National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fb uufiles tar

  1. FB Line Basis for Interim Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shedrow, B.

    1998-10-19

    The safety analysis of the FB-Line Facility indicates that the operation of FB-Line to support the current mission does not present undue risk to the facility and co-located workers, general public, or the environment.

  2. Centrifuge treatment of coal tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.A. Kazak; V.Z. Kaidalov; L.F. Syrova; O.S. Miroshnichenko; A.S. Minakov

    2009-07-15

    New technology is required for the removal of water and heavy fractions from regular coal tar. Centrifuges offer the best option. Purification of coal tar by means of centrifuges at OAO NLMK permits the production of pitch coke or electrode pitch that complies with current standards.

  3. GJO-2001-208-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2001-208-TAR MAC-GWSHP 11.7-1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Biological Assessment for Ground Water Remediation at the Shiprock Site Final April 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of ...

  4. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  5. Tar loads on Omani beaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F.T. )

    1991-11-01

    Owing to Oman's geographic position and long coastal line, the coastal areas of Oman are particularly vulnerable to oil pollution from normal tanker operations, illegal discharges, and accidental spills as well as local sources of oil input. UNEP carried out a survey on the coasts of Oman to determine the major sources of oil pollution and concluded that the major shoreline pollution problems in Oman arose from operational discharges of oil from passing vessels traffic. The oil, because of the high sea and air temperatures in the area, was subjected to relatively high rates of evaporation and photo-oxidation and tended to arrive at the coast as heavy petroleum particulate residues (tar balls). The aim of the present study was to measure the loads of tar balls in Omani coastal areas and to identify the source of oil pollutants on beaches.

  6. Process for hydrogenation of hydrocarbon tars

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dolbear, Geoffrey E.

    1978-07-18

    Hydrocarbon tars of high asphaltene content such as tars obtained from pyrolysis of coal are dissolved in a solvent formed from the hydrogenation of the coal tars, and the resultant mixture hydrogenated in the presence of a catalyst at a pressure from about 1500 to 5000 psig at a temperature from about 500.degree. F to about the critical temperature of the solvent to form a light hydrocarbon as a solvent for the tars. Hydrogen content is at least three times the amount of hydrogen consumed.

  7. Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources - Oil Shale and Tar Sands...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources - Oil Shale and Tar Sands Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources - Oil Shale and Tar Sands Profiles of Companies Engaged in Domestic Oil Shale ...

  8. $A^t_{FB}$ Meets LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, JoAnne L.; Shelton, Jessie; Spannowsky, Michael; Tait, Tim M.P.; Takeuchi, Michihisa; /Heidelberg U.

    2012-02-14

    The recent Tevatron measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of the top quark shows an intriguing discrepancy with Standard Model expectations, particularly at large t{bar t} invariant masses. Measurements of this quantity are subtle at the LHC, due to its pp initial state, however, one can define a forward-central-charge asymmetry which captures the physics. We study the capability of the LHC to measure this asymmetry and find that within the SM a measurement at the 5{sigma} level is possible with roughly 60 fb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 14 TeV. If nature realizes a model which enhances the asymmetry (as is necessary to explain the Tevatron measurements), a significant difference from zero can be observed much earlier, perhaps even during early LHC running at {radical}s = 7 TeV. We further explore the capabilities of the 7 TeV LHC to discover resonances or contact interactions which modify the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution using recent boosted top tagging techniques. We find that TeV-scale color octet resonances can be discovered, even with small coupling strengths and that contact interactions can be probed at scales exceeding 6 TeV. Overall, the LHC has good potential to clarify the situation with regards to the Tevatron forward-backward measurement.

  9. G JO-2001-283-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    JO-2001-283-TAR MAGLREP 6.3.1-4 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2001 Annual ... MAC-LREP 6 . 3 . 1 4 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2001 Annual Site ...

  10. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  11. Financial-Based (FB) CRAC (rates/adjustments)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oregon. To participate by telephone, please call Cynthia Jones (503) 230-5459 or Cain Bloomer (503-230-7443) in advance of the workshop. August 28, 2003 - Final FB and SN...

  12. FB EcoSolutions LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    claim is more efficient than others and can use almost any sort of biomass to produce methane and dramatically reduce the rest of the waste. References: FB EcoSolutions, LLC1...

  13. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  14. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  15. Future of heavy crude and tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F.; Steele, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    The 106 papers which were presented at the First International Conference on the Future of Heavy Crude and Tar Sands, held in Edmonton, Alberta are incorporated in this volume. They are grouped under the following sections: (1) role of heavy crude oils and tar sands in world energy; (2) major known occurrences; (3) chemistry and geochemistry; (4) geology; (5) resource evaluation techniques; (6) production research and pilot projects; (7) current production; (8) upgrading and refining; (9) transportation; (10) environmental research; (11) economics; (12) technological problems; (13) institutional factors; and (14) bibliography. All papers have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  16. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS You are ...

  17. Investigation of coal tar mobility at a former MGP site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moo-Young, H.K.; Mo, X.H.; Waterman, R.; Coleman, A.; Saroff, S.

    2009-11-15

    The presence of coal tar in the subsurface of former manufactured gas plant sites poses an environmental hazard and a potential threat to public health. Coal tar can release various chemical compounds that are transported into the groundwater. Before any efforts can be made to remove coal tar from contaminated subsurface soils, it is recommended to characterize coal tar properties and composition and to delineate the residual saturation point between mobile and immobile coal tar. This paper presents a new innovative field device, the Res-SAT field tool, and laboratory procedures that can be used to determine the saturation-capillary pressure relationship for a soil-water coal-tar system and the critical pressure for coal tar mobility.

  18. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY ...

  19. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  20. Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

  1. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  2. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael; Colmenares, Tulio Rafael; Zhang, Etuan; Marino, Marian; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Ryan, Robert Charles; Beer, Gary Lee; Dombrowski, Robert James; Jaiswal, Namit

    2009-12-22

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  3. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  4. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  5. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Westhoff, James D.; Harak, Arnold E.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000.degree. F. in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs.

  6. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

    1988-05-04

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000/degree/F in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Downgrade of the Savannah River Sites FB-Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SADOWSKI, ED; YOURCHAK, RANDY; PRETZELLO MARJI; MIXON, BONNIE; LYNN, ROBBIE

    2005-07-05

    This paper will discuss the Safeguards & Security (S&S) activities that resulted in the downgrade of the Savannah River Site's FB-Line (FBL) from a Category I Material Balance Area (MBA) in a Material Access Area (MAA) to a Category IV MBA in a Property Protection Area (PPA). The Safeguards activities included measurement of final product items, transferal of nuclear material to other Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities, discard of excess nuclear material items, and final measurements of holdup material. The Security activities included relocation and destruction of classified documents and repositories, decertification of a classified computer, access control changes, updates to planning documents, deactivation and removal of security systems, Human Reliability Program (HRP) removals, and information security training for personnel that will remain in the FBL PPA.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakatsu, C. H.; Barabote, Ravi; Thompson, Sue; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, T.; Han, Cliff F.; Beasley, Federico; Chen, Weimin; Konopka, Allan; Xie, Gary

    2013-09-30

    Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 is a species in the genus Arthrobacter Conn and Dimmick 1947, in the family Micrococcaceae and class Actinobacteria. A number of Arthrobacter genome sequences have been completed because of their important role in soil, especially bioremediation. This isolate is of special interest because it is tolerant to multiple metals and it is extremely resistant to elevated concentrations of chromate. The genome consists of a 4,698,945 bp circular chromosome and three plasmids (96,488, 115,507, and 159,536 bp, a total of 5,070,478 bp), coding 4,536 proteins of which 1,257 are without known function. This genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program.

  9. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Tanioka, Seiichi

    1997-12-31

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  10. Heavy oil and tar sands recovery and upgrading. International technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    This work provides an in-depth assessment of international technology for the recovery and upgrading of heavy crude oil and tar sands. The technologies included are currently in use, under development, or planned; emphasis is placed on post-1978 activities. The heavy oil technologies and processes considered include methods relating to the exploitation of heavy oil reservoirs, such as production from underground workings, all types of improved or enhanced recovery, subsurface extraction, and well rate stimulation. The tar sands section includes sizing the resource base and reviewing and evaluating past, present, and planned research and field developments on processes for mining, producing, extracting, and upgrading very heavy oils recovered from tar sands, e.g., bitumen recovery from tar sands where primary production was impossible because of the oil's high viscosity. 616 references.

  11. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-03-16

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  12. Assessment of tar pollution on the United Arab emirates beaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Hilal, A.H.; Khordagui, H.K. )

    1993-01-01

    In light of the inadequate information concerning stranded tar on the southwest beaches of the Arabian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, particularly following the massive oil releases during the Gulf War, the present investigation was designed to provide reference-integrated information on the nature, location, and levels of stranded tar balls on the beaches of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The recorded levels appeared to be higher than expected or previously reported. The tar distribution pattern, in addition to the degree of weathering, indicates that the massive oil release during the Gulf War did not reach the UAE shorelines. The highest reported levels of stranded tar ever recorded in the Arabian Gulf at Jabal Dhannah apparently originated from oil spills and tankers' ballast water at the main oil terminal at the Al-Ruwaiss oil refinery some 10 km to the east. The surprising, relatively high levels of stranded tar on the beaches of the Gulf of Oman were solely attributed to the heavy navigation traffic close to the shorelines. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Biodegradation of naphthalene from coal tar. Research progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoshal, S.; Ramaswami, A.; Luthy, R.G.

    1994-02-07

    Biodegradation experiments were conducted to evaluate the mineralization of naphthalene released from coal tar entrapped in microporous silica media. Tests were performed with two coal tars recovered from former manufactured gas plant sites. Results from these tests showed that the degradation end point for naphthalene was significantly lower than the total amount of naphthalene present in coal tar. The role of physico-chemical and biological processes on the rate of biotransformation of naphthalene was evaluated. Mass transfer rates for dissolution of naphthalene from entrapped coal tar were measured in batch, flow-through systems. The rate of naphthalene mass transfer from the coal tar was found to be significantly greater than the rate of naphthalene biomineralization in batch slurry reactors. This implied that the rate acting factor for the biodegradation process was related to biokinetic phenomena rather than mass transfer processes. Further tests indicated that conditions inhibitory to bacteria limited the biodegradation of naphthalene, and in some cases the inhibition was reversible upon dilution of the reactor contents.

  14. Heavy liquid beneficiation developed for Alabama tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The tar sand deposits in the State of Alabama contain about 1.8 billion barrels of measured and more than 4 billion barrels of speculative in-place bitumen. A comprehensive research program is in progress for the separation of bitumen from these deposits. In general, Alabama tar sands are oil wetted, low grade and highly viscous in nature. In view of these facts, a beneficiation strategy has been developed to recover bitumen enriched concentrate which can be used as a feed material for further processing. Heavy liquid separation tests and results are discussed. A 77% zinc bromide solution, specific gravity of 2.4, was used for the tests. 2 figures.

  15. Chiral U(1) flavor models and flavored Higgs doublets: the top FB asymmetry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and the W jj (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Chiral U(1) flavor models and flavored Higgs doublets: the top FB asymmetry and the W jj Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chiral U(1) flavor models and flavored Higgs doublets: the top FB asymmetry and the W jj We present U(1) flavor models for leptophobic Z' with flavor dependent couplings to the right-handed up-type quarks in the Standard Model (SM), which can accommodate the recent data on the top forward-backward (FB) asymmetry

  16. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  17. In situ recovery of oil from Utah tar sand: a summary of tar sand research at the Laramie Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchant, L.C.; Westhoff, J.D.

    1985-10-01

    This report describes work done by the United States Department of Energy's Laramie Energy Technology Center from 1971 through 1982 to develop technology for future recovery of oil from US tar sands. Work was concentrated on major US tar sand deposits that are found in Utah. Major objectives of the program were as follows: determine the feasibility of in situ recovery methods applied to tar sand deposits; and establish a system for classifying tar sand deposits relative to those characteristics that would affect the design and operation of various in situ recovery processes. Contents of this report include: (1) characterization of Utah tar sand; (2) laboratory extraction studies relative to Utah tar sand in situ methods; (3) geological site evaluation; (4) environmental assessments and water availability; (5) reverse combustion field experiment, TS-1C; (6) a reverse combustion followed by forward combustion field experiment, TS-2C; (7) tar sand permeability enhancement studies; (8) two-well steam injection experiment; (9) in situ steam-flood experiment, TS-1S; (10) design of a tar sand field experiment for air-stream co-injection, TS-4; (11) wastewater treatment and oil analyses; (12) economic evaluation of an in situ tar sand recovery process; and (13) appendix I (extraction studies involving Utah tar sands, surface methods). 70 figs., 68 tabs.

  18. Effect of ozonation on the composition of crude coal-tar benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semenova, S.A.; Patrakov, Y.F.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of ozonation on the composition of crude benzene produced by the coal-tar chemical industry was studied.

  19. Coal tar technology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning coal tar production and applications. Topics examine production from coal gasification, synthesis of chemicals from coal tar, and chemical analyses of coal tar products. Toxicology pollution studies, and commercial uses of the product are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Coal tar technology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning coal tar production and applications. Topics examine production from coal gasification, synthesis of chemicals from coal tar, and chemical analyses of coal tar products. Toxicology pollution studies, and commercial uses of the product are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Coal tar technology. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning coal tar production and applications. Topics examine production from coal gasification, synthesis of chemicals from coal tar, and chemical analyses of coal tar products. Toxicology pollution studies, and commercial uses of the product are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Heavy oil and tar sands recovery and upgrading: international technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth assessment of international technology for the recovery and upgrading of heavy crude oil and tar sands. The technologies included are currently in use, under development, or planned; emphasis is placed on post-1978 activities. The heavy oil technologies and processes considered in Part I include methods relating to the exploitation of heavy oil reservoirs, such as production from undergorun workings, all types of improved or enhanced recovery, subsurface extraction, and well rate stimulation. Furthermore, even though heavy crudes are understood to include only those liquid or semiliquid hydrocarbons with a gravity of 20/sup 0/API or less, technology applied to lighter crude oils with in situ viscosities of the same order of magnitude as some US heavy oils is also included. The scope of the tar sands section (Part II) includes sizing the resource base and reviewing and evaluatin past, present, and planned research and field developments on processes for mining, producing, extracting, and upgrading very heavy oils recovered from tar sands, e.g., bitumen recovery from tar sands where primary production was impossible because of the oil's high viscosity. On the production side, very heavy oil is defined as having a gravity less than 10/sup 0/ to 12/sup 0/API and greater than 100,000-centipoise viscosity at 50/sup 0/F. On the upgrading side, hydrocarbons whose characteristics dictated additional processing prior to conventional refining into salable products (1050+/sup 0/ material) were included, regardless of origin, in order to encompass all pertinent upgrading technologies.

  3. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  4. Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ruijian; Karanikas, John Michael

    2009-07-21

    A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

  5. Geology and resources of the Tar Sand Triangle, southeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana, G.F.; Oliver, R.L.; Elliott, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    The Tar Sand Triangle is located in southeastern Utah between the Dirty Devil and Colorado Rivers and covers an area of about 200 square miles. The geology of the area consists of gently northwest dipping strata exposed in the box canyons and slopes of the canyonlands morphology. Strata in the area range in age from Jurassic to Permian. The majority of tar sand saturation is found in the Permian White Rim Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation. The White Rim Sandstone Member consists of a clean, well-sorted sandstone which was deposited in a shallow marine environment. Resources were calculated from analytical data from the three coreholes drilled by the Laramie Energy Technology Center and other available data. The total in-place resources, determined from this study, are 6.3 billion barels. Previous estimates ranged from 2.9 to 16 million barrels. More coring and analyses will be necessary before a more accurate determination of resources can be attempted. 8 references, 11 figures, 7 tables.

  6. Decay Constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from HISQ Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazavov, A.; et al.

    2015-11-06

    We give a progress report on a project aimed at a high-precision calculation of the decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from simulations with HISQ heavy and light valence and sea quarks. Calculations are carried out with several heavy valence-quark masses on ensembles with 2+1+1 flavors of HISQ sea quarks at five lattice spacings and several light sea-quark mass ratios $m_{ud}/m_s$, including approximately physical sea-quark masses. This range of parameters provides excellent control of the continuum limit and of heavy-quark discretization errors. We present a preliminary error budget with projected uncertainties of 2.2~MeV and 1.5~MeV for $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$, respectively.

  7. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report, July 1990--July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    Contents of this report include the following: executive summary; characterization of the native bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit; influence of carboxylic acid content on bitumen viscosity; water based oil sand separation technology; extraction of bitumen from western oil sands by an energy-efficient thermal method; large- diameter fluidized bed reactor studies; rotary kiln pyrolysis of oil sand; catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; ebullieted bed hydrotreating and hydrocracking; super critical fluid extraction; bitumen upgrading; 232 references; Appendix A--Whiterocks tar sand deposit bibliography; Appendix B--Asphalt Ridge tar sand deposit bibliography; and Appendix C--University of Utah tar sands bibliography.

  8. NREL Patents a Catalyst that Removes Syngas Tar, Boosting the Economics of Biofuels (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    NREL has patented a catalyst that reforms tar into syngas, a breakthrough that can accelerate the process of getting biomass ready for fuel synthesis and use as a drop-in fuel.

  9. Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

    2011-05-28

    Biomass gasification is a flexible and efficient way of utilizing widely available domestic renewable resources. Syngas from biomass has the potential for biofuels production, which will enhance energy security and environmental benefits. Additionally, with the successful development of low Btu fuel engines (e.g. GE Jenbacher engines), syngas from biomass can be efficiently used for power/heat co-generation. However, biomass gasification has not been widely commercialized because of a number of technical/economic issues related to gasifier design and syngas cleanup. Biomass gasification, due to its scale limitation, cannot afford to use pure oxygen as the gasification agent that used in coal gasification. Because, it uses air instead of oxygen, the biomass gasification temperature is much lower than well-understood coal gasification. The low temperature leads to a lot of tar formation and the tar can gum up the downstream equipment. Thus, the biomass gasification tar removal is a critical technology challenge for all types of biomass gasifiers. This USDA/DOE funded program (award number: DE-FG36-O8GO18085) aims to develop an advanced catalytic tar conversion system that can economically and efficiently convert tar into useful light gases (such as syngas) for downstream fuel synthesis or power generation. This program has been executed by GE Global Research in Irvine, CA, in collaboration with Professor Lanny Schmidt's group at the University of Minnesota (UoMn). Biomass gasification produces a raw syngas stream containing H2, CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other hydrocarbons, tars, char, and ash. Tars are defined as organic compounds that are condensable at room temperature and are assumed to be largely aromatic. Downstream units in biomass gasification such as gas engine, turbine or fuel synthesis reactors require stringent control in syngas quality, especially tar content to avoid plugging (gum) of downstream equipment. Tar- and ash-free syngas streams are a critical

  10. Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-11

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future projectspecific analyses

  11. The first of a series of high efficiency, high bmep, turbocharged two-stroke cycle diesel engines; the general motors EMD 645FB engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotlin, J.J.; Dunteman, N.R.; Scott, D.I.; Williams, H.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The current Electro-Motive Division 645 Series turbocharged engines are the Model FB and EC. The FB engine combines the highest thermal efficiency with the highest specific output of any EMD engine to date. The FB Series incorporates 16:1 compression ratio with a fire ring piston and an improved turbocharger design. Engine components included in the FB engine provide very high output levels with exceptional reliability. This paper also describes the performance of the lower rated Model EC engine series which feature high thermal efficiency and utilize many engine components well proven in service and basic to the Model FB Series.

  12. First experimental results on the IShTAR testbed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D’Inca, R.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Morgal, I.; Fünfgelder, H.; Faugel, H.; Crombe, K.; Louche, F.; Van Eester, D.; Heuraux, S.; Devaux, S.; Moritz, J.; Faudot, E.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetized plasma test facility dedicated to the investigation of RF wave/plasma interaction [1] in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). It provides a better accessibility for the instrumentation than tokamaks while being representative of the neighboring region of the wave emitter. It is equipped with a magnetized plasma source (1 m long, 0.4 m diameter) powered by a helical antenna up to 3 kW at 11 MHz. We present the results of the first analysis of the plasma characteristics (plasma density, electron temperature) in function of the operating parameters (injected power, neutral pressure and magnetic field) as measured with fixed and movable Langmuir probes, spectrometer and cameras. The plasma is presently produced only by the helical antenna (no ICRF). We show that the plasma exists in three regime depending on the power level: the first two ones are stable and separated by a jump in density; a first spatial profile of the plasma density has been established for these modes; The third mode is unstable, characterized by strong oscillations of the plasma tube position.

  13. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crombé, K.; D’Inca, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Louche, F.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  14. Measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry with 9 fb? of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2011-09-16

    We present an updated measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry Absl for semileptonic b-hadron decays in 9.0 fb? of pp? collisions recorded with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We obtain Absl=(-0.7870.172(stat)0.093(syst))%. This result differs by 3.9 standard deviations from the prediction of the standard model and provides evidence for anomalously large CP violation in semileptonic neutral B decay. The dependence of the asymmetry on the muon impact parameter is consistent with the hypothesis that it originates from semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  15. Global Search for New Physics with 2.0 fb88-1 at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-09-01

    Data collected in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron are searched for indications of new electroweak-scale physics. Rather than focusing on particular new physics scenarios, CDF data are analyzed for discrepancies with the standard model prediction. A model-independent approach (VISTA) considers gross features of the data, and is sensitive to new large cross-section physics. Further sensitivity to new physics is provided by two additional algorithms: a Bump Hunter searches invariant mass distributions for 'bumps' that could indicate resonant production of new particles; and the Sleuth procedure scans for data excesses at large summed transverse momentum. This combined global search for new physics in 2.0 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV reveals no indication of physics beyond the standard model.

  16. A photographic method for estimating wear of coal tar sealcoat from parking lots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mateo Scoggins; Tom Ennis; Nathan Parker; Chris Herrington

    2009-07-01

    Coal-tar-based sealcoat has been recognized as an important source of PAHs to the environment through wear and transport via stormwater runoff. Sealcoat removal rates have not been measured or even estimated in the literature due to the complex array of physical and chemical process involved. A photographic study was conducted that incorporates all sources of wear using 10 coal tar-sealed parking lots in Austin, Texas, with sealcoat age ranging from 0 to 5 years. Randomly located photographs from each parking lot were analyzed digitally to quantify black sealed areas versus lighter colored unsealed areas at the pixel level. The results indicate that coal tar sealcoat wears off of the driving areas of parking lots at a rate of approximately 4.7% per year, and from the parking areas of the lots at a rate of approximately 1.4% per year. The overall annual loss of sealcoat was calculated at 2.4%. This results in an annual delivery to the environment of 0.51 g of PAHs per m{sup 2} of coal tar-sealed parking lot. These values provide a more robust and much higher estimate of loading of PAHs from coal tar sealcoated parking lots when compared to other available measures. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of tar reforming through auto-thermal reforming process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurhadi, N. Diniyati, Dahlia; Efendi, M. Ade Andriansyah; Istadi, I.

    2015-12-29

    Fixed bed gasification is a simple and suitable technology for small scale power generation. One of the disadvantages of this technology is producing tar. So far, tar is not utilized yet and being waste that should be treated into a more useful product. This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of tar conversion into gas producer through non-catalytic auto-thermal reforming technology. Tar was converted into components, C, H, O, N and S, and then reacted with oxidant such as mixture of air or pure oxygen. Thus, this reaction occurred auto-thermally and reached chemical equilibrium. The sensitivity analysis resulted that the most promising process performance occurred at flow rate of air was reached 43% of stoichiometry while temperature of process is 1100°C, the addition of pure oxygen is 40% and preheating of oxidant flow is 250°C. The yield of the most promising process performance between 11.15-11.17 kmol/h and cold gas efficiency was between 73.8-73.9%.The results of this study indicated that thermodynamically the conversion of tar into producer gas through non-catalytic auto-thermal reformingis more promising.

  18. Catalyst specificities in high pressure hydroprocessing of pyrolysis and gasification tars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soltes, E.J.; Lin, S.C.K.; Sheu, Y.H.E.

    1987-04-01

    Over a period of several years, the Department of Forest Science at Texas A and M University has been conducting studies in the hydroprocessing (catalytic high pressure hydrotreating or hydrodeoxygenation accompanied by hydrocracking) of pyrolytic tars produced in biomass pyrolysis and gasification. Upgrading through hydroprocessing results in good yields of volatile hydrocarbon and phenolic products. This paper compares the performance of twenty different catalysts selected for hydroprocessing of a pine pyrolysis oil, describes the use of noble metal catalysts with tars produced from nine different biomass feedstocks (oil from pine pyrolysis and the tars from pine wood chip, pine plywood trim, pecan shell, peanut shell, sugarcane bagasse, corncob, rice hull, and cottonseed hull gasification), and compares the use of several catalysts in a trickle bed reactor for kinetic studies of the hyroprocessing reaction.

  19. NREL Patents a Catalyst that Removes Syngas Tar, Boosting the Economics of Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patents a Catalyst that Removes Syngas Tar, Boosting the Economics of Biofuels NREL has patented a catalyst that reforms tar into syngas, a breakthrough that can accelerate the process of getting biomass ready for fuel synthesis and use as a drop-in fuel. The process also can help reduce greenhouse gases because the biomass that is used in fuel gets combusted into carbon dioxide, which is food for future biomass. The result is that 90% of carbon emissions get recycled into new biomass. Syngas is

  20. In situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation after drive process treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Stanecki, John

    2010-09-21

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing a drive fluid to a hydrocarbon containing layer of the tar sands formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the layer. At least some first hydrocarbons from the layer are produced. Heat is provided to the layer from one or more heaters located in the formation. At least some second hydrocarbons are produced from the layer of the formation. The second hydrocarbons include at least some hydrocarbons that are upgraded compared to the first hydrocarbons produced by using the drive fluid.

  1. U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) research and development programs for heavy oil and tar sand recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    The main emphasis of the DOE tar sand program described is to develop in situ techniques capable of recovering bitumen from domestic tar sand deposits. This program primarily involves field experiments of in situ techniques (in situ combustion and steam drive). Supporting activities include resource assessment, upgrading and surface processing research, and environmental permitting and control. 5 refs.

  2. Gas-chromatographic determination of the main components of hard-coal tar and its fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabivach, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the composition of bituminous coal tars from several coking plants in the Ukraine using gas-liquid chromatography. It was shown that analytical data can be used for operational quality control of the fractions produced.

  3. Modeling the impact of bubbling bed hydrodynamics on tar yield and its fluctuations during biomass fast pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Qingang; Ramirez, Emilio; Pannala, Sreekanth; Daw, C. Stuart; Xu, Fei

    2015-10-09

    The impact of bubbling bed hydrodynamics on temporal variations in the exit tar yield for biomass fast pyrolysis was investigated using computational simulations of an experimental laboratory-scale reactor. A multi-fluid computational fluid dynamics model was employed to simulate the differential conservation equations in the reactor, and this was combined with a multi-component, multi-step pyrolysis kinetics scheme for biomass to account for chemical reactions. The predicted mean tar yields at the reactor exit appear to match corresponding experimental observations. Parametric studies predicted that increasing the fluidization velocity should improve the mean tar yield but increase its temporal variations. Increases in the mean tar yield coincide with reducing the diameter of sand particles or increasing the initial sand bed height. However, trends in tar yield variability are more complex than the trends in mean yield. The standard deviation in tar yield reaches a maximum with changes in sand particle size. As a result, the standard deviation in tar yield increases with the increases in initial bed height in freely bubbling state, while reaches a maximum in slugging state.

  4. Modeling the impact of bubbling bed hydrodynamics on tar yield and its fluctuations during biomass fast pyrolysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiong, Qingang; Ramirez, Emilio; Pannala, Sreekanth; Daw, C. Stuart; Xu, Fei

    2015-10-09

    The impact of bubbling bed hydrodynamics on temporal variations in the exit tar yield for biomass fast pyrolysis was investigated using computational simulations of an experimental laboratory-scale reactor. A multi-fluid computational fluid dynamics model was employed to simulate the differential conservation equations in the reactor, and this was combined with a multi-component, multi-step pyrolysis kinetics scheme for biomass to account for chemical reactions. The predicted mean tar yields at the reactor exit appear to match corresponding experimental observations. Parametric studies predicted that increasing the fluidization velocity should improve the mean tar yield but increase its temporal variations. Increases in themore » mean tar yield coincide with reducing the diameter of sand particles or increasing the initial sand bed height. However, trends in tar yield variability are more complex than the trends in mean yield. The standard deviation in tar yield reaches a maximum with changes in sand particle size. As a result, the standard deviation in tar yield increases with the increases in initial bed height in freely bubbling state, while reaches a maximum in slugging state.« less

  5. Filamentous carbon catalytic deposition of coal-tar pitch fraction on corundum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martynkova, G.S.; Supova, M.

    2007-01-15

    Our work was focused on deposition of volatile hydrocarbons of carbonaceous precursor on corundum wafer, taking advantage of a metallic catalyst incorporated in precursor. Coal tar-pitch, namely a fraction soluble in toluene, served as precursor material for deposition of filamentous material. The toluene-soluble fraction of tar-pitch originally contained metallic particles of iron and nickel. During heat treatment up to 1000{sup o}C, metallic particles accompanied the volatile hydrocarbons conducive to forming a filamentous deposit. The deposit obtained demonstrates a semicrystalline material that has an irregular filamentous structure with an average filament diameter of 30 {mu}m. The presence of catalysts after the deposition process was proved in the deposit but catalysts were not found in the residuum.

  6. Method of producing drive fluid in situ in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mudunuri, Ramesh Raju (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-23

    Methods of treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. The heat may be allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation such that a drive fluid is produced in situ in the formation. The drive fluid may move at least some mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons from a first portion of the formation to a second portion of the formation. At least some of the mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons may be produced from the formation.

  7. Controlling and assessing pressure conditions during treatment of tar sands formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Etuan; Beer, Gary Lee

    2015-11-10

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the tar sands formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A pressure in the portion of the formation is controlled such that the pressure remains below a fracture pressure of the formation overburden while allowing the portion of the formation to heat to a selected average temperature of at least about 280.degree. C. and at most about 300.degree. C. The pressure in the portion of the formation is reduced to a selected pressure after the portion of the formation reaches the selected average temperature.

  8. Effect of cavitation on the properties of coal-tar pitch as studied by gas-liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.I. Baikenov; T.B. Omarbekov; S.K. Amerkhanova

    2008-02-15

    The applicability of the cavitation-wave effect to coal-tar pitch processing is considered. The results of the GLC analysis of the test material before and after rotor-pulsation cavitation treatment are given. The organic matter of coal-tar pitch was found to degrade upon cavitation; as a result of this, the yields of light and medium fractions considerably increased. 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell--GJO-99-96-TAR, June 1999

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. U.S. Department of Energy GJO-99-96-TAR Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell: Evaluation of Long-Term Performance and Risk June 1999 DOE Grand Junction Office June 1999 Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell Page iii Contents Page Executive Summary

  10. II international conference on heavy crude and tar sands. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Heavy Crude and Tar Sands clearly demonstrated that the world has abundant heavy and extra heavy crudes that will sustain the petroleum age for decades. Perhaps even more important for many developed and developing countries is that these resources are widely distributed throughout the world, for deposits are known to exist in at least forty-nine countries. Moreover, the rapid expansion over the last two and a half years of knowledge of the magnitude of these resources suggests there is much more to be added to the world's list of useful energy assets. The current ample supply of crude oil does not appear to have lessened the resolve to develop heavy crude and tar sands. Major industrial countries are eager to develop their heavy oil resources to free themselves from dependence on OPEC and the developing nations hope to reduce their cash outflows for imported oil which they can ill afford. Venezuela and Canada, which both have massive heavy crude reserves, are intent on developing their resources to supplement declining supplies of light oil. Despite the weakening international price of oil, the economics for many heavy crude ventures seem favorable. Statistics quoted at the conference suggest considerable heavy crude production can be brought on stream at costs approaching the finding costs of light conventional crude. At the same time, it has to be acknowledged that those large tar sands projects, like Alberta's multi-billion dollar ventures, are sufficiently marginal that they may be held back by current soft oil demand. This summary report covers the following areas: resources; international cooperation; production; environment; technological developments; upgrading and refining; marketing; and future of heavy crude oil and tar sands.

  11. Relationship of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide yield of cigarettes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Sherrill, D.L.; Paoletti, P.; Lebowitz, M.D. )

    1991-02-01

    The data from consecutive surveys of the Tucson Epidemiologic Study (1981-1988) were used to evaluate the relationship in cigarette smokers of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide (CO) yields of the cigarette. There were 690 subjects who reported smoking regularly in at least one survey, over age 15. After adjustment for intensity and duration of smoking and for depth of inhalation, the risk of chronic phlegm, cough, and dyspnea were not related to the tar and nicotine yields. In 414 subjects with pulmonary function tested in at least one of the three surveys the spirometric indices used were significantly related to the daily dose of tar, nicotine, and CO (product of the cigarette yield and daily number of cigarettes smoked). The effects were more pronounced for past than for current doses. However, the differentiation of pulmonary function due to various yields of cigarettes was small in comparison to the difference in pulmonary function between smokers and nonsmokers.

  12. Class I cultural resource overview for oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rourke, D.; Kullen, D.; Gierek, L.; Wescott, K.; Greby, M.; Anast, G.; Nesta, M.; Walston, L.; Tate, R.; Azzarello, A.; Vinikour, B.; Van Lonkhuyzen, B.; Quinn, J.; Yuen, R.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-01

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the 'Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005', Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is developing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to evaluate alternatives for establishing commercial oil shale and tar sands leasing programs in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah. This PEIS evaluates the potential impacts of alternatives identifying BLM-administered lands as available for application for commercial leasing of oil shale resources within the three states and of tar sands resources within Utah. The scope of the analysis of the PEIS also includes an assessment of the potential effects of future commercial leasing. This Class I cultural resources study is in support of the Draft Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and is an attempt to synthesize archaeological data covering the most geologically prospective lands for oil shale and tar sands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. This report is based solely on geographic information system (GIS) data held by the Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs). The GIS data include the information that the BLM has provided to the SHPOs. The primary purpose of the Class I cultural resources overview is to provide information on the affected environment for the PEIS. Furthermore, this report provides recommendations to support planning decisions and the management of cultural resources that could be impacted by future oil shale and tar

  13. Carcinogenic effects in A/J mice of particulate of a coal-tar paint used in potable water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, M.; Laurie, R.D.; Bull, R.J.; Stober, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Coal-tar paints are among the products used as inside coatings for water pipes and storage tanks to retard corrosion in potable water-supply systems. Four different formulations of these paints were tested in earlier work by this laboratory in the Ames mutagenesis and the mouse skin carcinogenesis bioassays(6). The paint most active in these assays was then tested in a particulate form in the lung adenoma assay with A/J mice. The paint was applied to clean glass plates, cured, collected and homogenized in 2% Emulphor. Doses of this coal-tar suspension were administered by gavage at 1.0, 10.0, and 55.0 mg in 0.2 ml per mouse 3 x weekly for 8 weeks. The total doses of coal-tar paint were 24, 240, and 1320 mg/mouse. Benzo(a)pyrene, administered in a parallel schedule to a total dose of 6 mg/mouse, served as positive control. A negative control group received an equivalent volume of 2% Emulphor. Animals were sacrificed at 9 months of age (8 months after first dose) and lung adenomas counted. A dose-related response, in the average number of lung tumors per mouse, was observed with the coal-tar particulate. There were also squamous-cell tumors of the forestomach in 42% of the mice receiving 55.0 mg coal tar paint per application.

  14. Biomass waste gasification - Can be the two stage process suitable for tar reduction and power generation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulc, Jindrich; Stojdl, Jiri; Richter, Miroslav; Popelka, Jan; Svoboda, Karel; Smetana, Jiri; Vacek, Jiri; Skoblja, Siarhei; Buryan, Petr

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of one stage (co-current) and two stage gasification of wood pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Original arrangement with grate-less reactor and upward moving bed of the pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two stage gasification leads to drastic reduction of tar content in gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One stage gasification produces gas with higher LHV at lower overall ER. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Content of ammonia in gas is lower in two stage moving bed gasification. - Abstract: A pilot scale gasification unit with novel co-current, updraft arrangement in the first stage and counter-current downdraft in the second stage was developed and exploited for studying effects of two stage gasification in comparison with one stage gasification of biomass (wood pellets) on fuel gas composition and attainable gas purity. Significant producer gas parameters (gas composition, heating value, content of tar compounds, content of inorganic gas impurities) were compared for the two stage and the one stage method of the gasification arrangement with only the upward moving bed (co-current updraft). The main novel features of the gasifier conception include grate-less reactor, upward moving bed of biomass particles (e.g. pellets) by means of a screw elevator with changeable rotational speed and gradual expanding diameter of the cylindrical reactor in the part above the upper end of the screw. The gasifier concept and arrangement are considered convenient for thermal power range 100-350 kW{sub th}. The second stage of the gasifier served mainly for tar compounds destruction/reforming by increased temperature (around 950 Degree-Sign C) and for gasification reaction of the fuel gas with char. The second stage used additional combustion of the fuel gas by preheated secondary air for attaining higher temperature and faster gasification of the remaining char from the first stage. The measurements of gas composition and tar

  15. In situ heat treatment from multiple layers of a tar sands formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-11-30

    A method for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. The method includes providing a drive fluid to a first hydrocarbon containing layer of the formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the first layer. At least some of the mobilized hydrocarbons are allowed to flow into a second hydrocarbon containing layer of the formation. Heat is provided to the second layer from one or more heaters located in the second layer. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the second layer of the formation.

  16. Method of condensing vaporized water in situ to treat tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-Fu

    2010-03-16

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat may be allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a first portion of the formation. Conditions may be controlled in the formation so that water vaporized by the heaters in the first portion is selectively condensed in a second portion of the formation. At least some of the fluids may be produced from the formation.

  17. Measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays using 5.4 fb? of pp? collision data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; ?wiok, M.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jain, S.; Jamin, D.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V.M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rich, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-02-18

    We present a measurement of the helicity of the W boson produced in top quark decays using tt decays in the l+jets and dilepton final states selected from a sample of 5.4 fb? of collisions recorded using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp? collider. We measure the fractions of longitudinal and right-handed W bosons to be f?=0.6690.102[0.078(stat.)0.065(syst.)] and f?=0.0230.053[0.041(stat.)0.034(syst.)], respectively. This result is consistent at the 98% level with the standard model. A measurement with f? fixed to the value from the standard model yields f?=0.0100.037[0.022(stat.)0.030(syst.)].

  18. Search for WH associated production in 5.3 fb -1 of pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; et al

    2011-03-01

    We present a search for associated production of Higgs and W bosons in collisions at a center of mass energy of in 5.3 fb -1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the D0 experiment. Multivariate analysis techniques are applied to events containing one lepton, an imbalance in transverse energy, and one or two b-tagged jets to discriminate a potential WH signal from Standard Model backgrounds. We observe good agreement between data and expected backgrounds, and set an upper limit of 4.5 (at 95% confidence level and for mH=115 GeV) on the ratio of the WH cross section multiplied by the branchingmore » fraction of H → bb¯ to its Standard Model prediction, which is consistent with an expected limit of 4.8.« less

  19. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

  20. Epoxy-borax-coal tar composition for a radiation protective, burn resistant drum liner and centrifugal casting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert S.; Boyer, Norman W.

    1980-01-01

    A boron containing burn resistant, low level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source. The material is basically composed of Borax in the range of 25-50%, coal tar in the range of 25-37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% Borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  1. Mass transfer and biodegradation of PAH compounds from coal tar. Quarterly technical report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramaswami, A.; Ghoshal, S.; Luthy, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    This study examines the role of physico-chemical mass transfer processes on the rate of biotransformation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds released from non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) coal tar present at residual saturation within a microporous medium. A simplified coupled dissolution-degradation model is developed that describes the concurrent mass transfer and biokinetic processes occurring in the system. Model results indicate that a dimensionless Damkohler number can be utilized to distinguish between systems that are mass transfer limited, and those that are limited by biological phenomena. The Damkohler number is estimated from independent laboratory experiments that measure the rates of aqueous phase dissolution and biodegradation of naphthalene from coal tar. Experimental data for Stroudsburg coal tar imbibed within 236 {mu}m diameter silica particles yield Damkohler numbers smaller than unity, indicating, for the particular system under study, that the overall rate of biotransformation of naphthalene is not limited by the mass transfer of naphthalene from coal tar to the bulk aqueous phase. There is a need for investigation of mass transfer for larger particles and/or other PAH compounds, and study of microbial rate-limiting phenomena including toxicity, inhibition and competitive substrate utilization.

  2. Stability and Regeneration of Catalysts for the Destruction of Tars from Bio-mass Black Liquor Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pradeep Agrawal

    2004-09-07

    The goal of this project was to develop catalytic materials and processes that would be effective in the destruction of tars formed during the gasification of black liquor and biomass. We report here the significant results obtained at the conclusion of this two year project.

  3. Varying properties of in situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation based on assessed viscosities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2014-03-04

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A viscosity of one or more zones of the hydrocarbon layer is assessed. The heating rates in the zones are varied based on the assessed viscosities. The heating rate in a first zone of the formation is greater than the heating rate in a second zone of the formation if the viscosity in the first zone is greater than the viscosity in the second zone. Fluids are produced from the formation through the production wells.

  4. Moving hydrocarbons through portions of tar sands formations with a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Mudunuri, Ramesh Raju; Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael; Jaiswal, Namit; Mo, Weijian

    2010-05-18

    A method for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. The method includes heating a first portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the first portion. The heat is controlled to increase a fluid injectivity of the first portion. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid is injected and/or created in the first portion to cause at least some hydrocarbons to move from a second portion of the hydrocarbon layer to a third portion of the hydrocarbon layer. The second portion is between the first portion and the third portion. The first, second, and third portions are horizontally displaced from each other. The third portion is heated from one or more heaters located in the third portion. Hydrocarbons are produced from the third portion of the formation. The hydrocarbons include at least some hydrocarbons from the second portion of the formation.

  5. Combination of searches for anomalous top quark couplings with 5.4 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J. A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffe, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-07-09

    We present measurements of the tWb coupling form factors using information from electroweak single top quark production and from the helicity of W bosons from top quark decays in t{bar t} events. We set upper limits on anomalous tWb coupling form factors using data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

  6. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

  7. Future directions in advanced exploratory research related to oil, gas, shale and tar sand resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Technical Coordination (OTC) is responsible for long-range, high-risk research that could provide major advances in technologies for the use of fossil fuels. In late 1986, OTC was given responsibility for an existing program of research in Advanced Process Technology (APT) for oil, gas, shale, and tar sands. To meet these challenges and opportunities, the OTC approached the National Research Council with a request to organize an advisory panel to examine future directions in fundamental research appropriate for sponsorship by the Advanced Process Technology program. An advisory group was formed with broad representation from the geosciences, physical sciences, and engineering disciplines to accomplish this task. The charge to the panel was to prepare a report for the director of the Office of Technical Coordination, identifying critical research areas. This report contains the findings and recommendations of the panel. It is written both to advise the research management of the Department of Energy on research opportunities and needs, and to stimulate interest and involvement in the research community in fundamental research related to fossil energy, and in particular, oil and gas resources. 1 tab.

  8. Search for Randall-Sundrum Gravitons in Dilepton and Diphoton Final States with 1 fb-1 of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Amitabha; /Boston U.

    2007-05-01

    The work presented in this thesis is the search for Randall-Sundrum (RS) gravitons from an analysis of approximately 1 fb{sup -1} data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab. The standard model has been a great success in explaining all experimental observations in particle physics. However, we also know that it has fundamental problems. One of these problems, called the hierarchy problem, is related to the large difference between the electroweak scale and the Planck scale. The model proposed by Randall and Sundrum presents a possible solution to the hierarchy problem by introducing physics beyond the standard model. Randall and Sundrum's theory postulates the existence of a 4th spatial dimension in addition to the conventional (3+1)-dimensional space. Gravity is localized on a 3+1 dimensional subspace, called a brane (Planck brane) that is separated in this new 4th spatial dimension from the standard model brane. As one moves away from this Planck brane, gravity is exponentially suppressed and this explains why gravity appears so weak at the standard model brane. In the simplest RS model, the only particles that propagate in the extra dimension are gravitons. The graviton manifests itself on the standard model brane as a series of excited states that couple to standard model particles with similar strength as the electroweak interaction. The ground state is the massless graviton and the order of magnitude of the mass of the lowest excited state is expected to be one TeV. The first excited mode of the graviton might be produced resonantly at the Tevatron. Gravitons can decay into fermion-antifermion or diboson pairs. Here I search for gravitons through their decay to e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} final states. These final states have similar signatures in our detector and can thus be treated together. After analyzing the data I do not find any excess over standard model expectations and set an upper limit on the production rate of such gravitons. I

  9. Statistical planning and analysis for treatments of tar sand wastewater. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirie, W.R.

    1984-03-01

    The first part of this report discusses the overall statistical planning, coordination and design for several tar sand wastewater treatment projects contracted by the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) of the Department of Energy. A general discussion of the benefits of consistent statistical design and analysis for data-oriented projects is included, with recommendations for implementation. A detailed outline of the principles of general linear models design is followed by an introduction to recent developments in general linear models by ranks (GLMR) analysis and a comparison to standard analysis using Gaussian or normal theory (GLMN). A listing of routines contained in the VPI Nonparametric Statistics Package (NPSP), installed on the Cyber computer system at the University of Wyoming is included. Part 2 describes in detail the design and analysis for treatments by Gas Flotation, Foam Separation, Coagulation, and Ozonation, with comparisons among the first three methods. Rank methods are used for most analyses, and several detailed examples are included. For optimization studies, the powerful tools of response surface analysis (RSA) are employed, and several sections contain discussion on the benefits of RSA. All four treatment methods proved to be effective for removal of TOC and suspended solids from the wastewater. Because the processes and equipment designs were new, optimum removals were not achieved by these initial studies and reasons for that are discussed. Pollutant levels were nevertheless reduced to levels appropriate for recycling within the process, and for such reuses as steam generation, according to the DOE/LETC project officer. 12 refs., 8 figs., 21 tabs.

  10. Search for Randall-Sundrum Gravitons in Dielectron and Diphoton Final States with 5.4fb-1 of D0 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; /Columbia U.

    2010-03-01

    A search for the lightest Kaluza-Klein mode of the graviton in the Randall-Sundrum model with a warped extra dimension is performed in the dielectron and diphoton channels. The data set used for the search corresponds to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron between July 2002 and Summer 2009. We search for resonances in the invariant mass spectrum of two electromagnetic showers from the decay of the graviton to either electron-positron pairs or photon pairs. To optimize the sensitivity, the dielectron and diphoton channels are analyzed separately, then the results are combined together in the end. We also investigate whether, due to the unique spin-2 nature of the graviton, the angular distribution of the final state particles can be used to significantly enhance the sensitivity of the search. We set 95% confidence level upper limits on the graviton production cross section times branching fraction into electron-positron pairs of between {approx} 7 fb and {approx} 0.5 fb for a range of graviton masses from 220 GeV and 1050 GeV, respectively. Compared with Randall-Sundrum model predictions, these results correspond to lower limits on the lightest graviton mass between 440 GeV and 1040 GeV, for the dimensionless graviton coupling to the Standard Model fields k/{bar M}{sub Pl} in the range from 0.01 to 0.1. In addition, for coupling k/{bar M}{sub Pl} of 0.01, gravitons with masses between 460 GeV and 560 GeV are also excluded at 95% confidence level. These results represent the most sensitive limits to date.

  11. Combined CDF and D0 Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to Two Photons with up to 8.2 fb^-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, focusing on the decay H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. We compute upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section times the decay branching fraction in the range 100 < m{sub H} < 150 GeV/c{sup 2}, and we interpret the results in the context of the standard model. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With datasets corresponding to 7.0 fb{sup -1} (CDF) and 8.2 fb{sup -1} (D0), the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 10.5 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Dubna, JINR /Oklahoma U. /Michigan State U. /Tata Inst. /Illinois U., Chicago /Florida State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /St. Petersburg, INP /Illinois U., Urbana /Sao Paulo, IFT /Munich U. /University Coll. London /Oxford U. /St. Petersburg, INP /Duke U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Chonnam Natl. U. /Florida U. /Osaka City U.

    2011-03-01

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W{sup +}W{sup -}, although acceptance for decays into {tau}{sup |+} {tau}{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg {yields} H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158 < m{sub H} < 173 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs-Boson Production with up to 6.7 fb$^{-1}$ of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination more data have been added, additional new channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 6.7 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.56 and 0.68 the values of the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2} and 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 158 < m{sub H} < 175 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  14. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs-Boson Production with 2.1 - 5.4 fb-1 of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration, The CDF; Collaboration, the D0; Physics, the Tevatron New; Group, Higgs Working

    2009-11-01

    We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination more data have been added and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-4.8 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 2.1-5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.70 (0.94) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.78 (0.89). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs is 163 < m{sub H} < 166 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an expected exclusion of 159 < m{sub H} < 168 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. Production and gasification tests of coal fines/coal tar extrudate. Final report June 1982-December 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, A.; Rib, D.; Smith, D.; Waslo, D.

    1984-01-01

    Gasification is a fuels conversion technology that permits the production of clean synthetic gas from coal and other carbonaceous fuels. Of the various gasifier types, however, the fixed bed is the only system currently being offered on a commercial basis. While this reactor type offers proven performance in terms of reliability and thermal efficiency, it requires a sized feedstock. This means that up to 30% of the incoming run-of-mine coal could be rejected as fines. Direct extrusion of this - 1/8-inch coal fines fraction with a tar binder offers a potentially attractive solution to this problem by consolidating the fines and, at the same time, providing a feed mechanism to the pressurized reactor. Work is described on a recently completed extrudate evaluation program conducted at the General Electric Research and Development Center in Schenectady under GRI and NYSERDA sponsorship. A 6-inch, single screw extruder was used to produce 88 tons of Illinois No. 6 coal extrudate with tar binder, which was then successfully gasified in General Electric's 1-ton/hr, Process Evaluation Facility (PEF) scale, fixed-bed reactor. Performance data on the extrusion process and on gasification testing are presented. The test results indicate that the extrudate makes a satisfactory gasifier feedstock in terms of both thermal and mechanical performance.

  16. Search for $WH$ associated production in 5.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    We present a search for associated production of Higgs and W bosons in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in 5.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by the D0 experiment. Multivariate analysis techniques are applied to events containing one lepton, an imbalance in transverse energy, and one or two b-tagged jets to discriminate a potential WH signal from standard model backgrounds. We observe good agreement between data and background, and set an upper limit of 4.5 (at 95% confidence level and for m{sub H} = 115 GeV) on the ratio of the WH cross section multiplied by the branching fraction of H {yields} b{bar b} to its standard model prediction. A limit of 4.8 is expected from simulation.

  17. Measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays using 5.4 fb$^{\\boldsymbol{-1}}$ of $\\boldsymbol{p\\bar{p}}$ collision data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    We present a measurement of the helicity of the W boson produced in top quark decays using t{bar t} decays in the {ell}+jets and dilepton final states selected from a sample of 5.4 fb{sup -1} of collisions recorded using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. We measure the fractions of longitudinal and right-handed W bosons to be f{sub 0} = 0.669 {+-} 0.102 [{+-}0.078 (stat.) {+-} 0.065 (syst.)] and f{sub +} = 0.023 {+-} 0.053 [{+-}0.041 (stat.){+-}0.034 (syst.)], respectively. This result is consistent at the 98% level with the standard model. A measurement with f{sub 0} fixed to the value from the standard model yields f{sub +} = 0.010 {+-} 0.037 [{+-}0.022 (stat.) {+-} 0.030 (syst.)].

  18. Measurement of the WZ and ZZ production cross sections using leptonic final states in 8.6 fb? of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Oteroy y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.

    2012-06-12

    We study the processes pp??WZ?l?l?l? and pp??ZZ?l?l???, where l=e or ?. Using 8.6 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we measure the WZ production cross section to be 4.50+0.630.66 pb which is consistent with, but slightly larger than, the prediction of the standard model. The ZZ cross section is measured to be 1.640.46 pb, in agreement with a prediction of the standard model. Combination with an earlier analysis of the ZZ?l?l?l?l? channel yields a ZZ cross section of 1.44+0.350.34 pb.

  19. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Associated WH Production in 9.7 fb? of pp? Collisions with the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-20

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and two or three jets, at least one of which is identified as a b-quark jet. The search is primarily sensitive to WH?l?bb production and uses data corresponding to 9.7 fb? of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. We observe agreement between the data and the expected background. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the production of a standard model Higgs boson of 5.2?SM, where ?SM is the standard model Higgs boson production cross section, while the expected limit is 4.7?SM.

  20. Search for Diphoton Events with Large Missing Transverse Energy in 6.3 fb-1 of ppbar Collisions using the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Mark Stephen; /Columbia U.

    2010-09-01

    A search for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The data were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider between 2002 and 2010, and correspond to 6.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The observed missing transverse energy distribution is well described by the Standard Model prediction, and 95% C.L. limits are derived on two realizations of theories beyond the Standard Model. In a gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking scenario, the breaking scale {Lambda} is excluded for {Lambda} < 124 TeV. In a universal extra dimension model including gravitational decays, the compactification radius R{sub c} is excluded for R{sub c}{sup -1} < 477 GeV.

  1. An NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) Investigation of the Chemical Association and Molecular Dynamics in Asphalt Ridge Tar Sand Ore and Bitumen

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Netzel, D. A.; Coover, P. T.

    1987-09-01

    Preliminary studies on tar sand bitumen given in this report have shown that the reassociation of tar sand bitumen to its original molecular configuration after thermal stressing is a first-order process requiring nearly a week to establish equilibrium. Studies were also conducted on the dissolution of tar sand bitumen in solvents of varying polarity. At a high-weight fraction of solute to solvent the apparent molecular weight of the bitumen molecules was greater than that of the original bitumen when dissolved in chloroform-d{sub 1} and benzene-d{sub 6}. This increase in the apparent molecular weight may be due to micellar formation or a weak solute-solvent molecular complex. Upon further dilution with any of the solvents studied, the apparent molecular weight of the tar sand bitumen decreased because of reduced van der Waals forces of interaction and/or hydrogen bonding. To define the exact nature of the interactions, it will be necessary to have viscosity measurements of the solutions.

  2. y12 disc 1954 FB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  3. A precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton final states using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of D{Ø} Run II data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Huanzhao

    2015-05-16

    The top quark is a very special fundamental particle in the Standard Model (SM) mainly due to its heavy mass. The top quark has extremely short lifetime and decays before hadronization. This reduces the complexity for the measurement of its mass. The top quark couples very strongly to the Higgs boson since the fermion-Higgs Yukawa coupling linearly depends on the fermion’s mass. Therefore, the top quark is also heavily involved in Higgs production and related study. A precise measurement of the top quark mass is very important, as it allows for self-consistency check of the SM, and also gives a insight about the stability of our universe in the SM context. This dissertation presents my work on the measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton final states of t$\\bar{t}$ events in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, using the full DØ Run II data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron. I extracted the top quark mass by reconstructing event kinematics, and integrating over expected neutrino rapidity distributions to obtain solutions over a scanned range of top quark mass hypotheses. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization that I made to minimize the expected statistical uncertainty. I also improve the calibration of jets in dilepton events by using the calibration determined in t$\\bar{t}$ → lepton+jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. The measured mass is 173.11 ± 1.34(stat)+0.83 -0.72(sys) GeV .

  4. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson with 7.5 fb? integrated luminosity at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.

    2012-08-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson. This search uses data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.5 fb? collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron. We select WH?l?bb candidate events with two jets, large missing transverse energy, and exactly one charged lepton. We further require that at least one jet be identified to originate from a bottom quark. Discrimination between the signal and the large background is achieved through the use of a Bayesian artificial neural network. The number of tagged events and their distributions are consistent with the standard model expectations. We observe no evidence for a Higgs boson signal and set 95% C.L. upper limits on the WH production cross section times the branching ratio to decay to bb pairs, ?(pp?WH)B(H?bb), relative to the rate predicted by the standard model. For the Higgs boson mass range of 100 to 150 GeV/c we set observed (expected) upper limits from 1.34 (1.83) to 38.8 (23.4). For 115 GeV/c the upper limit is 3.64 (2.78). The combination of the present search with an independent analysis that selects events with three jets yields more stringent limits ranging from 1.12 (1.79) to 34.4 (21.6) in the same mass range. For 115 and 125 GeV/c the upper limits are 2.65 (2.60) and 4.36 (3.69), respectively.

  5. Report. Results of a Piezocone Investigation - Shiprock, New Mexico - February 2002. GJO-2001-276-TAR. MAC-GWSHP 13.3-1.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2001-276-TAR MAC-GWSHP13.3-1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Results of A Piezocone Investigation Shiprock, New Mexico February 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0020-28-003 Document Number U0145400 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0145400 DOE/Grand Junction Office Results of A Piezocone InvestigationShiprock, New Mexico February 2002 Page 2 Executive Summary A piezocone

  6. Dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products containing coal tar and menthol for over-the-counter human use; amendment to the monograph. Final rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-03-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule amending the final monograph (FM) for over-the-counter (OTC) dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products to include the combination of 1.8 percent coal tar solution and 1.5 percent menthol in a shampoo drug product to control dandruff. FDA did not receive any comments or data in response to its previously proposed rule to include this combination. This final rule is part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products.

  7. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

  8. Search for neutral Higgs bosons in the multi-$b$-jet topology in 5.2fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    Data recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are analyzed to search for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b quarks. The search is performed in the three-b-quark channel using multijet-triggered events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.2 fb{sup -1}. In the absence of any significant excess above background, limits are set on the cross section multiplied by the branching ratio in the Higgs boson mass range 90 to 300 GeV, extending the excluded regions in the parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  9. Search for sneutrino production in $e\\mu$ final states in 5.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt(s) =1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-07-01

    We report the results of a search for R parity violating (RPV) interactions leading to the production of supersymmetric sneutrinos decaying into e{mu} final states using 5.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Having observed no evidence for production of e{mu} resonances, we set direct bounds on the RPV couplings {lambda}{prime}{sub 311} and {lambda}{sub 312} as a function of sneutrino mass.

  10. Search for Randall-Sundrum gravitons in the dielectron and diphoton final states with 5.4fb$^{-1}$ of data from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.

    2010-04-01

    Using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we search for decays of the lightest Kaluza-Klein mode of the graviton in the Randall-Sundrum model to ee and {gamma}{gamma}. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of the lightest graviton between 560 GeV and 1050 GeV for values of the coupling k/{bar M}{sub Pl} between 0.01 and 0.1.

  11. Combined CDF and D0 upper limits on $gg\\to H\\to W^+W^-$ and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Doug; /Tufts U.

    2011-08-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and gg {yields} H {yields} ZZ in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. With 8.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 8.1 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.01 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.40 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.47 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 124 and 286 GeV.

  12. Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb(-1) of pp collision data at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Khalek, SA; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, OS; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbia, E; Acharya, BS; Adamczyk, L; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Ad

    2012-03-29

    A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb{sup -1} to 4.9 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions collected at {radical}s = 7 TeV is presented. The Higgs boson mass ranges 112.9-115.5 GeV, 131-238 GeV and 251-466 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level (CL), while the range 124-519 GeV is expected to be excluded in the absence of a signal. An excess of events is observed around m{sub H} {approx} 126 GeV with a local significance of 3.5 standard deviations ({sigma}). The local significances of H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, H {yields} ZZ{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}{prime}{sup +}{ell}{prime}{sup -} and H {yields} WW{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{ell}{prime}{sup -}{bar {nu}}, the three most sensitive channels in this mass range, are 2.8{sigma}, 2.1{sigma} and 1.4{sigma}, respectively. The global probability for the background to produce such a fluctuation anywhere in the explored Higgs boson mass range 110-600 GeV is estimated to be {approx}1.4% or, equivalently, 2.2{sigma}.

  13. Search for Higgs boson production in dilepton and missing energy final states with 5.4 fb-1 of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) =1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2010-01-01

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson is presented using events with two charged leptons and large missing transverse energy selected from 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess of events above background predictions is found, and observed (expected) upper limits at 95% confidence level on the rate of Higgs boson production are derived that are a factor of 1.55 (1.36) above the predicted standard model cross section at m{sub H} = 165 GeV.

  14. Search for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy in 6.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $\\mathbf{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s}=1.96}$~TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto

    2010-08-01

    We report a search for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and correspond to 6.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The observed missing transverse energy distribution is well described by the standard model prediction, and 95% C.L. limits are derived on two realizations of theories beyond the standard model. In a gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking scenario, the breaking scale {Lambda} is excluded for {Lambda} < 124 TeV. In a universal extra dimension model including gravitational decays, the compactification radius R{sub c} is excluded for R{sub c}{sup -1} < 477 GeV.

  15. Search for $ZH \\rightarrow \\ell^+\\ell^-b\\bar{b}$ production in $4.2$~fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96~\\TeV$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-08-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 4.2 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Selected events contain one reconstructed Z {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} candidate and at least two jets, including at least one b-tagged jet. In the absence of an excess over the background expected from other standard model processes, limits on the ZH cross section multiplied by the branching ratios are set. The limit at M{sub H} = 115 GeV is a factor of 5.9 larger than the standard model prediction.

  16. Search for a heavy neutral gauge boson in the dielectron channel with 5.4~fb$^{-1}$ of $\\mathbf{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s} = 1.96}$~TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abazov, V.; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-08-01

    We report the results of a search for a heavy neutral gauge boson Z' decaying into the dielectron final state using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model prediction is observed in the dielectron invariant-mass spectrum. We set 95% C.L. upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} Z') x BR(Z' {yields} ee) depending on the dielectron invariant mass. These cross section limits are used to determine lower mass limits for Z' bosons in a variety of models with standard model couplings and variable strength.

  17. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?sJ/?? using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0?J/ ?? in 8 fb? of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ?sJ/??, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ??s, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s?J/??. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb? accumulated with the D0 detector using pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ??s=0.163+0.065?0.064 ps? and ?sJ/??=?0.55+0.38?0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  18. Measurement of the CP-violating phase phi sJ/psi phi using the flavor-tagged decay Bs(0) -> J/psi phi in 8 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, {phi}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}, from the flavor-tagged decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb{sup -1} accumulated with the D0 detector using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} = 0.163{sub -0.064}{sup +0.065} ps{sup -1} and {phi}{sub s}{sup J}/{psi}{phi} = -0.55{sub -0.36}{sup +0.38}. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  19. A search for resonant production of tt? pairs in 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-10-27

    We search for resonant production of tt? pairs in 4.8 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp? collision data at ?s = 1.96 TeV in the lepton+jets decay channel, where one top quark decays leptonically and the other hadronically. A matrix element reconstruction technique is used; for each event a probability density function (pdf) of the tt? candidate invariant mass is sampled. These pdfs are used to construct a likelihood function, whereby the cross section for resonant tt? production is estimated, given a hypothetical resonance mass and width. The data indicate no evidence of resonant production of tt? pairs. A benchmark model of leptophobic Z' ? tt? is excluded with mZ' < 900 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  20. Search for the Production of Narrow t anti-b Resonances in 1.9 fb-1 of p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-02-01

    We present new limits on resonant tb production in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We reconstruct a putative tb mass in events with a lepton, neutrino candidate, and two or three jets, and search for anomalous tb production as modeled by W{prime} {yields} tb. We set a new limit on a right-handed W{prime} with standard model-like coupling, excluding any mass below 800 GeV at 95% C.L. For any narrow W{prime}-like state with mass above 800 GeV, the cross-section is found to be less than 0.28 pb at 95% C.L. We also present an exclusion of the W{prime} coupling strength versus W{prime} mass.

  1. Measurement of the ?*? distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb-1 of pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-04-06

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable ?*? for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb1 at ?s = 1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable ?*? probes the same physical effects as the Z/?* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurements at any collider of the ?*? distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z ? ?+? boson mass peak. As a result, the data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.

  2. A search for resonant production of tt̄ pairs in 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-27

    We search for resonant production of tt̄ pairs in 4.8 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp̄ collision data at √s = 1.96 TeV in the lepton+jets decay channel, where one top quark decays leptonically and the other hadronically. A matrix element reconstruction technique is used; for each event a probability density function (pdf) of the tt̄ candidate invariant mass is sampled. These pdfs are used to construct a likelihood function, whereby the cross section for resonant tt̄ production is estimated, given a hypothetical resonance mass and width. The data indicate no evidence of resonant production of tt̄ pairs. A benchmark modelmore » of leptophobic Z' → tt̄ is excluded with mZ' < 900 GeV at 95% confidence level.« less

  3. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  4. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

  5. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH?l?l?bb? Production with the D0 Detector in 9.7 fb? of pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-20

    We present a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 9.7 fb? of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. Selected events contain one reconstructed Z?e?e? or Z????? candidate and at least two jets, including at least one jet identified as likely to contain a b quark. To validate the search procedure, we also measure the cross section for ZZ production in the same final state. It is found to be consistent with its SM prediction. We set upper limits on the ZH production cross section times branching ratio for H?bb? at the 95% C.L. for Higgs boson masses 90?MH?150 GeV. The observed (expected) limit for MH=125 GeV is 7.1 (5.1) times the SM cross section.

  6. Measurement of the φ*η distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb-1 of pp¯ collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-04-06

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable φ*η for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb–1 at √s = 1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable φ*η probes the same physical effects as the Z/γ* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurements at any collider of the φ*η distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z → ℓ+ boson mass peak. As a result, the data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.

  7. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H -> ZZ((*)) -> 4l with 4.8 fb(-1) of pp collision data at root s=7 TeV with ATLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad G.; Abbott B.; Abdallah J.; Khalek S. Abdel; Abdelalim A. A.; Abdesselam A.; Abdinov O.; Abi B.; Abolins M.; AbouZeid U. S.; Abramowicz H.; Abreu H.; Acerbi E.; Acharya B. S.; Adamczyk L.; Adams D. L.; Addy T. N.; Adelman J.; et al.

    2012-04-12

    This Letter presents a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H {yields} ZZ{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}{prime}{sup +}{ell}{prime}{sup -}, where {ell}, {ell}{prime} = e or {mu}, using proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb{sup -1}. The four-lepton invariant mass distribution is compared with Standard Model background expectations to derive upper limits on the cross section of a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass between 110 GeV and 600 GeV. The mass ranges 134-156 GeV, 182-233 GeV, 256-265 GeV and 268-415 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level. The largest upward deviations from the background-only hypothesis are observed for Higgs boson masses of 125 GeV, 244 GeV and 500 GeV with local significances of 2.1, 2.2 and 2.1 standard deviations, respectively. Once the look-elsewhere effect is considered, none of these excesses are significant.

  8. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in the ZH->vvbb channel in 5.2 fb-1 of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2009-12-01

    A search is performed for the standard model Higgs boson in 5.2 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The final state considered is a pair of b jets and large missing transverse energy, as expected from p{bar p} {yields} ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} production. The search is also sensitive to the WH {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b} channel when the charged lepton is not identified. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV, a limit is set at the 95% C.L. on the cross section multiplied by branching fraction for (p{bar p} {yields} (Z/W)H) x (H {yields} b{bar b}) that is a factor of 3.7 larger than the standard model value, consistent with the factor of 4.6 expected.

  9. y12 1950-55 FB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  10. GJO-2000-183-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LREP 6.1.13 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2000 Annual Site Inspection and ... Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2000 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring ...

  11. Process for detoxifying coal tars

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longwell, John P. (Cambridge, MA); Peters, William A. (Arlington, MA)

    1983-01-01

    A process for treating liquid hydrocarbons to remove toxic, mutagenic and/or carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons comprises feeding the hydrocarbons into a reactor where vapors are thermally treated in contact with a catalyst consisting essentially of calcium oxide or a calcium oxide containing mineral. Thermally treating liquid hydrocarbons in contact with calcium oxide preferentially increases the cracking of aromatics thus producing a product having a reduced amount of aromatic compounds.

  12. Tar Sands | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    jobs are considered, an even larger job growth number is found. The net value of oil sands rose from 1.3 billion to 22.8 billion over that same period. This resulted in a...

  13. GJO-2000-163-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... The Utah Air Conservation Rules address the prevention and control of air pollution sources in Utah and establish air quality emission standards and monitoring requirements. ...

  14. The Search for VH $\\bf\\to$ VWW Standard Model \\\\ Higgs Production in the Trilepton Signature\\\\ with $\\bf5.9\\fb$ of Data from $\\bf\\ppbar$ Collisions \\\\ at $\\bf\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nett, Jason Michael; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-06-01

    We present here the search for Standard Model VH {yields} VWW {yields} lll + E{sub T} (missing energy due to neutrinos) production, where V is a W or Z weak vector boson, which uses up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This analysis has recently added to the CDF high-mass Higgs group three new signal topologies characterized by a tri-lepton signature, which are chosen to isolate the VH {yields} VWW associated production signals in the three-lepton signature. As such, we define three new regions for a WH analysis, a ZH 1-jet analysis, and a ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis with which we expect to contribute an additional {approx} 5.8% (for m{sub H} = 165 GeV) acceptance to the current H {yields} WW dilepton analysis. The ZH trilepton regions are defined by events passing a Z-boson selection: events having at least one lepton pairing (among three possible pairings) with opposite sign, same flavor, and a dilepton invariant mass within [76.0, 106.0] GeV - a {+-} 15 GeV window around the Z-boson mass. The WH trilepton region is then defined as the set of trilepton events that are complement to those chosen by the Z-boson selection. These three new event topologies make a substantial contribution to the H {yields} WW group result. As a measure of the sensitivity of this search, we compute the median expected limit on the at 95% confidence level ('C.L.') on the production cross section (effectively the rate of production) for a Standard Model Higgs boson and report the result as a ratio to the theoretical production cross section. An observed limit ratio of one or less at a given mass would rule out the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson at that mass with 95% confidence. At m{sub H} = 165 GeV, the WH analysis expected limits reach 7.2 times the standard model cross section; the ZH 1-jet analysis is set at 29 times the expected standard model cross section; the ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis is set at 9.9 times the expected standard model cross section; and the combined

  15. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 2 -- Jointly sponsored research program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  16. Implementation of an ex situ stabilization technique at the Sand Springs superfund site to solidify and stabilize acid tar sludges involving a quick-lime based stabilization process and innovative equipment design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManus, R.W.; Grajczak, P.; Wilcoxson, J.C.; Webster, S.D.

    1997-12-31

    An old refinery site was safely remediated a year before schedule and for 25% less than final engineering estimates for the stabilization remedy thanks to energetic project management and innovative design involving ex situ stabilization/solidification of acid tar sludges. A quicklime based process, Dispersion by Chemical Reaction (DCR{trademark}), was employed to solidify and stabilize (SS) over 103,000 cubic meters (135,000 cubic yards) of petroleum waste, mostly acidic tarry sludge. The SS process was selected over competing methods because it afforded minimal volume increase, could readily achieve Record of Decision (ROD) specified physical and chemical treatment goals, could be implemented with treatment equipment that minimized emissions, and could be performed with low reagent usage and at low cost. To ensure treatment goals were achieved and an accelerated schedule met, a custom designed and fabricated transportable treatment unit (TTU) was employed to implement the process. The treated material was visually soil-like in character, it was left in stockpiles for periods of time, and it was placed and compacted in the on site landfill using standard earth-moving equipment.

  17. Measurement of sin2 θℓeff and Z-light quark couplings using the forward-backward charge asymmetry in pp -> Z/gamma* -> e+e- events with L=5.0 fb-1 at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.

    2011-07-26

    We measure the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry in 157,553 pp = Z/γ* = e+e- interactions, corresponding to 5.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV. The effective weak mixing angle (θℓeff) from this process involving predominantly the first generation of quarks is extracted as sin2 θℓeff = 0.2309 ± 0.0008 (stat.) ± 0.0006 (syst.). We also present the most precise direct measurement of the vector and axial-vector couplings of u and d quarks to the Z boson.

  18. Measurement of sin2 θℓeff and Z-light quark couplings using the forward-backward charge asymmetry in pp̄ -> Z/gamma* -> e+e- events with L=5.0 fb-1 at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.

    2011-07-26

    We measure the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry in 157,553 pp̄ = Z/γ* = e+e- interactions, corresponding to 5.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV. The effective weak mixing angle (θℓeff) from this process involving predominantly the first generation of quarks is extracted as sin2 θℓeff = 0.2309 ± 0.0008 (stat.) ± 0.0006 (syst.). We also present the most precise direct measurement of the vector and axial-vector couplings of u and d quarks to the Z boson.

  19. FB/SN CRAC Workshops (rates/meetings)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (A to Z) - - - - - - - - - - - - - Account Executives Administrator's RODs Aluminum Industry Study (2000-01) Billing Procedures Customer Service Centers Daily Notice Document...

  20. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2013-10-15

    A method for treating a karsted formation containing heavy hydrocarbons and dolomite includes providing heat to at least part of one or more karsted layers in the formation from one or more heaters located in the karsted layers. A temperature in at least one of the karsted layers is allowed to reach a decomposition temperature of dolomite in the formation. The dolomite is allowed to decompose and at least some hydrocarbons are produced from at least one of the karsted layers of the formation.

  1. GJO-99-112-TAR Rev.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... conditions, but also for planning reconstruction Summary of ... potential for schedule delays caused by technical problems. ...1-89002, Office of Emergency and Remedial Response, ...

  2. GJO-99-112-TAR Rev.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... care, and directs DOE to enter into cooperative agreements ... are insignificant in terms of contaminant adsorption. ... A literature search and treatability study, consisting of ...

  3. Vapor Pressures and Heats of Vaporization of Primary Coal Tars

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Therefore, future research could be directed at measuring the vapor pressures for the ... The results from the current work show that measuring the vapor pressures of complicated ...

  4. Implementation of an Outer Can Welding System for Savannah River Site FB-Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, S.R.

    2003-03-27

    This paper details three phases of testing to confirm use of a Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) system for closure welding the 3013 outer container used for stabilization/storage of plutonium metals and oxides. The outer container/lid closure joint was originally designed for laser welding, but for this application, the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process has been adapted. The testing progressed in three phases: (1) system checkout to evaluate system components for operational readiness, (2) troubleshooting to evaluate high weld failure rates and develop corrective techniques, and (3) pre-installation acceptance testing.

  5. Upgrade of the D0 detector: The Tevatron beyond 2 fb**(-1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Breese; /Mississippi U.

    2005-01-01

    Recent performance of Fermilab's Tevatron has exceeded this year's design goals and further accelerator upgrades are underway. The high-luminosity period which follows these improvements is known as Run IIb. The D0 experiment is in the midst of a comprehensive upgrade program designed to enable it to thrive with much higher data rate and occupancy. Extensive modifications of and additions to all levels of the trigger and the silicon tracker are in progress. All upgrade projects are on schedule for installation in the 2005 shutdown.

  6. Heavy crude and tar sands -- Fueling for a clean and safe environment. Proceedings: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F.

    1995-11-01

    Volume 2 of these proceedings contain 83 papers divided into the following topical sections: Reservoir characterization (7 papers); Well completions and artificial lift methods (11); Extraction and separation (6); Conversion technologies (7); Upgrading and refining (28); Handling and transportation (10); and Environmental studies (14). Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Heavy crude and tar sands - hydrocarbons for the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Volume 5 contains: list of participants; speeches and addresses made at the inaugural ceremony and opening plenary session, keynote speech, and speeches made at the closing plenary session; and question and answer sessions. Questions and answers are from the following sessions: geology, characterization and mining; reservoir behavior, drilling and production; recovery processes; and upgrading, government and environment.

  8. Oil shales and tar sands: a bibliography. Supplement 2, Parts 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grissom, M.C.

    1984-07-01

    This bibliography includes 4715 citations arranged in the broad subject categories: reserves and exploration; site geology and hydrology; drilling, fracturing, and mining; oil production, recovery, and refining; properties and composition; direct uses and by-products; health and safety; marketing and economics; waste research and management; environmental aspects; regulations; and general. There are corporate, author, subject, contract number, and report number indexes.

  9. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the Savannah River Site FB-Line

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Greg Rudy, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Data:C2f657fb-1bf4-43a7-bab8-35adf4b59fa0 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  11. Data:Ffe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  12. Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons below coal-tar-sealed parking lots and effects on stream benthic macroinvertebrate communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scoggins, M.; McClintock, N.L.; Gosselink, L.; Bryer, P.

    2007-12-15

    Parking-lot pavement sealants recently have been recognized as a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban stream sediments in Austin, Texas. Laboratory and field studies have shown that PAHs in sediments can be toxic to aquatic organisms and can degrade aquatic communities. After identifying increases in concentrations of PAHs in sediments below seal-coated parking lots, we investigated whether the increases had significant effects on stream biota in 5 Austin streams. We sampled sediment chemistry and biological communities above and below the point at which stormwater runoff from the parking lots discharged into the streams, thus providing 5 upstream reference sites and 5 downstream treatment sites. Differences between upstream and downstream concentrations of total PAH ranged from 3.9 to 32 mg/kg. Analysis of the species occurrence data from pool and riffle habitats indicated a significant decrease in community health at the downstream sites, including decreases in richness, intolerant taxa, Diptera taxa, and density. In pool sediments, Chironomidae density was negatively correlated with PAH concentrations, whereas Oligochaeta density responded positively to PAH concentrations. In general, pool taxa responded more strongly than riffle taxa to PAHs, but riffle taxa responded more broadly than pool taxa. Increases in PAH sediment-toxicity units between upstream and downstream sites explained decreases in taxon richness and density in pools between upstream and downstream sites.

  13. Heavy crude and tar sands: Hydrocarbons for the 21st century. Volume 4, Upgrading, government and environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F.

    1991-12-31

    The 46 reports in Volume 4 begin with a section in the all-important subject of upgrading. Seventeen papers deals with upgrading of heavy oil and bitumen involving either of two basic processes, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection. Another five reports deal with the treatment of the oil in upgrading process through demetallization and by coprocessing with coal or lignite. The two papers on the Imulsion process present both the technology and the field experiences developed to transport and produce ORIMULSION{trademark}, the fuel developed with the bitumen from the Orinoco Belt. Seven papers in the section on environmental impacts are directed specifically to heavy oil. These deal mostly with the upgrading process, although one addresses the vexing problems of the refusal of extraction fines to settle out of tailings ponds in oil sand processing. A principal objective of the Centre is the fostering of technical cooperation between countries and the transfer of technological expertise in the area of heavy oil and natural bitumens from countries with advanced technology to those with undeveloped resources. The five reports in the section on Marketing and Economics carefully consider the demand in the context of world oil supply. Economic incentives is the stage for the final section of the volume, Government Policies and Legal Considerations. One of these reports presents an excellent review of the Venezuelan oil industry and its major efforts to promote the exploitation and utilization of heavy crude oil. Another of the reports describes ways in which the leasing procedures in Alberta may be modified to make the development of oil sands more effective. A third paper outlines procedures a company may usefully follow in order to most efficiently undertake the entire process of obtaining and developing oil sands leases. Individual papers have been processed separately for the database.

  14. Heavy crude and tar sands: Hydrocarbons for the 21st century. Volume 2, Reservoir behavior, drilling and production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F.

    1991-12-31

    Volume 2 is devoted to heavy oil reservoir behavior, production, and the drilling and completion of wells to meet the special needs of these fascinating but difficult oils and bitumens. The volume begins with four papers describing approaches to the recovery of heavy oil and to two fields subject to different recovery mechanisms. Although most heavy oil fields are produced with the assistance of steam stimulation, which commenced in Venezuela, or steam flood, many other methods for the improvement of recovery are potentially applicable. The seven reports on pilot projects examine mostly the results of studies on the dominant thermal recovery methods - steam stimulation, steam flood, and in situ combustion. The behavior of reservoirs under development through use of horizontal wells is the subject of three reports, of vertical wells, nine papers. Much is still to be teamed concerning the relative advantages of these two distinctive methods of reservoir development. The 18 reports on drilling and production are of great importance to the science and engineering of heavy oil because of the problems heavy oil causes after it is induced to flow to the well bore. Artificial lifting of the oil has traditionally centered on the use of sucker rods, but other methods, such as chamber or cavity-pump lift may prove to be efficacious. Horizontal well drilling is a logical approach to maximizing the amount of reservoir exposed to the well bore but this entails special problems in bore-hole clean-up. Heavy oils, too, pose special, frequently very difficult gravel packing problems. Sand production with heavy oil has always posed both economic and technological difficulties and major effort is devoted to overcoming them, as evidenced by the reports in this section. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. Measurement of the φ*η distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb-1 of pp¯ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-04-06

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable φ*η for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb–1 at √s = 1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable φ*η probes the same physical effects as the Z/γ* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurementsmore » at any collider of the φ*η distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z → ℓ+ℓ– boson mass peak. As a result, the data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.« less

  16. Measurement of the Φ η * distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb - 1 of p p ¯ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2015-04-06

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable Φ*η for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb⁻¹ at √s=1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable Φ*η probes the same physical effects as the Z/γ* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurements at anymore » collider of the Φ*η distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z→l⁺l⁻ boson mass peak. The data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.« less

  17. Erratum to. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross-section in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV using 4.5 fb-1 of data with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C. -M.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Dobos, D.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Florez Bustos, A. C.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Gunther, J.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, J. I.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmes, T. R.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn’ova, T.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Hurwitz, M.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G. -Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jungst, R. M.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Keung, J.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khoriauli, G.; Khoroshilov, A.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiuchi, K.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Kluge, E. -E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; König, S.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Korotkov, V. A.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kreiss, S.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Kruker, T.; Krumnack, N.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kruse, A.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kurumida, R.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; La Rosa, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Laier, H.; Lambourne, L.; Lammers, S.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lasagni Manghi, F.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmacher, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leisos, A.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leontsinis, S.; Leroy, C.; Lester, C. G.; Lester, C. M.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, A.; Lewis, G. H.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, L.; Li, L.; Li, S.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Linde, F.; Lindquist, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Livermore, S. S. A.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loginov, A.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Lombardo, V. P.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lowe, A. J.; Lu, F.; Lu, N.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lungwitz, M.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Machado Miguens, J.; Macina, D.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeno, M.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A.; Magradze, E.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Mahmoud, S.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, A. A.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V. M.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mandelli, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Manfredini, A.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J. A.; Mann, A.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J. F.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marjanovic, M.; Marques, C. N.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massa, L.; Massol, N.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazzaferro, L.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Mechnich, J.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meric, N.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Merritt, H.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J-P.; Meyer, J.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Milstein, D.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mitsui, S.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Morii, M.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Morvaj, L.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, T.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagel, M.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Nanava, G.; Narayan, R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolics, K.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O’Brien, B. J.; O’grady, F.; O’Neil, D. C.; O’Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, M. I.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olchevski, A. G.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Perrino, R.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Qureshi, A.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodrigues, L.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, M.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savard, P.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Struebig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-09-01

    We found that the non-perturbative corrections calculated using Pythia with the Perugia 2011 tune did not include the effect of the underlying event. The affected correction factors were recomputed using the Pythia 6.427 generator. These corrections are applied as baseline to the NLO pQCD calculations and thus the central values of the theoretical predictions have changed by a few percent with the new corrections. This has a minor impact on the agreement between the data and the theoretical predictions. Figures 2 and 6 to 13, and all the tables have been updated with the new values. A few sentences in the discussion in sections 5.2 and 9 were altered or removed.

  18. Data:B485777c-c4fb-42b3-8d2a-3da95f7c7c10 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a-3da95f7c7c10 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  19. Turbine fuels from tar sands bitumen and heavy oil. Phase I. Preliminary process analysis. Interim report, 8 July 1983-9 April 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, A.F.; Elanchenny, V.; Macris, A.; Schwedock, J.P.

    1985-04-09

    The strategic potential of domestic bitumens and heavy crude oils as substitutes for imported crude rests with their efficient conversion into aviation turbine fuels. In this Phase I study, preliminary analyses of several processing schemes were performed. The comparison included both hydrogen-addition and carbon-rejection upgrading processes. Projected JP-4 yields, costs, and thermal efficiencies suggest further exploration of the hydrovisbreaking process. For Phase II, laboratory-scale demonstration of the recommended process is proposed.

  20. eia846bp01_10.g

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Coke - Unrefined or Green * Marketable Petroleum Coke - Calcined * Waste Oils and Tars (excluding Coal Tar) * Other Petroleum-based Combustion Energy Sources Energy Source ...

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1979 to the DOE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    resource development, oil shale and tar sand research, and multitechnology development. ... AND DOSIMETRY; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS Word Cloud More Like ...

  2. PBL FY 2002 Third Quarter Review Forecast of Generation Accumulated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revenue Basis. The FB CRAC Revenue Basis is the total generation revenue (not including LB CRAC) for the loads subject to FB CRAC plus Slice loads, for the year in which the FB...

  3. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

    1999-06-25

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

  4. Turbine fuels from tar sands bitumen and heavy oil. Volume 1. Phase 3. Pilot plant testing, final design, and economics. Final report, 1 June 1985-31 March 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, A.F.; Carson, T.C.; Magill, L.G.; Swesey, J.R.

    1987-08-01

    Pilot-plant-scale demonstration of an upgrading/refining scheme to convert bitumen or heavy crude oil into high yields of specification-quality aviation turbine fuel was performed. An atmospheric residue from San Ardo (California) crude was converted under hydrovisbreaking conditions to synthetic crude for further refining. Naphtha cuts from the straight run and synthetic crude were combined, catalytically hydrotreated, then hydrocracked. Products from these operations were combined to produce two prototype specification fuels (JP-4 and JP-8) as well as two heavier, variable-quality fuels. An engineering design (Volume II) was developed for a 50,000 BPSD grass-roots refinery, from the pilot-plant operations. Capital investment and operating costs were estimated, and fuel manufacturing costs projected. Conclusions and recommendations for further work are included.

  5. Index of /documents/public/root/material/4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Size Description DIR Parent Directory - ROOTGUIs.pdf 14-Jul-2009 00:34 1.1M DIR ROOTGUIPROGRAMS 13-Jul-2009 18:24 - TarBallGUIPrograms.tar 13-Jul-2009 18:25 15...

  6. Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, ... GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, ...

  7. HTAR Usage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To specify what HPSS username to use set the HPSSPRINCIPAL environmental variable: % env HPSSPRINCIPALusername htar -cf nova.tar nova To list the member files of nova.tar type: ...

  8. Index of /datasets/files/961/pub

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ARCHIVE 02-Jul-2013 09:51 - COMMERCIALLOADDATAEPLUSOUTPUT.part1.tar.gz 03-Nov-2013 13:09 386M COMMERCIALLOADDATAEPLUSOUTPUT.part2.tar.gz 03-Nov-2013 13:12 386M ...

  9. Key Issues in Syngas Cleanup

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Res. 2005, 44, 7945-7956. 7. Nitsch, X. et al., Energy Fuels 2013, 27, 5459-5465. 9 T 900C for tar conversion? EQUILIBRIUM DATA SAYS SO T increase 600 950C, less tar ...

  10. PNNL-18482

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Then syngas is sent to a tar reformer and a scrubber. Syngas free of tars and particulates ... feed rate is assumed to be 2000 metric tonesday of dry feed (2205 short tons per day). ...

  11. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Final report, July 1989--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    Research and development of surface extraction and upgrading processes of western tar sands are described. Research areas included modified hot water, fluidized bed, and rotary kiln pyrolysis of tar sands for extraction of bitumen. Bitumen upgrading included solvent extraction of bitumen, and catalytic hydrotreating of bitumen. Characterization of Utah tar sand deposits is also included.

  12. Efficiency Improvements - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 / june Efficiency Improvements - 2016 June Dual-Purpose Positioner Installed on NIF NIF's new Target and Diagnostic Manipulator (TANDM), the first of two new combination diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIM) and warm target positioners, was installed in the NIF Target Bay during the first week of June. Along with the current target positioner (TarPos) and cryogenic TarPos, the third target inserter will enhance NIF's efficiency by allowing the Cryo TarPos to remain dedicated to growing

  13. Strategic Significance of Americas Oil Shale Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... When the petroleum production peak occurs, the consequences will be severe if import-depen... unconventional fossil energy sources, namely liquids from oil shale, coal, and tar sand. ...

  14. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Brown University: Brain blood flow simulation with NekTar; a continuum model Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Brown University: Brain ...

  15. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    as sulfur and various metals; Drip gases, and liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. ...

  16. Bladen County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dublin, North Carolina East Arcadia, North Carolina Elizabethtown, North Carolina Kelly, North Carolina Tar Heel, North Carolina White Lake, North Carolina White Oak, North...

  17. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    workshop Traeger R K ed Harding B W GEOSCIENCES GEOTHERMAL ENERGY PETROLEUM NATURAL GAS OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS BOREHOLES SAMPLING WELL...

  18. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    USDOE - Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE)","02 PETROLEUM; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; BIOFUELS;...

  19. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Available","58 GEOSCIENCES; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; BOREHOLES; SAMPLING;...

  20. DOE Project 18546, AOP Task 1.1, Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Combustion Engines Bunting, Bruce G ORNL; Bunce, Michael ORNL 02 PETROLEUM; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; BIOFUELS;...

  1. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects on Advanced Combustion Engines Bunting Bruce G ORNL Bunce Michael ORNL PETROLEUM OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS SYNTHETIC FUELS ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS BIOFUELS CHEMISTRY...

  2. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; API GRAVITY; BOILING POINTS; MOLECULAR WEIGHT; OIL SANDS; PETROLEUM; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; STEAM; TESTING; ...

  3. 2. Chemical Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hydrocarbons (coal, oil shale, tar sand...); Renewable biofuels (alcohols, biodiesel...) - Engines: New concepts (direct injection, HCCI, low temperature...) * Combustion-enabled ...

  4. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3. 'Total' is the sum of all of the listed energy sources, including wood waste, hydrogen, and waste oils and tars. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing...

  5. FORM EIA-846(F)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    packing materials, etc.) Pulping or black liquor Waste oils and tars Biomass Hydrogen Other combustible energy sources: (List separately), K? Census use only sv(2) 216...

  6. Western Research Institute: Annual technical progress report, October 1986--September 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    Accomplishments for the year are presented for the following five areas of research: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuel research. Oil shale research covers: chemical and physical characterization of reference shales; oil shale retorting studies; and environmental base studies for oil shale. Tar sand covers: reference resource (tar sand deposits) evaluation; chemical and physical propeerties of reference tar sand; recovery processes; mathematical modeling; product evaluation; and environmental base studies. Underground coal gasification covers environmental impact assessment and groundwater impact mitigation. Advanced process technology includes advanced process analysis (contaminant control and new technology) and advanced mitigation concepts. Advanced fuels research is on jet fuels from coal. (AT).

  7. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted July 9, 2013 Particle analysis shows "tar ball" effect is significant LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 9, ...

  8. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-table 8b...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sum of all of the listed energy sources, and other energy sources such as wood waste, hydrogen, and waste oils and tars. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing...

  9. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-table 8b...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sum of all of the listed energy sources, and other energy sources such as wood waste, hydrogen, and waste oils and tars. Sources:Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing...

  10. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 4...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. 'Total' is the sum of all of the listed energy sources, including wood waste, hydrogen, and waste oils and tars. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing...

  11. SPRNG

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002483WKSTN00 SPRNG Scalable Parallel Random Number Generator LIbrary http://www.cs.fsu.edu/~asriniva/sprng1.1.tar

  12. Hydraulic fracturing: insights from field, lab, and numerical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 03 NATURAL GAS; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 02 PETROLEUM; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR ...

  13. Proceedings of the wellbore sampling workshop (Conference) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 58 GEOSCIENCES; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; 04 OIL SHALES ... Geology, & Exploration; 040100 -- Oil Shales & Tar Sands-- Reserves & ...

  14. Method of producing synthetic pitch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennel, Elliot B.; Stansberry, Peter G.; Stiller, Alfred H.; Zondlo, John W.

    2012-07-24

    Embodiments of a method are described for modifying pitches, oils, tars, and binders by using these materials as solvents to extract organic chemicals from coal.

  15. Microsoft Word - n0075700-4_5 Acre April to June 2004.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... and are more resistant to natural degradation, a phenomenon ... microbiological, dissolved gas, and geochemical testing to ... Site Biosparge System Integration Plan, GJO-2000-182-TAR, ...

  16. Whirlpool: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1420)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Whirlpool Corporation finding that refrigerator-freezer basic model 8TAR81 does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  17. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... sulfur absorbent) to oxidize sulfur to SO2 initial catalyst - zinc titanium oxide ... D. Sweeney, B. Christensen and K. Whitty. "Primary methods for reducing tar content in syngas ...

  18. AMG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMG AMG Description AMG is a parallel algebraic multigrid solver for linear systems arising from problems on unstructured grids. Download Download the AMG2013 tar file (updated May...

  19. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-05-07

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through September 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood projects. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the fourth quarter 2000 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being evaluated.

  20. SR0004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 1999 Media Contact: James R. Giusti (803) 725-2889 DOE Releases Accident Investigation Report On FB-Line Workers' Plutonium Intake Flag Ribbon Art Aiken, SC - The Department of Energy's Savannah River Operations Office (SR) today issued its Accident Investigation Board's findings on the cause of plutonium intakes by seven Savannah River Site (SRS) employees in the FB-Line facility. On September 1, 1999, plutonium was released from a failed plutonium storage canister at the Site's FB-Line

  1. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  2. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... I c3tr9830.0cr JrL lm l m ROOM FLOOR TOP V I EI FAI-I FAI.2 F A2-2 FAI -3 F A2-3 FA I.4 FAI-5 FA2-5 FBI-3 FB2-3 FBI-4 FB I.5 FB2-5 FrcuRE 4-2 LocATtoNs oF POSr-REMEDIAL AcrloN ...

  3. FY 2004 Second Quarter Review Forecast of Generation Accumulated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonneville Power Administration Power Business Line Generation (PBL) Accumulated Net Revenue Forecast for Financial-Based Cost Recovery Adjustment Clause (FB CRAC) and Safety-Net...

  4. PBL FY 2003 Third Quarter Review Forecast of Generation Accumulated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2003 Bonneville Power Administration Power Business Line Generation Accumulated Net Revenue Forecast for Financial-Based Cost Recovery Adjustment Clause (FB CRAC) and Safety-Net...

  5. NREL: Energy Analysis - Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gasification combine cycle (IGCC), fluidized bed (FB), and supercritical pulverized coal-combustion technologies), NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review life ...

  6. Oak Ridge Operations Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... I BAYO CANYON GLOSSARY ABBREVIATIONSTERMS DEFINITIONS AEC Atomic Energy Commission alpha ... FB&DU Ford, Bacon & Davis Utah Inc. gamma background Natural gamma ray activity everywhere ...

  7. AMG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMG AMG Description AMG is a parallel algebraic multigrid solver for linear systems arising from problems on unstructured grids. Download Download the AMG2013 tar file (updated May 20, 2013) How to Build $ tar xf amg2013.tar $ cd AMG2013/src Edit Makefile for your environment $ make The executable can be found in the 'test' directory. You can also 'make clean' or 'make veryclean' from the src directory. How to Run AMG requires specifying both the dimensionality of the problem and the scale, in

  8. HTAR Usage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage HTAR Usage HTAR is a command line utility that creates and manipulates HPSS-resident tar-format archive files. It is ideal for storing groups of files in HPSS. Since the tar file is created directly in HPSS, it is generally faster and uses less local space than creating a local tar file then storing that into HPSS. Furthermore, HTAR creates an index file that (by default) is stored along with the archive in HPSS. This allows you to list the contents of an archive without retrieving it to

  9. Design of an upgraded D0 silicon microstrip tracker for Run IIb at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanagaki, K.; /Fermilab

    2004-01-01

    The D0 collaboration planned to upgrade the Silicon Tracker to withstand the radiation dose corresponding to above 2 fb{sup -1} of data. This new detector was designed to be functional up to at least 15 fb{sup -1}. The authors report on the design of the new Silicon Tracker with details of the innermost layer.

  10. Clean Coal Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of harmful pollutants from coal, including mercury, sulfur and coal tars. References: Clean Coal Technologies1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

  11. Newbie question: How to view commercial/residential load profile...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Help TIA. Submitted by Baritone700 on 12 January, 2015 - 09:49 3 answers Points: 0 Hello, I provide user support for SAM. We do not use .tar files to distribute SAM, so I'm a...

  12. Using Cray MPI:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... help - Ex: PHASTA (CFD-turbulent flows) many MPIAllreduce calls * At 2048 processes : reduction from 262 sec to 218 sec. - Ex: But slowed down NekTarG (CFD-Blood Flow) by about ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Everything1 Electronic Full Text1 Citations0 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject earth sciences (1) oil shales & tar sands(04) (1) Filter by Author ...

  14. U-111: IBM AIX ICMP Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Deny Service...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    aixefixessecurityicmpfix.tar Addthis Related Articles U-096: IBM AIX TCP Large Send Offload Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service V-031: IBM WebSphere DataPower...

  15. Editedby]ody H.

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... The plugs are made of either two-part epoxy (TPE) or coal-tar epoxy (CTE) and remain intact following the test. D. Detonation The explosion initially creates an ...

  16. ARM Data File Standards: Version 1.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... (sss)(inst)(Fn).(dl).(yyyymmdd).(hhmmss).(xxx).(zzz).tar ARM Standards Committee, May ... the file or an instrument serial number. (xxx) is lower-case characters or numbers used ...

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1979 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment Part 4 Physical Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, J. M.

    1980-02-01

    This volume contains 63 articles on physical science activities in diverse areas, including coal, fission, radiation physics, geothermal resource development, oil shale and tar sand research, and multitechnology development.

  18. Proceedings of the wellbore sampling workshop Traeger, R.K. ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Harding, B.W. 58 GEOSCIENCES; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; BOREHOLES; SAMPLING;...

  19. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development of CFD Based Simulation Tools for In Situ Thermal Processing of Oil Shale Sands None OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS In our research we are taking the novel approach of...

  20. Development of CFD-Based Simulation Tools for In-Situ Thermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CFD-Based Simulation Tools for In-Situ Thermal Processing of Oil ShaleSands None 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS In our research, we are taking the novel approach of developing and...

  1. Buildings | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    have downloaded SAM (20112414) and cannot access open the .tar files. Help TIA. Dc Big solar-panel maker First Solar and Colorado's Clean Energy Collective ink deal Posted by:...

  2. DOE Tour of Zero: The Vista Palm Drive by Southeast Volusia Habitat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    single-story structure, hip-roof design, and bottom course of asphalt shingles are tar glued as well as nailed to the CDX plywood sheathing to make for a wind- and...

  3. An Industrial Membrane System Suitable for Distributed Used Oil...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    such as thermal and chemical stability, including waste oil re-refining, coal tar oil clean-up, and FCC slurry upgrading. * In parallel, use these applications and know-how ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing ...

  5. Task

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Noise exposure d) Application of cold coal tar coating to asphalt * Dermal contact ... up of high concentrations of carbon monoxide gas CO andor other by-products of combustion. ...

  6. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-11-08

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and

  7. Microsoft Word - S06815_2010 Ann Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 2000. Final Site Observational Work Plan for the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site, GJO-2000-169-TAR, Rev. 2, Grand Junction Office, Grand ...

  8. Microsoft Word - S07834_2011 Ann Rpt_ag comment revs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 2000. Final Site Observational Work Plan for the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site, GJO-2000-169-TAR, Rev. 2, Grand Junction Office, Grand ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Everything1 Electronic Full Text1 Citations0 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject geosciences (1) natural gas (1) oil shales and tar sands (1) petroleum ...

  10. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    74044007. True color image of light (PW1, PW2) and unpainted tar (PD1), and concrete (PD2) roofs at the Pantnagar, India site taken on October 21, 2011. We note that the...

  11. Microsoft Word - cover.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Grand Junction, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site May 2001 GJO-1999-90-TAR MAC-GWGRJ 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for ...

  12. Microsoft Word - u01493_July2002.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Remediation at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Site July 2002 U0149300 GJO-2001-297-TAR GWSHP1.9 Final Ground Water Compliance Action ...

  13. F:\\SHARE\\SE\\Web_Origs\\Wrk_Jan\\00-055\\U0027401.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9-TAR Phase I Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Tuba City, Arizona, UMTRA Site ... DOEGrand Junction Office Phase I Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Tuba City, ...

  14. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... transesterifcation methods (i.e., 0.26 gal vs. 0.51gal). ... shales, tar sands, gasifed coal, and chicken fat, and are ... Fuels CO 2 Sourceess - power plants - other industrial ...

  15. CX-007648: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Tar Sands Bitumen Extraction CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/29/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  16. Xeu York, Xeu York

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ttooku cue I'ila . . tar. Prot. Bureru . : X.Y.S. D8puemat of .L+w . I Xeu York, Xeu York -- 8.' : I . ..; .: - -- ---: POXA Material8 fra8 Dot - c .-. .-,--. - - I' ?-.-' 0 ...

  17. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels | OSTI, US Dept...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (1994) 29 Life Cycle Assessment of Coal-fired Power Production Spath, P. L.; Mann, ... AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja (1997) 23 ...

  18. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y.; Boysen, John E.; Branthaver, Jan F.

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  19. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond The In-Between World of the Mesoscale by Kathy Chambers on Tue, June 23, 2015 Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Brown University: Brain blood flow simulation with NekTar; a continuum model Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Brown University: Brain blood flow simulation with NekTar; a continuum modelEmerging mesoscale science opportunities are among the most promising for future research. The in-between world of the mesoscale

  20. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-01-31

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through September 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Fourth Quarter 2001 performing routine well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood and Tar V pilot steamflood projects. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 through November 2001 to increase production and injection. In December, water injection well FW-88 was plug and abandoned and replaced by new well FW-295 into the ''D'' sands to accommodate the Port of Long Beach at their expense. Well workovers are planned for 2002 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations

  1. Ecological risk assessment of elemental pollution in sediment from Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, Sabah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elias, Md Suhaimi; Hamzah, Mohd Suhaimi; Rahman, Shamsiah Ab; Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah; Siong, Wee Boon; Sanuri, Ezwiza

    2014-02-12

    Eleven (11) surface sediment samples were collected from Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, Sabah. The neutron activation analysis (NAA) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) techniques were applied for the determinations metal contents and their distributions in sediment samples. The results shown that Arsenic (As) concentrations are enriched at all sampling stations except for station TAR 09, with enrichment factor (EF) values ranged from 1.1 to 7.2. The elements such as Cd, Cr, Sb and U showed enrichment at a few stations and other elements (Cr, Cu, Pb, Th, Zn) shown as background levels in all stations. Degrees of contamination in this study were calculated base on concentrations of six elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn). TAR 11 station can be categorized as very high degree of contamination with degree of contamination value of 43.2. TAR 07 station can be categorized as a considerable degree of contamination (contamination value of 16.9). Six stations (TAR 01, 03, 04, 05, 06, 08, 10) showed moderate degree of contamination, with contamination values ranging from 8.0 to 16.0. TAR 02 and TAR 09 stations showed low degree of contaminations (< 8.0). TAR 11 showed very high ecological risk index (R{sub I}) with RI value is 916. TAR 07 and TAR 10 showed moderate ecological risk index with R{sub I} value 263 and 213, respectively. Other stations showed low ecological risk with RI values ranging from 42.3 to 117 (< 150). Very high ecological risk index could give an adverse effect to the benthic organism. The data obtained from the enrichment factor, degree of contamination and ecological risk index provided vital information, which can be used for future comparison. Information from the present study will be useful to the relevant government agencies and authorities in preparing preventive action to control direct discharge of heavy metals from industries, agro-base activities and domestic waste to the rivers and the sea.

  2. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-05-08

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Second Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A steamflood reservoirs have been operated over fifteen months at relatively stable pressures, due in large part to the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase in January 1999. Starting in the Fourth Quarter 2000, the project team has ramped up activity to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical

  3. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-11-01

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through June 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Third Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 to September 2001 to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for

  4. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-04-30

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are

  5. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be

  6. EIS-0220: Supplemental record of decision and supplement analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fuel located in the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) at the SRS, using the F-Canyon and FB-Line facilities. The TRR spent nuclear fuel to be stabilized consists of the...

  7. Search for Violation of CPT and Lorentz Invariance in B-s(0)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We present the first search for CPT-violating effects in the mixing of B0s mesons using the full Run II data set with an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb-1 of proton-antiproton ...

  8. October 2005 - March 2006 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    above provides a table of monthly Slice, PF, RL, and IP rates with a 30.56% non-Slice LB + FB + SN CRAC adjustment for each month of the six-month rate period. The table below...

  9. October 2004 - March 2005 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The PDF documents above provide tables of monthly Slice, PF, RL, and IP rates with the LB + FB + SN CRAC adjustments for each month of the rate period. The table below is simply...

  10. April - September 2005 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    above provides a table of monthly Slice, PF, RL, and IP rates with a 36.93% non-Slice LB + FB + SN CRAC adjustment for each month of the six-month rate period. The table below...

  11. October 2003 - March 2004 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    above provides a table of monthly Slice, PF, RL, and IP rates with a 43.66% non-Slice LB + FB + SN CRAC adjustment for each month of the rate period. The table below is simply a...

  12. October 2002 - March 2003 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    above provides a table of monthly Slice, PF, RL, and IP rates with a 43.91% non-Slice LB + FB CRAC adjustment for each month of the six-month rate period. The table below is...

  13. April - September 2003 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    above provides a table of monthly Slice, PF, RL, and IP rates with a 49.50% non-Slice LB + FB CRAC adjustment for each month of the six-month rate period. The table below is...

  14. April - September 2004 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    above provides a table of monthly Slice, PF, RL, and IP rates with a 47.00% non-Slice LB + FB + SN CRAC adjustment for each month of the six-month rate period. The table below...

  15. Los Angeles, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FB EcoSolutions LLC GFI Energy Ventures LLC Geothermal Power of America Global Clean Energy Holdings LLC GCEH Green Technology Institute at UCLA Grid Partners Hydrogen Car Co...

  16. Safety Net (SN) CRAC (rates/adjustments)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oregon. To participate by telephone, please call Cynthia Jones (503) 230-5459 or Cain Bloomer (503-230-7443) in advance of the workshop. August 28, 2003 - Final FB and SN...

  17. Search for Standard Model Production of Four Top Quarks in the Lepton + Jets Channel in pp Collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-27

    Our search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t¯tt¯t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM t¯tt¯t production is σSMt¯tt¯t≈1fb. A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. We determined that the data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set atmore » a 95% confidence level on the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 ± 17 fb is expected.« less

  18. Chiral U(1) Flavor Models and Flavored Higgs Doublets: The Top...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chiral U(1) Flavor Models and Flavored Higgs Doublets: The Top FB Asymmetry and the Wjj Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chiral U(1) Flavor Models and Flavored Higgs ...

  19. EIS-0219: F-Canyon Plutonium Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of processing the plutonium solutions to metal form using the F-Canyon and FB-Line facilities at the Savannah River Site.

  20. Combined search for anomalous pseudoscalar HVV couplings in VH...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bosons V ( W or Z) in a sample of proton-proton collision events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.9 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is presented. ...

  1. Recent results in b quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrington, Sinead M.; /Liverpool U.

    2007-12-01

    The summer 2007 results in b quark physics in 0.7 to 2.2 fb{sup -1} of CDFII data are summarized. Results in b production, mixing, new observations and branching ratio measurements are discussed.

  2. Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NNMCAB Upcoming Events calendar icon Calendar of Events Stay Connected fb.png googleplusicon.png YouTube-gray-shade.jpeg Northern New Mexico Citizens Advisory Board NNMCAB Logo ...

  3. Glass Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Name: Location: Depth: Initial Flow Rate: "fb" is not declared as a valid unit of measurement for this property. The given value was not understood. Flow Test Comment:...

  4. FY 2002 Generation Audited Accumulated Net Revenues, February...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to rates for the FY 2003- 2006 period through the SN CRAC to achieve a five-year 80% TPP, then applying no further FB or SN CRAC adjustments, potentially combined with using...

  5. Discovering colorons at the early stage LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dicus, Duane A.; Kao, Chung; Sayre, Joshua; Nandi, S.

    2011-05-01

    Prospects are investigated for the discovery of massive hypergluons using data from the early runs of the Large Hadron Collider. A center of mass energy of 7 TeV and an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1} or 5 fb{sup -1} are assumed. A phenomenological Lagrangian is adopted to evaluate the cross section of a pair of colored vector bosons (colorons, {rho}-tilde) decaying into four colored scalar resonances (hyperpions, {pi}-tilde), which then decay into eight gluons. The dominant eight-jet background from the production of 8g, 7g1q, 6g2q, and 5g3q is included. We find an abundance of signal events and that realistic cuts reduce the background enough to establish a 5{sigma} signal for the coloron mass of up to 733 GeV with 1 fb{sup -1} or 833 GeV with 5 fb{sup -1}.

  6. Search for Standard Model Production of Four Top Quarks in the Lepton + Jets Channel in pp Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-27

    Our search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t¯tt¯t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM t¯tt¯t production is σSMt¯tt¯t≈1fb. A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. We determined that the data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set at a 95% confidence level on the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 ± 17 fb is expected.

  7. Search for New Physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strologas, John; /New Mexico U.

    2009-06-01

    We present the current status of the search for new physics at CDF, using integrated luminosity up to 3.2 fb{sup -1}. We cover searches for supersymmetry, extra dimensions, new heavy bosons, and generic dilepton resonances.

  8. Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Mixed TRU Waste Streams: SR-W026-221F-HET-A through D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunsford, G.F.

    2001-10-02

    This document, along with referenced supporting documents provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for the heterogeneous debris mixed transuranic waste streams generated in the FB-Line after January 25, 1990 and before March 20, 1997.

  9. Forward-Backward Asymmetry of Top Quark Pair Productionn at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Ziqing

    2015-12-01

    This dissertation presents the final measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry (AFB) of top quark-antiquark pair events (t t-) at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t t- events are produced in proton{anti-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 1:96 TeV during the Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurements are performed with the full CDF Run II data (9.1 fb-1) in the final state that contain two charged leptons (electrons or muons, the dilepton final state), and are designed to con rm or deny the evidence-level excess in the AFB measurements in the final state with a single lepton and hadronic jets (lepton+jets final state) as well as the excess in the preliminary measurements in the dilepton final state with the first half of the CDF Run II data. New measurements include the leptonic AFB (AlFB), the lepton-pair AFB (All FB) and the reconstructed top AFB (At t FB). Each are combined with the previous results from the lepton+jets final state measured at the CDF experiment. The inclusive Al FB, All FB, and At t FB measured in the dilepton final state are 0.072 ± 0.060, 0.076 ± 0.081, and 0.12 ± 0.13, to be compared with the Standard Model (SM) predictions of 0.038 ± 0.003, 0.048 ± 0.004, and 0.010 ± 0.006, respectively. The CDF combination of AlFB and At t FB are 0.090+0:028 -0.026, and 0.160 ± 0.045, respectively. The overall results are consistent with the SM predictions.

  10. Contouring and Constraining Bowel on a Full-Bladder Computed Tomography Scan May Not Reflect Treatment Bowel Position and Dose Certainty in Gynecologic External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaparpalvi, Ravindra Mehta, Keyur J.; Bernstein, Michael B.; Kabarriti, Rafi; Hong, Linda X.; Garg, Madhur K.; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a gynecologic cancer setting, changes in bowel position, dose-volume parameters, and biological indices that arise between full-bladder (FB) and empty-bladder (EB) treatment situations; and to evaluate, using cone beam computed tomography (CT), the validity of FB treatment presumption. Methods and Materials: Seventeen gynecologic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed. Empty-bladder and FB CTs were obtained. Full-bladder CTs were used for planning and dose optimization. Patients were given FB instructions for treatment. For the study purpose, bowel was contoured on the EB CTs for all patients. Bowel position and volume changes between FB and EB states were determined. Full-bladder plans were applied on EB CTs for determining bowel dose-volume changes in EB state. Biological indices (generalized equivalent uniform dose and normal tissue complication probability) were calculated and compared between FB and EB. Weekly cone beam CT data were available in 6 patients to assess bladder volume at treatment. Results: Average (±SD) planned bladder volume was 299.7 ± 68.5 cm{sup 3}. Median bowel shift in the craniocaudal direction between FB and EB was 12.5 mm (range, 3-30 mm), and corresponding increase in exposed bowel volume was 151.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 74.3-251.4 cm{sup 3}). Absolute bowel volumes receiving 45 Gy were higher for EB compared with FB (mean 328.0 ± 174.8 vs 176.0 ± 87.5 cm{sup 3}; P=.0038). Bowel normal tissue complication probability increased 1.5× to 23.5× when FB planned treatments were applied in the EB state. For the study, the mean percentage value of relative bladder volume at treatment was 32%. Conclusions: Full-bladder planning does not necessarily translate into FB treatments, with a patient tendency toward EB. Given the uncertainty in daily control over bladder volume for treatment, we strongly recommend a “planning-at-risk volume bowel” (PRV{sub B}owel) concept to account for bowel motion

  11. JV Task 46 - Development and Testing of a Thermally Integrated SOFC-Gasification System for Biomass Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip Hutton; Nikhil Patel; Kyle Martin; Devinder Singh

    2008-02-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center has designed a biomass power system using a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) thermally integrated with a downdraft gasifier. In this system, the high-temperature effluent from the SOFC enables the operation of a substoichiometric air downdraft gasifier at an elevated temperature (1000 C). At this temperature, moisture in the biomass acts as an essential carbon-gasifying medium, reducing the equivalence ratio at which the gasifier can operate with complete carbon conversion. Calculations show gross conversion efficiencies up to 45% (higher heating value) for biomass moisture levels up to 40% (wt basis). Experimental work on a bench-scale gasifier demonstrated increased tar cracking within the gasifier and increased energy density of the resultant syngas. A series of experiments on wood chips demonstrated tar output in the range of 9.9 and 234 mg/m{sup 3}. Both button cells and a 100-watt stack was tested on syngas from the gasifier. Both achieved steady-state operation with a 22% and 15% drop in performance, respectively, relative to pure hydrogen. In addition, tar tolerance testing on button cells demonstrated an upper limit of tar tolerance of approximately 1%, well above the tar output of the gasifier. The predicted system efficiency was revised down to 33% gross and 27% net system efficiency because of the results of the gasifier and fuel cell experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of thermally integrating a gasifier and a high-temperature fuel cell in small distributed power systems.

  12. Flat band potential measurements of naked and viologen-modified n-WS[sub 2] electrodes in aqueous iodide and triiodide solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, J.; Wrighton, M.S. )

    1994-09-15

    The flat band potentials, E[sub FB], of naked n-WS[sub 2] electrodes and cationic viologen polymer-modified n-WS[sub 2] electrodes have been determined in KI and KI[sub 3] solutions by differential capacitance measurements. The E[sub FB] values for naked n-WS[sub 2] electrodes are shifted negatively in electrolyte media containing I[sup [minus

  13. SR9913

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10, 1999 Media Contact: Jim Giusti (803) 725-2889 DOE Initiates Investigation Into FB Line Worker Contamination Flag Ribbon Art Aiken, SC - The Department of Energy's Savannah River Operations Office has initiated action to establish a Type-B Investigation Board as a result of a preliminary dose estimate for the one of the seven SRS workers contaminated in routine operations in FB Line on September 1, 1999. The preliminary dose estimate exceed established federal exposure limits and exceeds

  14. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  15. Biomass Gasification Technology Assessment: Consolidated Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worley, M.; Yale, J.

    2012-11-01

    Harris Group Inc. (HGI) was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to assess gasification and tar reforming technologies. Specifically, the assessments focused on gasification and tar reforming technologies that are capable of producing a syngas suitable for further treatment and conversion to liquid fuels. HGI gathered sufficient information to analyze three gasification and tar reforming systems. This report summarizes the equipment, general arrangement of the equipment, operating characteristics, and operating severity for each technology. The order of magnitude capital cost estimates are supported by a basis-of-estimate write-up, which is also included in this report. The report also includes Microsoft Excel workbook models, which can be used to design and price the systems. The models can be used to analyze various operating capacities and pressures. Each model produces a material balance, equipment list, capital cost estimate, equipment drawings and preliminary general arrangement drawings. Example outputs of each model are included in the Appendices.

  16. Unconventional petroleum: a current awareness bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grissom, M.C.

    1983-10-30

    The summaries in this bulletin cover both secondary and tertiary recovery of petroleum and the following topics under Oil Shales and Tar Sands: reserves and exploration; site geology and hydrology; drilling, fracturing, and mining; oil production, recovery, and refining; properties and composition; direct uses and by-products; health and safety; marketing and economics; waste research and management; environmental aspects; and regulations. These summaries and older citations to information on petroleum, oil shales, and tar sands back to the 1960's are available for on-line searching and retrieval on the Energy Data Base using the DOE/RECON system or commercial on-line retrieval systems. Retrospective searches can be made on any aspect of petroleum, oil shales, or tar sands, or customized profiles can be developed to provide current information for each user's needs.

  17. Woo-Sun Yang! NERSC User Engagement Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paraver and BSC Tools Training - 1 - August 5, 2016 Introduction * Code performance tool suite developed at Barcelona Supercompu=ng Center (BSC), Spain * Instructor - Judit Gimenez, BSC, Spain * Presenta=on slides will be available from - h5p://www.nersc.gov/users/training/events/paraver-2016/ * Example codes in /project/projectdirs/training/2016/BSC_Tools * Use Cori Phase 1 * For in-person par=cipants - Wireless network: lbnl-visitor - 2 - $ module load training $ cp $EXAMPLES/*.tar . $ tar xvf

  18. Parallel Paradigm for Ultraparallel Multi-Scale Brain Blood Flow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Parallel Paradigm for Ultraparallel Multi-Scale Brain Blood Flow Simulations Authors: Grinberg, L., Karniadakis, G.E. In this paper we present one approach in building a scalable solver NekTarG for solution of multi-scale and large size problems [1]. NekTarG has been designed for multi-scale blood modeling. The macro-vascular scales describing the flow dynamics in large vessels are coupled to the mesovascular scales unfolding dynamics of

  19. mdtest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mdtest mdtest Description mdtest is a program that measures performance of various metadata operations. It uses MPI to coordinate the operations and to collect the results. The code is composed of one C file, mdtest.c. Download Download the mdtest-1.8.4.tar file. How to Build MPI and gmake are required in order to build the code. To build the code, un-tar the archive, cd to the src directory (which will be named "mdtest-<version>" and type "gmake." The resulting

  20. Method and apparatus for automated, modular, biomass power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P; Lilley, Arthur; Browne, III, Kingsbury; Walt, Robb Ray; Duncan, Dustin; Walker, Michael; Steele, John; Fields, Michael; Smith, Trevor

    2013-11-05

    Method and apparatus for generating a low tar, renewable fuel gas from biomass and using it in other energy conversion devices, many of which were designed for use with gaseous and liquid fossil fuels. An automated, downdraft gasifier incorporates extensive air injection into the char bed to maintain the conditions that promote the destruction of residual tars. The resulting fuel gas and entrained char and ash are cooled in a special heat exchanger, and then continuously cleaned in a filter prior to usage in standalone as well as networked power systems.

  1. Method and apparatus for automated, modular, biomass power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P.; Lilley, Arthur; Browne, Kingsbury III; Walt, Robb Ray; Duncan, Dustin; Walker, Michael; Steele, John; Fields, Michael; Smith, Trevor

    2011-03-22

    Method and apparatus for generating a low tar, renewable fuel gas from biomass and using it in other energy conversion devices, many of which were designed for use with gaseous and liquid fossil fuels. An automated, downdraft gasifier incorporates extensive air injection into the char bed to maintain the conditions that promote the destruction of residual tars. The resulting fuel gas and entrained char and ash are cooled in a special heat exchanger, and then continuously cleaned in a filter prior to usage in standalone as well as networked power systems.

  2. Paving the way: The use of solar energy in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabler, H. )

    1990-12-01

    Major roads in China, although never intended for today's heavy traffic, have been greatly abetted by Shao Shu Ren's method of solar tar preparation. Ren's method uses simple techniques. A solar melter is a passive component which requires little maintenance apart from regular cleaning. Many skilled workers know how to operate an electric-heating system. Electric heat considerably reduces the danger of fire that is always present when working with tar near an open flame. Finally, the implementing of this process trains people to work with solar energy, demonstrates its practical use, and may point the way to the application of solar energy in other spheres of production.

  3. Material for radioactive protection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, R.S.; Boyer, N.W.

    A boron containing burn resistant, low-level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source is described. The material is basically composed of borax in the range of 25 to 50%, coal tar in the range of 25 to 37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  4. RADIATION-RESISTANT FIBER OPTIC STRAIN SENSORS FOR SNS TARGET INSTRUMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blokland, Willem; Bryan, Jeff; Riemer, Bernie; Sangrey, Robert L; Wendel, Mark W; Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of stresses and strains in the mercury tar-get vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is important to understand the structural dynamics of the target. This work reports the development of radiation-resistant fiber optic strain sensors for the SNS target in-strumentation.

  5. Whirlpool: Order (2013-SE-1420)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Whirlpool Corporation to pay a $5,329,800 civil penalty after finding Whirlpool had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 26,649 units of basic model 8TAR81 noncompliant refrigerator-freezer.

  6. RedLeaf Resources Ecoshale Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RedLeaf Resources Ecoshale Project RedLeaf Resources Ecoshale Project Overview of oil shale reserves, unique oil extraction issues, novel approach for cost-effective extraction deer08_patten.pdf (6.04 MB) More Documents & Publications Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources - Oil Shale and Tar Sands Oil Shale Research in the United States EERE: VTO - Red Leaf PNG Image

  7. Effects of insulation for the steam string of the TS-1S experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayland, J. R.

    1980-07-01

    The character of the steam quality at the production depth in the Laramie Energy Technology Center's Tar Sand steam injection field experiment is studied. A series of calculations were made using the BORE wellbore heat loss code. The results are given in graphical form along with simple functional fits for use in the field.

  8. NEW METHOD OF GRAPHITE PREPARATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, S.D.; Harper, W.T.

    1961-08-29

    BS>A method is described for producing graphite objects comprising mixing coal tar pitch, carbon black, and a material selected from the class comprising raw coke, calcined coke, and graphite flour. The mixture is placed in a graphite mold, pressurized to at least 1200 psi, and baked and graphitized by heating to about 2500 deg C while maintaining such pressure. (AEC)

  9. Building Energy Performance Data Transforming Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential energy efBiciency is associated with lower m ortgage d efault a nd p repayment r isk National s ample o f 7 1,000 m ortgage l oans o 29,994 E nergy S tar o 46,118 C ...

  10. Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Nelson

    2009-10-01

    This report is a preliminary comparison of conventional and potential HTGR-integrated processesa in several common industrial areas: ? Producing electricity via a traditional power cycle ? Producing hydrogen ? Producing ammonia and ammonia-derived products, such as fertilizer ? Producing gasoline and diesel from natural gas or coal ? Producing substitute natural gas from coal, and ? Steam-assisted gravity drainage (extracting oil from tar sands).

  11. High coking value pitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Douglas J.; Chang, Ching-Feng; Lewis, Irwin C.; Lewis, Richard T.

    2014-06-10

    A high coking value pitch prepared from coal tar distillate and has a low softening point and a high carbon value while containing substantially no quinoline insolubles is disclosed. The pitch can be used as an impregnant or binder for producing carbon and graphite articles.

  12. Gridley Biofuels Project Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Balance for Conversion of 1,000 lbs. (dry, ash free) of Biomass (B) to Products ... 8.8 Wax 0.0 4.0 Biochar 135.5 135.5 Tars 1.6 1.6 C in Scrubber Water 13.0 13.0 Total Lbs. ...

  13. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31

    The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the

  14. Cameron synthetic fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The increasing scarcity of conventional crude oil resources, as well as the sharply higher prices of crude oil, will generate increased interest in heavy oil, tar sands, and oil shale as potential substitutes. For all of these unconventional oil resources, extraction will be much more difficult, time consuming, and costly than for conventional crude oil. Although the inplace resources are vast and exist in many areas including the United States, the USSR, western Europe, Canada, and Latin America, probably only a small fraction of the inplace resources will prove to be economically extractable. These unconventional oil resources are now being developed in several locations around the world, and depending upon the exact definition probably account for less than 1 percent of current world oil supplies. The major current developments include: Canadian tar sands. Heavy oil production at Yarega in the Komi Autonomous Republic in the Soviet Union. The USSR also burns shale for power generation in Estonia. Venezuelan production of heavy oil in the Orinoco Heavy Oil Belt is currently about 15,000 b/d. Oil shale is likely to prove much less important than heavy oil and tar sands over the next 20 years. Further development of these unconventional resources is planned, and many projects are under way or under study. On the basis of current planning, world output of heavy oils and oil from tar sands and shale will be unlikely to exceed 2 million b/d by 1990, roughly five time today's level. However, both of these resources will require the development of new technologies for any large increases in output above what is now planned. The bulk of Canada's tar sands exists at great depths and will require the development of in situ processes for extraction. In the Orinoco, heavy metals contained in the oil make it difficult to refine with existing technology.

  15. Comparison of Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Rake Receiver with a Maximum Ratio Combining Multicarrier Spread Spectrum Receiver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daryl Leon Wasden; Hussein Moradi; Behrouz Farhang-Broujeny

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the performance of a filter bank-based multicarrier spread spectrum (FB-MC-SS) system. We consider an FB-MC-SS setup where each data symbol is spread across multiple subcarriers, but there is no spreading in time. The results are then compared with those of the well-known direct sequence spread spectrum (DS-SS) system with a rake receiver for its best performance. We compare the two systems when the channel noise is white. We prove that as the processing gains of the two systems tend to infinity both approach the same performance. However, numerical simulations show that, in practice, where processing gain is limited, FB-MC-SS outperforms DS-SS.

  16. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of top-quark and antiquark pairs using the full CDF Run II data set

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2016-06-03

    In this study, we measure the forward--backward asymmetry of the production of top quark and antiquark pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energymore » $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96~\\mathrm{TeV}$$ using the full data set collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in Tevatron Run II corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $$9.1~\\rm{fb}^{-1}$$. The asymmetry is characterized by the rapidity difference between top quarks and antiquarks ($$\\Delta y$$), and measured in the final state with two charged leptons (electrons and muons). The inclusive asymmetry, corrected to the entire phase space at parton level, is measured to be $$A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}} = 0.12 \\pm 0.13$$, consistent with the expectations from the standard-model (SM) and previous CDF results in the final state with a single charged lepton. The combination of the CDF measurements of the inclusive $$A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}$$ in both final states yields $$A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}=0.160\\pm0.045$$, which is consistent with the SM predictions. We also measure the differential asymmetry as a function of $$\\Delta y$$. A linear fit to $$A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}(|\\Delta y|)$$, assuming zero asymmetry at $$\\Delta y=0$$, yields a slope of $$\\alpha=0.14\\pm0.15$$, consistent with the SM prediction and the previous CDF determination in the final state with a single charged lepton. The combined slope of $$A_{\\text{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}}(|\\Delta y|)$$ in the two final states is $$\\alpha=0.227\\pm0.057$$, which is $$2.0\\sigma$$ larger than the SM prediction.« less

  17. Measurement of the W Boson Mass with the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Buszello C. P.; Camacho-Perez E.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Caughron S.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Feng L.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De la Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Howley I.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson E.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu H.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel K. A.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-04-12

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass using data corresponding to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector during Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. With a sample of 1677394 W {yields} e{nu} candidate events, we measure M{sub W} = 80.367 {+-} 0.026 GeV. This result is combined with an earlier D0 result determined using an independent Run II data sample, corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, to yield M{sub W} = 80.375 {+-} 0.023 GeV.

  18. Constraints on anomalous top quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of distributions associated with the pair production of top quarks at the LHC can be used to constrain (or observe) the anomalous chromomagnetic dipole moment(k) of the top. For example, using either the tt(bar) invariant mass or the Pt distribution of top we find that sensitivities to ; k; of order 0.05 are obtainable with 100 /fb of integrated luminosity. This is similar in magnitude to what can be obtained at a 500 GeV NLC with an integrated luminosity of 50 /fb through an examination of the e(+)e(-) right arrow tt(bar)g process.

  19. Validation of a 4D-PET Maximum Intensity Projection for Delineation of an Internal Target Volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne ; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Dunn, Leon; Thompson, Mick; Siva, Shankar; Aarons, Yolanda; Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne ; Binns, David; Hicks, Rodney J.; Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The delineation of internal target volumes (ITVs) in radiation therapy of lung tumors is currently performed by use of either free-breathing (FB) {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) or 4-dimensional (4D)-CT maximum intensity projection (MIP). In this report we validate the use of 4D-PET-MIP for the delineation of target volumes in both a phantom and in patients. Methods and Materials: A phantom with 3 hollow spheres was prepared surrounded by air then water. The spheres and water background were filled with a mixture of {sup 18}F and radiographic contrast medium. A 4D-PET/CT scan was performed of the phantom while moving in 4 different breathing patterns using a programmable motion device. Nine patients with an FDG-avid lung tumor who underwent FB and 4D-PET/CT and >5 mm of tumor motion were included for analysis. The 3 spheres and patient lesions were contoured by 2 contouring methods (40% of maximum and PET edge) on the FB-PET, FB-CT, 4D-PET, 4D-PET-MIP, and 4D-CT-MIP. The concordance between the different contoured volumes was calculated using a Dice coefficient (DC). The difference in lung tumor volumes between FB-PET and 4D-PET volumes was also measured. Results: The average DC in the phantom using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was lowest for FB-PET/CT (DCAir = 0.72/0.67, DCBackground 0.63/0.62) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DCAir = 0.84/0.83, DCBackground = 0.78/0.73). The average DC in the 9 patients using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was also lowest for FB-PET/CT (DC = 0.45/0.44) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DC = 0.72/0.73). In the 9 lesions, the target volumes of the FB-PET using 40% and PET edge, respectively, were on average 40% and 45% smaller than the 4D-PET-MIP. Conclusion: A 4D-PET-MIP produces volumes with the highest concordance with 4D-CT-MIP across multiple breathing patterns and lesion sizes in both a phantom and among patients. Freebreathing PET/CT consistently

  20. CPsuperH2.3: an Updated Tool for Phenomenology in the MSSM with Explicit CP Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.S.; Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Pilaftsis, A.; Wagner, C.E.M.

    2013-04-01

    We describe the Fortran code CPsuperH2.3, which incorporates the following updates compared with its predecessor CPsuperH2.0. It implements improved calculations of the Higgs-boson masses and mixing including stau contributions and finite threshold effects on the tau-lepton Yukawa coupling. It incorporates the LEP limits on the processes e^+e^-->H_iZ,H_iH_j and the CMS limits on H_i->@t@?@t obtained from 4.6 fb^-^1 of data at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. It also includes the decay mode H_i->Z@c and the Schiff-moment contributions to the electric dipole moments of Mercury and Radium 225, with several calculational options for the case of Mercury. These additions make CPsuperH2.3 a suitable tool for analyzing possible CP-violating effects in the MSSM in the era of the LHC and a new generation of EDM experiments. Program summary: Program title: CPsuperH2.3 Catalogue identifier: ADSR_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSR_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 24058 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 158721 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran77. Computer: PC running under Linux and computers in Unix environment. Operating system: Linux. RAM: 32 MB Classification: 11.1. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADSR_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180(2009)312 Nature of problem: The calculations of mass spectrum, decay widths and branching ratios of the neutral and charged Higgs bosons in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with explicit CP violation have been improved. The program is based on renormalization-group-improved diagrammatic calculations that include dominant higher

  1. Study of Hadronic Transitions Between \\Upsilon States and Observation of \\Upsilon(4S) to\\eta\\Upsilon(1S) Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B

    2008-07-25

    The authors present a study of hadronic transitions between {Upsilon}(mS) (m = 4,3,2) and {Upsilon}(nS) (n = 2,1) resonances based on 347.5 fb{sup -1} of data taken with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings.

  2. Erratum to: Constraining couplings of top quarks to the Z boson...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We also consider the upcoming high-energy LHC run and find that with 300 inverse fb of data at an energy of 13 TeV the vector and axial ttbZ couplings can be constrained at the 95% ...

  3. Latest Results on Orbitally Excited Strange Bottom Mesons with the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorelov, Igor V.; /New Mexico U.

    2006-10-01

    The authors present the latest results on the spectroscopy of orbitally excited strange bottom mesons from {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of CDF data. The measurements are performed with fully reconstructed B decays collected by the CDF II detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in both the di-muon and the fully hadronic trigger paths.

  4. Measurements of Top Quark Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerrito, Lucio

    2009-05-01

    Preliminary results on the measurement of four selected properties of the top quark are presented. The relative fraction of t{bar t} production through gluon fusion has been measured in the t{bar t} dilepton decay channel by the CDF Collaboration as F{sub gg} = 0.53{sub -0.38}{sup +0.36}. Using an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector, we also determine the t{bar t} differential cross section with respect to values up to {approx}1 TeV of the t{bar t} invariant mass. We present a model-independent measurement of the helicity of W bosons produced in top quark decays, using an integrated luminosity of up to 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector, and find the fraction of longitudinal W bosons f{sub 0} = 0.49 {+-} 0.14, and the fraction of right-handed W bosons f{sub +} = 0.11 {+-} 0.08. Finally, we measure the parton level forward-backward asymmetry of pair produced top quarks using an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector, and find A{sub FB} = 0.19 {+-} 0.07. All results are consistent with the predictions of the standard model.

  5. Microsoft Word - 2013-12-12 P&RA CoP Webinar_121113

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ...j.php?MTIDm9b93ed24d0ae38ab9e7b0fb59fd5dab7 Meeting number: 998 033 386 Meeting password: Meeting1 Join by phone 1-650-479-3208 Call-in toll number (USCanada) Access code: ...

  6. Observation of [ital D][sup 0][r arrow][ital K][sup +][pi][sup [minus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinabro, D.; Henderson, S.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Gollin, G.; Ong, B.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Ball, S.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; O'Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Daubenmier, C.M.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Skovpen, Y.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.L.; Wood, M.; Brown, D.N.; Fast, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Payne, D.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.H.; Dominick,

    1994-03-07

    Using the CLEO II data sample, with an integrated luminosity of 1.8 fb[sup [minus]1] at and near the [Upsilon](4[ital S]) resonance, we have observed a signal for [ital D][sup 0][r arrow][ital K][sup +][pi][sup [minus

  7. Constraints on pdf uncertainties from CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Issever, C.; /Oxford U.

    2006-04-01

    Recent electroweak measurements and jet physics results from CDF which constrain the parton density functions (PDFs) are presented. Measurements of the W charge asymmetry, W and Z as well as jet cross sections based on k{sub T} and midpoint algorithm with up to 1 fb{sup -1} RunII data are discussed.

  8. Mechanism of formation of the response of a hydrogen gas sensor based on a silicon MOS diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaman, V. I.; Balyuba, V. I.; Gritsyk, V. Yu.; Davydova, T. A.; Kalygina, V. M.

    2008-03-15

    Experimental data on the dependence of the flat-band voltage and relaxation time for the capacitance of the space-charge region in an MOS diode (Pd-SiO{sub 2}-n-Si) on the hydrogen concentration in a hydrogen/air gaseous mixture are discussed. It is assumed that variation in the flat-band voltage U{sub fb} in an MOS structure with the thickness d = 369 nm subjected to a hydrogen/air gaseous mixture can be accounted for by the formation of dipoles in the Pd-SiO{sub 2} gap due to polarization of hydrogen atoms (H{sub a}). An analytical expression describing the dependence of variation in the flat-band voltage {delta}U{sub fb} on the hydrogen concentration n{sub H2} was derived. In MOS structures with d {<=} 4 nm (or MOS diodes), the value of {delta}U{sub fb} is mainly controlled by passivation of the centers responsible for the presence of the surface acceptor-type centers at the SiO{sub 2}-n-Si interface by hydrogen atoms. Analytical expressions describing the dependences of {delta}U{sub fb} and the capacitance relaxation time in the space-charge region on n{sub H2} are derived. The values of the density of adsorption centers and the adsorption heat for hydrogen atoms at the Pd-SiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}-n-Si interfaces are found.

  9. SU-E-J-35: Using CBCT as the Alternative Method of Assessing ITV Volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Redler, G; Chu, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To study the accuracy of Internal Target Volumes (ITVs) created on cone beam CT (CBCT) by comparing the visible target volume on CBCT to volumes (GTV, ITV, and PTV) outlined on free breathing (FB) CT and 4DCT. Methods A Quasar Cylindrical Motion Phantom with a 3cm diameter ball (14.14 cc) embedded within a cork insert was set up to simulate respiratory motion with a period of 4 seconds and amplitude of 2cm superioinferiorly and 1cm anterioposteriorly. FBCT and 4DCT images were acquired. A PTV-4D was created on the 4DCT by applying a uniform margin of 5mm to the ITV-CT. PTV-FB was created by applying a margin of the motion range plus 5mm, i.e. total of 1.5cm laterally and 2.5cm superioinferiorly to the GTV outlined on the FBCT. A dynamic conformal arc was planned to treat the PTV-FB with 1mm margin. A CBCT was acquired before the treatment, on which the target was delineated. During the treatment, the position of the target was monitored using the EPID in cine mode. Results ITV-CBCT and ITV-CT were measured to be 56.6 and 62.7cc, respectively, with a Dice Coefficient (DC) of 0.94 and disagreement in center of mass (COM) of 0.59 mm. On the other hand, GTV-FB was 11.47cc, 19% less than the known volume of the ball. PTV-FB and PTV-4D were 149 and 116 cc, with a DC of 0.71. Part of the ITV-CT was not enclosed by the PTV-FB despite the large margin. The cine EPID images have confirmed geometrical misses of the target. Similar under-coverage was observed in one clinical case and captured by the CBCT, where the implanted fiducials moved outside PTV-FB. Conclusion ITV-CBCT is in good agreement with ITV-CT. When 4DCT was not available, CBCT can be an effective alternative in determining and verifying the PTV margin.

  10. Applications of organo-calcium chemistry to control contaminant aromatic hydrocarbons in advanced coal gasification processes: Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longwall, J.P.; Chang, C.C.S.; Lai, C.K.S.; Chen, P.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Peters, W.A.

    1988-09-01

    The broad goal of this contract was to provide quantitative understanding of the thermal reactions of aromatics contaminants with calcium oxide under conditions pertinent to their in situ or out-board reduction or elimination from advanced coal gasification process and waste streams. Specific objectives were formalized into the following four tasks: cracking of fresh coal pyrolysis tar, benzene cracking, CaO deactivation behavior, and preliminary economic implications. The approach primarily involved laboratory scale measurements of rates and extents of feed conversion, and of quality indices or compositions of the resulting products, when pure aromatic compounds or newly formed coal pyrolysis tars undergo controlled extents of thermal treatment with CaO of known preparation history. 70 refs., 54 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas in a high-throughput gasifier. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmann, H.F.; Paisley, M.A.; Folsom, D.W.; Kim, B.C.

    1981-10-31

    Results of the experimental work conducted thus far have shown that wood can be readily gasified in a steam environment into a hydrocarbon rich fuel gas that can be used as a replacement for petroleum-based fuels or natural gas with minimal boiler retrofit. Further, this conversion can be achieved in a compact gasification reactor with heat supplied by a circulating entrained phase, thereby eliminating the need for an oxygen plant. Tars have not been found except at the lowest gasifier temperatures employed, and therefore heat recovery from the product gas should be much simpler than that from commercially available fixed-bed gasification systems where product gas contains significant quantities of tar. The data generated have been used in a preliminary conceptual design. Evaluation of this design has shown that a medium-Btu gas can be produced from wood at a cost competitive with natural gas or petroleum-based fuels.

  12. Process for control of pollutants generated during coal gasification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frumerman, Robert; Hooper, Harold M.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improvement in the coal gasification process that effectively eliminates substantially all of the environmental pollutants contained in the producer gas. The raw producer gas is passed through a two-stage water scrubbing arrangement with the tars being condensed essentially water-free in the first stage and lower boiling condensables, including pollutant laden water, being removed in the second stage. The pollutant-laden water is introduced into an evaporator in which about 95 percent of the water is vaporized and introduced as steam into the gas producer. The condensed tars are combusted and the resulting products of combustion are admixed with the pollutant-containing water residue from the evaporator and introduced into the gas producer.

  13. Use of bioassays in assessing health hazards from complex mixtures: A RASH analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, T.D.

    1993-10-14

    The Finney harmonic mean model for joint toxicity of ingredients in mixtures can be used to estimate the toxicity of the neat compound if one component can be substituted in potency-adjusted-doses for each of the other components. Chemical analysis data and relative potency values (computed according to the Rapid Screening of Hazard (RASH) method) were used to compare the toxicities as predicted from ingredients of cigarette smoke, PAHs in diesel exhaust, asphalt, coal tar, pitch, and creosote with the measured toxicities of the neat mixtures. Accuracy for cigarette smoke condensate, coal tar, pitch, and creosote were within a factor of three; asphalt within a factor of 18; but the PAC content of diesel particulate was inadequate to accurately describe the toxicity of diesel emissions.

  14. Health Hazard Evaluation Report No. HHA-80-238-931, new York Port Authority, Brooklyn, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.; Fannick, N.

    1981-08-01

    In August 1980, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request for a Health Hazard Evaluation from the Carpenters Union, Local 1456, AFL-CIO, to evaluate coal tar creosote exposure among dock builders. Specifically, the request concerned six employees engaged in pile-driving creosote-preserved wood logs for a dock underpinning in Brooklyn, New York. NIOSH concluded that coal tar products, including creosote, are carcinogenic (have the potential to cause cancer). Inhalation of CTPVs may increase the risk of developing lung cancer. Direct skin contact with creosote causes acute irritation and can lead to the development of skin tumors, including skin cancer. Recommendations on personal protection and hygiene, respirator usage, and medical monitoring are presented.

  15. Method of producing pyrolysis gases from carbon-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mudge, Lyle K.; Brown, Michael D.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Baker, Eddie G.

    1989-01-01

    A gasification process of improved efficiency is disclosed. A dual bed reactor system is used in which carbon-containing feedstock materials are first treated in a gasification reactor to form pyrolysis gases. The pyrolysis gases are then directed into a catalytic reactor for the destruction of residual tars/oils in the gases. Temperatures are maintained within the catalytic reactor at a level sufficient to crack the tars/oils in the gases, while avoiding thermal breakdown of the catalysts. In order to minimize problems associated with the deposition of carbon-containing materials on the catalysts during cracking, a gaseous oxidizing agent preferably consisting of air, oxygen, steam, and/or mixtures thereof is introduced into the catalytic reactor at a high flow rate in a direction perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the reactor. This oxidizes any carbon deposits on the catalysts, which would normally cause catalyst deactivation.

  16. A new hydrocracking catalyst for heavy oil upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, T. )

    1987-04-01

    In comparison with ordinary oil, tar sands bitumen and vacuum residue contain large quantities of impurities such as asphaltene, heavy metal compounds, sulfur, and nitrogen, which are obstacles to upgrading the refining process. Therefore, these types of materials are extremely difficult to treat with existing refining technologies. In order to upgrade oil feedstocks that are of poor quality, such as tar sands bitumen, new upgrading technologies must be established. In this paper, the author discusses first, the results of catalyst screening, second, the factors of the active catalyst, and finally, the performance of a semi-industrially produced catalyst. The catalyst has high middle-distillate yield, coke plus gum (coke precursors) suppressing ability, low hydrogen consumption and mechanical strength and high temperature stability in slurry reactors.

  17. Driving it home: choosing the right path for fueling North America's transportation future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ann Bordetsky; Susan Casey-Lefkowitz; Deron Lovaas; Elizabeth Martin-Perera; Melanie Nakagawa; Bob Randall; Dan Woynillowicz

    2007-06-15

    North America faces an energy crossroads. With the world fast approaching the end of cheap, plentiful conventional oil, we must choose between developing ever-dirtier sources of fossil fuels -- at great cost to our health and environment -- or setting a course for a more sustainable energy future of clean, renewable fuels. This report explores the full scale of the damage done by attempts to extract oil from liquid coal, oil shale, and tar sands; examines the risks for investors of gambling on these dirty fuel sources; and lays out solutions for guiding us toward a cleaner fuel future. Table of contents: Executive Summary; Chapter 1: Transportation Fuel at a Crossroads; Chapter 2: Canadian Tar Sands: Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel in Endangered Forests; Chapter 3: Oil Shale Extraction: Drilling Through the American West; Chapter 4: Liquid Coal: A 'Clean Fuel' Mirage; Chapter 5: The Investment Landscape: Dirty Fuels Are Risky Business; Chapter 6: The Clean Path for Transportation and Conclusion.

  18. Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.

    1985-06-19

    This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20 to 120 minutes at a temperature of 250 to 750/sup 0/C, preferably 350 to 450/sup 0/C, pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000 to 2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50 to 100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0 to 100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems. 1 fig.

  19. Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sundaram, Muthu S.; Steinberg, Meyer

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20-120 minutes at a temperature of 250.degree.-750.degree. C., preferably 350.degree.-450.degree. C., pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000-2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50-100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0-100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems.

  20. Method and apparatus for combating encroachment by in-situ treated formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowling, D.J.; Palmer, H.A.

    1986-03-18

    In radio frequency heating of oil shale or tar sand formations in-situ wherein a central conductor and a coaxial shield are employed down hole, a method is described of combating the encroachment of the heated formation, comprising applying relative motion to the central conductor periodically for removing the encroaching formation. In radio frequency heating of oil shale or tar sand formations in situ, in combination with an applicator for electromagnetic propagation of radio frequency energy into the formation, the applicator comprising a central conductor extending a predetermined distance beyond the end of a coaxial shielding conductor, and a radio frequency generator is described for supplying the radio frequency energy to the applicator. The improvement described here consists of means associated with the central conductor for moving it relative to the formation whereby encroachment by the formation may be prevented.

  1. Search for new phenomena with photon+jet events in proton-proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2016-03-08

    A search is performed for the production of high-mass resonances decaying into a photon and a jet in 3.2 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s =13 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Selected events have an isolated photon and a jet, each with transverse momentum above 150 GeV. No significant deviation of the γ+jet invariant mass distribution from the background-only hypothesis is found. Limits are set at 95% confidence level on the cross sections of generic Gaussian-shaped signals and of a few benchmark phenomena beyond the Standard Model: excited quarks withmore » vector-like couplings to the Standard Model particles, and non-thermal quantum black holes in two models of extra spatial dimensions. The minimum excluded visible cross sections for Gaussian-shaped resonances with width-to-mass ratios of 2% decrease from about 6 fb for a mass of 1.5 TeV to about 0.8 fb for a mass of 5 TeV. The minimum excluded visible cross sections for Gaussian-shaped resonances with width-to-mass ratios of 15% decrease from about 50 fb for a mass of 1.5 TeV to about 1.0 fb for a mass of 5 TeV. As a result, excited quarks are excluded below masses of 4.4 TeV, and non-thermal quantum black holes are excluded below masses of 3.8 (6.2) TeV for Randall-Sundrum (Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulous-Dvali) models with one (six) extra dimensions.« less

  2. Microsoft Word - U0127400.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    12-TAR MAC-GWMON 1.8 Chemistry of Phase I Phytoremediation Soils: Work Plan for the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project Site September 2001 This page intentionally left blank UMTRA Ground Water Project Chemistry of Phase I Phytoremediation Soils: Work Plan for the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project Site September 2001 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0015-37-000 Document Number U0127400 Work Performed Under DOE

  3. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  4. Domestic Nuclear Detection Office's Approach to Detect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Domestic Nuclear Detection Office's Approach to Detect Concealed Threats Joel Rynes, PhD Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) August 5, 2015 4:00 p.m. The Transformational and Applied Research (TAR) Directorate within the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has the mission to develop break-through technologies that will have a dramatic impact on capabilities to detect nuclear and radiological threats

  5. HTAR Configuration and Installation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Configuration and Installation HTAR Configuration and Installation HTAR is an archival utility similar to gnu-tar that allows for the archiving and extraction of local files into and out of HPSS. Configuration Instructions This distribution has default configuration settings which will work for most environments. If you want to use the default values (recommended) you can skip to the section labeled INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS. In certain environments, for example if your installation is on a

  6. Oil Shale Research in the United States | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research in the United States Oil Shale Research in the United States Profiles of Oil Shale Research and Development Activities In Universities, National Laboratories, and Public Agencies Oil Shale Research in the United States (7.2 MB) More Documents & Publications Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources - Oil Shale and Tar Sands Applicability of a Hybrid Retorting Technology in the Green River Formation National Strategic Unconventional Resource Model

  7. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted July 9, 2013 Particle analysis shows "tar ball" effect is significant LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 9, 2013-Wildfires produce a witch's brew of carbon- containing particles, as anyone downwind of a forest fire can attest. A range of fine carbonaceous particles rising high into the air significantly degrade air quality, damaging human and wildlife health, and interacting with sunlight to affect climate. But measurements

  8. Rate Design and Renewables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    INCIDENCE OF AN OIL GLUT: WHO BENEFITS FROM CHEAP CRUDE OIL IN THE MIDWEST? Severin Borenstein Haas School of Business and Energy Institute at Haas U.C. Berkeley Ryan Kellogg Department of Economics University of Michigan The Midwest oil glut has changed old views about integration of world oil markets * Common statement, pre-2011: "It's a world oil market" * Increased oil production in Canadian tar sands and North Dakota Bakken field changed the Midwest from crude importing to

  9. STREAM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STREAM STREAM Description STREAM is a simple, synthetic benchmark designed to measure sustainable memory bandwidth (in MB/s) and a corresponding computation rate for four simple vector kernels. Download NERSC8-Stream tar file How to Build the Code The version of STREAM provided here is the latest STREAM OpenMP enabled benchmark. (see http://www.cs.virginia.edu/stream/ref.html) Optionally, for GPU architectures, you may choose to run the Scalable Heterogeneous Computing Benchmark Suite (SHOC)

  10. ISC16 IXPUG Performance Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Porting the MIMD Lattice Computation (MILC) Code to the Intel Xeon Phi Knights Landing Processor Author(s): Ruizi Li, Dhiraj Kalamkar, Ashish Jha, Steven Gottlieb, Carleton DeTar, Doug Toussaint, Balint Joo, and Douglas Doerfler | Download File: 14-NERSC-Doerfler-MILC.pdf | pdf | 395 KB Applying the Roofline Performance Model to the Intel Xeon Phi Knights Landing Processor June 23, 2016 | Author(s): Douglas Doerfler, Jack Deslippe, Samuel Williams, Leonid Oliker, Brandon Cook, Thorsten Kurth,

  11. Fundamental studies of coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The authors have examined the pyrolysis of Argonne samples of Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coal in argon, undecane, Tetralin, and water. The effects of the pyrolysis on individual particles of coal were monitored visually in a cell with diamond windows capable of operation to temperature and pressures in excess of 500{degrees}C and 3000 psi. The changes in the particles from ambient to 460{degrees}C were recorded in real time on video tape, and images were then taken from the tape record and analyzed. The study showed that in argon both coals developed tars at 350{degrees}-370{degrees}C. The tars then quickly evaporated, leaving core particles remarkably similar in size and shape to the initial particles. These observations suggest that coal does not melt nor become fully liquid when heated. Nor does the softened coal undergo crosslinking to generate coke. Rather the simple loss of volatiles leaves behind the core residue as coke. Contrary to the common view, there appears to be no link between the bond-breaking processes yielding tar and the interaction of the coal with H-donors leading to liquefaction. Water as a medium was surprising in its effect. Both coals began to shrink at 300{degrees}-350{degrees}C, with the effect appearing to be more of an erosion rather than a uniform loss of substance as seen in Tetralin. The Wyodak continued to shrink to 460{degrees}C to about half its initial size. With the Illinois No. 6 coal, however, the process reversed at around 420{degrees}C, and the particles appeared to grow with the evolution of a tar, continuing to 460{degrees}C. The authors submit that this final observation is evidence for hydrothermal synthesis of hydrocarbons at these conditions.

  12. Multiscale Blood Flow Simulations | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a continuum model Brain blood flow simulation with NekTar; a continuum model. Leopold Grinberg, George Em. Karniadakis, Brown University; Vitali Morozov, Joseph A. Insley, Michael E. Papka, Kalyan Kumaran; Argonne National Laboratory; Dmitry A Fedosov, Forschungszentrum Juelich Multiscale Blood Flow Simulations PI Name: George Karniadakis PI Email: gk@dam.brown.edu Institution: Brown University Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 71 Million Year: 2013 Research Domain: Biological

  13. Ratiometric Sensing of Toxins using Quantum Dots | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INCIDENCE OF AN OIL GLUT: WHO BENEFITS FROM CHEAP CRUDE OIL IN THE MIDWEST? Severin Borenstein Haas School of Business and Energy Institute at Haas U.C. Berkeley Ryan Kellogg Department of Economics University of Michigan The Midwest oil glut has changed old views about integration of world oil markets * Common statement, pre-2011: "It's a world oil market" * Increased oil production in Canadian tar sands and North Dakota Bakken field changed the Midwest from crude importing to

  14. Originally Released: August 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    August 2009" "Revised: October 2009" "Next MECS will be conducted in 2010" "Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,"Waste" ,,,,"Blast",,,,"Pulping Liquor",,"Oils/Tars"

  15. RSE Table 3.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," ","

  16. Inclined fluidized bed system for drying fine coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y.; Merriam, Norman W.; Boysen, John E.

    1992-02-11

    Coal is processed in an inclined fluidized bed dryer operated in a plug-flow manner with zonal temperature and composition control, and an inert fluidizing gas, such as carbon dioxide or combustion gas. Recycled carbon dioxide, which is used for drying, pyrolysis, quenching, and cooling, is produced by partial decarboxylation of the coal. The coal is heated sufficiently to mobilize coal tar by further pyrolysis, which seals micropores upon quenching. Further cooling with carbon dioxide enhances stabilization.

  17. Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merriam, Norman W.; Sethi, Vijay; Brecher, Lee E.

    1994-01-01

    A process for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage.

  18. Syngas to Synfuels Process Development Unit Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Robert C.

    2012-03-30

    The process described is for the gasification of 20 kg/h of biomass (switchgrass) to produce a syngas suitable for upgrading to Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquid fuels (gas, diesel, waxes, etc.). The gas stream generated from gasification is primarily composed of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), steam (H2O), and methane (CH4), but also includes tars, particulate matter, ammonia (NH3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen chloride (HCl), hydrogen sulfide ( H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), etc. as contaminants. The gas stream passes through an array of cleaning devices to remove the contaminants to levels suitable for FT synthesis of fuels/chemicals. These devices consist primarily of an oil scrubber (to remove tars and remaining particulates), sulfur scrubber (to remove sulfur compounds), and a wet scrubber (to remove NH3, HCl and remaining water soluble contaminants). The ammonia and oil scrubbers are absorption columns with a combination of random and structured packing materials, using water and oil as the adsorption liquids respectively. The ammonia scrubber performed very well, while operating the oil scrubber proved to be more difficult due to the nature of tar compounds. The sulfur scrubber is a packed bed absorption device with solid extrudates of adsorbent material, primarily composed of ZnO and CuO. It performed well, but over a limited amount of time due to fouling created by excess tar/particulate matter and oil aerosols. Overall gas contaminants were reduced to below 1 ppm NH3, and less than 1 ppm collective sulfur compounds.

  19. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhichao; Benavides, Pahola T.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Cronauer, Donald C.

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) formation from the pyrolysis of different municipal solid waste fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Hui; Wu, Chunfei; Onwudili, Jude A.; Meng, Aihong; Zhang, Yanguo; Williams, Paul T.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • PAH from pyrolysis of 9 MSW fractions was investigated. • Pyrolysis of plastics released more PAH than that of biomass. • Naphthalene was the most abundant PAH in the tar. • The mechanism of PAH release from biomass and plastics was proposed. - Abstract: The formation of 2–4 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from the pyrolysis of nine different municipal solid waste fractions (xylan, cellulose, lignin, pectin, starch, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET)) were investigated in a fixed bed furnace at 800 °C. The mass distribution of pyrolysis was also reported. The results showed that PS generated the most total PAH, followed by PVC, PET, and lignin. More PAH were detected from the pyrolysis of plastics than the pyrolysis of biomass. In the biomass group, lignin generated more PAH than others. Naphthalene was the most abundant PAH, and the amount of 1-methynaphthalene and 2-methynaphthalene was also notable. Phenanthrene and fluorene were the most abundant 3-ring PAH, while benzo[a]anthracene and chrysene were notable in the tar of PS, PVC, and PET. 2-ring PAH dominated all tar samples, and varied from 40 wt.% to 70 wt.%. For PS, PET and lignin, PAH may be generated directly from the aromatic structure of the feedstock.

  1. Environmental research program for slagging fixed-bed coal gasification. Status report, November 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilzbach, K. E.; Stetter, J. R.; Reilly, Jr., C. A.; Willson, W. G.

    1982-02-01

    A collaborative environmental research program to provide information needed to assess the health and environmental effects associated with large-scale coal gasification technology is being conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center (GFETC). The objectives are to: investigate the toxicology and chemical composition of coal gasification by-products as a function of process variables and coal feed; compare the characteristics of isokinetic side-stream samples with those of process stream samples; identify the types of compounds responsible for toxicity; evaluate the chemical and toxicological effectiveness of various wastewater treatment operations; refine methodology for the collection and measurement of organic vapors and particulates in workplace air; and obtain preliminary data on workplace air quality. So far the toxicities of a set of process stream samples (tar, oil, and gas liquor) and side-stream condensates from the GFETC gasifier have been measured in a battery of cellular screening tests for mutagenicity and cytotoxicity. Preliminary data on the effects of acute and chronic exposures of laboratory animals to process tar have been obtained. The process tar has been chemically fractionated and the distribution of mutagenicity and compound types among the fractions has been determined. Organic vapors and particulates collected at various times and locations in the gasifier building have been characterized.

  2. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2004-03-05

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the

  3. Biomass Gas Cleanup Using a Therminator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dayton, David C; Kataria, Atish; Gupta, Rabhubir

    2012-03-06

    The objective of the project is to develop and demonstrate a novel fluidized-bed process module called a Therminator to simultaneously destroy and/or remove tar, NH3 and H2S from raw syngas produced by a fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. The raw syngas contains as much as 10 g/m3 of tar, 4,000 ppmv of NH3 and 100 ppmv of H2S. The goal of the Therminator module would be to use promising regenerable catalysts developed for removing tar, ammonia, and H2S down to low levels (around 10 ppm). Tars are cracked to a non-condensable gas and coke that would deposit on the acid catalyst. We will deposit coke, much like a fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) in a petroleum refinery. The deposited coke fouls the catalyst, much like FCC, but the coke would be burned off in the regenerator and the regenerated catalyst would be returned to the cracker. The rapid circulation between the cracker and regenerator would ensure the availability of the required amount of regenerated catalyst to accomplish our goal. Also, by removing sulfur down to less than 10 ppmv, NH3 decomposition would also be possible in the cracker at 600-700°C. In the cracker, tar decomposes and lays down coke on the acid sites of the catalyst, NH3 is decomposed using a small amount of metal (e.g., nickel or iron) catalyst incorporated into the catalyst matrix, and H2S is removed by a small amount of a metal oxide (e.g. zinc oxide or zinc titanate) by the H2S-metal oxide reaction to form metal sulfide. After a tolerable decline in activity for these reactions, the catalyst particles (and additives) are transported to the regenerator where they are exposed to air to remove the coke and to regenerate the metal sulfide back to metal oxide. Sulfate formation is avoided by running the regeneration with slightly sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen. Following regeneration, the catalyst is transported back to the cracker and the cycling continues. Analogous to an FCC reactor system, rapid cycling will allow the use of very

  4. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2003-09-04

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the

  5. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2003-06-04

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the

  6. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jet from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.

  7. Early physics with the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzner, A. G.

    2008-08-29

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva (Switzerland) will go into operation in the coming months and will soon enable us to analyse the highest energy collisions ever produced at an accelerator. With a design integrated luminosity of up to 100 fb{sup -1} per year and a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV it will not only allow us to probe the Standard Model beyond the TeV scale but also search for new phenomena such as the Higgs boson, supersymmetric particles, extra spatial dimensions etc. This article summarises a few selected analyses which are foreseen to be performed with the first 0.01 to 1 fb{sup -1}.

  8. Search for standard model production of four top quarks in the lepton + jets channel in pp collisions at ? = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-27

    A search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t?tt?t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6? recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM (t?tt?t) production is ?SM(t?tt?t). A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. The data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set at a 95% confidence level on the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 17 fb is expected.

  9. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top-quark pair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-16

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair (t?tH) is presented, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb? and 19.7 fb? collected in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV respectively. The search is based on the following signatures of the Higgs boson decay: H ? hadrons, H ? photons, and H ? leptons. The results are characterized by an observed t?tH signal strength relative to the standard model cross section, ?=?/?SM, under the assumption that the Higgs boson decays as expected in the standard model. The best fit value is ? = 2.8 1.0 for a Higgs boson mass of 125.6 GeV.

  10. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top-quark pair

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-16

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair (t?tH) is presented, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb? and 19.7 fb? collected in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV respectively. The search is based on the following signatures of the Higgs boson decay: H ? hadrons, H ? photons, and H ? leptons. The results are characterized by an observed t?tH signal strength relative to the standard model cross section, ?=?/?SM, under the assumption that the Higgs boson decays as expected in themorestandard model. The best fit value is ? = 2.8 1.0 for a Higgs boson mass of 125.6 GeV.less

  11. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; → tt̄ data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of Γ + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, wemore » measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.« less

  12. Search for a heavy vector boson decaying to two gluons in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khader, M.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Rao, K.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.

    2012-12-01

    We present a search for a new heavy vector boson Z' that decays to gluons. Decays to on-shell gluons are suppressed, leading to a dominant decay mode of Z'?g*g. We study the case where the off-shell gluon g* converts to a pair of top quarks, leading to a final state of ttg. In a sample of events with exactly one charged lepton, large missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb? collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio of this chromophilic Z' at 95% confidence level from 300 to 40 fb for Z' masses ranging from 400 to 1000 GeV/c, respectively.

  13. Search for a Higgs boson in the mass range from 145 to 1000 GeV decaying to a pair of W or Z bosons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-22

    A search for a heavy Higgs boson in the H → WW and H → ZZ decay channels is reported. The search is based upon proton-proton collision data samples corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb–1 at √s = 7 TeV and up to 19.7fb–1 at √s = 8 TeV, recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. Several final states of the H → WW and H → ZZ decays are analyzed. The combined upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the product of the cross section and branching fraction exclude a Higgs boson with standard model-like couplings and decays in the range 145 < mH < 1000 GeV. In addition, we interpret the results in the context of an electroweak singlet extension of the standard model.

  14. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top-quark pair

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-14

    Our search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair (ttH) is presented, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb-1 and 19.7 fb-1 collected in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV respectively. The search is based on the following signatures of the Higgs boson decay: H → hadrons, H → photons, and H → leptons. These results are characterized by an observed ttH signal strength relative to the standard model cross section, µ = σ/σSM, under the assumption that the Higgs boson decays as expectedmore » in the standard model. The best fit value is µ = 2.8 ± 1.0 for a Higgs boson mass of 125.6 GeV« less

  15. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top-quark pair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-14

    Our search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair (ttH) is presented, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb-1 and 19.7 fb-1 collected in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV respectively. The search is based on the following signatures of the Higgs boson decay: H → hadrons, H → photons, and H → leptons. These results are characterized by an observed ttH signal strength relative to the standard model cross section, µ = σ/σSM, under the assumption that the Higgs boson decays as expected in the standard model. The best fit value is µ = 2.8 ± 1.0 for a Higgs boson mass of 125.6 GeV

  16. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; → tt̄ data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of Γ + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, wemore »measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.« less

  17. Measurement of electroweak production of two jets in association with a Z boson in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-02-10

    The purely electroweak (EW) cross section for the production of two jets in association with a Z boson, in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV, is measured using data recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The electroweak cross section for the lljj final state (with l = e or ? and j representing the quarks produced in the hard interaction) in the kinematic region defined by Mll> 50 GeV, Mjj > 120 GeV, transverse momentum pTj > 25 GeV, and pseudorapidity |?j| more?EW(lljj) = 174 15 (stat) 40 (syst) fb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. The associated jet activity of the selected events is studied, in particular in a signal-enriched region of phase space, and the measurements are found to be in agreement with QCD predictions.less

  18. Search for standard model production of four top quarks in the lepton + jets channel in pp collisions at ? = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-27

    A search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t?tt?t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6? recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM (t?tt?t) production is ?SM(t?tt?t). A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. The data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set at a 95% confidence levelmoreon the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 17 fb is expected.less

  19. UPDATE ON FRICTION BONDING OF MONOLITHIC U-MO FUEL PLATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Burkes; N. P. Hallinan; J. M. Wight; M. D. Chapple

    2007-09-01

    Friction Bonding (FB), formerly referred to as Friction Stir Welding, is an alternative plate fabrication technique to encapsulate monolithic U-Mo fuel foils inside 6061-T6 aluminum alloy cladding. Over the past year, significant progress has been made in the area of FB, including improvements in tool material, tool design, process parameters, cooling capability and capacity and modeling, all of which improve and enhance the quality of fabricated fuel plates, reproducibility of the fabrication process and bond quality of the fuel plates. Details of this progress and how it relates to the observed improvements and enhancements are discussed. In addition, details on how these improvements have been implemented into the last two RERTR mini-plate irradiation campaigns are also discussed.

  20. Search for low-scale gravity signatures in multi-jet final states with the ATLAS detector at $ \\sqrt{s}=8 $ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn’ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R. W.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G. -Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E. -E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; König, S.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kreiss, S.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Krizka, K.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumnack, N.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kruse, A.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kucuk, H.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuger, F.; Kuhl, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunigo, T.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kurumida, R.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwan, T.; Kyriazopoulos, D.; La Rosa, A.; La Rosa Navarro, J. L.; La Rotonda, L.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lambourne, L.; Lammers, S.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, J. C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lasagni Manghi, F.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; LeBlanc, M.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leisos, A.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leontsinis, S.; Leroy, C.; Lester, C. G.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, A.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, L.; Li, L.; Li, S.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Liblong, A.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Linde, F.; Lindquist, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loginov, A.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Looper, K. A.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Lösel, P. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lu, N.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Macdonald, C. M.; Machado Miguens, J.; Macina, D.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeland, S.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A.; Magradze, E.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, A. A.; Maier, T.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V. M.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mancini, G.; Mandelli, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Manfredini, A.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mann, A.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mantoani, M.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marjanovic, M.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martoiu, V. S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massa, L.; Massol, N.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazza, S. M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J-P.; Meyer, J.; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Mortensen, S. S.; Morton, A.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O’Brien, B. J.; O’grady, F.; O’Neil, D. C.; O’Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-07-01

    A search for evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model in final states with multiple high-transverse-momentum jets is performed using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No significant excess of events beyond Standard Model expectations is observed, and upper limits on the visible cross sections for non-Standard Model production of multi-jet final states are set. A wide variety of models for black hole and string ball production and decay are considered, and the upper limit on the cross section times acceptance is as low as 0.16 fb at the 95% confidence level. For these models, excluded regions are also given as function of the main model parameters.

  1. Measurements of the Top Quark at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerrito, Lucio

    2007-01-01

    The authors present recent preliminary measurements of the top-antitop pair production cross section and determinations of the top quark pole mass, performed using the data collected by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Tevatron Collider. In the lepton plus jets final state, with semileptonic B decay, the pair production cross section has now been measured at CDF using {approx} 760 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. A measurement of the production cross section has also been made with {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of data in the all-jets final state by the CDF Collaboration. The mass of the top quark has now been measured using {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of collision data using all decay channels of the top quark pair, yielding the most precise measurements of the top mass to date.

  2. Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunsford, G.F.

    1999-08-23

    Since beginning operations in 1954, the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site FB-Line conducted atomic energy defense activities consistent with the listing in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The facility mission was to process and convert dilute plutonium solution into highly purified weapons grade plutonium metal. As a result of various activities conducted in support of the mission (e.g., operation, maintenance, repair, clean up, and facility modifications), the facility generated transuranic waste. This document, along with referenced supporting documents, provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration,equipment, process operations, and waste management practices.

  3. Search for Gluino-Mediated Sbottom Production in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-03-01

    We report on a search for the supersymmetric partner of the bottom quark produced from gluino decays in data from 2.5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Candidate events are selected requiring two or more jets and large missing transverse energy. At least two of the jets are required to be tagged as originating from a b quark to enhance the sensitivity. The results are in good agreement with the prediction of the standard model processes, giving no evidence for gluino decay to sbottom quarks. This result constrains the gluino-pair-production cross section to be less than 40 fb at 95% credibility level for a gluino mass of 350 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  4. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-12-14

    Through June 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar (Tar II-A) Zone. Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood project. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the third quarter 2000 revising the draft 1997-2000 Annual Report submitted last quarter, writing final reports on the research projects mentioned above, and operating the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the Tar II-A steamflood project. On January 12, 1999, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations by injecting cold water into the flanks of the steamflood. The purpose of flank injection has been to increase and subsequently maintain reservoir pressures at a level that would fill-up the steam chests in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands before they can collapse and cause formation compaction and to

  5. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-12-06

    Through March 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar (Tar II-A) Zone. Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood project. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the second quarter 2000 writing the 1997-2000 Annual Report, completing research for the project on the subjects mentioned above, and operating the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the Tar II-A steamflood project. On January 12, 1999, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations by injecting cold water into the flanks of the steamflood. The purpose of flank injection has been to increase and subsequently maintain reservoir pressures at a level that would fill-up the steam chests in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands before they can collapse and cause formation compaction and to prevent the steam

  6. Search for new physics in high pT like-sign dilepton events at CDF II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-25

    We present a search for new physics in events with two high pT leptons of the same electric charge, using data with an integrated luminosity of 6.1 fb-1. The observed data are consistent with standard model predictions. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of doubly-charged scalars decaying to like-sign dileptons, mH±± > 190 - 245 GeV/c2, depending on the decay mode and coupling.

  7. Invariant Mass Distribution of Jet Pairs Produced in Association with a W boson in pp-bar Collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T

    2011-04-28

    We report a study of the invariant mass distribution of jet pairs produced in association with a W boson using data collected with the CDF detector which correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb-1. The observed distribution has an excess in the 120-160 GeV/c2 mass range which is not described by current theoretical predictions within the statistical and systematic uncertainties. In this letter we report studies of the properties of this excess.

  8. Measurement of the $s$-channel Single Top Quark Cross Section at the CDF Experiment and Contributions to the Evidence of $H\\rightarrow bb$ at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hao

    2014-08-01

    In this thesis, we present the measurement of the s-channel single top quark production cross section. In the cross section measurement we use data generated by protonantiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF Run II detector. The total data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1.

  9. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratorybreath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reardon, Kelli A.; Read, Paul W.; Morris, Monica M.; Reardon, Michael A.; Geesey, Constance; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2013-07-01

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratorybreath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p?0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation.

  10. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the $WH \\to \\ell \

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagai, Yoshikazu; /Tsukuba U.

    2010-02-01

    We have searched for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the WH {yields} lvbb channel in 1.96 TeV pp collisions at CDF. This search is based on the data collected by March 2009, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb-1. The W H channel is one of the most promising channels for the Higgs boson search at Tevatron in the low Higgs boson mass region.

  11. Invariant Mass Distribution of Jet Pairs Produced in Association with a W boson in pp? Collisions at ?s= 1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; et al

    2011-04-28

    We report a study of the invariant mass distribution of jet pairs produced in association with a W boson using data collected with the CDF detector which correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb-1. The observed distribution has an excess in the 120-160 GeV/c2 mass range which is not described by current theoretical predictions within the statistical and systematic uncertainties. In this letter we report studies of the properties of this excess.

  12. A Search for Dark Higgs Bosons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-06-08

    Recent astrophysical and terrestrial experiments have motivated the proposal of a dark sector with GeV-scale gauge boson force carriers and new Higgs bosons. We present a search for a dark Higgs boson using 516 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector. We do not observe a significant signal and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the Standard Model-dark sector mixing angle and the dark sector coupling constant.

  13. OVERVIEW OF HIGGS BOSON STUDIES AT THE TEVATRON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zivkovic, Lidija

    2014-05-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron pp Collider collected data between 2002 and 2011, accumulating up to 10 fb?1 of data. During that time, an extensive search for the standard model Higgs boson was performed. Combined results from the searches for the standard model Higgs boson with the final dataset are presented, together with results on the Higgs boson couplings and spin and parity.

  14. Measurement of differential and integrated fiducial cross sections for Higgs boson production in the four-lepton decay channel in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-01

    Integrated fiducial cross sections for the production of four leptons via the H → 4ℓ decays (ℓ = e, μ) are measured in pp collisions atmore » $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8TeV. Measurements are performed with data corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb$$^{–1}$$ at 7TeV, and 19.7 fb$$^{–1}$$ at 8 TeV, collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Differential cross sections are measured using the 8 TeV data, and are determined as functions of the transverse momentum and rapidity of the four-lepton system, accompanying jet multiplicity, transverse momentum of the leading jet, and difference in rapidity between the Higgs boson candidate and the leading jet. A measurement of the Z → 4ℓ cross section, and its ratio to the H → 4ℓ cross section is also performed. All cross sections are measured within a fiducial phase space defined by the requirements on lepton kinematics and event topology. Here, the integrated H → 4ℓ fiducial cross section is measured to be 0.56$$_{–0.44}^{+0.67}$$ (stat)$$_{–0.06}^{+0.21}$$ (syst) fb at 7 TeV, and 1.11$$_{–0.35}^{+0.41}$$ (stat)$$_{–0.10}^{+0.14}$$ (syst) fb at 8 TeV. The measurements are found to be compatible with theoretical calculations based on the standard model.« less

  15. Study of the B+c ? J/?D+s and B+c ? J/?D*s+ decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-05

    The decays B+c ? J/?D+s and B+c ? J/?D*s+ are studied with the ATLAS detector at the LHC using a dataset corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.9 and 20.6 fb1 of pp collisions collected at centre-of-mass energies ?s = 7 TeV and 8 TeV, respectively. Furthermore, signal candidates are identified through J/? ? ?+?- and D(*)+s ? ??+(?/?0) decays.

  16. A new generation of engineers > EMC2 News > The Energy Materials Center at

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cornell A new generation of engineers October 15th, 2015 › Article excerpt from Vol. VIII No. 1, Fall 2015 Engineers as entrepreneurs After Samuel F.B. Morse and Ezra Cornell's successful intercity test of the telegraph, Cornell partnered with Morse to run lines between more cities. The engineer once contracted to work behind the scenes found himself the owner of his own company and eventually a major shareholder of Western Union Telegraph Co. Cornell's entrepreneurial spirit transformed

  17. Tn-seq of Caulobacter crescentus under uranium stress reveals genes essential for detoxification and stress tolerance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yung, Mimi C.; Park, Dan M.; Overton, K. Wesley; Blow, Matthew J.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Smit, John R.; Murray, Sean R.; Ricci, Dante P.; Christen, Beat; Bowman, Grant R.; et al

    2015-07-20

    Ubiquitous aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is highly resistant to uranium (U) and facilitates U biomineralization and thus holds promise as an agent of U bioremediation. In order to gain an understanding of how C. crescentus tolerates U, we employed transposon (Tn) mutagenesis paired with deep sequencing (Tn-seq) in a global screen for genomic elements required for U resistance. Of the 3,879 annotated genes in the C. crescentus genome, 37 were found to be specifically associated with fitness under U stress, 15 of which were subsequently tested through mutational analysis. Systematic deletion analysis revealed that mutants lacking outer membrane transporters (rsaFamore » and rsaFb), a stress-responsive transcription factor (cztR), or a ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase (spoT) exhibited a significantly lower survival rate under U stress. RsaFa and RsaFb, which are homologues of TolC in Escherichia coli, have previously been shown to mediate S-layer export. Transcriptional analysis revealed upregulation of rsaFa and rsaFb by 4- and 10-fold, respectively, in the presence of U. We additionally show that rsaFa mutants accumulated higher levels of U than the wild type, with no significant increase in oxidative stress levels. These results suggest a function for RsaFa and RsaFb in U efflux and/or maintenance of membrane integrity during U stress. In addition, we present data implicating CztR and SpoT in resistance to U stress. Together, our findings reveal novel gene targets that are key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of U resistance in C. crescentus.« less

  18. Search for Higgs Boson Pair Production in the bbbb Final State Using pp Collision Data at root ?s=8 TeV from the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-09

    A search for Higgs boson pair production \\(pp \\rightarrow hh\\) is performed with 19.5 fb\\(^{-1}\\) of protonproton collision data at \\(\\sqrt{s}=8\\) TeV, which were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. The decay products of each Higgs boson are reconstructed as a high-momentum \\(b\\bar{b}\\) system with either a pair of small-radius jets or a single large-radius jet, the latter exploiting jet substructure techniques and associated b-tagged track-jets. No evidence for resonant or non-resonant Higgs boson pair production is observed. The data are interpreted in the context of the RandallSundrum model with a warped extra dimensionmoreas well as the two-Higgs-doublet model. An upper limit on the cross-section for \\(pp\\rightarrow G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}} \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b} \\) of 3.2 (2.3) fb is set for a KaluzaKlein graviton \\(G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}}\\) mass of 1.0 (1.5) TeV, at the 95 % confidence level. The search for non-resonant Standard Model hh production sets an observed 95 % confidence level upper limit on the production cross-section \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b})\\) of 202 fb, compared to a Standard Model prediction of \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b}) = 3.6 \\pm 0.5\\) fb.less

  19. Status and performance of the CDF Run II silicon detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2006-10-01

    The CDF silicon detector is one of the largest silicon detectors in operation. It has a total of 722,432 electronic channels, and it covers a sensor surface area of 6 m{sup 2}. The detector has been operating reliably for five years, and it has recorded 1.5 fb{sup -1} of data. This article discusses experiences of operating such a large, complex system as well as the longevity of the detector.

  20. Model independent search for new phenomena in pp collisions at√s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Alverson, George O; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; et al

    2012-05-24

    We describe a model independent search for physics beyond the standard model in lepton final states. We examine 117 final states using 1.1 fb-1 of pp collisions data at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector. We conclude that all observed discrepancies between data and model can be attributed to uncertainties in the standard model background modeling, and hence we do not see any evidence for physics beyond the standard model.

  1. Search for Higgs boson pair production in the bb¯bb¯ final state from pp collision at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-09

    A search for Higgs boson pair production \\(pp \\rightarrow hh\\) is performed with 19.5 fb\\(^{-1}\\) of proton–proton collision data at \\(\\sqrt{s}=8\\) TeV, which were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. The decay products of each Higgs boson are reconstructed as a high-momentum \\(b\\bar{b}\\) system with either a pair of small-radius jets or a single large-radius jet, the latter exploiting jet substructure techniques and associated b-tagged track-jets. No evidence for resonant or non-resonant Higgs boson pair production is observed. The data are interpreted in the context of the Randall–Sundrum model with a warped extra dimensionmore » as well as the two-Higgs-doublet model. An upper limit on the cross-section for \\(pp\\rightarrow G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}} \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b} \\) of 3.2 (2.3) fb is set for a Kaluza–Klein graviton \\(G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}}\\) mass of 1.0 (1.5) TeV, at the 95 % confidence level. Thus, the search for non-resonant Standard Model hh production sets an observed 95 % confidence level upper limit on the production cross-section \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b})\\) of 202 fb, compared to a Standard Model prediction of \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b}) = 3.6 \\pm 0.5\\) fb.« less

  2. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Leptons plus Jets Final States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Huong

    2014-01-01

    Searches for SM Higgs boson production in the leptons plus jets final states with a data set corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of $\\bar{p}$p collisions at √s = 1.96TeV collected by the DØ Experiment are presented in this thesis. The searches are carried out in two independent analyses, accounting for different signal topologies.

  3. Search for Higgs boson pair production in the bb¯bb¯ final state from pp collision at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-09

    A search for Higgs boson pair production \\(pp \\rightarrow hh\\) is performed with 19.5 fb\\(^{-1}\\) of proton–proton collision data at \\(\\sqrt{s}=8\\) TeV, which were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. The decay products of each Higgs boson are reconstructed as a high-momentum \\(b\\bar{b}\\) system with either a pair of small-radius jets or a single large-radius jet, the latter exploiting jet substructure techniques and associated b-tagged track-jets. No evidence for resonant or non-resonant Higgs boson pair production is observed. The data are interpreted in the context of the Randall–Sundrum model with a warped extra dimension as well as the two-Higgs-doublet model. An upper limit on the cross-section for \\(pp\\rightarrow G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}} \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b} \\) of 3.2 (2.3) fb is set for a Kaluza–Klein graviton \\(G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}}\\) mass of 1.0 (1.5) TeV, at the 95 % confidence level. Thus, the search for non-resonant Standard Model hh production sets an observed 95 % confidence level upper limit on the production cross-section \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b})\\) of 202 fb, compared to a Standard Model prediction of \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b}) = 3.6 \\pm 0.5\\) fb.

  4. Measuring Arithmetic Intensity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measuring Arithmetic Intensity Measuring Arithmetic Intensity Arithmetic intensity is a measure of floating-point operations (FLOPs) performed by a given code (or code section) relative to the amount of memory accesses (Bytes) that are required to support those operations. It is most often defined as a FLOP per Byte ratio (F/B). This application note provides a methodology for determining arithmetic intensity using Intel's Software Development Emulator Toolkit (SDE) and VTune Amplifier (VTune)

  5. Searches for BSM (non-SUSY) physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerberich, Heather K.; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-11-01

    As of July 2005, the Tevatron at Fermilab has delivered {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of data to the CDF and D0 experiments. Each experiment has recorded more than 80% of the delivered luminosity. Results of searches for physics (non-SUSY and non-Higgs) beyond the Standard Model using 200 pb{sup -1} to 480 pb{sup -1} at D0 and CDF are presented.

  6. $B$ mixing and lifetimes at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Piedra, J.

    2006-04-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of b-hadrons. Both the D0 and CDF experiments have collected a sample of about 1 fb{sup -1}. they report results on three topics: b-hadron lifetimes, polarization amplitudes and the decay width difference in B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  7. Search for supersymmetric neutral Higgs bosons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlon, Tim; /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-10-01

    Recent preliminary results obtained by the CDF and D0 Collaborations on searches for Higgs bosons beyond the Standard Model at Run II of the Tevatron are discussed. The data, corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 1 fb{sup -1}, are compared to theoretical expectations. No significant excess of signal above the expected background is observed in any of the various final states examined, and so limits at 95% Confidence Level (CL) are presented.

  8. Hot topics from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenzinski, D.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    The Tevatron Run-II began in March 2001. To date, both the CDF and D0 experiments have collected 1 fb{sup -1} of data each. The results obtained from this data set were summarized at this conference in 39 parallel session presentations covering a wide range of topics. The author summarizes the most important of those results here and comments on some of the prospects for the future.

  9. Inclusive jet production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2006-08-01

    Preliminary results on inclusive jet production in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV based on 1 fb{sup -1} of CDF Run II data are presented. Measurements are preformed using different jet algorithms in a wide range of jet transverse momentum and jet rapidity. The measured cross sections are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations

  10. Mechanism of formation of the response of a hydrogen gas sensor based on a silicon MOS diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaman, V. I.; Balyuba, V. I.; Gritsyk, V. Yu.; Davydova, T. A.; Kalygina, V. M.

    2008-03-15

    Experimental data on the dependence of the flat-band voltage and relaxation time for the capacitance of the space-charge region in an MOS diode (Pd-SiO{sub 2}-n-Si) on the hydrogen concentration in a hydrogen/air gaseous mixture are discussed. It is assumed that variation in the flat-band voltage U{sub fb} in an MOS structure with the thickness d = 369 nm subjected to a hydrogen/air gaseous mixture can be accounted for by the formation of dipoles in the Pd-SiO{sub 2} gap due to polarization of hydrogen atoms (H{sub a}). An analytical expression describing the dependence of variation in the flat-band voltage {Delta}U{sub fb} on the hydrogen concentration n{sub H{sub 2}} was derived. In MOS structures with d {<=} 4 nm (or MOS diodes), the value of {Delta}U{sub fb} is mainly controlled by passivation of the centers responsible for the presence of the surface acceptor-type centers at the SiO{sub 2}-n-Si interface by hydrogen atoms. Analytical expressions describing the dependences of {Delta}U{sub fb} and the capacitance relaxation time in the space-charge region on n{sub H{sub 2}} are derived. The values of the density of adsorption centers and the adsorption heat for hydrogen atoms at the Pd-SiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}-n-Si interfaces are found.

  11. Measurements of fiducial cross-sections for tt¯ production with one or two additional b-jets in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-07

    Fiducial cross-sections for tt¯ production with one or two additional b -jets are reported, using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 of proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider, collected with the ATLAS detector. The cross-section times branching ratio for tt¯ events with at least one additional b-jet is measured to be 950 ± 70 (stat.) +240-190 (syst.) fb in the lepton-plus-jets channel and 50 ± 10 (stat.) +15-10 (syst.) fb in the eμ channel. The cross-section times branching ratio for events with at least two additional b -jets is measured to bemore » 19.3 ± 3.5 (stat.) ± 5.7 (syst.) fb in the dilepton channel ( eμ , μμ , and ee ) using a method based on tight selection criteria, and 13.5 ± 3.3 (stat.) ± 3.6 (syst.) fb using a looser selection that allows the background normalisation to be extracted from data. The latter method also measures a value of 1.30 ± 0.33 (stat.) ± 0.28 (syst.)% for the ratio of tt¯ production with two additional b-jets to tt¯ production with any two additional jets. As a result, all measurements are in good agreement with recent theory predictions.« less

  12. Top quark pair production cross section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortiana, Giorgio; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.

    2008-04-01

    Top quark pair production cross section has been measured at the Tevatron by CDF and D0 collaborations using different channels and methods, in order to test standard model predictions, and to search for new physics hints affecting the t{bar t} production mechanism or decay. Measurements are carried out with an integrated luminosity of 1.0 to 2.0 fb{sup -1}, and are found to be consistent with standard model expectations.

  13. Measurement of the production fraction times branching fraction $\\boldsymbol{ f(b\\to\\Lambda_{b})\\cdot \\mathcal{B}(\\Lambda_{b}\\to J/\\psi \\Lambda)}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    The {Lambda}{sub b}(udb) baryon is observed in the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} using 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The production fraction multiplied by the branching fraction for this decay relative to that for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} is measured to be 0.345 {+-} 0.034 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.) {+-} 0.003 (PDG). Using the world average value of f(b {yields} B{sup 0}) {center_dot} {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (1.74 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -5}, they obtain f(b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}) {center_dot} {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}) = (6.01 {+-} 0.60 (stat.) {+-} 0.58 (syst.) {+-} 0.28 (PDG)) x 10{sup -5}. This measurement represents an improvement in precision by about a factor of three with respect to the current world average.

  14. Measurement of top quark-antiquark pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    The measurement of a cross section for the production of top quark–antiquark pairs (tt¯) in association with a vector boson V (W or Z) in proton-proton collisions at √s=8 TeV is presented. The results are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement is performed in three leptonic (e and μ) channels: a same-sign dilepton analysis targeting tt¯W events, and trilepton and four-lepton analyses designed for tt¯Z events. In the same-sign dilepton channel, the tt¯W cross section is measured as σtt¯W=170+90-80(stat)±70(syst)fb, corresponding to a significance ofmore » 1.6 standard deviations over the background-only hypothesis. Combining the trilepton and four-lepton channels, a direct measurement of the tt¯Z cross section, σtt¯Z=200+80-70(stat)+40-30(syst)fb-1, is obtained with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations. Finally, the measured cross sections are compatible with standard model predictions within their experimental uncertainties. The inclusive tt¯V process is observed with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations from the combination of all three leptonic channels.« less

  15. Pseudoscalar boson and standard model-like Higgs boson productions at the LHC in the simplest little Higgs model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Lei; Han Xiaofang

    2010-11-01

    In the framework of the simplest little Higgs model, we perform a comprehensive study for the pair productions of the pseudoscalar boson {eta} and standard model-like Higgs boson h at LHC, namely gg(bb){yields}{eta}{eta}, gg(qq){yields}{eta}h, and gg(bb){yields}hh. These production processes provide a way to probe the couplings between Higgs bosons. We find that the cross section of gg{yields}{eta}{eta} always dominates over that of bb{yields}{eta}{eta}. When the Higgs boson h which mediates these two processes is on-shell, their cross sections can reach several thousand fb and several hundred fb, respectively. When the intermediate state h is off-shell, those two cross sections are reduced by 2 orders of magnitude, respectively. The cross sections of gg{yields}{eta}h and qq{yields}{eta}h are about in the same order of magnitude, which can reach O(10{sup 2} fb) for a light {eta} boson. Besides, compared with the standard model prediction, the cross section of a pair of standard model-like Higgs bosons production at LHC can be enhanced sizably. Finally, we briefly discuss the observable signatures of {eta}{eta}, {eta}h, and hh at the LHC.

  16. Observation of top quark pairs produced in association with a vector boson in pp collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-06

    Measurements of the cross sections for top quark pairs produced in association with a W or Z boson are presented, using 8 TeV pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. We found that final states are selected in which the associated W boson decays to a charged lepton and a neutrino or the Z boson decays to two charged leptons. Signal events are identified by matching reconstructed objects in the detector to specific final state particles from tt-W or tt-Z decays. The tt-W cross section is measured to be 382+117 -102 fb with a significance of 4.8 standard deviations from the background-only hypothesis. The tt-Z cross section is measured to be 242+65 -55 fb with a significance of 6.4 standard deviations from the background-only hypothesis. These measurements are used to set bounds on five anomalous dimension-six operators that would affect the tt-W and tt-Z cross sections.

  17. Feature Based Machining Process Planning V5.1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-07-30

    The purpose of the FB-Machining Advisor product is to provide industry with an end user product that will enable end users to more effectively interact with a solid model for manufacturing applications. The product allows end users to visualize and organize their manufacturing process plans as they are being conceived; avoid redundant and time consuming geometric construction and calculation; automate geometric reasoning processes, and automate downstream manufacturing applications. The product augments a solid model representationmore » of the part with a set of machining features (e.g., pockets, steps, holes, cutouts). The product also enables end users to interact with a solid model to create process plans. It will automatically recognize, or interactively create and modify surface based machining features (represented by sets of faces on the solid model) and volumetric machining features which are represented by delta volumes (solid bodies representing volumes of material to be removed from the part). The FB-Machining Advisor will generate “in process shapes” that represent the shape of the work piece prior or subsequent to a material removal operation. It is designed to facilitate process change propagation in order to minimize rework resulting from process modifications. The machining features will provide vital shape and tolerance information (i.e. depth of pocket, minimum side radius of pocket, diameter of hole, maximum surface finish of side walls). The FB-Machining Advisor also integrates solid model based (3 Dimensional) tolerance information with the machining feature representations.« less

  18. Measurement of top quark-antiquark pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    The measurement of a cross section for the production of top quarkantiquark pairs (tt) in association with a vector boson V (W or Z) in proton-proton collisions at ?s=8 TeV is presented. The results are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement is performed in three leptonic (e and ?) channels: a same-sign dilepton analysis targeting ttW events, and trilepton and four-lepton analyses designed for ttZ events. In the same-sign dilepton channel, the ttW cross section is measured as ?ttW=170+90-80(stat)70(syst)fb, corresponding to a significance ofmore1.6 standard deviations over the background-only hypothesis. Combining the trilepton and four-lepton channels, a direct measurement of the ttZ cross section, ?ttZ=200+80-70(stat)+40-30(syst)fb-1, is obtained with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations. Finally, the measured cross sections are compatible with standard model predictions within their experimental uncertainties. The inclusive ttV process is observed with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations from the combination of all three leptonic channels.less

  19. Search for the Flavor Changing Neutral Current Decay t --> Z q at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gimmell, Jennifer Lindsay; /Rochester U.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis reports the results of a search for the flavor changing neutral current decay of the top quark, t {yields} Zq, in decays of t{bar t} pairs produced in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. This search is performed on a data sample recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1}. This search follows a previous CDF analysis that resulted in an upper limit for the branching fraction {Beta}(t {yields} Zq) of 10.4% at 95% C.L. using a dataset equivalent to 1.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This thesis extends to 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data, and has improved sensitivity to the small signal with the introduction of a template fit technique that includes systematic uncertainties by a linear interpolation between templates. Using a Feldman-Cousins construction, an upper limit at 95% C.L. is set on {Beta}(t {yields} Zq) of 3.7%, with the expected upper limit in absence of a signal is 5.0 {+-} 2.2% for a top mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. Search for the associated production of a Higgs boson with a single top quark in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-29

    Our paper presents the search for the production of a Higgs boson in association with a single top quark, using data collected in proton-proton collisions at a centerof-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The search exploits a variety of Higgs boson decay modes resulting in final states with photons, bottom quarks, and multiple charged leptons, including tau leptons, and employs a variety of multivariate techniques to maximize sensitivity to the signal. Furthermore, our analysis is optimized for the opposite sign of the Yukawa coupling to that in the standard model and corresponding to a large enhancement of the signal cross section. In the absence of an excess of candidate signal events over the background predictions, 95% confidence level observed (expected) upper limits on anomalous tHq production are set, ranging between 600 (450) fb and 1000 (700) fb depending on the assumed diphoton branching fraction of the Higgs boson. This is the first time that results on anomalous tHq production have been reported.

  1. Search for anomalous production of prompt like-sign lepton pairs at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7\\;\\mathrm{TeV} $$ with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2012-12-03

    An inclusive search for anomalous production of two prompt, isolated leptons with the same electric charge is presented. The search is performed in a data sample corresponding to 4.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected in 2011 at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Pairs of leptons (e± e±, e± μ±, and μ± μ±) with large transverse momentum are selected, and the dilepton invariant mass distribution is examined for any deviation from the Standard Model expectation. No excess is found, and upper limits on the production cross section of like-sign lepton pairs from physics processes beyondmore » the Standard Model are placed as a function of the dilepton invariant mass within a fiducial region close to the experimental selection criteria. The 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section of anomalous e± e±, e± μ±, or μ± μ± production range between 1.7 fb and 64 fb depending on the dilepton mass and flavour combination.« less

  2. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2014-10-28

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb?, with 4.9 fb? at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb? at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSMmoreparameter space for different benchmark scenarios, mhmax, mhmod+ , mhmod , light-stop, light-stau, ?-phobic, and low-mH. Upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.less

  3. Direct production of a light CP-odd Higgs boson at the Tevatron and LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dermisek, Radovan; Gunion, John F.

    2010-03-01

    We show that the existing CDF L=630 pb{sup -1} Tevatron data on pp{yields}{mu}{sup +{mu}-}X places substantial limits on a light CP-odd Higgs boson a with m{sub a}<2m{sub B} produced via gg{yields}a, even for m{sub a}>2m{sub {tau}}for which BR(a{yields}{mu}{sup +{mu}-}) is relatively small. Extrapolation of this existing CDF analysis to L=10 fb{sup -1} suggests that Tevatron limits on the abb coupling strength in the region m{sub a}>8 GeV could be comparable to or better than limits from Upsilon decays in the m{sub a}<7 GeV region. We also give rough estimates of future prospects at the LHC, demonstrating that early running will substantially improve limits on a light a (or perhaps discover a signal). In particular, outside the Upsilon peak region, integrated luminosity of only 5 fb{sup -1}-20 fb{sup -1} (depending on m{sub a} and {radical}(s)) could reveal a peak in M{sub {mu}}{sup +}{sub {mu}}{sup -} and will certainly place important new limits on a light a. The importance of such limits in the context of next-to-minimal supersymmetric model Higgs discovery and (g-2){sub {mu}}are outlined.

  4. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-28

    Our search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb-1, with 4.9 fb-1 at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSMmore » parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, m h max , m h mod + , m hmod - , light-stop, light-stau, τ-phobic, and low-m H. Lastly, upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.« less

  5. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-28

    Our search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb-1, with 4.9 fb-1 at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSM parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, m h max , m h mod + , m hmod - , light-stop, light-stau, τ-phobic, and low-m H. Lastly, upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.

  6. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2014-10-28

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb?, with 4.9 fb? at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb? at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSM parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, mhmax, mhmod+ , mhmod , light-stop, light-stau, ?-phobic, and low-mH. Upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.

  7. Search for diphoton events with large missing transverse momentum in 1 fb⁻¹ of 7 TeV proton–proton collision data with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2012-04-01

    A search for diphoton events with large missing transverse momentum has been performed using 1.07 fb⁻¹ of proton–proton collision data at √s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector. No excess of events was observed above the Standard Model prediction and 95% Confidence Level (CL) upper limits are set on the production cross section for new physics. The limits depend on each model parameter space and vary as follows: σ<(22–129) fb in the context of a generalised model of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking (GGM) with a bino-like lightest neutralino, σ<(27–91) fb in the context of a minimal model of gauge-mediatedmore » supersymmetry breaking (SPS8), and σ<(15–27) fb in the context of a specific model with one universal extra dimension (UED). A 95% CL lower limit of 805 GeV, for bino masses above 50 GeV, is set on the GGM gluino mass. Lower limits of 145 TeV and 1.23 TeV are set on the SPS8 breaking scale Λ and on the UED compactification scale 1/R, respectively. These limits provide the most stringent tests of these models to date.« less

  8. Thermal Modeling of A Friction Bonding Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Dixon; Douglas Burkes; Pavel Medvedev

    2007-10-01

    A COMSOL model capable of predicting temperature evolution during nuclear fuel fabrication is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Fuel plates are fabricated by friction bonding (FB) uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy foils positioned between two aluminum plates. The ability to predict temperature distribution during fabrication is imperative to ensure good quality bonding without inducing an undesirable chemical reaction between U-Mo and aluminum. A three-dimensional heat transfer model of the FB process implementing shallow pin penetration for cladding monolithic nuclear fuel foils is presented. Temperature distribution during the FB process as a function of fabrication parameters such as weld speed, tool load, and tool rotational frequency are predicted. Model assumptions, settings, and equations are described in relation to standard friction stir welding. Current experimental design for validation and calibration of the model is also demonstrated. Resulting experimental data reveal the accuracy in describing asymmetrical temperature distributions about the tool face. Temperature of the bonded plate drops beneath the pin and is higher on the advancing side than the retreating side of the tool.

  9. Search for the associated production of a Higgs boson with a single top quark in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 $$$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; et al

    2016-06-01

    Our paper presents the search for the production of a Higgs boson in association with a single top quark, using data collected in proton-proton collisions at a centerof-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The search exploits a variety of Higgs boson decay modes resulting in final states with photons, bottom quarks, and multiple charged leptons, including tau leptons, and employs a variety of multivariate techniques to maximize sensitivity to the signal. Furthermore, our analysis is optimized for the opposite sign of the Yukawa coupling to that in the standard model and corresponding tomore » a large enhancement of the signal cross section. In the absence of an excess of candidate signal events over the background predictions, 95% confidence level observed (expected) upper limits on anomalous tHq production are set, ranging between 600 (450) fb and 1000 (700) fb depending on the assumed diphoton branching fraction of the Higgs boson. This is the first time that results on anomalous tHq production have been reported.« less

  10. Observation of the Exclusive Reaction e^+e^-\\ to \\phi\\eta at \\sqrt{s}=10.58 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-11-17

    The authors report the observation of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}{eta} near {radical}s = 10.58 GeV with 6.5 {sigma} significance in the K{sup +}K{sup -}{gamma}{gamma} final state in a data sample of 224 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. They measure the restricted radiation-corrected cross section to be {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}{eta}) = 2.1 {+-} 0.4(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst) fb within the range |cos{theta}*| < 0.8, where {theta}* is the center-of-mass polar angle of the {phi} meson. The {phi} meson is required to be in the invariant mass range of 1.008 < m{sub {phi}} < 1.035 GeV/c{sup 2}. The radiation corrected cross section in the full cos {theta}* range is extrapolated to be 2.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst) fb.

  11. Observation of top quark pairs produced in association with a vector boson in pp collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-01-18

    Measurements of the cross sections for top quark pairs produced in association with a W or Z boson are presented, using 8 TeV pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. We found that final states are selected in which the associated W boson decays to a charged lepton and a neutrino or the Z boson decays to two charged leptons. Signal events are identified by matching reconstructed objects in the detector to specific final state particles from tt-W or tt-Z decays. The tt-W cross section is measured tomore » be 382+117 -102 fb with a significance of 4.8 standard deviations from the background-only hypothesis. The tt-Z cross section is measured to be 242+65 -55 fb with a significance of 6.4 standard deviations from the background-only hypothesis. These measurements are used to set bounds on five anomalous dimension-six operators that would affect the tt-W and tt-Z cross sections.« less

  12. Critical studies of the rapid pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of coal. Final project report, January 1, 1977-June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.A.

    1982-09-01

    This report summarizes major findings from a study of the effects of reaction conditions on the rapid pyrolysis behavior of coal in inert and hydrogen atmospheres. The independent effects of final temperature (150 to 1100/sup 0/C), reaction time at final temperature (0 to 30 s), heating rate (10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 4/ /sup 0/C/s), total pressure (0.0001 to 100 atm), hydrogen partial pressure (0 to 69 atm), and particle size (45 to 1000 ..mu..m), on product yields and compositions were determined for a Montana lignite and a Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam bituminous coal. Kinetic data were obtained for formation of specific pyrolysis products from each coal. A new mass transfer model for rapid hydrogasification of softening coal was also formulated. Effects of native mineral matter and selected inorganic additives on the pyrolysis behavior of the Pittsburgh Seam coal and of a Wyodak subbituminous coal were also studied. Detailed project findings are included in papers appended to the main body of the report. Important results include: (1) temperature and residence time are major parameters in determining pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis behavior; (2) coal type is also important, since major differences are observed in the yields, compositions, and evolution kinetics of products from rapid pyrolysis of the bituminous coal and of the lignite; (3) hydrogen can react rapidly with decomposing coal during the early stages of pyrolysis and, under conditions minimizing the elevated temperature contacting of hydrogen and pyrolysis tars, methane accounts for most of the resulting increased conversion; (4) secondary reactions of tar have a major role in determining product yields, compositions, and evolution kinetics in pyrolysis of the bituminous coal; and (5) increased CO production and decreased tar evolution are obtained by treating the bituminous coal with lime or calcite before pyrolysis.

  13. Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soncini, Ryan M; Means, Nicholas C; Weiland, Nathan T

    2013-10-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

  14. Reaction-induced temperature deviations during coal devolatilization in a heated grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freihaut, J.D.; Zabielski, M.F.; Seery, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    To gain further insight into the primary devolatilization process, particularly with respect to the tar yields, a new control circuit was designed to permit any heating rate from 800 C/sec to 4 x 10/sup 3/ C/sec to any final temperature in the 300 to 1100/sup 0/C range. With this circuit, the effects of sample characteristics on local heating of the grid were examined to assess the influence of devolatilization on programmed heating rates. The results clearly demonstrate that the devolatilization process has a considerable influence on the time-temperature history of the local screen in immediate contact with the sample. With respect to the coal particles, the direct implication is that the temperature path is the resultant of several components: the resistive heating of the grid, the physical properties of the samples, the devolatilization properties of the sample. Once the range of devolatilization temperatures of a particular coal is achieved, the primary devolatilization process appears to dominate the temperature-time trajectory. Because the heat requirement of the primary devolatilization affects the temperature trajectory of the coal particle, a real time model of primary coal devolatilization must necessarily include a consideration of this requirement. In addition, the data appears to indicate that the heat requirement varies with the rank characteristics of the coal. For a transient process such as rapid coal devolatilization the absolute magnitude of the heat required to vaporize the volatile components need not be large to result in a significant deviation from a programmed heating rate or a calculated heating rate of a nonvolatile particle. The results indicate that the tar release is closely coupled in time to the devolatilization-induced temperature deviations during primary devolatilization and the onset of the tar release significantly precedes the slower light hydrocarbon gas evolution.

  15. CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

    2003-08-28

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when

  16. Microsoft Word - N0049800.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    49800 GJO-2002-306-TAR MAC-PIN 14.5.2 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project at the Young-Rainey STAR Center Building 100 Area Plume Control Technology Selection Report February 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC02-10 This page intentionally left blank Document Number N0049800 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Building 100 Area Plume Control Technology

  17. Development of clean coal and clean soil technologies using advanced agglomeration techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignasiak, B.; Ignasiak, T.; Szymocha, K.

    1990-01-01

    Three major topics are discussed in this report: (1) Upgrading of Low Rank Coals by the Agflotherm Process. Test data, procedures, equipment, etc., are described for co-upgrading of subbituminous coals and heavy oil; (2) Upgrading of Bituminous Coals by the Agflotherm Process. Experimental procedures and data, bench and pilot scale equipments, etc., for beneficiating bituminous coals are described; (3) Soil Clean-up and Hydrocarbon Waste Treatment Process. Batch and pilot plant tests are described for soil contaminated by tar refuse from manufactured gas plant sites. (VC)

  18. Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H.

    2008-07-01

    We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Software | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software ALCF MPI Benchmark Suite: ALCF MPI Benchmark Suite, which is designed to benchmark and measure several basic routines, such as messaging rate, ping-pong, aggregate off-node bandwidth, bi-section bandwidth, and collective operations. Contact: Vitali Morozov Download: ALCF_MPI_Benchmark_v1.01.BGQ.tar.bz2 BigSort Benchmark: The BigSort benchmark sorts a large number of 64-bit integers (from 0 to T) in parallel. In particular, the total size of the data set can exceed the aggregated memory

  20. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 204: STORAGE BUNKERS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 330 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 6, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The unit is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as CAU 330: Areas 6, 22, and 23 Tanks and Spill Sites. CAU 330 consists of the following CASs: CAS 06-02-04, Underground Storage Tank (UST) and Piping CAS 22-99-06, Fuel Spill CAS 23-01-02, Large Aboveground Storage Tank (AST) Farm CAS 23-25-05, Asphalt Oil Spill/Tar Release

  1. Trenton strata in western Illinois Basin, Brown and Schuyler Counties, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pochel, R.M.

    1984-12-01

    Trenton strata in the western Illinois basin are very good prospects for oil exploration. Much drilling has been done in the area but, as yet, no producing wells have been completed. Oil stains and some tars have been found in some samples from most wells. The Trenton in the area of Brown and Schuyler Counties is a fine-grained limestone that underlies the Maquoketa Shale at an average depth of 800 ft (244 m). Because of its position near the edge of the Illinois basin, the stratigraphy varies considerably and inconsistencies are present in most samples viewed.

  2. mpimemu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mpimemu mpimemu Description The code mpimemu is a simple tool that helps approximate MPI library memory usage as a function of scale. It takes samples of /proc/meminfo (node level) and /proc/self/status (process level) and outputs the min, max and avg values for a specified period of time. More information can be found in the README and README.QUICKSTART files. Download mpimemu tar file (updated July 5, README only) How to Build ./configure CC=mpicc (or your appropriate MPI C compiler) make How

  3. PSNAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PSNAP PSNAP Description PSNAP is the PAL System Noise Activity Program from the Performance and Architecture Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a spin loop that is calibrated to take a given amount of time (typically 1 ms). This loop is repeated for a number of iterations. The actual time each iteration takes is recorded. Analysis of those times allows one to quantify operating system interference or noise. Download psnap-1.2tar file made available June 28, 2013 How to

  4. Self lubrication of bitumen froth in pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, D.D.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper I will review the main properties of water lubricated pipelines and explain some new features which have emerged from studies of self-lubrication of Syncrudes` bitumen froth. When heavy oils are lubricated with water, the water and oil are continuously injected into a pipeline and the water is stable when in a lubricating sheath around the oil core. In the case of bitumen froth obtained from the Alberta tar sands, the water is dispersed in the bitumen and it is liberated at the wall under shear; water injection is not necessary because the froth is self-lubricating.

  5. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-12-06

    Through December 1999, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar (Tar II-A) Zone. Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood project. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone in order to focus the remaining time on using the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the Tar II-A steamflood project. On January 12, 1999, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations by injecting cold water into the flanks of the steamflood. The purpose of flank injection has been to increase and subsequently maintain reservoir pressures at a level that would fill-up the steam chests in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands before they can collapse and cause formation compaction and to prevent the steam chests from reoccurring. A new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model was used to provide operations with the necessary water injection rates and allowable production rates by well to minimize future surface subsidence and

  6. Unusual aryl-porphyrin rotational barriers in peripherally crowded porphyrins.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shyr, David C.; Dooley, Neal R.; Haddad, Raid Edward; Shelnutt, John Allen; Muzzi, Cinzia M.; Ma, Jian-Guo; Olmstead, Marilyn M.; Jaquinod, Laurent A.; Nurco, Daniel J.; Medforth, Craig John; Smith, Kevin M.

    2003-06-01

    Previous studies of 5,10,15,20-tetraarylporphyrins have shown that the barrier for meso aryl-porphyrin rotation ({Delta}G{sub ROT}) varies as a function of the core substituent M and is lower for a small metal (M = Ni) compared to a large metal (M = Zn) and for a dication (M 4H{sup 2+}) versus a free base porphyrin (M = 2H). This has been attributed to changes in the nonplanar distortion of the porphyrin ring and the deformability of the macrocycle caused by the core substituent. In the present work, X-ray crystallography, molecular mechanics (MM) calculations, and variable temperature (VT) {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy are used to examine the relationship between the aryl-porphyrin rotational barrier and the core substituent M in some novel 2,3,5,7,8,10,12,13,15,17,18,20-dodecaarylporphyrins (DArPs), and specifically in some 5,10,15,20-tetraaryl-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaphenylporphyrins (TArOPPs), where steric crowding of the peripheral groups always results in a very nonplanar macrocycle. X-ray structures of DArPs indicate differences in the nonplanar conformation of the macrocycle as a function of M, with saddle conformations being observed for M = Zn, 2H or M = 4H{sup 2+} and saddle and/or ruffle conformations for M = Ni. VT NMR studies show that the effect of protonation in the TArOPPs is to increase {Delta}G{sub ROT}, which is the opposite of the effect seen for the TArPs, and MM calculations also predict a strikingly high barrier for the TArOPPs when M = 4H{sup 2+}. These and other findings suggest that the aryl-porphyrin rotational barriers in the DArPs are closely linked to the deformability of the macrocycle along a nonplanar distortion mode which moves the substituent being rotated out of the porphyrin plane.

  7. In situ recovery from residually heated sections in a hydrocarbon containing formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael; Ryan, Robert Charles

    2010-12-14

    Methods of treating a tar sands formation is described herein. The methods may include providing heat to a first section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the first section of the formation. Heat is transferred from the heaters so that at least a first section of the formation reaches a selected temperature. At least a portion of residual heat from the first section transfers from the first section to a second section of the formation. At least a portion of hydrocarbons in the second section are mobilized by providing a solvation fluid and/or a pressurizing fluid to the second section of the formation.

  8. Microsoft Word - contents

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2001-272-TAR MAC-GWDUR 1.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Site Observational Work Plan for the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site January 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW 511-0006-10-000 Document Number U0143200 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0143200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan -Durango, Colorado January

  9. u42501.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    88-TAR Rev. 1 Final Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Old Rifle Site August 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0017-06-000 Document Number U0042501 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0042501 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan for Old Rifle, Colorado August 1999 Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and

  10. UMT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UMT UMT Description The UMT benchmark is a 3D, deterministic, multigroup, photon transport code for unstructured meshes. Download Download the UMT_v1.3.tar file (May 20, 2013) How to Build Two steps are required. cd to src; make cd to Teton; make SuOlsonTest The result is SuOlsonTest in the Teton directory. The build process requires MPI. The g++ compiler is also needed for preprocessing. How to Run In the 'run' directory you will find scripts for the small, large and extra large problems as

  11. IOR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IOR IOR Description IOR is designed to measure parallel file system I/O performance at both the POSIX and MPI-IO level. "IOR" stands "InterleavedOrRandom," which has very little to do with how the program works currently. This parallel program performs writes and reads to/from files under several sets of conditions and reports the resulting throughput rates. Download Download IOR-2.10.3.tar (Updated 12 July to correct an error in the README files; no code changes) How to

  12. Two-stage fixed-bed gasifier with selectable middle gas off-take point

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strickland, Larry D.; Bissett, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    A two-stage fixed bed coal gasifier wherein an annular region is in registry with a gasification zone underlying a devolatilization zone for extracting a side stream of high temperature substantially tar-free gas from the gasifier. A vertically displaceable skirt means is positioned within the gasifier to define the lower portion of the annular region so that vertical displacement of the skirt means positions the inlet into the annular region in a selected location within or in close proximity to the gasification zone for providing a positive control over the composition of the side stream gas.

  13. Upgrading heavy oils by non-catalytic treatment with hydrogen and hydrogen transfer solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbyshire, F.J.; Mitchell, T.O.; Whitehurst, D.D.

    1981-09-29

    Heavy liquid hydrocarbon oil, such as petroleum derived tars, predominantly boiling over 425/sup 0/C, are upgraded to products boiling below 425/sup 0/C, without substantial formation of insoluble char, by heating the heavy oil with hydrogen and a hydrogen transfer solvent in the absence of hydrogenation catalyst at temperatures of about 320/sup 0/C to 500/sup 0/C, and a pressure of 20 to 180 bar for 3 to 30 minutes. The hydrogen transfer solvents polycyclic compounds free of carbonyl groups, e.g., pyrene, and have a polarographic reduction potential which is less negative than phenanthrene and equal to or more negative than azapyrene.

  14. Process for the production of ethylene and other hydrocarbons from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Meyer; Fallon, Peter

    1986-01-01

    A process for the production of economically significant amounts of ethyl and other hydrocarbon compounds, such as benzene, from coal is disclosed wherein coal is reacted with methane at a temperature in the approximate range of 500.degree. C. to 1100.degree. C. at a partial pressure less than about 200 psig for a period of less than 10 seconds. Ethylene and other hydrocarbon compounds may be separated from the product stream so produced, and the methane recycled for further production of ethylene. In another embodiment, other compounds produced, such as by-product tars, may be burned to heat the recycled methane.

  15. Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Reserves Based Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    August 2009 Revised: October 2009 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Waste Blast Pulping Liquor Oils/Tars NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, and Waste Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Materials Total United States 311 Food 10 0 3 0 0 7 Q 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 7 0 1 0 0 6 *

  16. GRAPHITE EXTRUSIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benziger, T.M.

    1959-01-20

    A new lubricant for graphite extrusion is described. In the past, graphite extrusion mixtures have bcen composed of coke or carbon black, together with a carbonaceous binder such as coal tar pitch, and a lubricant such as petrolatum or a colloidal suspension of graphite in glycerin or oil. Sinee sueh a lubricant is not soluble in, or compatible with the biiider liquid, such mixtures were difficult to extrude, and thc formed pieees lacked strength. This patent teaches tbe use of fatty acids as graphite extrusion lubricants and definite improvemcnts are realized thereby since the fatty acids are soluble in the binder liquid.

  17. JeffPorter-ALICE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H eavy---ion c ollider e xperiments: F ocus o n ALICE e xperiment a t t he L HC 5/26/11 1 Jeff Porter LBNL ~1995 R. Jeff Porter (LBNL) STAR ALICE P rocessing m odel f or A LICE & S TAR o n N ERSC/PDSF * Event---based p rocessing  " pleasantly p arallel" - Event = i ndependent " collision" r egistered i n d etector - Task = p rocess a n e vent c ollec0on, s et o f i ndependent j obs - Naturally d istributed: o n c luster, g rid o f c lusters ... * Data I ntensive -

  18. Kaon semileptonic vector form factor and determination of |Vus| using

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    staggered fermions | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Kaon semileptonic vector form factor and determination of |Vus| using staggered fermions Authors: A. Bazavov, C. Bernard, C. M. Bouchard, C. DeTar, Daping Du, A. X. El-Khadra, J. Foley, E. D. Freeland6, E. Gámiz, Steven Gottlieb, U. M. Heller, Jongjeong Kim, A. S. Kronfeld, J. Laiho, L. Levkova, P. B. Mackenzie, E. T. Neil, M. B. Oktay, Si-Wei Qiu, J. N. Simone, R. Sugar, D. Toussaint, R. S. Van de Water, Ran Zhou Using staggered

  19. Engineering analysis of biomass gasifier product gas cleaning technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Moore, R.H.; Mudge, L.K.; Elliott, D.C.

    1986-08-01

    For biomass gasification to make a significant contribution to the energy picture in the next decade, emphasis must be placed on the generation of clean, pollutant-free gas products. This reports attempts to quantify levels of particulated, tars, oils, and various other pollutants generated by biomass gasifiers of all types. End uses for biomass gases and appropriate gas cleaning technologies are examined. Complete systems analysis is used to predit the performance of various gasifier/gas cleanup/end use combinations. Further research needs are identified. 128 refs., 20 figs., 19 tabs.

  20. Recent N* results from photoproduction experiments at CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Sokhan

    2011-10-01

    The recent breakthroughs in the technology of polarized targets have enabled a new generation of meson photo-production experiments to be carried out. A measurement of a full set of polarization observables off both polarized proton and neutron tar gets and in a large number of meson-production channels has come within sight. Such a measurement would very significantly reduce model-dependence in the analysis of the data and thus has the potential to resolve long-standing issues, such as the 'missing resonance' problem, and shed new light on the nucleon excitation spectrum. This has formed the motivation for the recent N* experimental programme of CLAS.

  1. Neutral B-meson mixing from three-flavor lattice quantum chromodynamics:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determination of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Neutral B-meson mixing from three-flavor lattice quantum chromodynamics: Determination of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ Authors: A. Bazavov, C. Bernard, C. M. Bouchard, C. DeTar, M. Di Pierro, A. X. El-Khadra, R. T. Evans, E. D. Freeland, E. Gámiz, Steven Gottlieb, U. M. Heller, J. E. Hetrick, R. Jain, A. S. Kronfeld, J. Laiho, L. Levkova, P. B. Mackenzie, E. T. Neil, M. B. Oktay, J. N. Simone, R. Sugar, D.

  2. Nonperturbative QCD Simulations with 2+1 Flavors of Improved Staggered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarks | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Nonperturbative QCD Simulations with 2+1 Flavors of Improved Staggered Quarks Authors: Bazavov, A., Bernard, C., DeTar, C., Gottlieb, S., Heller, U.M., Hetrick, J.E., Laiho, J., Levkova, L., Mackenzie, P.B., Oktay, M.B., Sugar, R., Toussaint, D., Van de Water, R.S. Dramatic progress has been made over the last decade in the numerical study of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) through the use of improved formulations of QCD on the lattice (improved

  3. DOE Tour of Zero: Via del Cielo by Palo Duro Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Via del Cielo by Palo Duro Homes DOE Tour of Zero: Via del Cielo by Palo Duro Homes 1 of 10 Palo Duro built this 2,215-square-foot home in Santa Fe, New Mexico, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 10 The stucco cladding covers energy-saving wall framing with 2-by-6 studs spaced 24-inch on-center that are sealed at all seams with sealant and filled with R-21 of blown fiberglass. A double layer of tar paper provides a drainage

  4. Coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant of Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, V.N.; Anikin, G.J.; Gross, M.

    1995-12-01

    Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, Russia, decided to erect a new coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant to replace the existing obsolete units and to improve the environmental conditions of the area. The paper deals with the technological concept and the design requirements. Commissioning is scheduled at the beginning of 1996. The paper describes H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, sulfur recovery and ammonia destruction, primary gas cooling and electrostatic tar precipitation, and the distributed control system that will be installed.

  5. Investigation of formation of nitrogen compounds in coal combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, D.W.; Crane, I.D.; Wendt, J.O.L.

    1983-10-01

    This is the final report on DOE contract number DE-AC21-80MC14061. It concerns the formation of nitrogen oxide from fuel-bound nitrogen during coal combustion. The work reported was divided into three tasks. They addressed problems of time-resolving pyrolysis rates of coal under simulated combustion conditions, the combustion of the tar that results from such pyrolysis, and theoretical modeling of the pyrolysis process. In all of these tasks, special attention was devoted to the fate of coal nitrogen. The first two tasks were performed by Exxon Research and Engineering Company. 49 references.

  6. Indigenous Sustainability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indigenous S ustainability Image by Jonathan Thunder Climate Change Impacts Tar Sands 86% Food Economy Food Dollars Spent On the Food Dollars Spent On the "the staEsEcs showed tha ReservaEon ReservaEon only 1 million dollars or 14% of the reservaEon households' food dollars stayed on the reservaEon, while 7 million or 86% le6 the reservaEon." ---WELRP Food Sovereignty Report 2008 14 14% 86% Indigenous Corn RestoraEon Project Seneca Pink Lady Flour Corn with Sue Wika Pawnee Eagle Corn

  7. Originally Released: August 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    August 2009 Revised: October 2009 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Waste Blast Pulping Liquor Oils/Tars NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, and Waste Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Materials Total United States 311 Food 10 0 3 0 0 7 Q 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 7 0 1 0 0 6 *

  8. Released: August 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,"Waste",," " ,,,"Blast",,,"Pulping Liquor",,"Oils/Tars" "NAICS",,,"Furnace/Coke",,"Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black

  9. Released: March 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste" " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS","

  10. I*

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :c* - . 2e. a.;*. _ . . . -&3&G &q, ,;, -%+ ., . I* .g* 1 . . @ 3 - . a .b,: & ' b-Q&8 " ' , .-. . The Secretary of Energy Washington, bC 20585 ,&q!. 0s .". 3 0 .' . ..; October 10, 1997 . . The ,Honorable William S. Cohen Secretary of Defense Washington, D.C. 20301 . # ._ &tar Mr. Secretary: . ' The Congress recently sent to the President for signature the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act,' 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would

  11. Restoring a sludge holding tank at a wastewater treatment plant using high-performance coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Dea, V.

    2005-11-01

    Faced with a serious hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) corrosion problem in two sludge holding tanks in 1993, the city of Concord, New Hampshire, repaired the deteriorating substrate by using a conventional acrylic-modified cementitious resurfacer and a coal tar epoxy (CTE) coating system. CTE failure occurred within 2 years, leading to more severe coating delamination. Restoration was delayed for 10 years, which caused extensive chemical attack on the concrete substrate-upwards of 2 in. (50 mm) of concrete loss. This article explains how one of these tanks was restored and prepared for another 15+ years of service.

  12. Table 5. Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials" "Greenhouse Gas Name","Formula","GWP" ,,"SAR1","TAR2","AR43" "(1) Carbon Dioxide","CO2",1,1,1 "(2) Methane","CH4",21,23,25 "(3) Nitrous Oxide","N2O",310,296,298 "(4) Hydroflourocarbons" "HFC-23 (trifluoromethane)","CHF3",11700,12000,14800 "HFC-32

  13. Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merriam, N.W.; Sethi, V.; Brecher, L.E.

    1994-06-21

    A process is described for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage. 1 fig.

  14. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Twenty-seventh quarterly report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1993-09-01

    Significant advances have been made at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive two-dimensional computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification and pulverized coal combustion. During the same time period, significant advances have been made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in the mechanisms and kinetics of coal pyrolysis and secondary reactions of pyrolysis products. This program presents a unique opportunity to merge the technology developed by each organization to provide detailed predictive capability for advanced coal characterization techniques in conjunction with comprehensive computer models to provide accurate process simulations. The program will streamline submodels existing or under development for coal pyrolysis chemistry, volatile secondary reactions, tar formation, soot formation, char reactivity, and SO{sub x}-NO{sub x} pollutant formation. Submodels for coal viscosity, agglomeration, tar/char secondary reactions, sulfur capture, and ash physics and chemistry will be developed or adapted. The submodels will first be incorporated into the BYU entrained-bed gasification code and subsequently, into a fixed-bed gasification code (to be selected and adapted). These codes will be validated by comparison with small scale laboratory and PDU-scale experiments. Progress is described.

  15. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTION KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Guenther

    2002-10-28

    The modifications to the SRT-RCFR facility described in the June report were completed. As a result of these changes, the furnace hot zone was increased in length from 7 cm to 15.5 cm. The injector region of the furnace, providing entrainment and sheath flows, was unchanged, while the flow path from the exit of the furnace to the sample collection section was shortened by approximately 10 cm. The modified facility was used to resume testing of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal at 10 atm. The first goal was to confirm that the facility now provides true secondary pyrolysis test conditions. That is, the tar product should be completely converted to soot even in the absence of oxygen in the gas stream. We have now performed four tests with pure argon carrier gas, and have consistently observed voluminous soot product with little or no evidence of tar. Thus, this objective was met. The clogging problems for Pittsburgh No. 8 coal under secondary pyrolysis test conditions may preclude achieving this data point. In that case, we will make measurements under oxidizing conditions, which are expected to eliminate the clogging, and to gradually reduce the oxygen content to the point where product yields can reliably be extrapolated to the zero oxygen case.

  16. Current Research on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, R. M.; Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Nimlos, M. R.; Pepiot, P.; Donohoe, B. S.; Hensley, J. E.; Phillips, S. D.

    2012-04-05

    The thermochemical research platform at the National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is primarily focused on conversion of biomass to transportation fuels using non-biological techniques. Research is conducted in three general areas relating to fuels synthesis via thermochemical conversion by gasification: (1) Biomass gasification fundamentals, chemistry and mechanisms of tar formation; (2) Catalytic tar reforming and syngas cleaning; and (3) Syngas conversion to mixed alcohols. In addition, the platform supports activities in both technoeconomic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) of thermochemical conversion processes. Results from the TEA and LCA are used to inform and guide laboratory research for alternative biomass-to-fuels strategies. Detailed process models are developed using the best available material and energy balance information and unit operations models created at NREL and elsewhere. These models are used to identify cost drivers which then form the basis for research programs aimed at reducing costs and improving process efficiency while maintaining sustainability and an overall net reduction in greenhouse gases.

  17. Coupling DAEM and CFD for simulating biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Qingang; Zhang, Jingchao; Wiggins, Gavin; Daw, C. Stuart; Xu, Fei

    2015-12-03

    We report results from computational simulations of an experimental, lab-scale bubbling bed biomass pyrolysis reactor that include a distributed activation energy model (DAEM) for the kinetics. In this study, we utilized multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to account for the turbulent hydrodynamics, and this was combined with the DAEM kinetics in a multi-component, multi-step reaction network. Our results indicate that it is possible to numerically integrate the coupled CFD–DAEM system without significantly increasing computational overhead. It is also clear, however, that reactor operating conditions, reaction kinetics, and multiphase flow dynamics all have major impacts on the pyrolysis products exiting the reactor. We find that, with the same pre-exponential factors and mean activation energies, inclusion of distributed activation energies in the kinetics can shift the predicted average value of the exit vapor-phase tar flux and its statistical distribution, compared to single-valued activation-energy kinetics. Perhaps the most interesting observed trend is that increasing the diversity of the DAEM activation energies appears to increase the mean tar yield, all else being equal. As a result, these findings imply that accurate resolution of the reaction activation energy distributions will be important for optimizing biomass pyrolysis processes.

  18. Combustion of volatile matter during the initial stages of coal combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlow, D.; Niksa, S.; Kruger, C.H.

    1990-08-01

    Both the secondary pyrolysis and combustion of the volatiles from a bituminous coal will be studied. Devolatilization and secondary pyrolysis experiments will be conducted in a novel flow reactor in which secondary pyrolysis of the volatiles occurs after devolatilization is complete. This allows unambiguous measurements of the yields from both processes. Measurements will be made for reactor temperatures from 1500 to 1700 K, and a nominal residence time of 200 msec. These conditions are typical of coal combustion. Yields of tar, soot, H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} hydrocarbons will be determined as a function of reactor temperature. The yields will be reported as a function of the temperature of the reactor. The instrumentation for temperature measurements will be developed during future studies. Combustion studies will be conducted in a constant volume bomb, which will be designed and constructed for this study. Tar and soot will be removed before introducing the volatiles to the bomb, so that only the combustion of the light gas volatiles will be considered. The burning velocities of light gas volatiles will be determined both as functions of mixture stoichiometry and the temperature at which the volatiles are pyrolysed. 90 refs., 70 figs., 13 tabs.

  19. Western Research Institute quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Accomplishments for the quarter are described briefly for the following areas of research: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers process studies. Tar sand research is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE{sup TM}) Process. Coal research includes: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residua; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid state NMR analysis of Mowry formation shale from different sedimentary basins; solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of an effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

  20. Hoe Creek groundwater restoration, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renk, R.R.; Crader, S.E.; Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the summer of 1989, approximately 6.5 million gallons of contaminated groundwater were pumped from 23 wells at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site, near Gillette, Wyoming. The organic contaminants were removed using activated carbon before the water was sprayed on 15.4 acres at the sites. Approximately 2647 g (5.8 lb) of phenols and 10,714 g (23.6 lb) of benzene were removed from the site aquifers. Phenols, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and naphthalene concentrations were measured in 43 wells. Benzene is the only contaminant at the site exceeds the federal standard for drinking water (5 {mu}g/L). Benzene leaches into the groundwater and is slow to biologically degrade; therefore, the benzene concentration has remained high in the groundwater at the site. The pumping operation affected groundwater elevations across the entire 80-acre site. The water levels rebounded quickly when the pumping operation was stopped on October 1, 1989. Removing contaminated groundwater by pumping is not an effective way to clean up the site because the continuous release of benzene from coal tars is slow. Benzene will continue to leach of the tars for a long time unless its source is removed or the leaching rate retarded through mitigation techniques. The application of the treated groundwater to the surface stimulated plant growth. No adverse effects were noted or recorded from some 60 soil samples taken from twenty locations in the spray field area. 20 refs., 52 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 390: AREAS 9, 10, AND 12 SPILL SITES, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-10-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 390 consists four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 9, 10, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site. The closure activities performed at the CASs include: (1) CAS 09-99-03, Wax, Paraffin: 2 cubic yards of drilling polymer was removed on June 20,2005, and transported to the Area 9 Landfill for disposal. (2) CAS 10-99-01, Epoxy Tar Spill: 2 cubic feet of asphalt waste was removed on June 20,2005, and transported to the Area 9 Landfill for disposal. (3) CAS 10-99-03, Tar Spills: 3 cubic yards of deteriorated asphalt waste was removed on June 20,2005, and transported to the Area 9 Landfill for disposal. (4) CAS 12-25-03, Oil Stains (2); Container: Approximately 16 ounces of used oil were removed from ventilation equipment on June 28,2005, and recycled. One CAS 10-22-19, Drums, Stains, was originally part of CAU 390 but was transferred out of CAU 390 and into CAU 550, Drums, Batteries, and Lead Materials. The transfer was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection on August 19,2005, and a copy of the approval letter is included in Appendix D of this report.

  2. CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALBERT CALDERON

    1998-09-22

    This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (i) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (ii) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (iii) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; and (iv) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: ? Consolidation of the project team-players; ? Recruiting Koppers Industries as an additional stakeholder; ? Developing a closed system for the production of binder pitch from tar in the Calderon coking process as the incentive for Koppers to join the team; ? Gathering appropriate equipment for conducting a set of experiments at bench scale to simulate tar quality produced from the Calderon coking process for the production of binder pitch; and ? Further progress made in the design of the commercial coking reactor.

  3. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-391-2156, Morton Salt Company, Weeks Island, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, R.P.; Knutti, E.B.

    1991-11-01

    In response to a request from the International Chemical Workers Union, project director, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at the Morton Salt Company (SIC-1479), Weeks Island, Louisiana. At Weeks Island the salt was mined from large domes, circular in shape and from a few hundred yards to a mile across. The only detectable overexposures in the mining operation were to coal-tar pitch volatiles. None of the 20 personal breathing zone and area air samples collected in the mill were above detectable limits for asbestos (1332214). The prevalences of chronic cough and chronic phlegm reported were statistically different, exceeding those reported by a group of nonexposed blue collar workers. Chronic symptoms were reported by underground workers in all smoking categories, but only by those surface workers who also smoked. There were more complaints about eye irritation and tearing of the eyes in the underground workers, consistent with diesel byproduct exposure. Four workers were identified through pulmonary function test results with mild obstructive lung disease and one with moderate obstructive lung disease. Three workers with mild restriction of lung volume were noted. None of the 61 chest films taken read positively for pneumoconiosis. The authors conclude that overexposures to coal-tar pitch volatiles existed at the time of the survey. The authors recommend measures for reducing occupational exposures to workplace contaminants. A follow up medical questionnaire survey should be conducted.

  4. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  5. Design and fabrication of advanced materials from Illinois coal wastes. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, V.M.; Wright, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    The main goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to design and fabricate advanced brake and structural composite materials from Illinois coal combustion residues. During the first quarter of the project, the thrust of the work was directed towards setting up the experimental facilities and undertaking preliminary tests to gauge the ability of coal tar derived binder in fabricating the brake skeletons. In addition systematic scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were conducted on PCC fly ash (Baldwin), fly ash (ADM), FBC fly ash, FBC spent bed bottom ash, bottom ash (ADM), and scrubber sludge residues to characterize their geometrical shape and thermal stability. The PCC fly ash particles being highly spherical in shape and thermally inert up to 1100{degrees}C will make an excellent raw material for our composites. This is born out by fabricating brake skeletons from PCC fly ash colloids. Unlike the PCC fly ash and FBC fly ash, the scrubber sludge particles are not suitable hosts for our brake lining materials because of a whisker-like particle structure. Six different compositions of various combustion residues were tested in the fabrication of brake skeletons, and our tar derived binder shows great promise in the fabrication of composite materials.

  6. Jet flames of a refuse derived fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Roman; Kupka, Tomasz; Zajac, Krzysztof

    2009-04-15

    This paper is concerned with combustion of a refuse derived fuel in a small-scale flame. The objective is to provide a direct comparison of the RDF flame properties with properties of pulverized coal flames fired under similar boundary conditions. Measurements of temperature, gas composition (O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO) and burnout have demonstrated fundamental differences between the coal flames and the RDF flames. The pulverized coals ignite in the close vicinity of the burner and most of the combustion is completed within the first 300 ms. Despite the high volatile content of the RDF, its combustion extends far into the furnace and after 1.8 s residence time only a 94% burnout has been achieved. This effect has been attributed not only to the larger particle size of fluffy RDF particles but also to differences in RDF volatiles if compared to coal volatiles. Substantial amounts of oily tars have been observed in the RDF flames even though the flame temperatures exceeded 1300 C. The presence of these tars has enhanced the slagging propensity of RDF flames and rapidly growing deposits of high carbon content have been observed. (author)

  7. OCT (Offshore Technology Conference) accents deepwater action around the globe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yost, P.; Scarborough, R.H.

    1980-05-12

    According to P. Yost (US Coast Guard) at the 12th Offshore Technology Conference (Houston 1980), the US Coast Guard's high-seas boom and skimmer equipment worked well with the strong constant currents and heavy crude involved in the Ixtoc blowout but due to a lighter crude and more variable currents, was not as successful in containing spills from the Burmah Agate tanker in the fall of 1989. Texas beaches will not remove any more oil from the Ixtoc blowout, but the long term effects of the spill remain unknown. Federal and state officials are examining options concerning the 17-19 tar mats deposited by the spill on the beaches; the only way to remove the tar mats might be by bulldozer at low tide. A Coast Guard study of tanker and freighter traffic off Galveston, Texas has been completed and recommendations, possibly involving earlier boarding by pilots of incoming vessels, will be made soon. Other papers presented at the OTC are discussed.

  8. Coupling DAEM and CFD for simulating biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidized beds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiong, Qingang; Zhang, Jingchao; Wiggins, Gavin; Daw, C. Stuart; Xu, Fei

    2015-12-03

    We report results from computational simulations of an experimental, lab-scale bubbling bed biomass pyrolysis reactor that include a distributed activation energy model (DAEM) for the kinetics. In this study, we utilized multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to account for the turbulent hydrodynamics, and this was combined with the DAEM kinetics in a multi-component, multi-step reaction network. Our results indicate that it is possible to numerically integrate the coupled CFD–DAEM system without significantly increasing computational overhead. It is also clear, however, that reactor operating conditions, reaction kinetics, and multiphase flow dynamics all have major impacts on the pyrolysis products exiting themore » reactor. We find that, with the same pre-exponential factors and mean activation energies, inclusion of distributed activation energies in the kinetics can shift the predicted average value of the exit vapor-phase tar flux and its statistical distribution, compared to single-valued activation-energy kinetics. Perhaps the most interesting observed trend is that increasing the diversity of the DAEM activation energies appears to increase the mean tar yield, all else being equal. As a result, these findings imply that accurate resolution of the reaction activation energy distributions will be important for optimizing biomass pyrolysis processes.« less

  9. Man-made marine debris and sea turtle strandings on beaches of the upper Texas and southwestern Louisiana coasts, June 1987 through September 1989. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duronslet, M.J.; Revera, D.B.; Stanley, K.M.

    1991-02-01

    The upper Texas and southwestern Louisiana coastlines were divided into six sampling zones to survey the amounts, types and rates of accumulation of man-made marine debris, the number of sea turtle strandings, the incidence of sea turtle entanglements in marine debris and the incidence of ingestion of such debris by sea turtles. From June 1987 through September 1989, 473 sample plots were examined for marine debris. Significant differences were detected in mean number of debris items per 100 sq m of beach sampled by year, zone and month. Significant differences in mean weight of debris items per 100 sq m of beach sampled were detected by month and zone. Both number and weights (per 100 sq m) of debris were lowest in the winter months. Number per 100 sq m was greatest in August while weight per 100 sq m peaked in May. Tar balls and plastic items were the most frequently encountered marine debris items. Wooden items had the highest average weights while tar balls and polystyrene foam were the lightest items collected. A total of 171 sea turtles stranded on the surveyed beaches during the study. Of 26 gastrointestinal tracts examined, 16 had ingested some form of man-made debris. Six turtles were entangled in man-made debris and 9 were live stranded.

  10. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-06-27

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

  11. Development of Mercury and Hydrogen Chloride Emission Monitors for Coal Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Norton; D. Eckels; C. Chriswell

    2001-02-26

    The gas conditioning issues involved with coal gasification streams are very complex and do not have simple solutions. This is particularly true in view of the fact that the gas conditioning system must deal with tars, high moisture contents, and problems with NH{sub 3} without affecting low ppb levels of Hg, low levels (low ppm or less) of HCl, or the successful operation of conditioner components and analytical systems. Those issues are far from trivial. Trying to develop a non-chemical system for gas conditioning was very ambitious in view of the difficult sampling environment and unique problems associated with coal gasification streams. Although a great deal was learned regarding calibration, sample transport, instrumentation options, gas stream conditioning, and CEM design options, some challenging issues still remain. Sample transport is one area that is often not adequately considered. Because of the gas stream composition and elevated temperatures involved, special attention will need to be given to the choice of materials for the sample line and other plumbing components. When using gas stream oxidation, there will be sample transport regions under oxidizing as well as reducing conditions, and each of those regions will require different materials of construction for sample transport. The catalytic oxidation approach worked well for removal of tars and NH{sub 3} on a short term basis, but durability issues related to using the catalyst tube during extended testing periods still require study.

  12. Catalytic hydroprocessing of coal-derived gasification residues to fuel blending stocks: effect of reaction variables and catalyst on hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), and hydrodesulfurization (HDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dieter Leckel

    2006-10-15

    Gas liquors, tar oils, and tar products resulting from the coal gasification of a high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch plant can be successfully refined to fuel blending components by the use of severe hydroprocessing conditions. High operating temperatures and pressures combined with low space velocities ensure the deep hydrogenation of refractory oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen compounds. Hydrodeoxygenation, particularly the removal of phenolic components, hydrodesulfurization, and hydrodenitrogenation were obtained at greater than 99% levels using the NiMo and NiW on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Maximum deoxygenation activity was achieved using the NiMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst having a maximum pore size distribution in the range of 110-220{angstrom}. The NiMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, which also has a relatively high proportion of smaller pore sizes (35-60 {angstrom}), displays lower hydrogenation activity. 30 refs., 1 fig. 8 tabs.

  13. Proceedings of the fuels technology contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, R.D.

    1993-11-01

    The Fuels Technology Contractors Review Meeting was held November 16-18, 1993, at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting was sponsored and hosted by METC, the Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). METC periodically provides an opportunity to bring together all of the R&D participants in a DOE-sponsored contractors review meeting to present key results of their research and to provide technology transfer to the active research community and to the interested public. This meeting was previously called the Natural Gas Technology Contractors Review Meeting. This year it was expanded to include DOE-sponsored research on oil shale and tar sands and so was retitled the Fuels Technology Contractors Review Meeting. Current research activities include efforts in both natural gas and liquid fuels. The natural gas portion of the meeting included discussions of results summarizing work being conducted in fracture systems, both natural and induced; drilling, completion, and stimulation research; resource characterization; delivery and storage; gas to liquids research; and environmental issues. The meeting also included project and technology summaries on research in oil shale, tar sands, and mild coal gasification, and summaries of work in natural-gas fuel cells and natural-gas turbines. The format included oral and poster session presentations. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong Fan

    2006-08-09

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section

  15. Low Emissions Burner Technology for Metal Processing Industry using Byproducts and Biomass Derived Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Ajay; Taylor, Robert

    2013-09-30

    This research and development efforts produced low-emission burner technology capable of operating on natural gas as well as crude glycerin and/or fatty acids generated in biodiesel plants. The research was conducted in three stages (1) Concept definition leading to the design and development of a small laboratory scale burner, (2) Scale-up to prototype burner design and development, and (3) Technology demonstration with field vefiication. The burner design relies upon the Flow Blurring (FB) fuel injection based on aerodynamically creating two-phase flow near the injector exit. The fuel tube and discharge orifice both of inside diameter D are separated by gap H. For H < 0.25D, the atomizing air bubbles into liquid fuel to create a two-phase flow near the tip of the fuel tube. Pressurized two-phase fuel-air mixture exits through the discharge orifice, which results in expansion and breakup of air bubbles yielding a spray with fine droplets. First, low-emission combustion of diesel, biodiesel and straight VO (soybean oil) was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine sprays for these fuels with significantly different physical properties. Visual images for these baseline experiments conducted with heat release rate (HRR) of about 8 kW illustrate clean blue flames indicating premixed combustion for all three fuels. Radial profiles of the product gas temperature at the combustor exit overlap each other signifying that the combustion efficiency is independent of the fuel. At the combustor exit, the NOx emissions are within the measurement uncertainties, while CO emissions are slightly higher for straight VO as compared to diesel and biodiesel. Considering the large variations in physical and chemical properties of fuels considered, the small differences observed in CO and NOx emissions show promise for fuel-flexible, clean combustion systems. FB injector has proven to be very effective in atomizing fuels with very different physical properties, and it offers a

  16. Measurement of top quark-antiquark pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    A measurement of the cross section for the production of top quarkantiquark pairs ( ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}}$ ) in association with a vector boson V (W or Z) in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$ is presented. The results are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb$^{-1}$ recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement is performed in three leptonic (e and $\\mu$) channels: a same-sign dilepton analysis targeting ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} \\mathrm {W} $ events, and trilepton and four-lepton analyses designed for ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} {\\mathrm {Z}} $ events. In the same-sign dilepton channel, the ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} \\mathrm {W} $ cross section is measured as $\\sigma _{{\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} \\mathrm {W}} = 170 ^{+90-80}\\,\\text {(stat)} \\pm 70\\,\\text {(syst)} \\, \\text {fb} $ , corresponding to a significance of 1.6 standard deviations over the background-only hypothesis. Combining the trilepton and four-lepton channels, a direct measurement of the ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} {\\mathrm {Z}} $ cross section, $\\sigma _{{\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} {\\mathrm {Z}}} = 200 ^{+80-70}\\,\\text {(stat)} ^{+40-30}\\,\\text {(syst)} \\mathrm{fb}^{-1} $ , is obtained with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations. The measured cross sections are compatible with standard model predictions within their experimental uncertainties. The inclusive ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} {\\mathrm {V}} $ process is observed with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations from the combination of all three leptonic channels.

  17. SU-E-J-33: Cardiac Movement in Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left-Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, M; Lee, S; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the displacement of heart using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart. Methods: Treatment planning was performed on the computed tomography (CT) datasets of 20 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Heart, lung and both breasts were outlined. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy divided into 28 fractions. The dose distributions in all the plans were required to fulfill the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement specifications that include 100% coverage of the CTV with ? 95% of the prescribed dose and that the volume inside the CTV receiving > 107% of the prescribed dose should be minimized. Displacement of heart was measured by calculating the distance between center of heart and left breast. For the evaluation of radiation dose to heart, minimum, maximum and mean dose to heart were calculated. Results: The maximum and minimum left-right (LR) displacements of heart were 8.9 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The heart moved > 4 mm in the LR direction in 17 of the 20 patients. The distances between the heart and left breast ranged from 8.0217.68 mm (mean, 12.23 mm) and 7.8512.98 mm (mean, 8.97 mm) with DIBH CT and FB CT, respectively. The maximum doses to the heart were 3115 cGy and 4652 cGy for the DIBH and FB CT dataset, respectively. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the DIBH technique could help to reduce the risk of radiation dose-induced cardiac toxicity by using movement of cardiac; away from radiation field. The DIBH technique could be used in an actual treatment room for a few minutes and could effectively reduce the cardiac dose when used with a sub-device or image acquisition standard to maintain consistent respiratory motion.

  18. Measurement of top quark-antiquark pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    A measurement of the cross section for the production of top quarkantiquark pairs ( ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}}$ ) in association with a vector boson V (W or Z) in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$ is presented. The results are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb$^{-1}$ recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement is performed in three leptonic (e and $\\mu$) channels: a same-sign dilepton analysis targeting ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} \\mathrm {W} $ events, and trilepton and four-lepton analyses designed for ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} {\\mathrm {Z}} $ events. Inmorethe same-sign dilepton channel, the ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} \\mathrm {W} $ cross section is measured as $\\sigma _{{\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} \\mathrm {W}} = 170 ^{+90-80}\\,\\text {(stat)} \\pm 70\\,\\text {(syst)} \\, \\text {fb} $ , corresponding to a significance of 1.6 standard deviations over the background-only hypothesis. Combining the trilepton and four-lepton channels, a direct measurement of the ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} {\\mathrm {Z}} $ cross section, $\\sigma _{{\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} {\\mathrm {Z}}} = 200 ^{+80-70}\\,\\text {(stat)} ^{+40-30}\\,\\text {(syst)} \\mathrm{fb}^{-1} $ , is obtained with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations. The measured cross sections are compatible with standard model predictions within their experimental uncertainties. The inclusive ${\\mathrm {t}}\\overline{{\\mathrm {t}}} {\\mathrm {V}} $ process is observed with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations from the combination of all three leptonic channels.less

  19. Search for a high-mass Higgs boson decaying to a W boson pair in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-07

    A search for a high-mass Higgs boson H is performed in the H → WW → ℓνℓν and H → WW → ℓνqq decay channels using pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 collected at √s = 8 TeV by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence of a high-mass Higgs boson is found. Limits on σH × BR(H → WW) as a function of the Higgs boson mass mH are determined in three different scenarios: one in which the heavy Higgs boson has a narrow width compared to the experimental resolution, onemore » for a width increasing with the boson mass and modeled by the complex-pole scheme following the same behavior as in the Standard Model, and one for intermediate widths. The upper range of the search is mH = 1500 GeV for the narrow-width scenario and mH = 1000 GeV for the other two scenarios. The lower edge of the search range is 200–300 GeV and depends on the analysis channel and search scenario. For each signal interpretation, individual and combined limits from the two WW decay channels are presented. Thus, at mH = 1500 GeV, the highest-mass point tested, σH × BR(H → WW) for a narrow-width Higgs boson is constrained to be less than 22fb and 6.6fb at 95% CL for the gluon fusion and vector-boson fusion production modes, respectively.« less

  20. An Improved Plutonium Trifluoride Precipitation Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, H.D.

    2001-06-26

    This report discusses results of the plutonium trifluoride two-stage precipitation study. A series of precipitation experiments was used to identify the significant process variables affecting precipitation performance. A mathematical model of the precipitation process was developed which is based on the formation of plutonium fluoride complexes. The precipitation model relates all process variables, in a single equation, to a single parameter which can be used to control the performance of the plutonium trifluoride precipitation process. Recommendations have been made which will optimize the FB-Line plutonium trifluoride precipitation process.

  1. Distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events produced in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV with a data sample collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to a luminosity of 5.1fb-1. We corrected the distributions for detector effects, and compared with several event generators based on two- and multi-parton matrix elements at leading order. Thus, among the considered calculations, MADGRAPH interfaced with PYTHIA6displays the overall best agreement with data.

  2. Evidence for simultaneous production of $J/\\psi$ and $\\Upsilon$ mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-11-07

    We report evidence for the simultaneous production of J/ψ and Υ mesons in 8.1 fb-1 of data collected at √s =1.96 TeV by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab pp- Tevatron Collider. Events with these characteristics are expected to be produced predominantly by gluon-gluon interactions. In our analysis, we extract the effective cross section characterizing the initial parton spatial distribution, σeff = 2.2 ± 0.7 (stat) ± 0.9 (syst) mb.

  3. Model independent search for new phenomena in pp̄ collisions at√s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Alverson, George O; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Aoki, Masato

    2012-05-24

    We describe a model independent search for physics beyond the standard model in lepton final states. We examine 117 final states using 1.1 fb-1 of pp̄ collisions data at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector. We conclude that all observed discrepancies between data and model can be attributed to uncertainties in the standard model background modeling, and hence we do not see any evidence for physics beyond the standard model.

  4. Search for events with leptonic jets and missing transverse energy in $\\mathbf{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s}=1.96}$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-08-01

    We present the first search for pair production of isolated jets of charged leptons in association with a large imbalance in transverse energy in p{bar p} collisions using 5.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No excess is observed above Standard Model background, and the result is used to set upper limits on the production cross section of pairs of supersymmetric chargino and neutralino particles as a function of 'dark-photon' mass, where the dark photon is produced in the decay of the lightest supersymmetric particle.

  5. Precise study of the $Z/\\gamma^*$ boson transverse momentum distribution in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions using a novel technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-10-01

    Using 7.3 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, we measure the distribution of the variable {phi}*{sub {eta}}, which probes the same physical effects as the Z/{gamma}* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. A QCD prediction is found to describe the general features of the {phi}*{sub {eta}} distribution, but is unable to describe its detailed shape or dependence on boson rapidity. A prediction that includes a broadening of transverse momentum for small values of the parton momentum fraction is strongly disfavored.

  6. Geothermal Direct Use Feasibility Study on the Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale Merrick

    2007-04-20

    The Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation (FBIR) is rich in renewable energy resources. Development of its geothermal resources has the potential to profoundly affect the energy and economic future of the FBIC. Geothermal energy can contribute to making the reservation energy self-sufficient and, potentially, an energy exporter. The feasibility study assessed the feasibility of installing a geothermal district heating system to provide low-cost, efficient heating of existing and planned residences, community buildings and water, using an existing geothermal well, FB-3.

  7. Searches for the standard model Higgs at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilminster, Ben; /Ohio State U.

    2007-05-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron are currently the only capable of searching for the Standard Model Higgs boson. This article describes their most sensitive searches in the expected Higgs mass range, focusing on advanced methods used to extract the maximal sensitivity from the data. CDF presents newly updated results for H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and Zh {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -}b{bar b}. D0 presents two new searches for WH {yields} lvb{bar b}. These new analyses use the same 1 fb{sup -1} dataset as previous searches, but with improved techniques resulting in markedly improved sensitivity.

  8. Recent Results on Top-Quark Physics at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, Kenneth

    2015-10-23

    We present the most recent measurements on top-quark physics obtained with Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collisions recorded by the D0 experiment at $\\sqrt{s}= 1.96$ TeV. The full Run II data set of 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ is analyzed. Both lepton+jets and dilepton channels of top-quark pair production are used to measure the differential and inclusive cross sections, the forward-backward asymmetries, the top-quark mass, the spin correlations, and the top-quark polarization.

  9. Search for the rare decay Bs0→μ+μ-

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; et al

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of a search for the flavor changing neutral current decay B0susing 6.1 fb-1 of pp⁻ collisions at collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of B0scandidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting upper limit on the branching fraction is B (B0s → μ⁺μ⁻) < 5.1 x 10-8 at the 95% C.L. This limit is a factor of 2.4 better than that of the previous D0 analysis and the best limit to date.

  10. Distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events in pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events produced in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV with a data sample collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to a luminosity of 5.1fb-1. The distributions are corrected for detector effects, and compared with several event generators based on two- and multi-parton matrix elements at leading order. Among the considered calculations, MadGraph interfaced with pythia6 displays the overall best agreement with data.

  11. Searches for electroweak production of charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons decaying to leptons and W, Z, and Higgs bosons in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-26

    Our searches for the direct electroweak production of supersymmetric charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons in a variety of signatures with leptons and W, Z, and Higgs bosons are presented. Results are based on a sample of proton-proton collision data collected at center-of-mass energy √s=8TeV with the CMS detector in 2012, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. These observed event rates are in agreement with expectations from the standard model. Finally, these results probe charginos and neutralinos with masses up to 720 GeV, and sleptons up to 260 GeV, depending on the model details.

  12. Top Physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2011-06-01

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV analyzed by the CDF collaboration. Thanks to this large data sample, precision top quark measurements are now a reality at the Tevatron. Further, several new physics signals could appear in this large dataset. We will present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  13. Study of double parton interactions in diphoton + dijet events in $$p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2016-03-01

    We use a sample of diphoton+dijet events to measure the effective cross section of double parton interactions, which characterizes the area containing the interacting partons in proton-antiproton collisions, and find it to be σeff=19.3±1.4(stat)±7.8(syst) mb. The sample was collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider inmore » $$p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb-1.« less

  14. Search for Resonant WW and WZ Production in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; ?wiok, M.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jain, S.; Jamin, D.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rich, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-06-29

    We search for resonant WW or WZ production by using up to 5.4 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data are consistent with the standard model background expectation, and we set limits on a resonance mass by using the sequential standard model W' boson and the Randall-Sundrum model graviton G as benchmarks. We exclude a sequential standard model W' boson in the mass range 180690 GeV and a Randall-Sundrum graviton in the range 300754 GeV at 95% C.L.

  15. Measurement of the ?b? lifetime in the exclusive decay ?b??J/??? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.

    2012-06-07

    We measure the ??b lifetime in the fully reconstructed decay ??b?J/??? using 10.4 fb? of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at ?s=1.96 TeV. The lifetime of the topologically similar decay channel B??J/?K?S is also measured. We obtain ?(??b)=1.3030.075(stat)0.035(syst) ps and ?(B?)=1.5080.025(stat)0.043(syst) ps. Using these measurements, we determine the lifetime ratio of ?(??b)/?(B?)=0.8640.052(stat)0.033(syst).

  16. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings in single top quark production in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beni S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-02-14

    We present new direct constraints on a general Wtb interaction using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model provides a purely left-handed vector coupling at the Wtb vertex, while the most general, lowest dimension Lagrangian allows right-handed vector and left- or right-handed tensor couplings as well. We obtain precise limits on these anomalous couplings by comparing the data to the expectations from different assumptions on the Wtb coupling.

  17. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.

    2012-08-15

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb?, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+?, where the ?(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.5510.014(stat)0.017(syst) GeV/c, which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  18. Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-30

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  19. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Faur, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.

    2012-08-20

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 fb? of integrated luminosity in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  20. Searches for signals from microscopic black holes in processes of proton collisions at {radical} s = 7 TeV in the CMS experiment at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savina, M. V.

    2013-09-15

    If the fundamental scale of multidimensional gravity is about one or several TeV units, microscopic black holes or objects referred to as string balls may be produced at the LHC. The most recent results obtained by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC from searches for such signals at the c.m. protoninteraction energy of 7 TeV and for an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb{sup -1}. Lower limits on the masses of objects of strongly acting gravity were set in the parameter region accessible to tests at the present time. Prospects for further research in this field are discussed.