{sup o}C) to 140{sup o}C to observe the wettability. In addition, liquid tar was also used to determine the wettability of semi-cokes. From the standpoint of wettability, the temperature of 900{sup o}C was determined to be the critical point for coke produced from sub-bituminous coals. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The first of a series of high efficiency, high bmep, turbocharged two-stroke cycle diesel engines; the general motors EMD 645FB engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotlin, J.J.; Dunteman, N.R.; Scott, D.I.; Williams, H.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The current Electro-Motive Division 645 Series turbocharged engines are the Model FB and EC. The FB engine combines the highest thermal efficiency with the highest specific output of any EMD engine to date. The FB Series incorporates 16:1 compression ratio with a fire ring piston and an improved turbocharger design. Engine components included in the FB engine provide very high output levels with exceptional reliability. This paper also describes the performance of the lower rated Model EC engine series which feature high thermal efficiency and utilize many engine components well proven in service and basic to the Model FB Series.

  5. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    WITH BIODEGRADATION OF CRUDE-OIL IN THE OUACHITA MOUNTAINS,A SPHALTS AND H EAVY O IL Crude oil is an extremely complexto natural gas, liquid crude oil, shale oil, tars and

  6. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

  7. Global Search for New Physics with 2.0 fb88-1 at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-09-01

    Data collected in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron are searched for indications of new electroweak-scale physics. Rather than focusing on particular new physics scenarios, CDF data are analyzed for discrepancies with the standard model prediction. A model-independent approach (VISTA) considers gross features of the data, and is sensitive to new large cross-section physics. Further sensitivity to new physics is provided by two additional algorithms: a Bump Hunter searches invariant mass distributions for 'bumps' that could indicate resonant production of new particles; and the Sleuth procedure scans for data excesses at large summed transverse momentum. This combined global search for new physics in 2.0 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV reveals no indication of physics beyond the standard model.

  8. Measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry with 9 fb?¹ of pp? collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-09-16

    We present an updated measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry Absl for semileptonic b-hadron decays in 9.0 fb?¹ of pp? collisions recorded with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We obtain Absl=(-0.787±0.172(stat)±0.093(syst))%. This result differs by 3.9 standard deviations from the prediction of the standard model and provides evidence for anomalously large CP violation in semileptonic neutral B decay. The dependence of the asymmetry on the muon impact parameter is consistent with the hypothesis that it originates from semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  9. Protein Expression Profile of an Environmentally Important Bacterial Strain: the Chromate Response of Arthrobacter Species Strain FB24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henne, Kristene L.; Turse, Joshua E.; Nakatsu, C. H.; Konopka, Allan

    2011-05-03

    The global proteomic response of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 to different levels of chromate stress was evaluated with both two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS) [Henne et al. 2009b]. Proteome coverage of 22% and 71% was obtained with 2-DGE and LC/LC-MS/MS, respectively. The strong response of strain FB24 to chromate suggests a condition of sulfur limitation, which could be driven by competition for the sulfate transporter by the structurally similar chromate ion. Additionally, the involvement of genes hypothesized to be directly involved in chromate resistance in strain FB24 was supported at the protein level.

  10. Hurricane Disturbance Alters Secondary Forest Recovery in Puerto Rico Dan F.B. Flynn1,7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uriarte, Maria

    Hurricane Disturbance Alters Secondary Forest Recovery in Puerto Rico Dan F.B. Flynn1,7 , Mar structure and composition. How introduced species respond to disturbances such as hurricanes in post-agriculture forest recovery is of particular interest. To examine the effects of hurricane disturbance and previous

  11. A note on comparing response times in the M/GI/1/FB and M/GI/1/PS queues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the overall mean response time (a.k.a. sojourn time) of the PS and FB queues under an M/GI/1 system. We show from optimal mean response time (a.k.a sojourn time). The Shortest-Remaining-Processing-Time (SRPT have the least attained service (a.k.a age), they time-share the processor via PS. By biasing towards

  12. A note on comparing response times in the M/GI/1/FB and M/GI/1/PS queues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the overall mean response time (a.k.a. sojourn time) of the PS and FB queues under an M/GI/1 system. We show from optimal mean response time (a.k.a sojourn time). The Shortest­Remaining­Processing­Time (SRPT have the least attained service (a.k.a age), they time­share the processor via PS. By biasing towards

  13. Diplomoppgaven tar for seg emnet datamodeller for digitale film-og video-arkiv. Vren 1993 utfrte jeg et vrprosjekt med tittelen "Datamodeller for film".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forord Diplomoppgaven tar for seg emnet datamodeller for digitale film- og video-arkiv. Våren 1993 utførte jeg et vårprosjekt med tittelen "Datamodeller for film". Diplomoppgaven utdyper og viderefører. Trondheim, 22. desember, 1993 Petter Merok Datamodeller for digitale film- og videoarkiv i #12;ii

  14. Cko.efer f. (i.f\\~f':tn\\ltt E'~~CS'\\'~ A~\\ !f~ \\fb a... 'T":~4.r.-t..

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Kin-Yin

    QC~-®! Cko.efer f. (i.f\\~f':tn\\ltt E'~~CS'\\'~ A~\\ !f~ \\fb a... 'T":~4.r.-t.. ~c-l.;~. ~e...CA weo

  15. Search for Sneutrino Production in e? Final States in 5.3??fb(?1) of pp-bar Collisions at s?=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.

    2010-11-05

    We report the results of a search for R parity violating (RPV) interactions leading to the production of supersymmetric sneutrinos decaying into e? final states using 5.3??fb(?1) of integrated luminosity collected by the ...

  16. Measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays using 5.4 fb?¹ of pp? collision data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-02-01

    We present a measurement of the helicity of the W boson produced in top quark decays using tt¯ decays in the l+jets and dilepton final states selected from a sample of 5.4 fb?¹ of collisions recorded using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp? collider. We measure the fractions of longitudinal and right-handed W bosons to be f?=0.669±0.102[±0.078(stat.)±0.065(syst.)] and f?=0.023±0.053[±0.041(stat.)±0.034(syst.)], respectively. This result is consistent at the 98% level with the standard model. A measurement with f? fixed to the value from the standard model yields f?=0.010±0.037[±0.022(stat.)±0.030(syst.)].

  17. Search for WH associated production in 5.3 fb -1 of pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; et al

    2011-03-01

    We present a search for associated production of Higgs and W bosons in collisions at a center of mass energy of in 5.3 fb -1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the D0 experiment. Multivariate analysis techniques are applied to events containing one lepton, an imbalance in transverse energy, and one or two b-tagged jets to discriminate a potential WH signal from Standard Model backgrounds. We observe good agreement between data and expected backgrounds, and set an upper limit of 4.5 (at 95% confidence level and for mH=115 GeV) on the ratio of the WH cross section multiplied by the branchingmore »fraction of H ? bb¯ to its Standard Model prediction, which is consistent with an expected limit of 4.8.« less

  18. The C-Terminus of Transmembrane Helix 2 (TM2) of the Escherichia coli Tar Chemorecptor Determines Signal Output and Ligand Sensitivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adase, Christopher A. 1981-

    2012-11-20

    to ribose and galactose (Trg); and taxis-associated protein for dipeptides (Tap). The aerotaxis receptor (Aer) is an additional MCP-like protein that mediates redox responses in the cell and undergoes methylation-independent adaptation, unlike... the methylation-dependent adaptation of the MCPs (8-13). The two major transducers in E.coli are Tar and Tsr, which are found in approximately 3-5 fold greater abundance than the minor transducers Tap, Trg, and Aer (14). The major transducers do not require...

  19. ENERGY ECONOMY CII5fB 81 (R3) (L2) (M2) UDC 728.3 (489) Low-energy houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solutions as to design, choice of building materials, heating systems, energy sources, etc. (ref. 1). EachENERGY ECONOMY CII5fB 81 (R3) (L2) (M2) UDC 728.3 (489) Low-energy houses: insulation and air tightness by Bjarne Saxhof and Allan A. Nielsen 142 The Hjortekar project of six low energy house designs

  20. Single event-driven export of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and suspended matter from coal tar-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Totsche, K.U.; Jann, S.; Kogel-Knabner, I. [University of Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Mobile colloidal and suspended matter is likely to affect the mobility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the unsaturated soil zone at contaminated sites. We studied the release of mobile particles and dissolved organic matter as a function of variable climatic boundary conditions, and their effect on the export of PAHs at a coal tar-contaminated site using zero-tension lysimeters. Seepage water samples were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), pH, electrical conductivity, turbidity, and particles larger than 0.7 {mu}m. The 16 Environmental Protection Agency PAHs were analyzed in the filtrate < 0.7 m and in the particle fraction. Our results show that extended no-flow periods that are followed by high-intensity rain events, such as thunderstorms, promote the mobilization of particles in the size 0.7 to 200 m. Mobilization is enforced by extended drying during summer. High particle concentrations are also associated with freezing and thawing cycles followed by either rain or snowmelt events. The export of PAHs is strongly connected to the release of particles in the 0.7- to 200-{mu}m size fraction. During the 2-yr monitoring period, up to 0.418 {mu}g kg{sup -1} PAHs were mobilized in the. ltrate (< 0.7 m) while the eightfold mass, 3.36 {mu}g kg{sup -1}, was exported with the retentate (0.7-200 {mu}m). Equilibrium dissolution of PAHs and transport in the dissolved phase seem to be of minor importance for the materials studied. Extreme singular-release events occurred in January 2003 and January 2004, when up to 55 {mu}g L{sup -1} PAHs per one single seepage event were observed within the retentate. Freezing and thawing cycles affect the PAH source materials, that is, the remnants of the nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). High mechanical strain during freezing results in the formation of particles. At the onset of the thawing and following rain or snowmelt events, PAHs associated with these particles are then exported from the lysimeter.

  1. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

  2. Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb[superscript ?1] of pp collision data at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb[superscript ?1] to 4.9 fb[superscript ?1] of pp collisions ...

  3. Combined CDF and D0 Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to Two Photons with up to 8.2 fb^-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF Collaboration; the D0 Collaboration; the Tevatron New Physics; Higgs Working Group

    2011-07-25

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV, focusing on the decay H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma. We compute upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section times the decay branching fraction in the range 100Higgs boson. With datasets corresponding to 7.0 fb-1 (CDF) and 8.2 fb-1 (D0), the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 10.5 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c^2.

  4. Search for New Heavy Resonances Decaying To t+t^- Pairs at the LHC with Square Root S= 7 TEV (L = 5.0 FB^-1) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Indara

    2015-01-22

    for Heavy Resonances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 3. THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER AND THE CMS DETECTOR . . . 21 3.1 The Large Hadron Collider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.2 The Compact Muon Solenoid Detector...V center-of-mass energy to the CMS detector. CMS recorded 5.55 fb?1 of data. . . . . . . . . . . 23 3.3 Cross-sectional View of the CMS Detector. The subdetectors in or- der from the interaction point outward are the pixel detector, the sili- con tracker...

  5. Search for Randall-Sundrum Gravitons in Dilepton and Diphoton Final States with 1 fb-1 of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Amitabha; /Boston U.

    2007-05-01

    The work presented in this thesis is the search for Randall-Sundrum (RS) gravitons from an analysis of approximately 1 fb{sup -1} data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab. The standard model has been a great success in explaining all experimental observations in particle physics. However, we also know that it has fundamental problems. One of these problems, called the hierarchy problem, is related to the large difference between the electroweak scale and the Planck scale. The model proposed by Randall and Sundrum presents a possible solution to the hierarchy problem by introducing physics beyond the standard model. Randall and Sundrum's theory postulates the existence of a 4th spatial dimension in addition to the conventional (3+1)-dimensional space. Gravity is localized on a 3+1 dimensional subspace, called a brane (Planck brane) that is separated in this new 4th spatial dimension from the standard model brane. As one moves away from this Planck brane, gravity is exponentially suppressed and this explains why gravity appears so weak at the standard model brane. In the simplest RS model, the only particles that propagate in the extra dimension are gravitons. The graviton manifests itself on the standard model brane as a series of excited states that couple to standard model particles with similar strength as the electroweak interaction. The ground state is the massless graviton and the order of magnitude of the mass of the lowest excited state is expected to be one TeV. The first excited mode of the graviton might be produced resonantly at the Tevatron. Gravitons can decay into fermion-antifermion or diboson pairs. Here I search for gravitons through their decay to e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} final states. These final states have similar signatures in our detector and can thus be treated together. After analyzing the data I do not find any excess over standard model expectations and set an upper limit on the production rate of such gravitons. I compare this limit to the production rate predicted by the theory for a range of possible couplings and set mass limits on the lowest excited gravitons state of up to 898 GeV.

  6. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Diphoton Decay Channel with 4.9??fb[superscript -1] of pp Collision Data at ?s=7??TeV with ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson is performed in the diphoton decay channel. The data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.9??fb[superscript -1] collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron ...

  7. Search for Randall-Sundrum Gravitons in Dielectron and Diphoton Final States with 5.4fb-1 of D0 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; /Columbia U.

    2010-03-01

    A search for the lightest Kaluza-Klein mode of the graviton in the Randall-Sundrum model with a warped extra dimension is performed in the dielectron and diphoton channels. The data set used for the search corresponds to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron between July 2002 and Summer 2009. We search for resonances in the invariant mass spectrum of two electromagnetic showers from the decay of the graviton to either electron-positron pairs or photon pairs. To optimize the sensitivity, the dielectron and diphoton channels are analyzed separately, then the results are combined together in the end. We also investigate whether, due to the unique spin-2 nature of the graviton, the angular distribution of the final state particles can be used to significantly enhance the sensitivity of the search. We set 95% confidence level upper limits on the graviton production cross section times branching fraction into electron-positron pairs of between {approx} 7 fb and {approx} 0.5 fb for a range of graviton masses from 220 GeV and 1050 GeV, respectively. Compared with Randall-Sundrum model predictions, these results correspond to lower limits on the lightest graviton mass between 440 GeV and 1040 GeV, for the dimensionless graviton coupling to the Standard Model fields k/{bar M}{sub Pl} in the range from 0.01 to 0.1. In addition, for coupling k/{bar M}{sub Pl} of 0.01, gravitons with masses between 460 GeV and 560 GeV are also excluded at 95% confidence level. These results represent the most sensitive limits to date.

  8. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

    2011-08-16

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

  9. Combined CDF and D0 Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to Two Photons with up to 8.2 fb^-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, focusing on the decay H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. We compute upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section times the decay branching fraction in the range 100 < m{sub H} < 150 GeV/c{sup 2}, and we interpret the results in the context of the standard model. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With datasets corresponding to 7.0 fb{sup -1} (CDF) and 8.2 fb{sup -1} (D0), the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 10.5 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

  11. Measurement of the ? ? * distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb - 1 of p p ¯ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.?M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.?S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.?P.; Alexeev, G.?D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2015-04-06

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable ?*? for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?¹ at ?s=1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable ?*? probes the same physical effects as the Z/?* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurements at anymore »collider of the ?*? distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z?l?l? boson mass peak. The data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.« less

  12. Search for new physics in the dijet mass distribution using 1 fb?¹ of pp collision data at ?s = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2012-02-01

    Invariant mass distributions of jet pairs (dijets) produced in LHC proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy ?s = 7 TeV have been studied using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb?¹ recorded in 2011 by ATLAS. Dijet masses up to ~4 TeV are observed in the data, and no evidence of resonance production over background is found. Limits are set at 95% C.L. for several new physics hypotheses: excited quarks are excluded for masses below 299 TeV, axigluons are excluded for masses below 3.32 TeV, and colour octet scalar resonances are excluded for masses below 1.92more »TeV.« less

  13. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Associated WH Production in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? Collisions with the D0 Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-09-20

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and two or three jets, at least one of which is identified as a b-quark jet. The search is primarily sensitive to WH?l?bb¯ production and uses data corresponding to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. We observe agreement between the data and the expected background. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the production ofmore »a standard model Higgs boson of 5.2×?SM, where ?SM is the standard model Higgs boson production cross section, while the expected limit is 4.7×?SM.« less

  14. Search for Diphoton Events with Large Missing Transverse Energy in 6.3 fb-1 of ppbar Collisions using the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Mark Stephen; /Columbia U.

    2010-09-01

    A search for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The data were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider between 2002 and 2010, and correspond to 6.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The observed missing transverse energy distribution is well described by the Standard Model prediction, and 95% C.L. limits are derived on two realizations of theories beyond the Standard Model. In a gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking scenario, the breaking scale {Lambda} is excluded for {Lambda} < 124 TeV. In a universal extra dimension model including gravitational decays, the compactification radius R{sub c} is excluded for R{sub c}{sup -1} < 477 GeV.

  15. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?sJ/?? using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0?J/ ?? in 8 fb?¹ of pp? collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ?sJ/??, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ??s, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s?J/??. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb?¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ??s=0.163+0.065?0.064 ps?¹ and ?sJ/??=?0.55+0.38?0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  16. A search for resonant production of tt? pairs in 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-27

    We search for resonant production of tt? pairs in 4.8 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp? collision data at ?s = 1.96 TeV in the lepton+jets decay channel, where one top quark decays leptonically and the other hadronically. A matrix element reconstruction technique is used; for each event a probability density function (pdf) of the tt? candidate invariant mass is sampled. These pdfs are used to construct a likelihood function, whereby the cross section for resonant tt? production is estimated, given a hypothetical resonance mass and width. The data indicate no evidence of resonant production of tt? pairs. A benchmark modelmore »of leptophobic Z' ? tt? is excluded with mZ' « less

  17. Measurement of the ? ? * distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb - 1 of p p ¯ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.?M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.?S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.?P.; Alexeev, G.?D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.?V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J.?F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.?B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.?C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.?E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X.?B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.?P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B.?C.?K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.?M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.?W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.?E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S.?J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.?P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.?T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.?F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.?V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.?D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.?N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.?E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P.?H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J.?A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.?E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P.?D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M.?W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.?M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A.?P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.?D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.?D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.?L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.?S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.?S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.?W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.?N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.?M.; Kozelov, A.?V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V.?A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.?S.; Lee, S.?W.; Lee, W.?M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.?Z.; Li, X.; Lim, J.?K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.?V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.?L.; Maciel, A.?K.?A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.?L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.?L.; Meijer, M.?M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.?G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.?K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.?A.; Negret, J.?P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.?T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.?K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V.?M.; Popov, A.?V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P.?N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M.?P.; Santos, A.?S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R.?D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A.?A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G.?R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D.?A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V.?V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W.?M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.?W.; Vasilyev, I.?A.; Verkheev, A.?Y.; Vertogradov, L.?S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H.?D.; Wang, M.?H.?L.?S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.

    2015-04-01

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable ?*? for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?¹ at ?s=1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable ?*? probes the same physical effects as the Z/?* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurements at any collider of the ?*? distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z?l?l? boson mass peak. The data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.

  18. Measurement of the WZ and ZZ production cross sections using leptonic final states in 8.6 fb?¹ of pp? collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-06-12

    We study the processes pp??WZ?l±?l?l? and pp??ZZ?l?l???¯, where l=e or ?. Using 8.6 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we measure the WZ production cross section to be 4.50+0.63–0.66 pb which is consistent with, but slightly larger than, the prediction of the standard model. The ZZ cross section is measured to be 1.64±0.46 pb, in agreement with a prediction of the standard model. Combination with an earlier analysis of the ZZ?l?l?l?l? channel yields a ZZ cross section of 1.44+0.35–0.34 pb.

  19. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Associated WH Production in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? Collisions with the D0 Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and two or three jets, at least one of which is identified as a b-quark jet. The search is primarily sensitive to WH?l?bb¯ production and uses data corresponding to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. We observe agreement between the data and the expected background. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the production of a standard model Higgs boson of 5.2×?SM, where ?SM is the standard model Higgs boson production cross section, while the expected limit is 4.7×?SM.

  20. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs Working Group

    2011-09-20

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m_H=115 GeV/c^2, 140 GeV/c^2, and 165 GeV/c^2, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small (approx. 1 sigma) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125

  1. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.6 fb-1 of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CDF, The; Collaborations, D0; Phenomena, the Tevatron New; Group, Higgs Working

    2011-07-01

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 8.2 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF and up to 8.6 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. our upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.17, 1.71, and 0.48 times the values of the SM cross section for Higgs bosons of mass m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, 140 GeV/c{sup 2}, and 165 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.16, 1.16, and 0.57. There is a small ({approx} 1{sigma}) excess of data events with respect to the background estimation in searches for the Higgs boson in the mass range 125 < m{sub H} < 155 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 156 < m{sub H} < 177 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an expected exclusion region of 148 < m{sub H} < 180 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. University of Southern California, USC Dornsife Office of Pre-Health Advisement, 3641 Watt Way, HNB 120, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (213) 740-4844, E-mail: prehealth@dornsife.usc.edu; Website: http://dornsife.usc.edu/pre-health; FB: www.facebook.com/USCPreHeal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    ://dornsife.usc.edu/pre-health; FB: www.facebook.com/USCPreHealth The mission of the Office of Pre-Health Advisement, within the Dana

  3. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photons cross section in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector using 4.6 fb[superscript -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A measurement of the cross section for the production of isolated prompt photons in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy ?s = 7??TeV is presented. The results are based on an integrated luminosity of 4.6??fb[superscript ...

  4. Search for the Production of Narrow tb-bar Resonances in 1.9 fb-1 of pp-bar Collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present new limits on resonant tb? production in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV, using 1.9??fb[superscript -1] of data recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We reconstruct a candidate tb? mass ...

  5. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7??fb(?1) of pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, Gemma; Clutter, Justace Randall; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.

    2013-09-17

    We present a search for the Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW??????? decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7??fb(?1) of pp...

  6. Search for a Higgs boson in diphoton final states with the D0 detector in 9.6??fb(?1) of pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, G.; Clutter, Justace Randall; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.

    2013-09-17

    We present a search for a Higgs boson decaying into a pair of photons based on 9.6??fb(?1) of pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The search employs multivariate techniques...

  7. Search for diphoton events with large missing transverse momentum in 1 fb[superscript -1] of 7 TeV proton–proton collision data with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for diphoton events with large missing transverse momentum has been performed using 1.07 fb[superscript ?1] of proton–proton collision data at ?s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector. No excess of events was ...

  8. Search for t[¯ over t] resonances in the lepton plus jets final state with ATLAS using 4.7??fb[superscript -1] of pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs (tt? ) is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 4.7??fb[superscript -1] of proton–proton (pp) collision data collected ...

  9. Process for detoxifying coal tars

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longwell, John P. (Cambridge, MA); Peters, William A. (Arlington, MA)

    1983-01-01

    A process for treating liquid hydrocarbons to remove toxic, mutagenic and/or carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons comprises feeding the hydrocarbons into a reactor where vapors are thermally treated in contact with a catalyst consisting essentially of calcium oxide or a calcium oxide containing mineral. Thermally treating liquid hydrocarbons in contact with calcium oxide preferentially increases the cracking of aromatics thus producing a product having a reduced amount of aromatic compounds.

  10. GJO-2000-163-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3 2,000 4,000DOEK

  11. GJO-2001-208-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3 2,000

  12. Search for diphoton events with large missing transverse momentum in 1 fb?¹ of 7 TeV proton–proton collision data with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2012-04-01

    A search for diphoton events with large missing transverse momentum has been performed using 1.07 fb?¹ of proton–proton collision data at ?s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector. No excess of events was observed above the Standard Model prediction and 95% Confidence Level (CL) upper limits are set on the production cross section for new physics. The limits depend on each model parameter space and vary as follows: ? in the context of a generalised model of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking (GGM) with a bino-like lightest neutralino, ? in the context of a minimal model of gauge-mediatedmore »supersymmetry breaking (SPS8), and ? in the context of a specific model with one universal extra dimension (UED). A 95% CL lower limit of 805 GeV, for bino masses above 50 GeV, is set on the GGM gluino mass. Lower limits of 145 TeV and 1.23 TeV are set on the SPS8 breaking scale ? and on the UED compactification scale 1/R, respectively. These limits provide the most stringent tests of these models to date.« less

  13. Search for vector-like quark production in the lepton+jets and dilepton+jets final states using 5.4 fb-1 of Run II data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caughron, Seth; /Columbia U.

    2010-10-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics provides an excellent description of particle interactions at energies up to {approx}1 TeV, but it is expected to fail above that scale. Multiple models developed to describe phenomena above the TeV scale predict the existence of very massive, vector-like quarks. A search for single electroweak production of such particles in p{anti p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is performed in the W+jets and Z+jets channels. The data were collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}. Events consistent with a heavy object decaying to a vector boson and a jet are selected. We observe no significant excess in comparison to the background prediction and set 95% confidence level upper limits on production cross sections for vector-like quarks decaying to W+jet and Z+jet. Assuming a vector-like quark -- standard model quark coupling parameter {tilde {kappa}}{sub qQ} of unity, we exclude vector-like quarks with mass below 693 GeV for decays to W+jet and mass below 449 GeV for decays to Z+jet. These represent the most sensitive limits to date.

  14. Search for tt¯ resonances in the lepton plus jets final state with ATLAS using 4.7 fb?¹ of pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.

    2013-07-01

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs (tt¯) is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb?¹ of proton–proton (pp ) collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy ?s =7 TeV . In the tt¯ ?WbWb decay, the lepton plus jets final state is used, where one W boson decays leptonically and the other hadronically. The tt¯ system is reconstructed using both small-radius and large-radius jets, the latter being supplemented by a jet substructure analysis. A search for local excesses in the number of data events compared to the Standard Model expectation in the tt¯ invariant mass spectrum is performed. No evidence for a tt¯ resonance is found and 95% credibility-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states predicted in two benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' resonance range from 5.1 pb for a boson mass of 0.5 TeV to 0.03 pb for a mass of 3 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolor Z' resonance with a mass below 1.74 TeV is excluded. Limits are also derived for a broad color-octet resonance with ?/m=15.3% . A Kaluza–Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall–Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.07 TeV.

  15. y12 disc 1954 FB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r mReducingwhistleblowerxinyufu Ames25

  16. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W± boson with 7.5 fb?¹ integrated luminosity at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.

    2012-08-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W± boson. This search uses data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.5 fb?¹ collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron. We select WH?l?bb¯ candidate events with two jets, large missing transverse energy, and exactly one charged lepton. We further require that at least one jet be identified to originate from a bottom quark. Discrimination between the signal and the large background is achieved through the use of a Bayesian artificial neural network. The number of tagged events and their distributions are consistent with the standard model expectations. We observe no evidence for a Higgs boson signal and set 95% C.L. upper limits on the WH production cross section times the branching ratio to decay to bb¯ pairs, ?(pp¯?W±H)×B(H?bb¯), relative to the rate predicted by the standard model. For the Higgs boson mass range of 100 to 150 GeV/c² we set observed (expected) upper limits from 1.34 (1.83) to 38.8 (23.4). For 115 GeV/c² the upper limit is 3.64 (2.78). The combination of the present search with an independent analysis that selects events with three jets yields more stringent limits ranging from 1.12 (1.79) to 34.4 (21.6) in the same mass range. For 115 and 125 GeV/c² the upper limits are 2.65 (2.60) and 4.36 (3.69), respectively.

  17. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W± boson with 7.5 fb?¹ integrated luminosity at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-08-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W± boson. This search uses data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.5 fb?¹ collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron. We select WH?l?bb¯ candidate events with two jets, large missing transverse energy, and exactly one charged lepton. We further require that at least one jet be identified to originate from a bottom quark. Discrimination between the signal and the large background is achieved through the use of a Bayesian artificial neural network. The number of tagged events and their distributions are consistent withmore »the standard model expectations. We observe no evidence for a Higgs boson signal and set 95% C.L. upper limits on the WH production cross section times the branching ratio to decay to bb¯ pairs, ?(pp¯?W±H)×B(H?bb¯), relative to the rate predicted by the standard model. For the Higgs boson mass range of 100 to 150 GeV/c² we set observed (expected) upper limits from 1.34 (1.83) to 38.8 (23.4). For 115 GeV/c² the upper limit is 3.64 (2.78). The combination of the present search with an independent analysis that selects events with three jets yields more stringent limits ranging from 1.12 (1.79) to 34.4 (21.6) in the same mass range. For 115 and 125 GeV/c² the upper limits are 2.65 (2.60) and 4.36 (3.69), respectively.« less

  18. Search for tt¯ resonances in the lepton plus jets final state with ATLAS using 4.7 fb?¹ of pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; et al

    2013-07-23

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs (tt¯) is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb?¹ of proton–proton (pp ) collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy ?s =7 TeV . In the tt¯ ?WbWb decay, the lepton plus jets final state is used, where one W boson decays leptonically and the other hadronically. The tt¯ system is reconstructed using both small-radius and large-radius jets, the latter being supplemented by a jet substructure analysis. A search for local excesses in the number of data events compared to themore »Standard Model expectation in the tt¯ invariant mass spectrum is performed. No evidence for a tt¯ resonance is found and 95% credibility-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states predicted in two benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' resonance range from 5.1 pb for a boson mass of 0.5 TeV to 0.03 pb for a mass of 3 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolor Z' resonance with a mass below 1.74 TeV is excluded. Limits are also derived for a broad color-octet resonance with ?/m=15.3% . A Kaluza–Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall–Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.07 TeV.« less

  19. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W± boson with 7.5 fb?¹ integrated luminosity at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.

    2012-08-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W± boson. This search uses data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.5 fb?¹ collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron. We select WH?l?bb¯ candidate events with two jets, large missing transverse energy, and exactly one charged lepton. We further require that at least one jet be identified to originate from a bottom quark. Discrimination between the signal and the large background is achieved through the use of a Bayesian artificial neural network. The number of tagged events and their distributions are consistent with the standard model expectations. We observe no evidence for a Higgs boson signal and set 95% C.L. upper limits on the WH production cross section times the branching ratio to decay to bb¯ pairs, ?(pp¯?W±H)×B(H?bb¯), relative to the rate predicted by the standard model. For the Higgs boson mass range of 100 to 150 GeV/c² we set observed (expected) upper limits from 1.34 (1.83) to 38.8 (23.4). For 115 GeV/c² the upper limit is 3.64 (2.78). The combination of the present search with an independent analysis that selects events with three jets yields more stringent limits ranging from 1.12 (1.79) to 34.4 (21.6) in the same mass range. For 115 and 125 GeV/c² the upper limits are 2.65 (2.60) and 4.36 (3.69), respectively.

  20. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in $\\bm{\\ell?}$+jets final states in 9.7~fb$\\bm{^{-1}}$ of $\\bm{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions with the D0 detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-01-25

    We present, in detail, a search for the standard model Higgs boson, $H$, in final states with a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing energy, and two or more jets in data corresponding to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected at a center of mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ Collider. The search uses $b$-jet identification to categorize events for improved signal versus background separation and is sensitive to associated production of the $H$ with a $W$ boson, $WH\\to\\ell\

  1. Search for a heavy gauge boson decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino in 1 fb-1 of pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2011-11-01

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC is used to search for heavy charged gauge bosons (W'), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb?¹. No excess beyond Standard Model expectations is observed. A W' with Sequential Standard Model couplings is excluded at the 95% confidence level for masses up to 2.15 TeV.

  2. Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb?¹ of pp collision data at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; et al

    2012-03-01

    A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb?¹ to 4.9 fb?¹ of pp collisions collected at ?s=7 TeV is presented. The Higgs boson mass ranges 112.9–115.5 GeV, 131–238 GeV and 251–466 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level (CL), while the range 124–519 GeV is expected to be excluded in the absence of a signal. An excess of events is observed around mH~126 GeV with a local significance of 3.5 standard deviations (? ). The local significances of H ? ??, Hmore »? ZZ(?) ? ?????????? and H ? WW(?) ? ???????¯, the three most sensitive channels in this mass range, are 2.8?, 2.1? and 1.4?, respectively. The global probability for the background to produce such a fluctuation anywhere in the explored Higgs boson mass range 110–600 GeV is estimated to be ~1.4% or, equivalently, 2.2?.« less

  3. Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb(-1) of pp collision data at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Khalek, SA; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, OS; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbia, E; Acharya, BS; Adamczyk, L; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Ad

    2012-03-29

    A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb{sup -1} to 4.9 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions collected at {radical}s = 7 TeV is presented. The Higgs boson mass ranges 112.9-115.5 GeV, 131-238 GeV and 251-466 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level (CL), while the range 124-519 GeV is expected to be excluded in the absence of a signal. An excess of events is observed around m{sub H} {approx} 126 GeV with a local significance of 3.5 standard deviations ({sigma}). The local significances of H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, H {yields} ZZ{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}{prime}{sup +}{ell}{prime}{sup -} and H {yields} WW{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{ell}{prime}{sup -}{bar {nu}}, the three most sensitive channels in this mass range, are 2.8{sigma}, 2.1{sigma} and 1.4{sigma}, respectively. The global probability for the background to produce such a fluctuation anywhere in the explored Higgs boson mass range 110-600 GeV is estimated to be {approx}1.4% or, equivalently, 2.2{sigma}.

  4. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 2 -- Jointly sponsored research program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  5. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH?l?l?bb? Production with the D0 Detector in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-09-20

    We present a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. Selected events contain one reconstructed Z?e?e? or Z????? candidate and at least two jets, including at least one jet identified as likely to contain a b quark. To validate the search procedure, we also measure the cross section for ZZ production in the same final state. It is found to be consistent with its SM prediction. We set upper limits on the ZHmore »production cross section times branching ratio for H?bb? at the 95% C.L. for Higgs boson masses 90?MH?150 GeV. The observed (expected) limit for MH=125 GeV is 7.1 (5.1) times the SM cross section.« less

  6. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?sJ/?? using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0?J/ ?? in 8 fb?¹ of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ?sJ/??, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ??s, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s?J/??. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb?¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ??s=0.163+0.065?0.064 ps?¹ and ?sJ/??=?0.55+0.38?0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  7. A search for resonant production of tt? pairs in 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-10-27

    We search for resonant production of tt? pairs in 4.8 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp? collision data at ?s = 1.96 TeV in the lepton+jets decay channel, where one top quark decays leptonically and the other hadronically. A matrix element reconstruction technique is used; for each event a probability density function (pdf) of the tt? candidate invariant mass is sampled. These pdfs are used to construct a likelihood function, whereby the cross section for resonant tt? production is estimated, given a hypothetical resonance mass and width. The data indicate no evidence of resonant production of tt? pairs. A benchmark model of leptophobic Z' ? tt? is excluded with mZ' < 900 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  8. Search for the Production of Narrow t anti-b Resonances in 1.9 fb-1 of p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-02-01

    We present new limits on resonant tb production in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We reconstruct a putative tb mass in events with a lepton, neutrino candidate, and two or three jets, and search for anomalous tb production as modeled by W{prime} {yields} tb. We set a new limit on a right-handed W{prime} with standard model-like coupling, excluding any mass below 800 GeV at 95% C.L. For any narrow W{prime}-like state with mass above 800 GeV, the cross-section is found to be less than 0.28 pb at 95% C.L. We also present an exclusion of the W{prime} coupling strength versus W{prime} mass.

  9. Search for a Standard Model Higgs boson in the H -> ZZ -> llnunu decay channel using 4.7 fb-1 of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV data with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-05-30

    A search for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson decaying via H -> ZZ -> llnunu, where l represents electrons or muons, is presented. It is based on proton-proton collision data at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb^-1. The data agree with the expected Standard Model backgrounds. Upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for Higgs boson masses between 200 GeV and 600 GeV and the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass in the range 319 - 558 GeV is excluded at the 95% confidence level.

  10. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH?l?l?bb? Production with the D0 Detector in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-01

    We present a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. Selected events contain one reconstructed Z?e?e? or Z????? candidate and at least two jets, including at least one jet identified as likely to contain a b quark. To validate the search procedure, we also measure the cross section for ZZ production in the same final state. It is found to be consistent with its SM prediction. We set upper limits on the ZH production cross section times branching ratio for H?bb? at the 95% C.L. for Higgs boson masses 90?MH?150 GeV. The observed (expected) limit for MH=125 GeV is 7.1 (5.1) times the SM cross section.

  11. Measurement of sin(2)?(?)(eff) and Z-light quark couplings using the forward-backward charge asymmetry in pp-bar?Z/?*?e(+)e(?) events with L=5.0??fb(?1) at s?=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.

    2011-07-26

    -4 determinations of sin2?‘eff come from the b-quark forward- backward asymmetry at LEP, A0;bFB , with sin2?‘eff ¼ 0:232 21 ? 0:000 29, and the left-right asymmetry at SLD, AlrðSLDÞ, with sin2?‘eff ¼0:23098?0:00026. These two measurements differ from each other... and SLD Collaborations [15]. The comparison is shown in Fig. 6. The most precise measure- ments are the LEP b-quark forward-backward asymmetry, A0;bFB , the SLD left-right asymmetry, AlrðSLDÞ, the LEP ?-lepton polarization measurement, AlðP?Þ, and the SLD...

  12. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 7.9 fb[superscript ?1] of p[bar-over p] collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson, using up to 7.9 fb[superscript ?1] of integrated luminosity from p[bar-over p] collisions collected with the CDF II detector. ...

  13. Combined CDF and Dzero Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production at High Mass (155-200 GeV/c2) with 3 fb-1 of data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tevatron New Phenomena; Higgs working group; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    2008-08-05

    We combine results from CDF and DO searches for a standard model Higgs boson in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV. With 3.0 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and at DO, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 1.2, 1.0 and 1.3 higher than the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m_{H}=$165, 170 and 175 GeV, respectively. We exclude at 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson of m_H=170 GeV. Based on simulation, the ratios of the corresponding median expected upper limit to the Standard Model cross section are 1.2, 1.4 and 1.7. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and refined analysis techniques have been used. These results extend significantly the individual limits of each experiment and provide new knowledge on the mass of the standard model Higgs boson beyond the LEP direct searches.

  14. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrts = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-01-07

    We present a search for Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H -> WW -> lvlv decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at sqrt s = 1.96 TeV. To validate our search methodology, we measure the non-resonant W W production cross section and find sigma_WW = 11.6 +/- 0.7 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. In the Higgs boson search, no significant excess above the background expectation is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the Higgs boson production cross section are therefore derived. Within the standard model, the Higgs boson mass range 159 Higgs boson production cross sections 4.1 times larger than the standard model expectation, which is compatible with the presence of a Higgs boson at this mass. Within a theoretical framework with a fourth generation of fermions, the mass range 125 Higgs boson couplings, which yields an exclusion of fermiophobic Higgs boson production cross sections 3.1 times larger than the expectation for MH = 125 GeV.

  15. Search for a Higgs boson in diphoton final states with the D0 detector in 9.6 fb-1 of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-01-22

    We present a search for a Higgs boson decaying into a pair of photons based on 9.6 fb-1 of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The search employs multivariate techniques to discriminate signal from the non-resonant background and is separately optimized for a standard model and a fermiophobic Higgs boson. No significant excess of data above the background prediction is observed and upper limits on the product of the cross section and branching fraction are derived at the 95% confidence level as a function of Higgs boson mass. For a standard model Higgs boson with mass of 125 GeV, the observed (expected) upper limits are a factor of 12.8 (8.7) above the standard model prediction. The existence of a fermiophobic Higgs boson with mass in the 100-113 GeV range is excluded at the 95% confidence level.

  16. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H -> ZZ((*)) -> 4l with 4.8 fb(-1) of pp collision data at root s=7 TeV with ATLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad G.; Abbott B.; Abdallah J.; Khalek S. Abdel; Abdelalim A. A.; Abdesselam A.; Abdinov O.; Abi B.; Abolins M.; AbouZeid U. S.; Abramowicz H.; Abreu H.; Acerbi E.; Acharya B. S.; Adamczyk L.; Adams D. L.; Addy T. N.; Adelman J.; et al.

    2012-04-12

    This Letter presents a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H {yields} ZZ{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}{prime}{sup +}{ell}{prime}{sup -}, where {ell}, {ell}{prime} = e or {mu}, using proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb{sup -1}. The four-lepton invariant mass distribution is compared with Standard Model background expectations to derive upper limits on the cross section of a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass between 110 GeV and 600 GeV. The mass ranges 134-156 GeV, 182-233 GeV, 256-265 GeV and 268-415 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level. The largest upward deviations from the background-only hypothesis are observed for Higgs boson masses of 125 GeV, 244 GeV and 500 GeV with local significances of 2.1, 2.2 and 2.1 standard deviations, respectively. Once the look-elsewhere effect is considered, none of these excesses are significant.

  17. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross-section in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV using 4.5 fb$^{-1}$ of data with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-10-09

    The inclusive jet cross-section is measured in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2011. Jets are identified using the anti-$k_t$ algorithm with radius parameter values of 0.4 and 0.6. The double-differential cross-sections are presented as a function of the jet transverse momentum and the jet rapidity, covering jet transverse momenta from 100 GeV to 2 TeV. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected for non-perturbative effects and electroweak effects, as well as Monte Carlo simulations with next-to-leading-order matrix elements interfaced to parton showering, are compared to the measured cross-sections. A quantitative comparison of the measured cross-sections to the QCD calculations using several sets of parton distribution functions is performed.

  18. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2013-10-15

    A method for treating a karsted formation containing heavy hydrocarbons and dolomite includes providing heat to at least part of one or more karsted layers in the formation from one or more heaters located in the karsted layers. A temperature in at least one of the karsted layers is allowed to reach a decomposition temperature of dolomite in the formation. The dolomite is allowed to decompose and at least some hydrocarbons are produced from at least one of the karsted layers of the formation.

  19. GJO-99-112-TAR Rev.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadisonAMOCOELIkNATION ;.7,? . - G

  20. G JO-2001-283-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3 2,000 4,000DOEK I NFe

  1. GJO-99-112-TAR Rev.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N S I551 -xiii Please

  2. Scattering versus polarization Scattering amplitudes: fa, fb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guifu

    · ^y ^hs · ^z ^vs · ^x ^vs · ^y ^vs · ^z " # $ % & ' ! Ci = ^hi · ^x ^vi · ^x hi · ^y ^vi · ^y ^hi · ^z = ^hi · ^xb ^vi · ^xb hi · ^yb ^vi · ^yb ^hi · ^zb ^vi · ^zb " # $ $ $ % & ' ' ' ! ^xb ^yb ^zb " # $ % & ' *x 0 0 0 *y 0 0 0 *z " # $ $ $ % & ' ' ' ^hi · ^xb ^vi · ^xb hi · ^yb ^vi · ^yb ^hi · ^zb ^vi · ^zb

  3. y12 1950-55 FB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r mReducingwhistleblowerxinyufu Ames25

  4. The Search for VH $\\bf\\to$ VWW Standard Model \\\\ Higgs Production in the Trilepton Signature\\\\ with $\\bf5.9\\fb$ of Data from $\\bf\\ppbar$ Collisions \\\\ at $\\bf\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nett, Jason Michael; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-06-01

    We present here the search for Standard Model VH {yields} VWW {yields} lll + E{sub T} (missing energy due to neutrinos) production, where V is a W or Z weak vector boson, which uses up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This analysis has recently added to the CDF high-mass Higgs group three new signal topologies characterized by a tri-lepton signature, which are chosen to isolate the VH {yields} VWW associated production signals in the three-lepton signature. As such, we define three new regions for a WH analysis, a ZH 1-jet analysis, and a ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis with which we expect to contribute an additional {approx} 5.8% (for m{sub H} = 165 GeV) acceptance to the current H {yields} WW dilepton analysis. The ZH trilepton regions are defined by events passing a Z-boson selection: events having at least one lepton pairing (among three possible pairings) with opposite sign, same flavor, and a dilepton invariant mass within [76.0, 106.0] GeV - a {+-} 15 GeV window around the Z-boson mass. The WH trilepton region is then defined as the set of trilepton events that are complement to those chosen by the Z-boson selection. These three new event topologies make a substantial contribution to the H {yields} WW group result. As a measure of the sensitivity of this search, we compute the median expected limit on the at 95% confidence level ('C.L.') on the production cross section (effectively the rate of production) for a Standard Model Higgs boson and report the result as a ratio to the theoretical production cross section. An observed limit ratio of one or less at a given mass would rule out the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson at that mass with 95% confidence. At m{sub H} = 165 GeV, the WH analysis expected limits reach 7.2 times the standard model cross section; the ZH 1-jet analysis is set at 29 times the expected standard model cross section; the ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis is set at 9.9 times the expected standard model cross section; and the combined trilepton analysis is set at 4.9 times the expected standard model cross section. We announce that the combination of this trilepton VH {yields} VWW Higgs boson search and the previous CDF dilepton H {yields} WW search achieves an expected median limit of 1.00 at 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. The expected median limit of 1.00 indicates we anticipate a 50% probability of ruling out the existence of a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass of 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the first time a single hadron collider experiment has achieved sensitivity to the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson. We do not see evidence for a significant signal of Higgs bosons in the data and place observed limits on the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson of 165 GeV/c{sup 2} at 1.08 times Standard Model production cross section.

  5. Measurement of sin2 ??eff and Z-light quark couplings using the forward-backward charge asymmetry in pp? -> Z/gamma* -> e+e- events with L=5.0 fb-1 at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.

    2011-07-26

    We measure the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry in 157,553 pp? = Z/?* = e+e- interactions, corresponding to 5.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at ?s = 1.96 TeV. The effective weak mixing angle (??eff) from this process involving predominantly the first generation of quarks is extracted as sin2 ??eff = 0.2309 ± 0.0008 (stat.) ± 0.0006 (syst.). We also present the most precise direct measurement of the vector and axial-vector couplings of u and d quarks to the Z boson.

  6. TAR JETA DE USUARIO TDA Universitarios 3.312

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    59 RUGBY 42 TAEKWONDO 43 TAI CHI 14 TENIS 151 TENIS DE MESA 32 TIRO CON ARCO 42 TRABAJO DE ALTA FÚTBOL SALA 152 KAYAK - POLO 8 TAEKWONDO 16 TENIS 11 VOLEIBOL 43 VOLEY PLAYA 12 WATERPOLO 57 TOTAL 421 BATUKA 12 DANZA CONTEMPORÁNEA 12 FÚTBOL SALA 150 KAYAK - POLO 9 RUGBY 45 TAEKWONDO 17 TENIS DE MESA 8

  7. Vapor Pressures and Heats of Vaporization of Primary Coal Tars

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivity (BAM)Sampling6a Dynamic- -/

  8. What are Tar Balls and How Do They Form? Tar balls, the little, dark-colored pieces of oil that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that stick to our feet when we go to the beach, are actually remnants of oil spills. When crude oil (or of oil, such as crude oil or home heating oil, much of the oil remains behind. At the same time, some crude oils mix with water to form an emulsion that often looks like chocolate pudding. This emulsion

  9. FB2 Biologie / Chemie www.uni-bremen.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    , differentiation of simple functions, application: extreme value) · Integral calculus (definitions, calculation functions), sequences and series) · Differential calculus of one variable (definitions, calculation rules-chenregeln, Differentiation einfacher Funktionen, Anwendung: Extremwerte) -Integralrechnung (Definitionen, Rechenregeln

  10. FB EcoSolutions LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop,Erosion FlumeEventFAOFB EcoSolutions LLC Jump to:

  11. Financial-Based (FB) CRAC (rates/adjustments)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |Final Report DocumentRatesFinancialFinancial

  12. FB/SN CRAC Workshops (rates/meetings)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtrans - Permeation Measurement2 0 thFATIGUE

  13. TAR JETA DE USUARIO TDA TU TOTAL Universitarios 3309 309 3618

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    SPINNING 201 STEP 2 TAEKWONDO 26 TECNICAS DE RELAJACION 2 TENIS 162 TIRO CON ARCO 27 VOLEY PLAYA 30 (KATA) 12 JUDO (SHIRI) 8 KÁRATE 25 PÁDEL 50 TAEKWONDO 15 TENIS 14 TENIS-MESA 11 VOLEIBOL 42 VOLEY PLAYA BADMINTON 17 BALONCESTO 3x3 18 BALONCESTO TRIPLES 15 FÚTBOL SALA 209 KÁRATE 13 PÁDEL 22 RUGBY 40 TAEKWONDO 8

  14. Transmembrane Signaling of Chemotaxis Receptor Tar: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hahnbeom; Im, Wonpil; Seok, Chaok

    2011-06-22

    Transmembrane signaling of chemotaxis receptors has long been studied, but how the conformational change induced by ligand binding is transmitted across the bilayer membrane is still elusive at the molecular level. To ...

  15. Investigation of sand consolidation using steam for the Tar Zone, Wilmington field, California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Knut Arild

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to better understand and optimize the process of sand consolidation using high-pH steam in wells of the Wilmington field, California. The apparatus consisted of a vertical 18 in. long aluminum cylindrical cell...

  16. THE EFFECT OF WATER-GAS TAR ON OYSTERS By Philip H. Mitchell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this series. A siphon delivered sea water from an aquarium to a point about 2 inches from the bottom of the jar, while another siphon at the same time drew off water from the middle of the jar. Water of the water, none, or very little of it, was removed while the water flowed through the siphons. The water

  17. Oil shales and tar sands: a bibliography. Supplement 2, Parts 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grissom, M.C.

    1984-07-01

    This bibliography includes 4715 citations arranged in the broad subject categories: reserves and exploration; site geology and hydrology; drilling, fracturing, and mining; oil production, recovery, and refining; properties and composition; direct uses and by-products; health and safety; marketing and economics; waste research and management; environmental aspects; regulations; and general. There are corporate, author, subject, contract number, and report number indexes.

  18. Feature Subset Selection with TAR2less Rajesh Gunnalan GUNNALAN@CSEE.WVU.EDU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzies, Tim

    @MENZIES.US Kalaivani Appukutty AVANI@CSEE.WVU.EDU Amarnath Srinivasan AMARNATH@CSEE.WVU.EDU Lane Department of Com. Sci

  19. FEASIBILITY OF IN-SITU COMBUSTION OF TAR FROM A TARMAT Sidqi A. Abu-Khamsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    dropped below 500 °C causing the front to stagnate and become extinguished a short distance away from temperatures maintained above 500 °C and high oxygen utilization. It appears that a minimum iron concentration above 500 °C and the reaction's activation energy was about 100 kJ/mol. Since such a temperature

  20. The White House & Tar Sands Remarks in front of the White House on 29 August 2011.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    companies, (3) climate disruption costs not paid c. Only workable solution: rising across-the-board flat fee on carbon, collected from fossil companies at point where fossil fuel enters domestic market (domestic mine/gallon of gasoline. The public will not allow this to happen unless 100% of the collected fee

  1. Bacterial mutagenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reconstituted mixtures and crude coal tar extracts and fractions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onufrock, Amy Mildred

    1994-01-01

    Although polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) are one of the most ubiquitous carcinogens in the environment, little is known regarding their potential mutagenic interactions. Risk assessment of complex PAH mixtures ...

  2. Small-Scale Forward Smouldering Experiments for Remediation of Coal Tar in Inert Media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pironi, Paolo; Switzer, Christine; Rein, Guillermo; Gerhard, Jason; Torero, Jose L; Fuentes, Andres

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a series of experiments conducted to assess the potential of smouldering combustion as a novel technology for remediation of contaminated land by water-immiscible organic compounds. The results from ...

  3. NREL Patents a Catalyst that Removes Syngas Tar, Boosting the Economics of Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact:News Releases | NREL NRELRow 3 Site 3.4

  4. Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell--GJO-99-96-TAR, June 1999

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694Performed Under DOE

  5. Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources - Oil Shale and Tar Sands | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant to the contract clause entitled, "Laws,of

  6. Rapid Prototypingof Tools Lee E. Welss, E. Levent Gursoz, F.B. Prim,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Lee E.

    by the DefenseAdvanced ResearchAgency underthe Office of Naval Research contract N00014-68-K-0642, in part Flgure3-1: Electrlc Arc Spraylng Figure3-2: ConventionalMold Figure3-3: SprayedTool Process Figure34: SprayedTurblne Blade Mold Figure3-5: SLA MoldPatterns Flgure 36: Parting Plane Model Figure 4-1: Sllclng

  7. CDF note 9640 Search for X ZZ with 3 fb-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    dilepton pair using the nominal CDF event reconstruction software, we reprocess these events pair of final states from the reprocessed data. The electron criteria listed in Tables I through III

  8. Chiral U(1) Flavor Models and Flavored Higgs Doublets: The Top FB Asymmetry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements ofCOMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROM BOILINGChemCam on Marsand the

  9. Chiral U(1) Flavor Models and Flavored Higgs Doublets: The Top FB Asymmetry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission,TextitSciTechin ComplexChi-NuSciTechand the Wjj__

  10. Reality Bites: Why TAR's Promises Have Yet to be Fulfilled William P. Butterfield, Conor R. Crowley & Jeannine Kenney1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oard, Doug

    -established. Even productions resulting from carefully designed search terms developed through a fully cooperative Working Group on Electronic Document Retention and Production, where he served as editor Retention and Production, where he served as Editor-in-Chief of The Sedona Conference Commentary

  11. Zevenhoven & Kilpinen VOCs, PAHs, soot, tar, CO 17.6.2001 6-1 Chapter 6 VOCs, PAHs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    17.6.2001 6-2 Table 6.2 Organic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) of interest for thermal power) hazardous air pollutant POHC (USA) principle organic hazardous constituents, selected on the basis of difficulties with their incineration (LaGrega et al., 1994) Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as defined

  12. Heavy crude and tar sands: Hydrocarbons for the 21st century. Volume 1, Geology, characterization and mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Volume 1 is concerned with the geology of the resources and with the mining of those occurring at or near the earth`s surface. The chemical characterization of natural bitumens and heavy oil is the subject of 15 papers. These concentrate on those properties which govern the exploitability and use of these hydrocarbons. Six reports deal with exploration for bitumens and certain aspects of their later development. No less than three of the papers investigate the trace metals and their possible role in comprehending the occurrence of the bitumens and, therefore, the clues they may offer for the location of additional deposits. Another eight reports are concerned directly with the geologic occurrence of specific resource accumulations. These deposits are found in Canada, China, Madagascar, Nigeria, and Venezuela. One report describes a model that may be applied in basin analysis for predicting the composition of heavy oils expelled from the sources rocks of the basin. Additional papers then characterize the resources found in Indonesia, Iran, and the USA. Volume 1 concludes with the reports on the many kinds of bitumen extraction and use. Not only are innovative techniques evolving for the extraction of the material but also for its economic enhancement through the exploitation of coproducts. Ten papers deal with bitumen mining and its present, or prospective, utilization in places like the Mongolia Republic, the State of Utah in the USA, Trinidad in Latin America or Nigeria in Africa. Each paper has been processed separately for the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. THE ERNEST KEMPTON ADAMS FbND FOR PHYSICAL RESEARCH OF COLUMBIA UNM3R!XI'Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    of soil mechanics. Terzaghi's treatment, however, is restricted to the one-dimensional problem of a column (Received October 2.5, 1940) The settlement of soils under load is caused by a phenomenon called consolidation, whose mechanism is known to be in many cases identical with the process of squeezing water out

  14. Ionisation of the Middle Atmosphere by Energetic Particles May-Britt Kallenrode FB Physik, University of Osnabruck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallenrode, May-Britt

    . Their relation is described by two kinds of models: proton precipitation in solar energetic particle (SEP] Previous own contribution: development of an Atmospheric Ionization Module (AIMOS) [7] based on a Monte of ion- ization (protons) in selected events [5, 6, 8, 9] Open Questions modeling (and comparison

  15. '('()%0 1 243 57698A@CB(8EDGF24FB(8AHI8A24P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to share and re-use knowledge between the geographical lo- cations. As O'Leary claims, KM is difficult when knowl- edge flows (e.g. face to face communication) are simply not present (O'Leary, 1998). Selected

  16. 3 Rigid Spacecraft Attitude Control Consider a rigid spacecraft with body-fixed frame Fb with origin O at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damaren, Christopher J.

    from u to is passive. It follows that the strictly passive feedback, u = -Kd, Kd = KT d > O (2) yields, hence = 0. In order to stabilize this equilibrium, we must feed back in some form. Building on our makes senses in the limit of small angles, since the map from u to = is passive and the above

  17. Combination of searches for anomalous top quark couplings with 5.4 fb(-1) of pp-bar collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, G.; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; D0 Collaboration; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.

    2012-07-09

    , M.-C. Cousinou l, A. Croc o, D. Cutts bt, A. Das ap, G. Davies an, .J. de Jong ad,ae, E. De La Cruz-Burelo ac, F. Déliot o, R. Demina bn, D. Denisov as, S.P. Denisov ai, S. Desai as, . Deterre o, K. DeVaughan bi, H.T. Diehl as, M. Diesburg as, P..., Ferbel bn, F. Fiedler u, F. Filthaut ad,ae, W. Fisher bg, H.E. Fisk as, M. Fortner au, H. Fox am, S. Fuess as, . Garcia-Bellido bn, J.A. García-González ac, G.A. García-Guerra ac,3, V. Gavrilov ag, P. Gay j, W. Geng l,bg, . Gerbaudo bk, C.E. Gerber at, Y...

  18. Labor and the Elderly in the Welfare Retrenchment Era: Institutions and Collective Action in the Public Pension Reforms of Affluent Democracies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Juan J.

    2009-01-01

    DC DC DC Tar. Tar. Bas. + Finland Solidarity DB Tar. DB Tar.OECD Economic Surveys for Finland 1995 . Paris: OECD. —.OECD Economic Surveys for Finland 1997 . Paris: OECD. —.

  19. Global identification and characterization of transcriptionally active regions in the rice genome.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    selected non-exonic TARs. Pie charts indicate the percentageof antisense TARs. (A) Pie chart analysis of antisense TARs.and intergenic TARs. (b) Pie chart analysis of the hits

  20. Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    made from tar sands and conventional oil. Environmentalvery heavy oils fuel providers that and tar sands, also emit

  1. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    and characterization of long-chain-alkane degrading Bacillus thermoleovorans from deep subterranean petroleum reservoirs.characterization of microbial assemblages associated with high- temperature petroleum reservoirs.

  2. 1. Autorit giudiziaria innanzi alla quale si procede e numero di registro generale del ricorso: T.A.R. LAZIO, ROMA, R.G. n. 11501/13;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    Ludovica, Spinelli Giovanni, Galipo' Erika, Irrera Ludovica, Ali' Salvatore, Simone Giulia, Basile Michela, Sangiorgio Alessio Rocco, Lombardo Francesco, Zaccaria Ferruccio 2.1. Indicazione dell

  3. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water: Theof petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water: The

  4. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water:Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water:dioxide and water (Heitzer and Sayler, 1993). Bioremediation

  5. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    been converted to natural gas, liquid crude oil, shale oil,been converted to natural gas, liquid crude oil, shale oil,

  6. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    growth on natural asphalts and heavy oil compounds. A majorand the origin of heavy oil. Nature, 426, 344-352. HEITKAMP,mainly of asphalts and heavy oils, which have saturated into

  7. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    and the origin of heavy oil. Nature, 426, 344-352. HEITKAMP,natural asphalts and heavy oil compounds. A major questionmainly of asphalts and heavy oils, which have saturated into

  8. Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Burrell Vicinity Property, Blairsville, Pennsylvania, GJO-2002-331-TAR, MAC-LBUR 1.1, Revised April 2000

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~LONG-TERMLetter Report

  9. Report. Results of a Piezocone Investigation - Shiprock, New Mexico - February 2002. GJO-2001-276-TAR. MAC-GWSHP 13.3-1.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnPandAlba Craft Laboratory

  10. Co-Designing Sustainable Communities: The Identification and Incorporation of Social Performance Metrics in Native American Sustainable Housing and Renewable Energy System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelby, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    the development of tar oil sands supplies and deliverfrom Canadian Athabasca tar sands oil to the United States.with extracting the oil from tar sands makes the energy

  11. Environmental Information Sources: Websites and Books

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrode, Flora

    2009-01-01

    about tar sands, or oil sands, which are "a combination ofa heavy black viscous oil. Tar sands can be mined andthen refined into oil." Discusses tar sands locations, the

  12. Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2008-01-01

    in Figure 9 for tar sands and heavy oil. But, because of theregion for the tar sands and heavy oil resource in Figurewith small tar sands and heavy oil endowment use their

  13. 30 E MAGAZINE MAY/JUNE 2012 Rob Jackson, Ph.D., is the Nicholas Chair of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    you see public resistance against fracking and the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline as positive signs to fracking is a concern about human health. The tar sands perhaps, because tar sands extraction is environmen

  14. Robert Morris : from a crisis in vision to a vision of crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Benjamin Andrews

    2012-01-01

    Tar Babies of the New World Order. Milano: Charta, 1997.the Tar Babies of the New World Order (1997) and House andlater Tar Babies of a New World Order (Venice, 1997), where

  15. Updated Combination of Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at the D0 Experiment in 9.7 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-07-02

    Searches for standard model Higgs boson production at the D0 experiment in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (m_H) in the range 100Higgs boson. In absence of a significant excess above the background expectation, 95% confidence level upper limits are set on the production cross section for a standard model Higgs boson. The upper limits are found to be a factor of 2.11 (0.73) times the predicted standard model cross section for m_H=115 (165) GeV. Under the background-only hypothesis, the corresponding expected limit is 1.46 (0.72) times the standard model prediction. At the same confidence level, these analyses exclude a standard model Higgs boson with a mass in the range 159

  16. Data:C2f657fb-1bf4-43a7-bab8-35adf4b59fa0 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  17. Data:Ffe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  18. TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS & BOOKS PRESENTED/PUBLISHED GOMES J.S. & ALVES, F.B. (2013): "The Universe of the Oil & Gas Industry From Exploration to Refining", 780

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Universe of the Oil & Gas Industry ­ From Exploration to Refining", 780 pages University textbook published by PARTEX Oil & Gas, Lisbon, Portugal. ISBN 9789892037783. GOMES J.S. (2012): "New Technologies in the Oil and Gas Industry", edited by J.S. Gomes, published by INTECH open science (www

  19. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in ??+jets final states in 9.7??fb(?1) of pp-bar collisions with the D0 detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, G.; Clutter, Justace Randall; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbinante, A.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.

    2013-09-17

    and expected background. We test our method by measuring WZ and ZZ production with Z?bb-bar and find production rates consistent with the standard model prediction. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the production of a standard...

  20. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in associated $WH$ production in 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions with the D0 detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The D0 Collaboration

    2012-09-21

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and two or three jets, at least one of which is identified as a $b$-quark jet. The search is primarily sensitive to $WH\\to\\ell\

  1. CDF/PHYS/EXO/PUBLIC/10464 An inclusive search for new physics in like-sign dilepton events at CDF with 6.1 fb-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    a search for new physics in events with two high pT leptons of the same electric charge using data the statistical consistency. Companion notes interpret the sample in terms of supersymmetry [7] and same-sign top quarks [8]. II. DATASET AND SELECTION Events were recorded by CDF II [9, 10], a general purpose detector

  2. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the Savannah River Site FB-Line

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Greg Rudy, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1981

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    we must relate the properties of the coal tar to constantscoal tar i n a diverse molecular-weight range. The presence of entrained ash complicates mixture properties

  4. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Energy Board (2004). Canada's oil sands: opportunities andheavy oil, coal, tar sands, oil shale Natural gas, biomassproduction), extra heavy oil, tar sands, and even natural

  5. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Energy Board (2004). Canada's oil sands: opportunities andheavy oil, coal, tar sands, oil shale Natural gas, biomassproduction), extra heavy oil, tar sands, and even natural

  6. ARE Update Volume 13, Number 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    conversion of tar sands for oil is highly contaminating.to invest in oil produced from tar sands and to convert coal

  7. ARE Update Volume 12, Number 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    oil versus oil produced from tar sands. A third policy isas the fraction of oils produced from tar sands and shale

  8. Excavating Chinese America in the Delta: Race and the historical archaeology of the Isleton Chinese American community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, Kelly Nicole

    2013-01-01

    plastic roofing tar slate Styrofoam yarn TOTAL Table 9.tar Seashell Slate Small finds Styrofoam Unidentified TOTALceramics, bottle caps, Styrofoam, nails, bullet casings,

  9. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Petroleum, natural gas, very heavy oil, coal, tar sands, oilgas production), extra heavy oil, tar sands, and evenof hydrocarbons are the heavy oils of California, Venezuela,

  10. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Petroleum, natural gas, very heavy oil, coal, tar sands, oilgas production), extra heavy oil, tar sands, and evenof hydrocarbons are the heavy oils of California, Venezuela,

  11. Humic acid complexation of basic and neutral polycyclic aromatic compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    , metallurgical processes, and some coal, oil shale, and tar sand conversion systems. These com- pounds exhibit

  12. Search for new physics in the dijet mass distribution using 1 fb[superscript ?1] of pp collision data at ?s = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Invariant mass distributions of jet pairs (dijets) produced in LHC proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy ?s = 7 TeV have been studied using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 ...

  13. Search for a heavy gauge boson decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino in 1 fb[superscript ?1] of pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC is used to search for high-mass states, such as heavy charged gauge bosons (W?), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of ...

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H?ZZ(*)?4? with 4.8 fb[superscript -1] of pp collision data at ?s = 7 TeV with ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter presents a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H?ZZ(*)??[superscript +]?[superscript ?]??[superscript +]??[superscript ?], where ?,?? = e or ?, using proton–proton collisions at ?s = ...

  15. Search for a standard model Higgs boson in the H?ZZ??[superscript +]?[subscript ?]?[bar over ?] decay channel using 4.7 fb[superscript -1] of ?s = 7 TeV data with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for a Standard Model Higgs boson decaying via H?ZZ??[superscript +]?[superscript ?]?[bar over ?], where ? represents electrons or muons, is presented. It is based on proton–proton collision data at ?s = 7 TeV, ...

  16. Data:B485777c-c4fb-42b3-8d2a-3da95f7c7c10 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a-3da95f7c7c10 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  17. Search for Direct Top Squark Pair Production in Final States with One Isolated Lepton, Jets, and Missing Transverse Momentum in ?s=7??TeV pp Collisions Using 4.7??fb[superscript -1] of ATLAS Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search is presented for direct top squark pair production in final states with one isolated electron or muon, jets, and missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at ?s=7??TeV. The measurement is based on ...

  18. Search for squarks and gluinos with the ATLAS detector in final states with jets and missing transverse momentum using 4.7??fb?1 of ?s=7??TeV proton-proton collision data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for squarks and gluinos in final states containing jets, missing transverse momentum and no high-pT electrons or muons is presented. The data represent the complete sample recorded in 2011 by the ATLAS experiment ...

  19. Search for neutral Higgs bosons in the multi-b -jet topology in 5.5 fb-1 of pp-bar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Chen, G.; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; D0 Collaboration; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.

    2011-04-04

    Data recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are analyzed to search for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b quarks. The search is performed in the three-b -quark channel using multijet-triggered events...

  20. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

    1999-06-25

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

  1. The Implications of Global Climate Change for Mountain Gorilla Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    a changing and uncertain climate. Frontiers in Ecology andother/ipcc_tar/? src=/climate/ipcc_tar/wg2/index.htm.The implication of projected climate change for freshwater

  2. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    S E DWARD B URTYNSKY , Oil Sands #2, Fort McMurray, Alberta,for the very heavy oils and tar sands that oil companies aremade from tar sands and conventional oil. Envi- ronmental

  3. Uinta Basin Oil and Gas Development Air Quality Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Production EASTERN UTAH BLM Proposed Leasing for Oil Shale and Tar Sands Development "Indian Country" ­ Regulatory Authority Controlled by the Tribes and EPA Oil Shale Leasing Tar Sands Leasing "Indian Country

  4. Newbie question: How to view commercial/residential load profile...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    cannot access open the .tar files. Help TIA. Submitted by Baritone700 on 12 January, 2015 - 10:49 3 answers Points: 0 Hello, I provide user support for SAM. We do not use .tar...

  5. temperature that Earth will experience to the year 2100 depends most reliably on the total

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -traditional fossil-fuel sources of tar shales, oil sands or methane hydrates. Last year, we probably emitted more

  6. Pablo Vargas Real Jardn Botnico. CSIC.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    la trasferencia de polen pudiera es- tar alterada por la presencia de plantas introducidas y, por tan

  7. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , vehicles can still drive with gasoline/diesel derived from tar sand, oil shale, and coal derived liquids

  8. Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining Permitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    " or "Gas" does not include any gaseous or liquid substance processed from coal, oil shale, or tar sands

  9. Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Adam R. 2008. “Converting Oil Shale to Liquid Fuels: Energyshale gas, tight oil, oil shale, and tar (bitumen) sands. In

  10. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 6 (2012) 6976 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    of gasification was also emulated using catalytic steam reforming of a model-tar compound. However, post

  11. Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

    2006-01-01

    in deep-sea deposits, heavy oils, and tar sands. Ominously,Includes crude oil, light products, and heavy products.

  12. Nmero de bolseiros no ensino superior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    existiam dívidas fiscais ou contributivas nas famílias e que estão agora a contac- tar os serviços das

  13. "How did you become an activist?" I was surprised by the question. I never considered myself an activist. I am a slow-paced taciturn scientist from the Midwest. Most of my relatives are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    coal use rapidly, (2) leave tar sands in the ground, and (3) not go after the last drops of oil of Statoil, should intervene in their plans to develop the tar sands of Canada. I received a polite response, by letter, from the Deputy Minister of Petroleum and Energy. The government position is that the tar sands

  14. Near Surface 2011 17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    campaigns performed around a housing estate located downstream to an old coke tar site in France. This coke than water, such as chlorinated solvents, wood preservative wastes, coal tar wastes, and pesticides electrical resistivity campaigns performed around a housing estate located downstream an old coke tar site

  15. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Final report, July 1989--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    Research and development of surface extraction and upgrading processes of western tar sands are described. Research areas included modified hot water, fluidized bed, and rotary kiln pyrolysis of tar sands for extraction of bitumen. Bitumen upgrading included solvent extraction of bitumen, and catalytic hydrotreating of bitumen. Characterization of Utah tar sand deposits is also included.

  16. INTERFACING AUTOCAD WITH MAGNETIC DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, M.

    2010-01-01

    more procedures, namely, fbI, fbll, eatblank, car4str, andwritten by Michael Helm. fbI finds the next blank in theprocedures car4str, cdr4str, fbI, fbll, and eatblank (which

  17. FM File Manager Page 1 Revision 1.0 COPYRIGHT (C) 1982 BY LOGICAL SYSTEMS, INC.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Tim

    ) ....................................... 9 28 FB (Use Flag Bit) .................................. 9 28 CFB (Clear Flag Bit

  18. Canting in polarization plane Backscattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guifu

    " % & ' ( ) * ! A = cos2 " + sin2 # sin2 "! = Afa + Bfb ( fa " fb ) BC ( fa " fb ) BC Cfb + Dfa # $ % & ' ( ! B = cos2 " + sin2 # sin2 " ! = Afa + Bfb ( fa " fb ) BC ( fa " fb ) BC Cfb + Dfa # $ % & ' ( ! B = cos2 " sin2 · Gaussian pdf Statistical polarization signatures ! fhh 2 = Afa + Bfb( ) Afa * + Bfb * ( ) ! p(",#) = p

  19. CS 3214, Spring 2012 Project 1: Defusing a Binary Bomb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butt, Ali R.

    your group's bomb, one (and only one) of the group members should point your Web browser to the bomb request daemon at http://cs3214.cs.vt.edu:15213 Fill out the HTML form with the CS SLO IDs of your team browser in a tar file called bombk.tar, where k is the unique number of your bomb. Save the bombk.tar file

  20. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted July 9, 2013 Particle analysis shows "tar ball" effect is significant LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 9,...

  1. Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2008-01-01

    EOR continues to unlock oil resources. Oil & Gas Journal, [of conventional oil resource availability. Estimates ofthe tar sands and heavy oil resource in Figure 10. Note that

  2. SURVEY OF THE LITERATURE ON THE CARBON-HYDROGEN SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakowski, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    carbon greatly influences outgassing characteristics, i.e. ,to these factors, the outgassing problem or "tar effect" hasKnowledge of the outgassing problem is of great importance

  3. Microsoft Word - Summary of Presentations and Comments for QER...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and export, and turns America's heartland into a throughway for Canadian tar sands export pipelines will directly undercut the laudable efforts of the Administration to...

  4. SPRNG

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002483WKSTN00 SPRNG Scalable Parallel Random Number Generator LIbrary  http://www.cs.fsu.edu/~asriniva/sprng1.1.tar 

  5. Glossary Glossary

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, residual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

  6. Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Black Carbon Reference Materials and Individual Carbonaceous Atmospheric Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Marten, Bryan D.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2007-01-01

    A. (1998), Determination of chemical- structural changes inOptical, physical, and chemical properties of tar ballsE. (2001), Study on the chemical character of water soluble

  7. Asilomar Declaration on Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    intensive oil sources such as tar sands and heavy oil.sands produces about ?fty percent more CO 2 emissions than making gasoline from conventional oil.

  8. Hydrogen Generation for Refineries

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    vacuum resid) * Dilbit (tar sand bitumen diluted with 30% condensate) * Biomass fast pyrolysis oil (whole raw oil) * Norpar 12 (C 11 C 12 paraffinic solvent - used as naphtha...

  9. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. 'Total' is the sum of all of the listed energy sources, including wood waste, hydrogen, and waste oils and tars. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing...

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE 50th ANNIVERSARY OF THE LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY. SYMPOSIUM AND BANQUET SPEECHES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    locked up in tar sand and oil shale. One can anticipate thatin our own Green River oil shale is also comparable to that

  11. pubs.acs.org/Organometallicsr XXXX American Chemical Society Organometallics XXXX, XXX, 000000 A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baik, Mu-Hyun

    feedstocks,6,7 such as heavy oils, tar sands, coal, and oil shale, the key components in need of significant

  12. Transportation Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    TRANSPORTATION ment of Oil Shale Technology. Washing- ton,interest and investments in oil shale, ethanol, coal liquidsbiomass materials, coal, oil shale, tar sands, natural gas,

  13. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the sum of all of the listed energy sources, and other energy sources such as wood waste, hydrogen, and waste oils and tars. Sources: Energy Information Administration,...

  14. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    the sum of all of the listed energy sources, and other energy sources such as wood waste, hydrogen, and waste oils and tars. Sources:Energy Information Administration,...

  15. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    from California’s heavy oil and importing fuel refined frommanufactured from heavy oil, and fuel b might representresources, including heavy oil, tar sands, oil shale and

  16. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    from California’s heavy oil and importing fuel refined frommanufactured from heavy oil, and fuel b might representresources, including heavy oil, tar sands, oil shale and

  17. The Outside Within: Literature of Colonial Hokkaido

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Noriko Agatsuma

    2012-01-01

    imitating Ueno station, and Dalian station, built in 1937,by Sakami Saichi, and Dalian, by ?ta S?tar?. Ibid. Ibid.

  18. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operationsand Lee, P. : Does the Alberta tar sands industry pollute?gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76

  19. Method of producing synthetic pitch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennel, Elliot B. (Morgantown, WV); Stansberry, Peter G. (North Olmsted, OH); Stiller, Alfred H. (Morgantown, WV); Zondlo, John W. (Albright, WV)

    2012-07-24

    Embodiments of a method are described for modifying pitches, oils, tars, and binders by using these materials as solvents to extract organic chemicals from coal.

  20. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    saturated solution) Styrene Sulfuric cid(1.83sp.Gr. ) AXylene Coal tar distillate Styrene MISCELLANEOUS LacquerAcid Stoddard Solvent . Styrene Sulfuric Acid (Diluted)

  1. Biofuels: Review of Policies and Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janda, Karel; Kristoufek, Ladislav; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    with new technologies of fracking or tar sands mining.oil drilling. Hydraulic fracking, which is considered to betar sands or hydraulic fracking which, on one hand, provide

  2. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    workshop Traeger R K ed Harding B W GEOSCIENCES GEOTHERMAL ENERGY PETROLEUM NATURAL GAS OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS BOREHOLES SAMPLING WELL...

  3. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    USDOE - Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE)","02 PETROLEUM; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; BIOFUELS;...

  4. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Available","58 GEOSCIENCES; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; BOREHOLES; SAMPLING;...

  5. DOE Project 18546, AOP Task 1.1, Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Combustion Engines Bunting, Bruce G ORNL; Bunce, Michael ORNL 02 PETROLEUM; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; BIOFUELS;...

  6. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects on Advanced Combustion Engines Bunting Bruce G ORNL Bunce Michael ORNL PETROLEUM OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS SYNTHETIC FUELS ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS BIOFUELS CHEMISTRY...

  7. Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    laboratory measurements of biomass-burning emissions: 1.tar balls: Particles from biomass and biofuel burning, J.Eleuterio (2005), A review of biomass burning emissions part

  8. Paleoecology of the Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 03 NATURAL GAS; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; BLACK SHALES; GEOLOGY; PALEONTOLOGY; KENTUCKY; DEVONIAN PERIOD; FOSSILS; GEOLOGIC HISTORY; BITUMINOUS...

  9. DOE/OR/07-2247&D1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Revision 4 November 2011 11 Samples of both the pipe and the tar-like coating were collected and submitted for laboratory analyses for asbestos and PCBs,...

  10. Resource Limits and Conversion Efficiency with Implications for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croft, Gregory Donald

    2009-01-01

    Basin, is estimated to have 2 billion barrels of OOIP while other known tar sands at Oxnard, Arroyo Grande and Paris

  11. 10/1/2014 Micro-windmill research encourages innovation -The Shorthorn : News http://www.theshorthorn.com/news/micro-windmill-research-encourages-innovation/article_d477da18-48fb-11e4-a7ee-001a4bcf6878.html?mode=print 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    microns and a diameter of 1.8 millimeters, the micro-windmill has the potential capacity to power cellphones and wireless sensors in ways solar energy cannot. The diameter of a strand of human hair is about

  12. 2/1/2014 Tinywindmills mayone daypower cell phones http://www.eetindia.co.in/articleLogin.do?artId=8800694132&fromWhere=/ART_8800694132_1800008_NT_36244fb4.HTM&catId=1800008&newsType=NT&pag... 1/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    of the University of Texas created what is said to be the world's smallest wind turbine that could one day power. *Verify code: Power/Alternative Energy Tiny windmills may one day power cell phones KeywordsA, linear regulator Micropower 3-Sensor Combination Including Acceleration and Temperature Whitepaper SAS

  13. 1950 B i M d l 1960 General Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rannacher, Rolf

    AFA 2001 TAR 2000 Earth System Models (ESMs) 2014 ARS Climate Research Meteo- rology Climate Change Atmosphere Ocean Models (AOGCMs) 1979 Charney Report 1990 FAR 1995 SAR 2007 AFA 2001 TAR 2000 Earth System Models (ESMs) 2014 ARS Climate Research Meteo- rology Climate Change Science and Policy 1 Cl Re Meteo

  14. To better understand the processes that connect the Earth environment to the Sun,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    an innovative strategy to focus research on the most complex science tar- gets. The targets are drawn up each year by a panel of senior scientists. These tar- gets are then publicized, and individual researchers (AU)). It is inflated by the solar wind and threaded by mag- netic fields that affect the electrical

  15. A Fork in the Road We stand at a fork in the road. Conventional oil and gas supplies are limited. We can move

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A Fork in the Road We stand at a fork in the road. Conventional oil and gas supplies are limited the dirtiest tar sands and tar shales, hydrofracking for gas, continued mountain-top removal and mechanized change. Fossil fuel moguls get richer, we get poorer. Our children are screwed. Our well-oiled coal

  16. Averting Our Eyes E-mails received regarding the letter from the National Mining Association CEO and my

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    peak production of both oil a burn all of the fossil fuels (oil, gas, coal and unconventional fossil fuels such as tar shale and tar in the air today is due about 50% to coal, 35% to oil and 15% to gas. The annual increments for the past few

  17. Negotiated Learning for Smart Grid Agents: Entity Selection based on Dynamic Partially Observable Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veloso, Manuela M.

    -time pricing (RTP) tar- iffs, where customers are incentivized to quickly adapt to changes in the cost of supply. However, choosing amongst competitive RTP tariffs is difficult when tar- iff prices change rapidly. The problem is further com- plicated when we assume that the price changes for a tariff

  18. Parking Lot Sealcoat: An Unrecognized Source of Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    structures stemming from their origins: coal tar is a byproduct of the production of coke from coal, whereas,maydominateloadingofPAHstourbanwaterbodies in the United States. Particles in runoff from parking lots with coal-tar emulsion sealcoat had mean and cement lots. Diagnostic ratios of individual PAHs indicating sources are similar for particles from coal

  19. les jabots des abeilles taient beaucoup plus remplis et la dissection et l'analyse ont t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of tar of brown coal and19 million tons of mineral oil have been processed into the final-products bitumin, paraffine, fuel, petrol and coke in the tar factory Rositz (Altenburger Land) from 1917 1990, 19 millions de tonnes de goudron de lignite ont été tranformés en coke, bitume et paraffine, et19

  20. Environ. Sci. Technol. 1994, 28, 1331-1340 Semlempirical Thermodynamic Modeling of Liquid-Liquid Phase Equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    of the coal tar pseudocomponent, and the calibrated liquid-phase activity coefficient equations can be usedEnviron. Sci. Technol. 1994, 28, 1331-1340 Semlempirical Thermodynamic Modeling of Liquid-Liquid Phase Equilibria: Coal Tar Dissolutionin Water-Miscible Solvents Catherine A. Peters'it and Richard 0

  1. Plasma/catalytic gas cleaning to deliver high quality syngas from waste biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma/catalytic gas cleaning to deliver high quality syngas from waste biomass Paul T. Williams, Alstom, Process Systems Enterprises Ltd, C-Tech Innovation Ltd Introduction #12;Background Biomass for decarbonising power production." BUT: · A key problem for biomass gasification is tar in the syngas. · Tar

  2. Search for R-Parity Violating Decays of Sneutrinos to e?, ??, and e? Pairs in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present a search for supersymmetric neutrino ?˜ production using the Tevatron pp? collision data collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1??fb-1 [fb superscript -1]. We focus ...

  3. RoboCup 2004 Thomas Rofer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    RoboCup 2004 Thomas R¨ofer Tim Laue Center for Computing Technology, FB 3 Informatik, Universit Stefan Uhrig Fachgebiet Simulation und Systemoptimierung, FB 20 Informatik, Technische Universit

  4. HORTSCIENCE 47(3):391394. 2012. Fruit Phosphorous and Nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    browning, total phenolic concentration, postharvest consumer quality Abstract. Fruit flesh browning (FB activity, polyphenol oxidase activity, total phenolics, and fruit FB potential were evaluated. Nutrient of oxidative degradation of pheno- lic compounds by polyphenol oxidase (PPO), which leads to production

  5. Protist, Vol. 162, 8599, January 2011 http://www.elsevier.de/protis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Laura

    Program in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA bFB Organismische

  6. Mathematiques Projective modules in the intersection cohomology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malle, Gunter

    Germain, 5 rue Thomas Mann, 75205 Paris CEDEX 13, France. bFB Mathematik, TU Kaiserslautern, Postfach 3049

  7. ELSEVIER PIh S0032-3861(97)10388-3 Polymer Vol. 39 No. 17, pp. 4081-4088, 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    , University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5308, USA bFB-6, Physical Chemistry, Gerhard Mercator University

  8. Realizability Models Refuting Ishihara's Boundedness Peter Lietza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

    Nordendstr. 11, D-60318 Frankfurt, Germany bFB4 Mathematik, TU Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstr. 7, D-64289 Darmstadt

  9. Boundary Forces in lattice Boltzmann: Analysis of Momentum Exchange algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a Michael Junk b a Fraunhofer ITWM, Fraunhofer-Platz 1 D-67663, Kaiserslautern, Germany bFB Mathematik und

  10. arXiv:1109.0460v2[hep-ph]10Jul2012 SU(3) breaking corrections to the D, D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weise, Wolfram

    ¨unchen, D-85747 Garching, Germany 2 School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University can predict quantitatively the ratios of fD s /fD , fBs /fB, and fB s /fB taking into account heavy should be testable in future lattice QCD simula- tions, providing a stringent test of our understanding

  11. NOx reduction with the use of feedlot biomass as a reburn fuel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goughnour, Paul Gordon

    2009-05-15

    composted FB (LA PC FB) with equivalence ratio ranging from 1 to 1.15. The results of these experiments show that NOx levels can be reduced by as much as 90% - 95 % when firing pure LA PC FB and results are almost independent of. The reburn fuel was injected...

  12. Attitudes and Experiences of Dental Hygiene Faculty Regarding Interactions with Current Undergraduate Dental Hygiene Students on Facebook 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyatt, Leigh A

    2014-11-24

    Facebook (FB) currently boasts over 1 billion active monthly users. Forty-eight percent of 18-43 year olds access FB when they wake up; furthermore, since the end of 2012, the number of FB users ages 45-54 increased 45%. It is no surprise, then...

  13. Development of a Biomarker and Clay Based Remediation Strategy for Populations at Risk for Fumonisin Toxicosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Abraham

    2012-07-16

    F. nygamai FA1-3, FB1-5, FAK1, FBK1, FC1,4, FP1-3, PH1a-b 7200 530 140 F. dlamini FB1 82 NT NT F. napiforme FB1 480 NT NT F. pseudonygamai FB1-2 Tr Tr NT F. andiyazi FB1 Tr ND NT Section Elegans F. oxysporum FC1,3-4, N...-acetyl-FC1,iso-FC1, N-acetyl-iso-FC1, OH-FC1, N-acetyl-OH-FC1 NT NT NT F. oxysporum var. redolens FB1-3 300 6 0.9 Section Arthrosporiella F. polyphialidicum FB1 500 NT NT NT, not tested. Tr, trace amounts (1 to 4 ng g -1) were detected. ND...

  14. 3/21/09 11:36 PMAbstract Print View Page 1 of 2http://www.abstractsonline.com/plan/AbstractPrintView.aspx?mID=19...4f7c-91b5-bfa105d6f144&cKey=fb7a90dc-52c3-44c1-9223-a211de73b7a4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Krishna V.

    in this application the system includes a lithium ion battery pack and a separate clock chip, the INI chip can also. Using the available space inside the aluminum enclosure for a 2000 mA-hr battery pack, this device can

  15. Combustion Assisted Gravity Drainage (CAGD): An In-Situ Combustion Method to Recover Heavy Oil and Bitumen from Geologic Formations using a Horizontal Injector/Producer Pair 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahnema, Hamid

    2012-11-21

    Combustion assisted gravity drainage (CAGD) is an integrated horizontal well air injection process for recovery and upgrading of heavy oil and bitumen from tar sands. Short-distance air injection and direct mobilized oil production are the main...

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1979 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment Part 4 Physical Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, J. M.

    1980-02-01

    This volume contains 63 articles on physical science activities in diverse areas, including coal, fission, radiation physics, geothermal resource development, oil shale and tar sand research, and multitechnology development.

  17. Chemical and biological methods for the analysis and remediation of environmental contaminants frequently identified at Superfund sites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiles, Melinda Christine

    2004-11-15

    Substantial environmental contamination has occurred from coal tar creosote and pentachlorophenol (C5P) in wood preserving solutions. The present studies focused on the characterization and remediation of these contaminants. The first objective...

  18. primaryreactor(PR) secondaryreactor(SR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    Importance of gas-solid contact (biomass) gasification heat transport, catalyst partially for tar reforming reactors in a novel way to improve scale-up potential of gasification and CO2 capture processes. B a c k g

  19. Producing Clean Syngas via Catalytic Reforming for Fuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magrini, K. A.; Parent, Y.; Jablonski, W.; Yung, M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermochemical biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals can be achieved through gasification to syngas. The biomass derived raw syngas contains the building blocks of carbon monoxide and hydrogen as well as impurities such as tars, light hydrocarbons, and hydrogen sulfide. These impurities must be removed prior to fuel synthesis. We used catalytic reforming to convert tars and hydrocarbons to additional syngas, which increases biomass carbon utilization. In this work, nickel based, fluidizable tar reforming catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for tar and methane reforming performance with oak and model syngas in two types of pilot scale fluidized reactors (recirculating and recirculating regenerating). Because hydrogen sulfide (present in raw syngas and added to model syngas) reacts with the active nickel surface, regeneration with steam and hydrogen was required. Pre and post catalyst characterization showed changes specific to the syngas type used. Results of this work will be discussed in the context of selecting the best process for pilot scale demonstration.

  20. Contaminating Fresh Waters (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is illegal to discharge any dyestuff, coal tar, oil, sawdust, poison, or deleterious substances into any fresh running waters in Florida in quantities sufficient to injure, stupefy, or kill fish...

  1. Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2008-01-01

    31] NEB. Canada’s oil sands: opportunities and challenges toUtah. Technical report, Oil Sands Exploration Company andSupply Conventional oil Tar sands production GTL production

  2. Strategic Significance of Americas Oil Shale Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heavy oil and tar sand, coal liquids, gas-to-liquids (GTL), hydrogen, gas hydrates, and renewable energy resources, as well as oil shale, which is the focus of this re- port....

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multimedia0 Datasets0 Filter Results Filter by Subject earth sciences (1) oil shales & tar sands(04) (1) Filter by Author Fang, Chen (1) Hoda, Nazish (1) Kelkar, Sharad...

  4. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    industry contaminated the system with heavy metals and coal tar that contained polyaromatic hydrocarbons). As early as the 1850s, the Harbour was considered an unsuitable source of drinking water due to concerns

  5. Peer Review Summary Document (4/13/2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toxicology and Chemistry in North America, and is a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA of coal tar sealants." Comments among the three reviewers of the initial submittal touched on many

  6. Washington, D. C. UNITED STATES DEPAHThmN'r OF TlrF. IWrEHIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , oraw, and crab) in North America. The distribution of these animals depends upon numerous factors coal tar creosote dip at the rate of 1 part to 100 parts of water. Apply 1 ounce to each crawfish

  7. Counting Guns in Early America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindgren, James

    2002-01-01

    Bang! Historian Explodes American Gun Myths, M INN . S TAR Tat 339-40 (1994). Counting Guns in Early America, Wm. & Maryto estimate levels of gun ownership in early America. This

  8. Variability of Gas Composition and Flux Intensity in Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, J F; Schwager, Katherine; Washburn, Libe

    2005-01-01

    Observations from the Coal Oil Point Seep Field. Geo- MarineSeeps Offshore of Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara, California.Master Thesis. Fischer, P. J. 1978. Oil and tar seeps, Santa

  9. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    for CO2 evolved from oil shale." Fuel Processing TechnologyT. and G. A. Miller (1980). "Oil Shales and Carbon Dioxide."oil, coal, tar sands, oil shale Natural gas, biomass Natural

  10. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    for CO2 evolved from oil shale." Fuel Processing TechnologyT. and G. A. Miller (1980). "Oil Shales and Carbon Dioxide."oil, coal, tar sands, oil shale Natural gas, biomass Natural

  11. Analysis of the Impact of Using Improved Multi-Layer Window Models for Code-Compliant Residential Building Energy Simulation in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jong-Hyo

    2014-12-23

    are a crucial building component that affects a building’s heating and cooling energy. Currently, there are two window modeling methods, the Transmittance, Absorptance and Reflectance (TAR) method, and the Multi-Layer Window (MLW) method. MLW method...

  12. Experimental investigation of sand consolidation using high-temperature alkaline solution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Romero, Fidel Enrique

    2000-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to better understand the sand consolidation process under high-temperature alkaline solution. Wilmington Tar sand samples were successfully consolidated in the laboratory using high-temperature (250-260?C...

  13. Air Pollutant Climate Forcings within the Big Climate Picture* J. Hansen, M. Sato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    are phased out and unconventional fossil fuels (such as tar sands and oil shale) are not developed as substitutes for oil and gas as the oil and gas resources decline. With these assumptions, the non-CO2 forcings

  14. Heavier Crude, Changing Demand for Petroleum Fuels, Regional Climate Policy, and the Location of Upgrading Capacity:

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John

    The crude slate is likely to become heavier in the future with greater reliance on bitumens, tar sands, heavy oils, and eventually possibly shale oil. Under standard refining processes these crude oil sources produce a ...

  15. Children and Adults on Climate Policy: Evidence that They "Get It" 1 April 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    we can set a goal for reducing emissions sometime in the future, and meanwhile we can do fracking promoting tar shale, fracking, and exporting every fossil fuel that can be found. Yet hope springs from our

  16. Proceedings of the wellbore sampling workshop Traeger, R.K. ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Harding, B.W. 58 GEOSCIENCES; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; BOREHOLES; SAMPLING;...

  17. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development of CFD Based Simulation Tools for In Situ Thermal Processing of Oil Shale Sands None OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS In our research we are taking the novel approach of...

  18. Development of CFD-Based Simulation Tools for In-Situ Thermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CFD-Based Simulation Tools for In-Situ Thermal Processing of Oil ShaleSands None 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS In our research, we are taking the novel approach of developing and...

  19. Summer 2014 BOSTONIA 3 LETTERS READERS WRITE BACK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For instance, China's hunger for fossil fuels is a driving force for the mining and transport of tar sands oil. Such an assumption is, of course, questionable, but forgivable. What struck me as utterly illusory, however

  20. Paleoecological and taphonomic implications of insect-damaged Pleistocene vertebrate remains from Rancho La Brea, southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Anna R.; Harris, John H.; Timm, Robert M.

    2013-07-03

    and valuable paleoecological and taphonomic indicators. Of the thousands of fossil bird and mammal bones recovered from the Tar Pits, insect trace damage is thus far almost exclusively confined to the foot bones of large herbivores, especially bison, camel...

  1. ZOOMING OUT Long Now Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    to burn: · Oil: 3 trillion barrels · Natural gas: 1.1 trillion barrels · Coal: 4.5 trillion barrels · Tar? Notes by Philip Cooney, then chief of staff of the White House Council on Environmental Quality ­ now

  2. Version 3.4 User's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @mol.biol.ethz.ch ___________________________ #12;Installation 7 Installation Configuration The program PROSA is delivered either on tape cartridge the indi- vidual files from the tape cartridge , use the UNIX command: tar xvf tape-device [1] which

  3. CX-007648: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tar Sands Bitumen Extraction CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/29/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  4. technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Tanja Sovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Anton

    -solid contact (biomass) gasification heat transport, catalyst partially for tar reforming in the gas generator scale-up potential of gasification and CO2 capture processes. Background The general idea with dual

  5. EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL USE GRANT REVIEW FORM ECU policy requires that all grant proposals involving the use of hazardous chemicals be reviewed by an institutional review committee or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -benezene 4-Aminodiphenyl Asbestos Coal tar pitch volatiles Methyl chloromethyl ether Formaldehyde Vinyl chloride Coke oven emissions 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane Lead Cadmium Benzene Cotton dust Chromium VI

  6. Postadress Box 118 Besksadress John Ericssons vg 3 Telefon dir INT-46-46-222 3423, vxel INT-46-46-222 00 00 Telefax INT-46-46-222 4531 E-post anders.axelsson@rektor.lth.se Internet http://www.lth.se

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Lars Samuelsson i Hall of Fame Prof Lars Samuelsson är den första svensken som tar plats i Cleantech Scandinavia Hall of Fame. Utmärkelsen förärades honom under Cleantech Venture Day i Malmö. Lars Samuelsson

  7. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    gas such as tight gas, shale gas, or coal bed methane gas tolocation. Development of shale oil and gas, tar sands, coalGas hydrates will undoubtedly also be present in shales,

  8. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    resources, including heavy oil, tar sands, oil shale andCalifornia oil production is heavy oil that is more viscousfrom gasoline made from heavy oil are upstream, due to

  9. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    resources, including heavy oil, tar sands, oil shale andCalifornia oil production is heavy oil that is more viscousfrom gasoline made from heavy oil are upstream, due to

  10. EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL USE GRANT REVIEW FORM ECU policy requires that all grant proposals involving the use of hazardous chemicals be reviewed by an institutional review committee or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalakrishnan, K.

    tar pitch volatiles Methyl chloromethyl ether Formaldehyde Vinyl chloride Coke oven emissions 1 materials. DOT Class 1 Explosive DOT Class 6 Poison Toxic DOT Class 2 Gas DOT Class 8 Corrosive Highly Toxic

  11. Crystalline phases of II-VI compound semiconductors grown by pulsed laser deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, Hoi S.

    and 100 InP and GaAs substrates by PLD in this study. A clean stainless steel vacuum chamber . There was no annealing performed on the tar- get. Substrates were cut from single-crystal wafers and cleaned

  12. Copyright by SIAM. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. SIAM J. APPL. MATH. c 2009 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - Loop TAR Stem- Loop U175 0 D18 20 40 80A3G (nM) Time (min) 64 0 20 40 80 Figure S1 C174 U173 A158 U157

  13. Neural Networks. Vol. 9. No.2. pp. 273-294, 1996 Copyright IC 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottrell, Garrison W.

    ARTICLE Experience with Selecting Exemplars from Clean Data MARK PLUTOWSKI,l GARRISON COTTRELL2 called Netsim.tar.gz in the directory /pub/gary/active. Requests for reprints should be sent to Garrison

  14. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-11-08

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

  15. Metal dependent structure, dynamics, and function in RNA measured by site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Nak-Kyoon

    2007-04-25

    -directed spin labeling (SDSL) and EPR spectroscopy, distances in RNA duplexes, TAR RNA, and the hammerhead ribozyme have been measured to investigate RNA structures. Kinetic measurements have been performed in the extended hammerhead ribozyme to correlate...

  16. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  17. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-01-31

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through September 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Fourth Quarter 2001 performing routine well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood and Tar V pilot steamflood projects. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 through November 2001 to increase production and injection. In December, water injection well FW-88 was plug and abandoned and replaced by new well FW-295 into the ''D'' sands to accommodate the Port of Long Beach at their expense. Well workovers are planned for 2002 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that were being addressed in 2001. As the fluid production is hot, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001.

  18. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  19. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    solar systems, and anaerobic digesters, F.B. Lucarelli, J.the anaerobic di- gester. The gas mixture from the digester

  20. Thin Servers with Smart Pipes: Designing SoC Accelerators for Memcached

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenisch, Thomas F.

    .lim@hp.com David Meisner Facebook meisner@fb.com Ali G. Saidi ARM R&D ali.saidi@arm.com Parthasarathy Ranganathan

  1. Optimization Methods and Software Vol. 18, No. 4, August 2003, pp. 395415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    YAMAMOTOa, aInstitute of Policy and Planning Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573, Japan; bFB4

  2. Higgs boson search at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Snyder; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-09-04

    The status of the ATLAS Higgs boson search using about 5 fb^-1 of data recorded in 2011 is summarized. Proceedings from Physics at the LHC 2012 (Vancouver).

  3. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Pharmaceutical 19% Fermentation 7% Food & Beverage 35% Sewage 4% Pulp and Paper 9% Source: Biothane (approx 500 installations) F&B Key Industrial Market * Small scale...

  4. ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, E.L.

    2011-01-01

    of Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) from MSW, Direct combustion ofrefuse derived fuel (RDF) systems, and direct combustionDirect combustion RDF = Refuse-derived fuels FB = Fluidized-

  5. A search for new physics with Z bosons, jets, and missing transverse energy at CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Warren T.

    2012-01-01

    4.1.1 Jets and MET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Models: MET and Jets . . . . . . . . . . 4.7 Simplifiedyields for the preselection with N jets ? 3 for 4.98 fb ?

  6. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

  7. Ecological risk assessment of elemental pollution in sediment from Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, Sabah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elias, Md Suhaimi; Hamzah, Mohd Suhaimi; Rahman, Shamsiah Ab; Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah; Siong, Wee Boon; Sanuri, Ezwiza

    2014-02-12

    Eleven (11) surface sediment samples were collected from Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, Sabah. The neutron activation analysis (NAA) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) techniques were applied for the determinations metal contents and their distributions in sediment samples. The results shown that Arsenic (As) concentrations are enriched at all sampling stations except for station TAR 09, with enrichment factor (EF) values ranged from 1.1 to 7.2. The elements such as Cd, Cr, Sb and U showed enrichment at a few stations and other elements (Cr, Cu, Pb, Th, Zn) shown as background levels in all stations. Degrees of contamination in this study were calculated base on concentrations of six elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn). TAR 11 station can be categorized as very high degree of contamination with degree of contamination value of 43.2. TAR 07 station can be categorized as a considerable degree of contamination (contamination value of 16.9). Six stations (TAR 01, 03, 04, 05, 06, 08, 10) showed moderate degree of contamination, with contamination values ranging from 8.0 to 16.0. TAR 02 and TAR 09 stations showed low degree of contaminations (< 8.0). TAR 11 showed very high ecological risk index (R{sub I}) with RI value is 916. TAR 07 and TAR 10 showed moderate ecological risk index with R{sub I} value 263 and 213, respectively. Other stations showed low ecological risk with RI values ranging from 42.3 to 117 (< 150). Very high ecological risk index could give an adverse effect to the benthic organism. The data obtained from the enrichment factor, degree of contamination and ecological risk index provided vital information, which can be used for future comparison. Information from the present study will be useful to the relevant government agencies and authorities in preparing preventive action to control direct discharge of heavy metals from industries, agro-base activities and domestic waste to the rivers and the sea.

  8. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-05-08

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Second Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A steamflood reservoirs have been operated over fifteen months at relatively stable pressures, due in large part to the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase in January 1999. Starting in the Fourth Quarter 2000, the project team has ramped up activity to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001. Much of the second quarter was spent writing DOE annual and quarterly reports to stay current with contract requirements.

  9. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-04-30

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are described in the Reservoir Management section. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that have been addressed during this quarter. As the fluid production temperatures were beginning to exceed 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and will be converted to cold water injection next quarter.

  10. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-11-01

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through June 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Third Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 to September 2001 to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001.

  11. Pyrolysis product distribution of a Victorian brown coal under high pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathe, C.; Li, C.Z.

    1999-07-01

    A Loy Yang brown coal sample was pyrolyzed in a wire-mesh reactor at pressures ranging from 100 kPa to 1000 kPa. Tar yield was found to be very sensitive to changes in heating rate, peak temperature, holding time and pressure. Tar yield decreased with increases in pressure at high heating rate. At low heating rate tar yield was not sensitive to changes in pressure. Char yields were found to be much less sensitive to changes in pressure and/or heating rate. UV absorption spectroscopy of the tar samples indicated that the yields of larger aromatic ring systems decreased with increasing pressure and/or decreasing heating rate. The effects of pressure are mainly due to the changes in the transportation of volatile precursors with pressure. Increases in pressure might have slowed down the bulk diffusion within meso- and macro-pores in char, which in turn have slowed down the Knudsen diffusion in the micro-pores due to the reduced concentration gradients for the Knudsen diffusion. During the extended stay within the char particle, volatile precursors were thermally cracked, leading to the retention of some larger aromatic ring systems as char and the release of other components as tar and gas.

  12. The physics case of DAFNE-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Venanzoni

    2007-10-18

    We present the physics case of DAFNE-2, an $e^+e^-$ collider expected to deliver 20-50 fb$^{-1}$ at the $\\phi(1020)$ peak, and $\\sim$ 5 fb$^{-1}$ in the energy region between 1 and 2.5 GeV.

  13. Observation of an Excited B[± over c] Meson State with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for excited states of the B[± over c] meson is performed using 4.9??fb[superscript ?1] of 7 TeV and 19.2??fb[superscript ?1] of 8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. A new state is ...

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the two photon decay channel with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the two photon decay channel is reported, using 1.08 fb?11.08 fb[superscript ?1] of proton–proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV recorded by the ATLAS ...

  15. Observation and examination of a Higgs boson in the ZZ to four lepton channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralph, Duncan (Duncan Kelley)

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented on 5.1 fb- 1 of proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.7 fb- 1 at 8 TeV in a search for decays of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson to two Z bosons to four charged ...

  16. Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The data sets used correspond to integrated luminosities from 4.6??fb[superscript -1] to 4.9??fb[superscript -1] of ...

  17. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top-quark pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair (tt¯H) is presented, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb?1 and 19.7 fb?1 collected in pp ...

  18. Design Methodology for Unmannded Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Team Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    1 Design Methodology for Unmannded Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Team Coordination F.B. da Silva S.D. Scott-mail: halab@mit.edu #12;2 Design Methodology for Unmannded Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Team Coordination by F.B. da Silva, S.D. Scott, and M.L. Cummings Executive Summary Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems, despite

  19. Molecular Characterization of MADS-BOX Transcription Factors and Analysis of Field Population Diversity in the Maize Pathogen Fusarium verticillioides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Carlos S

    2013-04-10

    (FB1), the most prevalent fumonisin in nature, was first identified in 1988 and has been found to be toxic to human and animals. The gene cluster for FB1 biosynthesis and some environmental conditions responsible for the toxin production are known...

  20. CDF Note 10625 Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 10625 Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in + - + jets final state with 8.3fb-1 a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in + - + jets final state, using CDF Run II data with an integrated luminosity of 8.3 fb-1 . The Signal considered in this search is four Higgs boson production

  1. Measurement of Higgs boson production and properties in the WW decay channel with leptonic final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a W-boson pair at the LHC is reported. The event sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb[superscript ?1] and 19.4 fb[superscript ?1] collected with ...

  2. Improved Search for a Higgs Boson Produced in Association with Z?l+l- in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We search for the standard model Higgs boson produced with a Z boson in 4.1??fb-1 [fb superscript -1] of integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. In events consistent with the decay of the ...

  3. Digitally controlled low frequency square wave electronic ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and the Boost converter is commonly used. However the boost output DC voltage has to be set to be greater tha and the second is a full-bridge converter (FB) used for both ignition and square wave drive. Ignition is achieved as a resonant inverter. After ignition the converter operates as a LFSW inverter by controlling the FB to act

  4. Measurement of Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A measurement of the production processes of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed in the two-photon final state using 4.5??fb[superscript ?1] of proton-proton collisions data at ?s=7??TeV and 20.3??fb[superscript ...

  5. S A P D O C U M E N T N U M B E R S IF THE FINANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    S A P D O C U M E N T N U M B E R S IF THE FINANCE DOCUMENT STARTS WITH AND IS AND DOC TYPE Transactions Enter Asset Transaction FB03 Any Finance or Sponsored Transactional Reports such as: CO Monthly long AB Automatic Clearing Automatic Clearing FB03 Any Finance or Sponsored Transactional Reports

  6. BOREHOLE RADAR OBSERVER SHEET Site: Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    walkaway: Start Pos (t0 Search): Step: End Pos.: FB sample: t0 delay: (iii) Downhole walkaway: Start Pos.: Step: End Pos.: (iv) Airwave record: Separation: Number of Traces: FB sample: t0 delay: (v) Level run: Stacks: Start Pos.: Step: End Pos.: Acquisition Parameters: Antenna frequency: Transmitter power

  7. Fixed bed gasification studies on coal-feedlot biomass and coal-chicken litter biomass under batch mode operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priyadarsan, Soyuz

    2002-01-01

    &M University Boiler Burner Laboratory, and was fired with a) coal, b) feedlot biomass (FB), c) chicken litter biomass (LB), d) high ash feedlot biomass (HFB), e) coal: FB blend (CFB), f) coal: LB blend (CLB), g) coal: HFB blend (CHFB), and h) LB: HFB blend...

  8. Characterizing Facebook's Memcached Yuehai Xu (Wayne State University, Facebook) yhxu@wayne.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frachtenberg, Eitan

    Characterizing Facebook's Memcached Workload Yuehai Xu (Wayne State University, Facebook) yhxu@wayne.edu Eitan Frachtenberg (Facebook) etc@fb.com Song Jiang (Wayne State University) sjiang@wayne.edu Mike Paleczny (Facebook) mpal@fb.com Abstract This article analyzes the workload of Memcached at Facebook, one

  9. Psychology 204 Spring 2007. Tuesdays 5 7:30 PM Industrial Psychology & Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Matthew

    will spontaneously occur based on students' particular interests. Abbreviations are given for the require readings: Surveys and related diagnostic techniques. 2/20 Creativity in individual, group, and organizational on leadership (MEP 9; F&B: 14- 15). 4/10 Negotiation and conflict resolution (F&B 10). 4/17 Modifying

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-07-13

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. The Hydrotreatment Facility is being prepared for trials with coal liquids. Raw coal tar distillate trials have been carried out by heating coal tar in the holding tank in the Hydrotreatment Facility. The liquids are centrifuged to warm the system up in preparation for the coal liquids. The coal tar distillate is then recycled to keep the centrifuge hot. In this way, the product has been distilled such that a softening point of approximately 110 C is reached. Then an ash test is conducted.

  11. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  12. Biomass Gasification Technology Assessment: Consolidated Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worley, M.; Yale, J.

    2012-11-01

    Harris Group Inc. (HGI) was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to assess gasification and tar reforming technologies. Specifically, the assessments focused on gasification and tar reforming technologies that are capable of producing a syngas suitable for further treatment and conversion to liquid fuels. HGI gathered sufficient information to analyze three gasification and tar reforming systems. This report summarizes the equipment, general arrangement of the equipment, operating characteristics, and operating severity for each technology. The order of magnitude capital cost estimates are supported by a basis-of-estimate write-up, which is also included in this report. The report also includes Microsoft Excel workbook models, which can be used to design and price the systems. The models can be used to analyze various operating capacities and pressures. Each model produces a material balance, equipment list, capital cost estimate, equipment drawings and preliminary general arrangement drawings. Example outputs of each model are included in the Appendices.

  13. Unconventional petroleum: a current awareness bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grissom, M.C.

    1983-10-30

    The summaries in this bulletin cover both secondary and tertiary recovery of petroleum and the following topics under Oil Shales and Tar Sands: reserves and exploration; site geology and hydrology; drilling, fracturing, and mining; oil production, recovery, and refining; properties and composition; direct uses and by-products; health and safety; marketing and economics; waste research and management; environmental aspects; and regulations. These summaries and older citations to information on petroleum, oil shales, and tar sands back to the 1960's are available for on-line searching and retrieval on the Energy Data Base using the DOE/RECON system or commercial on-line retrieval systems. Retrospective searches can be made on any aspect of petroleum, oil shales, or tar sands, or customized profiles can be developed to provide current information for each user's needs.

  14. Temperature dependence of the vapour tension of methyl-substituted phenol derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.G. Gagarin [Institute of Mineral Fuels (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15

    Notable among the coking products of coal are phenol and its derivatives, derived for the coal tar and water layer above ht tar. Given that phenol an its derivatives are mainly extracted from coal tar fractions by rectification, information on how the vapor tension of the individual components depends on the temperature is of great importance. For phenol and various substituted alkylphenols there are tabular data. In the pre-computer era these data were sufficient for the separation of phenol mixtures. However, the development and introduction of information technology in the coal industry and in the design process demands the mathematical description of the physicochemical processes of coking products. The temperature dependence of the saturated vapor pressure for organic compounds is commonly described by the Antoine equation.

  15. Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in Humans and Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGill, Mitchell Ryan

    2013-05-31

    Gill and Jaeschke (2013), Pharmaceutical Research, in press, with permission from the publisher. 2 1.1 HISTORY OF ACETAMINOPHEN Acetaminophen (APAP) is the only survivor of a class of drugs known as the coal tar analgesics, so-named because... they are structural derivatives of aniline which is abundant in coal tar. The first among these was acetanilide (Fig. 1.1.1). Although synthesized by French chemist Charles Gerhardt (better known for his role in the development of aspirin) in 1852, the clinical...

  16. Method and apparatus for automated, modular, biomass power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P; Lilley, Arthur; Browne, III, Kingsbury; Walt, Robb Ray; Duncan, Dustin; Walker, Michael; Steele, John; Fields, Michael; Smith, Trevor

    2013-11-05

    Method and apparatus for generating a low tar, renewable fuel gas from biomass and using it in other energy conversion devices, many of which were designed for use with gaseous and liquid fossil fuels. An automated, downdraft gasifier incorporates extensive air injection into the char bed to maintain the conditions that promote the destruction of residual tars. The resulting fuel gas and entrained char and ash are cooled in a special heat exchanger, and then continuously cleaned in a filter prior to usage in standalone as well as networked power systems.

  17. Method and apparatus for automated, modular, biomass power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Lilley, Arthur (Finleyville, PA); Browne, Kingsbury III (Golden, CO); Walt, Robb Ray (Aurora, CO); Duncan, Dustin (Littleton, CO); Walker, Michael (Longmont, CO); Steele, John (Aurora, CO); Fields, Michael (Arvada, CO); Smith, Trevor (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-03-22

    Method and apparatus for generating a low tar, renewable fuel gas from biomass and using it in other energy conversion devices, many of which were designed for use with gaseous and liquid fossil fuels. An automated, downdraft gasifier incorporates extensive air injection into the char bed to maintain the conditions that promote the destruction of residual tars. The resulting fuel gas and entrained char and ash are cooled in a special heat exchanger, and then continuously cleaned in a filter prior to usage in standalone as well as networked power systems.

  18. COFFEE HOUSE Gourmet Food & Beverages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    Oreo cookies, or walnuts) and chocolate or caramel syrup. MIGHTY LEAF® TEA is artisan blended and organic. Our selection in- cludes Earl Grey, Breakfast Americana, African Nec- tar, Vanilla Bean, Green wrapped in handcrafted silken and award-winning biodegradable tea pouches. About the brown And brew COFFEE

  19. u c l a Col le g e R e p or t 11u c l a Col le g e R e p or t 11 Thomas G. Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conducted both basic research and applied industrial research on heavy crude oils, includ- ing studies of tar-like molecules called asphaltenes--the bottom of the barrel in oil production. "Most of the oils of crude oils. Heavier oils can contain 10­20 percent asphaltenes; because of this, heavier oils

  20. PAH Sorption Mechanism and Partitioning Behavior in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    of crude oil at high temperatures in the gas-making operation and is coated or impregnated with oil of oil at high temperatures. Lampblack Production. Lampblack and tar were byprod- ucts of the oilPAH Sorption Mechanism and Partitioning Behavior in Lampblack-Impacted Soils from Former Oil

  1. Deflection of Concrete Slabs Reinforced with Advanced Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    investigated as an alternative to overcome the corrosion problem in bridge decks, parking garages, water and wastewater treatment facilities, marine structures and chemical plants. In addition to their excellent non rod produced by Mitsubishi Kasei, Japan. The CFRP rods are fabricated using continuous coal tar pitch

  2. Short Supply Controls Part 7546page 1 Export Administration Regulations January 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    cover the following: (i) Crude oil described by ECCN 1C981 (Crude petroleum, including reconstituted crude petroleum, tar sands, and crude shale oil listed in Supplement No. 1 to this part). For specific crude oil listed in Supplement No. 1 to this part, that were produced or derived from the Naval

  3. Prior experience with national leaders purported to be of the "greenest" variety, including Tony Blair and Angela Merkel, revealed their greenness to be greenwash1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    . We need one nation to stand tall, to speak truth to world leaders. Could that nation be Norway? If Norway foreswore the tar sands, it might be a catalyst to global action to stabilize climate. Norway near zero via a focus on reducing positive (warming) forcings such as black soot and tropospheric ozone

  4. OPTIMIZING TRANSMISSION FOR WIRELESS VIDEO STREAMING Mei-Hsuan Lu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    2009 Mei-Hsuan Lu All rights reserved #12;ii ABSTRACT With advances in wireless networking technologies solution consists of two building blocks: PRO and TAR. PRO (Protocol for Retransmitting Opportunistically that further pushes the performance envelope. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed solutions, analytical

  5. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz://www.grida.no/climate/ipcc_tar/wg1/ #12;EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY The global ocean has warmed latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. #12;MORE EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE

  6. The Cyclic-Routing UAV Problem is PSPACE-Complete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouaknine, Joël

    The Cyclic-Routing UAV Problem is PSPACE-Complete Hsi-Ming Ho and Joël Ouaknine Department a fixed transit flight time. Given a flock of identical UAVs, can one ensure that every target is repeatedly visited by some UAV at intervals of duration at most the tar- get's relative deadline? The Cyclic

  7. TREKiSM Issue 21 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1981-01-01

    .. .:who does those things superlatively well. What we are out to do is tell a good story .... ! like a good yarn 0 That is ~ credo, and that is the credo 0 f this new 'S tar Trek· ... On music for the mov~~1 "My feeling about the music is that when...

  8. Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Nelson

    2009-10-01

    This report is a preliminary comparison of conventional and potential HTGR-integrated processesa in several common industrial areas: ? Producing electricity via a traditional power cycle ? Producing hydrogen ? Producing ammonia and ammonia-derived products, such as fertilizer ? Producing gasoline and diesel from natural gas or coal ? Producing substitute natural gas from coal, and ? Steam-assisted gravity drainage (extracting oil from tar sands).

  9. The Shorthorn: Casey Crane Robert Arrowood, Carrizo Oil and Gas, Inc. representative, takes local homeowners' questions about on-campus natural gas drilling in an Arlington office complex Tuesday.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    The Shorthorn: Casey Crane Robert Arrowood, Carrizo Oil and Gas, Inc. representative, takes local," Gilfour said. A spokesman with the Tar- rant County Medical Examiner's office said toxicology results that plans to drill on university property. Carrizo Oil and Gas, Inc. recently signed a one-year lease

  10. 1 Education Library September 2010 RReessoouurrcceess ffoorr GGeeooggrraapphhyy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    geography in graphic novel (K12): G133 .W67 2004 · Geography of Canada : ESL Gr. 9: New Text FC57 .G46 2002: Battle For The Arctic, Arctic Meltdown, Asbestos (Canada), Canadian Innovations; The Hour Does Business Dairies 0 Sustainability In Action, Burning The Future ­ Coal In America, Pollution In China, , Tar

  11. Vol. 60364 P. L. WALKER,JR.,AND EMILERAATS whether the swelling is of the predicted order of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . CHANGES IN PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF GRAPHITIZED CARBON RODS UPON GASIFICATION WITH CARBON DIOXIDE'J BYP. L Park, Penna~lvania Received September 1 , 1066 Changes in the physical properties of graphitized carbon ofpetro- leum coke bound together by a thin shell of coal tar pitch coke, which essentially consists

  12. Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic Institute of Chemical Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    properties of polymer and ceramic membranes, preparation of ceramic membranes · Relation between the morphology and application properties of polymer catalysts and adsorbents · Dynamic behaviour of two; extraction and refining of phenols from coal tars; liquid-liquid extraction of heavy metals · Supercritical

  13. MOLECULAR PHYSICS, 2002, VOL. 100, NO. 11, 16591675 Key properties of monohalogen substituted phenols: interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    MOLECULAR PHYSICS, 2002, VOL. 100, NO. 11, 1659±1675 Key properties of monohalogen substituted August 2001; accepted 31 December 2001) This paper is an attempt to bridge the key properties by Runge from coal tar [1] in 1834 and named pheÂnol by Gerhardt in 1843 [2] (see also Laurent [3

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory / Energy Security and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake Natural Gas Infrastructure, Bill Pickles S2TAR GEN IV, AAA, and AFCI, Bill Halsey GeothermalLawrence Livermore National Laboratory / Energy Security and Technology Program Jeffrey Stewart is to provide research in the areas of national and homeland security and other important areas to DOE

  15. Rate of environmental change determines stress response specificity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elowitz, Michael

    as to salt (13), calcium (14), heat, and other stresses (15). Bacteria also contain general stress responseRate of environmental change determines stress response specificity Jonathan W. Younga,1 , James C (received for review August 2, 2012) Cells use general stress response pathways to activate diverse tar- get

  16. Phase Stability of Multicomponent NAPLs Containing PAHs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    of a contaminant is dependent on its phase state. For solid phase contaminants in contact with water, the maximum aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), most of which are solids in pure form at ambient temperatures. Because any of contaminants such as coal tars. NAPL/aqueous phase equilibrium studies were conducted to demonstrate

  17. T-592: Cisco Security Advisory: Cisco Secure Access Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The vendor has issued a fix: 1. Cisco Secure ACS version 5.1: File 5-1-0-44-6.tar.gpg - ACS 5.1.0.44 cumulative patch 6 2. Cisco Secure ACS version 5.2: File...

  18. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, July 2010, p. 43964401 Vol. 76, No. 13 0099-2240/10/$12.00 doi:10.1128/AEM.01763-09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handelsman, Jo

    the presence of resistance genes in producers and susceptible tar- get bacteria (1, 27). A study antibiotics (15). Analysis of antibiotic-resistant bacteria typically involves culturing bacteria from antibiotic resistance genes originated from culturable bacteria, there are likely many more resistance

  19. Contaminant and genotoxicity profiles of sediments and zebra mussels as indicators of chemical contamination in Hamilton Harbour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarry, B.E.; Allan, L.M.; Marvin, C.H.; Villella, J.; Bryant, D.W. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Samples of bottom sediments, suspended sediments and Zebra mussels were collected from Hamilton Harbour, an embayment of western Lake Ontario. In addition, sediment samples were collected from creeks which flow into the Harbour. These sediment samples were extracted with dichloromethane and the organic extract was cleaned up prior to analysis for PAH and thia-arenes by GC-MS. These extracts were also subjected to genotoxicity bioassays (Ames assays) in two strains of Salmonella typhimurium (a TA98-like strain, YG1024-S9 and a TA100-like strain, YG1025 + S9). The sediment and Zebra mussels samples collected near sites of heavy coal tar contamination showed PAH, thia-arene and genotoxicity profiles that are very similar to the corresponding profiles for coal tar. These observations are consistent with the resuspension and distribution of coal tar-contaminated bottom sediments in the water column. The sediment samples collected in a major creek entering the Harbor and the sediment and Zebra mussels samples collected in Windemere Arm near the mouth of this creek showed very different chemical and genotoxicity profiles. Thus, the chemical and genotoxicity burdens on Hamilton Harbour posed by the resuspension of coal tar-contaminated sediments and the inputs from urban activity into a major creek and the Harbor can be differentiated.

  20. North Carolina Section 319(h) NPS Program Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    North Carolina Section 319(h) NPS Program Final Report Project Title: Toisnot Creek Stormwater BMP and erosion control practices being tested in North Carolina, but much less demonstration and research as the neighboring Tar-Pamlico Basin. 1 #12;North Carolina Section 319(h) NPS Program Final Report Eight different

  1. Institute of Chemical Engineering page 1 Chemical Process Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auzinger, Winfried

    as well as catalytic tar removal from producer gas originating from thermo-chemical hydrocarbon conversion of hydrocarbons in secondary units · Research and development on novel of gas cleaning technologies #12;Institute at TU Wien: · Development and research on novel gasification processes · Measurement results and data

  2. CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE, JANUARYFEBRUARY 2001 39 Table grapes are a nonclimacteric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    moderate to severe stem browning. Our survey of potential cluster water loss during harvest- ing operations of cluster bags and foam boxes re- duced grape cluster water loss during harvest operations. Water loss the clusters at harvest and then reweigh- ing them periodically until the tar- geted percent water loss

  3. Security Architecture for Federated Mobile Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Shouhuai

    Security Architecture for Federated Mobile Cloud Computing Shouhuai Xu and E. Paul Ratazzi, federated mobile cloud computing imposes a diverse set of new chal- lenges, especially from a security clouds for security purposes? How should we deal with the tar- geted attackers that attempt to launch

  4. Application of a clustering framework to UK domestic electricity Ian Dent, Uwe Aickelin, Tom Rodden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    , (email: tar@cs.nott.ac.uk). Prior to the planned roll out of smart meters, electricity suppliers were with the roll out of Smart Meters which is planned to be complete in the UK by 2019. [2] shows that the provision of Smart Meters will allow greatly increased analysis of a customer's electricity usage

  5. Digestion Experiments. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1908-01-01

    STATION. ppp DIGESTION EXPERIMENTS G. S. FRAPS, PH. D., CHEMIST. POSTOFFICE COLLEGE SL'ATION, HRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. AUSTIN, TEXAS: \\'ON BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRLNTEHP. 1908 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 8TArFIONS. OFFICERS. GOVERNING BOARD... OF CONTENTS . 1 . Digestibility of 1Caffir Corn. Milo Maize. and Molasses ....... G .................................... Ilcfinition of Terms 7 .................................. Method of Experiment 7 ............ Digestibility of Basal Ration of Meal...

  6. IXTOC OIL SPILL ASSESSMENT FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    IXTOC OIL SPILL ASSESSMENT FINAL REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Prepared for : Bureau of Land Management in input of tar/oil to the Texas Gulf Coast (Geyer ;, 1981) have less of an obvious ecological impact, if any . The Brittany coast of France has been affected for several years by the acute oil input from

  7. Swartz: Oil on the coasts? 'We will never, ever get By SALLY SWARTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Swartz: Oil on the coasts? 'We will never, ever get it off.' By SALLY SWARTZ Posted: 7:58 p the Deepwater Horizon oil spill for a long time, a geologist who worked for the oil industry told Martin County great, Mr. Egan said. "But scratch the surface of the sand, and you hit tar. Oil got into the food chain

  8. Computational Engineering and Science Program at the University of Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    Computational Engineering and Science Program at the University of Utah Carleton DeTar3 , Aaron L://www.chem.utah.edu/faculty/truong/index.html Abstract. We summarize the Computational Engineering and Science program at the University of Utah. Program and computational biology, and computational medicine. 1 Computational Engineering and Science Program The grand

  9. by William Menke, February 2012 An environmental journalist asked me whether he

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    of renewable energy (wind and solar). New sources that we would choose to set aside would include gas shale, tar sands (as in Athabasca) and conventional petroleum in unexploited regions such as the Arctic of natural gas emits less CO2 per unit of energy than does coal or oil, because a larger percent

  10. General equations for Biomass Properties Nadge Richard1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the temperature of the particle during pyrolysis. These empirical correlations are found by curve fitting (see of 573 K -1173 K. Pyrolysis is a thermal decomposition of a product without any oxygen at high of reaction, flash pyrolysis. This type of reaction yields higher amount of tar than slow pyrolysis. In [2

  11. Proc. 18th Int'l Workshop on Qualitative Reasoning, 2004. Gaussian Processes for Active Data Mining of Spatial Aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    Proc. 18th Int'l Workshop on Qualitative Reasoning, 2004. Gaussian Processes for Active Data Mining an active data mining mechanism for quali- tative analysis of spatial datasets, integrating identifica- tion and analysis of structures in spatial data with tar- geted collection of additional samples. The mechanism

  12. Implementacin paralela del algoritmo Belief Propagation A. Mendiburu J. Miguel-Alonso J. A. Lozano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel-Alonso, José

    Implementación paralela del algoritmo Belief Propagation A. Mendiburu J. Miguel-Alonso J. A. Lozano concreto. Entre estos métodos podemos ci- tar los algoritmos belief propagation, que se aplican estos algoritmos de inferencia, concretamente loopy belief pro- pagation sobre factor graphs. Nuestra

  13. Temas Selectos de Estadistica Por entregar el 2 de junio;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Horebeek, Johan

    permite implementar FDA usando alg´un algoritmo de m´inimos cuadrados. En R ser´a a trav´es de la funci diferentes algoritmos de clasificaci´on para clasificar textos. Quiz´as el siguiente art´iculo puede dar/www/naive- bayes/20 newsgroups.tar.gz Algunos comentarios: · Usa algoritmos de clasificaci´on basada

  14. Grandparents Climate Campaign Leader Halfdan Wiik, vre Kyvik 94, 5414 Stord, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Stord, Norway Stord, April 17th 2012 Open letter to the Board of Statoil ASA, by chair Svein Campaign Leader Halfdan Wiik, Øvre Kyvik 94, 5414 Stord, Norway 3. Extraction that Statoil's continued exploitation of tar sands is contradictory to the long-term interest of Norway

  15. Proceedings of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics, pages 14431452, Uppsala, Sweden, 11-16 July 2010. c 2010 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Source and Target Syntax David Chiang USC Information Sciences Institute 4676 Admiralty Way, Suite 1001 about the grammar of the tar- get language, some use information about the grammar of the source information on the target side (Galley et al., 2004; Galley et al., 2006) or the source side (Liu et al., 2006

  16. lara skinner, Ph.D anD sean sweeney, Ph.D Cornell University Global labor institUte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    : renewable energy and the Clean economy 17 northern Gateway march 2012 Lara Skinner, Ph.D. and Sean SweeneyCanada's keystone Xl Pipeline 6 the Potential impact of tar sands spills on Jobs and the economy 6 transCanada inflates keystone Xl Job numbers 11 agriculture in the Pipeline states 12 when a spill Happens: social

  17. TIME STRUCTURE OF PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN THE MERIT HIGH-POWER TARGET EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    TIME STRUCTURE OF PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN THE MERIT HIGH-POWER TARGET EXPERIMENT I. Efthymiopoulos power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory complex or a muon collider production from the tar- get will be reported. In particular, the analysis is focused on the time evolution

  18. Oxidative Modifications and Aggregation of Cu,Zn-Superoxide Dismutase Associated with Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Lian

    and Parkinson Diseases* Received for publication, December 20, 2004, and in revised form, January 18, 2005 oxidative stress has been strongly impli- cated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson(s) that could potentially be tar- geted by similar therapeutic strategies. Alzheimer disease (AD),1 Parkinson

  19. CANDIDATURAS 'BOLSA RETOMAR' A 21 DE JULHO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    CANDIDATURAS À 'BOLSA RETOMAR' A 21 DE JULHO Quem está desempregado e aban- donou o curso superior Setembro à bolsa Retomar. O Ministério da Educação tem "plafond" para gas- tar até 3.000 bolsas por ano. Cada uma no valor de 1.200 euros. Esta quinta-feira, 17 de Julho, foi publi- cado o regulamento do

  20. ZU: The Life of a Sumerian Verb in Early Mesopotamia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Jared Norris

    2015-01-01

    68 nar $ir 3 zu-e nam-tar gig-ga-gu 10 gu-gin 7 ha-ra-si-il-= Alster 1997) 3.140 // 7.95 gig gu 2 -nida lal 3 -gin 7 ibe ki dingir-re-e-ne-ke 4 nu-gig lukur nu-mu- da-il 2 -e C:

  1. Digital Storytelling: A Comparative Case Study in Three Northern California Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Whitney

    2009-01-01

    the Tar for the continuing =orC =e =ill do to create and i-'=ell this Lust isnit going to =orC out. thereis no =ay totogether. they 'ut a lot of =orC and energy into it5V Qd =as

  2. A qualitative case study of the impact of socio-cultural factors on prominent Turkish writers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunersel, Adalet Baris

    2009-05-15

    in the development of their students. v DEDICATION This work is dedicated to my wonderful mother, F?sun G?nersel, and father, Tar?k G?nersel, who have helped me become the person I am today. vi...

  3. Air quality over the Canadian oil sands: A first assessment using satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boersma, Folkert

    -measurement trends and increases in annual bitumen production. An increase in SO2 was also found, but given larger. 1. Introduction [2] Vast deposits of bitumen­oil mixed with sand, clay, and water generally referred to as "oil sands" (or "tar sands")­ are located in the Canadian province of Alberta (see Figure 1a). The oil

  4. Optimal Smart Grid Tariffs Longbo Huang, Jean Walrand, Kannan Ramchandran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Longbo

    way for the utility companies to adjust their power prices, and allows the users to preTar can significantly outperform the commonly used uniform pricing schemes. The pricing design approach energy to reduce the carbon emission of power generation. In this paper, we consider the problem

  5. BIomass GasIfIcaTIon Summary of technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    or coal, into a clean gaseous fuel that can be burned in a gas engine to generate electricity-rankfuels,such as mallee and brown coal, into a clean gaseous fuel with very low tar concentration. This has the capacityBIomass GasIfIcaTIon Summary of technology Gasification converts a solid fuel, such as biomass

  6. Comparing Self-Stabilizing Dining Philosophers through Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterenko, Mikhail

    in the execution model of the self-stabilizing algorithm. The common source model is combined atomicity (a.k.a. state model, or high-atomicity model) and the tar- get model is read/write atomicity (a.k.a. low

  7. Proceedings of the 10th Conference on Parsing Technologies, pages 1122, Prague, Czech Republic, June 2007. c 2007 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    al., 2005). Their aim was to re-train a probabilistic model for a new domain at low cost, and more. In this approach, we train probabilities of lex- ical entry assignments to words in a tar- get domain cost. We also evaluated our method in the Brown corpus to show the portability of our approach

  8. Summary, Texas Bulletins Nos. 1 to 94, Inclusive. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1907-01-01

    be supplemented by daubing the margins of the wound with pine tar to ward off the fly. A vast number of cases can be prevented by keeping cattle free from common cattle ticks. SORGHUM; VALUE AS A FEED STUFF; EFFECT ON SOIL. TEOSINTE; ANALYSES AT DIFFERENT... .................................................. Alfalfa Root Rot 23 ............................................ Black Rot of the Grape 23 ................................................... The Cattle Tick 23 Texas Soils ....................................................... 24...

  9. TUTORIAL FOR UW NETWORK CODING USING OPNET AND CHRIS LYDICK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Sumit

    have downloaded the .zip or .tar.gz file from the UWEE FUNLAB web- site (http, the packets we are processing for network coding) follow the dark blue arrow to either a sink processor to all of its output streams (again, the dark blue arrows going from the nc-proc processor to other

  10. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 2010, v. 80, 943954 Research Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    González, Luis A.

    boreholes advanced to depths of 400­450 cm (top of limestone bedrock) from the Chattanooga Coke Plant (CCP of anthropogenically remolded clay soil fill containing coal clinker, cinder grains, and limestone gravel; most layers of coarse fill were impregnated with creosote and coal tar. Most undisturbed soil (below 1 m depth

  11. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE IV ColloqueC7, supplkmentau Journal de Physique 111, Volume3,novembre 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to that of a mixture of light benzene and bitumious coal tar if the pyrolysis gas is used as fluidizing gas. The other in the gas conditioning. Furthermore, the pollutants are concentrated in a coke-like residue surrounding them in melting vessels, blast furnaces, autoclaves, tube reactors, rotary kilns, coking chambers and fluidized

  12. High coking value pitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Douglas J.; Chang, Ching-Feng; Lewis, Irwin C.; Lewis, Richard T.

    2014-06-10

    A high coking value pitch prepared from coal tar distillate and has a low softening point and a high carbon value while containing substantially no quinoline insolubles is disclosed. The pitch can be used as an impregnant or binder for producing carbon and graphite articles.

  13. ctualmente se afronta una im-portante prdida de biodiversi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figuerola, Jordi

    a los medios de comunicación y sean cada vez más tratadas en la prensa científica, no son un fenómeno enfermedades con nuestras actividades por encima del nivel que se daba en siglos ante- riores. Por último y percepción pública sobre la necesidad de conservar el medio natural (¿no sería mejor ma- tar a todos los

  14. www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 295 8 FEBRUARY 2002 981 S C I E N C E ' S C O M PA S S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Dustin R.

    occurring stable isotopes such as car- bon (13C), hydrogen (2H deuterium), sulfur (34S), and strontium (87Sr (3). In contrast to tradi- tional capture-recovery methods, isotope tracking only requires knowledge measurement af- ter capture becomes a recapture because, like bands, rings, or other markers, the tar- get

  15. Case history advanced coatings for water treatment plant components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, L.D.; Kumar, A.

    2008-12-15

    Components of water treatment plants (WTPs) are susceptible to corrosion from constant immersion in water. A case history of corrosion and proximity to chlorine problems and their treatment at an Army WTP is presented. Solutions included using high micro-silica restoration mortar and advanced coal tar epoxy coatings.

  16. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 426429, 1999 Printed in the USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    --Nonaqueous phase liquid Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Coal tar UNIFAC Multicomponent INTRODUCTION Many in the USA 0730-7268/99 $9.00 .00 UNIFAC MODELING OF MULTICOMPONENT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS CONTAINING-2125, USA (Received 12 March 1998; Accepted 17 June 1998) Abstract--Multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquid

  17. Buckling of a thin, viscous film in an axisymmetric geometry S. Bhattacharya, R. V. Craster, and M. R. Flynn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Morris R.

    the present theory. Experiments reveal a limited range of angular velocities wherein waves of either small, in particular, to the action of waves and wind shear, film rupture, the formation of "tar balls," etc that arise due to in-plane shear in a rectilinear geometry (Figure 1(a)). Building on the analysis

  18. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31

    The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

  19. Cameron synthetic fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The increasing scarcity of conventional crude oil resources, as well as the sharply higher prices of crude oil, will generate increased interest in heavy oil, tar sands, and oil shale as potential substitutes. For all of these unconventional oil resources, extraction will be much more difficult, time consuming, and costly than for conventional crude oil. Although the inplace resources are vast and exist in many areas including the United States, the USSR, western Europe, Canada, and Latin America, probably only a small fraction of the inplace resources will prove to be economically extractable. These unconventional oil resources are now being developed in several locations around the world, and depending upon the exact definition probably account for less than 1 percent of current world oil supplies. The major current developments include: Canadian tar sands. Heavy oil production at Yarega in the Komi Autonomous Republic in the Soviet Union. The USSR also burns shale for power generation in Estonia. Venezuelan production of heavy oil in the Orinoco Heavy Oil Belt is currently about 15,000 b/d. Oil shale is likely to prove much less important than heavy oil and tar sands over the next 20 years. Further development of these unconventional resources is planned, and many projects are under way or under study. On the basis of current planning, world output of heavy oils and oil from tar sands and shale will be unlikely to exceed 2 million b/d by 1990, roughly five time today's level. However, both of these resources will require the development of new technologies for any large increases in output above what is now planned. The bulk of Canada's tar sands exists at great depths and will require the development of in situ processes for extraction. In the Orinoco, heavy metals contained in the oil make it difficult to refine with existing technology.

  20. Search for WZ resonances in the fully leptonic channel using pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for resonant WZ production in the ???[superscript ?]?[superscript ?] (?,?[superscript ?] =e,?) decay channel using 20.3 fb[superscript ?1] of ?s = 8 TeV collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at LHC is ...