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Sample records for farmyards backyards patios

  1. .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI Comments from...

  2. .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RFI | Department of Energy .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI Comments from Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI PDF icon .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI More Documents & Publications HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment

  3. Give Me My Tax Credit! (Or, How I Almost Bought the Wrong Patio Door)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Over the past few weeks, my husband and I have been shopping for a new patio door. We currently have a sliding glass door that we have always hated—full exposure to winds from the west and to open...

  4. Comments of the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association on the U.S. Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy's Request for Comment on Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency Testing (75 Fed. Reg. 52892 (August 30, 2010)) | Department of Energy Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association on the U.S. Department of Energy's Request for Comment on Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency Testing (75 Fed. Reg. 52892 (August 30, 2010)) Comments of the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association on the U.S. Department of Energy's Request for Comment on Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency Testing (75 Fed. Reg.

  5. User-Friendly Model Puts Solar Energy in Your Backyard | OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a photovoltaic (PV) system for your home or property, check out the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's In My Backyard (IMBY) tool. It's quick, useful, and-let's just say...

  6. Anaerobic digestion submarine in Abbey farmyard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    An anaerobic digestion system and fiber separation plant installed at Bethlehem Abbey (Northern Ireland) produces biogas for central heating and grain drying, and a compost which is bagged and sold. According to one report, it even keeps the monks warm at night. Designed by James Murcott of Farm Gas Ltd., the digester (shaped like a submarine) receives 10% solids slurry.

  7. Comments of the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association on the U...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    that appear to subject essentially all vented gas fireplaces-including decorative gas fireplaces certified to the American National Standards Institute ("ANSI") Z21.50...

  8. In My Backyard | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Analysis Tools, Resource assessment Resource Type: Softwaremodeling tools User Interface: Website...

  9. In My Backyard | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Analysis Tools, Resource assessment Resource Type:...

  10. Backyard waste management - problems and benefits of individuals managing their solid waste at home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen, M.

    1995-05-01

    The problems and benefits of individuals managing their solid wastes at home are surveyed. The survey indicates that as the population rises people tend to burn only the combustible portions of their waste. Some communities have limited ordinances that ban the burning of raw garbage, but other municipalities allow residents to burn all of their wastestream, even though some materials are not combustible and cannot be burned. Potential environmental effects involve both the ash residue and the air emissions. While selected burning can reduce some of the environmental hazards these would probably only be marginally less than the impacts of burning it all. The study clearly indicates that the environmental problems of burn barrels are not insignificant. However, the attitudes and motivations of those who burn waste will have to be addressed by the communities that attempt or should attempt to control this problem. These include: avoidance of waste collection costs; availability of trash cartage services; and habit. Habit is probably as strong a motivation as cost avoidance and ease of collection combined. Residents have often burned trash for several generations and regard the practice as a {open_quotes}god-given right.{close_quotes}

  11. HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) provides these comments in response to the Department of Energy (DOE) Notice of Proposed Rulemaking entitled "Energy Conservation ...

  12. HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment The Hearth, Patio ...

  13. Re: Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulatory Burden RFI Re: Regulatory Burden RFI Hearth Patio & Barbecue Association comments on Regulatory Burden RFI PDF icon Re: Regulatory Burden RFI More Documents & Publications Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011

  14. HPBA December 15, 2015 Ex Parte Meeting Memo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 15, 2015, representatives of the Hearth Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) met with Department of Energy (DOE) officials to discuss issues related to DOE’s proposed energy...

  15. What Will You be Buying for an Energy Tax Credit?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Tuesday, Allison talked about her experience shopping for a patio door that met the requirements for a federal tax credit for energy efficiency. She found that it's important to make sure the...

  16. Regulatory Burden RFI from HPBA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) is pleased to submit for your consideration the following comments in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Request for Information...

  17. Concept:U.S. National Software Tools | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In My Backyard Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs Introduction to Hydrogen for Code Officials J Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) L LEDS...

  18. One of Knoxville's and Y-12's best assets | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    am") have three children: Matt, 11; Anna, 10 and Jaynie, 8. The family enjoys hiking, sports and backyard farming together. "Living in Knoxville, being at Y-12, I feel like I've...

  19. RegReview_ReplyComments_Lennox_Hearth_Products.PDF | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RegReview_ReplyComments_Lennox_Hearth_Products.PDF RegReview_ReplyComments_Lennox_Hearth_Products.PDF PDF icon RegReview_ReplyComments_Lennox_Hearth_Products.PDF More Documents & Publications Re: Regulatory Burden RFI Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI

  20. Fireplace photo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    photo Fireplace photo Photo of a fireplace. PDF icon Fireplace photo More Documents & Publications .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Re: Regulatory Burden RFI

  1. CORPES 11: International Workshop on Strong Correlations and Angle-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoemission Spectroscopy CORPES 11: International Workshop on Strong Correlations and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy July 18-22, 2011 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California More information Attendees participated in a poster session Thursday on the ALS patio, engaging in conversations over lunch and at the posters. An international workshop entitled "Strong Correlations and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy", or CORPES11 , was held at Berkeley Lab

  2. 17th Annual ALS Users' Association Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Art; Tamura, Lori

    2004-11-29

    It's not exactly Russian roulette, but scheduling October events outdoors is not risk-free, even in usually sunny California. An overflow crowd of more than 400 registered users, ALS staff, and vendors enjoyed a full indoor program featuring science highlights and workshops spread over two and a half days from October 18 to October 20. However, a major storm, heralding the onset of the San Francisco Bay Area rainy season, posed a few weather challenges for the events on the ALS patio.

  3. .

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HPBA COMMENTS ON DOE'S REGULATORY BURDEN RFI 76 Fed. Reg. 6123 (February 3, 2011) March 21, 2011 The Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) appreciates the opportunity to respond to a Department of Energy's (DOE's) request for information - published at 76 Fed. Reg. 6123 (February 3, 2011) - seeking comment and information to assist DOE in reviewing its existing regulations to determine whether such regulations should be modified or repealed pursuant to Executive Order 13563

  4. HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Equipment | Department of Energy Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment The Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) provides these comments in response to the Department of Energy (DOE) Notice of Proposed Rulemaking entitled "Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment," published at 76 Fed. Reg. 43941 (July 22,

  5. HPBA Requests Following Public Meeting (EERE-2014-BT-STD-0036) | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Requests Following Public Meeting (EERE-2014-BT-STD-0036) HPBA Requests Following Public Meeting (EERE-2014-BT-STD-0036) The Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association ("HPBA") has already requested several actions with respect to DOE's notice of proposed rulemaking entitled "Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Hearth Products; Proposed Rule," 80 Fed. Reg. 7082 (February 9, 2015) (the "NOPR"). PDF icon

  6. Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (Reply Comments) | Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Comments on RFI on reducing regulatory burden PDF icon Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) More Documents & Publications Re: Regulatory Burden RFI RegReview_ReplyComments_Lennox_Hearth_Products.PDF .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue

  7. Solar Decathlon 2013: Meet the Teams | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Decathlon 2013: Meet the Teams Solar Decathlon 2013: Meet the Teams Addthis Arizona State University and The University of New Mexico 1 of 18 Arizona State University and The University of New Mexico Arizona State University and The University of New Mexico are teaming up to create SHADE -- an adaptable, self-sustaining house designed for the typical southwestern suburbia. An 800-square-foot house, SHADE uses multiple patios to extend the living space of the house. Image: Jessica Slater, ASU

  8. Meeting Summary Docket ID No. EERE-2014-BT-STD-0036-0023

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Meeting Summary Docket ID No. EERE-2014-BT-STD-0036-0023 RIN 1904-AD35 Tuesday, December 22, 2015 On December 15, 2015, representatives of the Hearth Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) met with Department of Energy (DOE) officials to discuss issues related to DOE's proposed energy conservation standard for "hearth products" published at 80 Fed. Reg. 7082 (February 9, 2015). The meeting was attended by the following individuals: Jack Goldman, President & CEO of HPBA Ryan

  9. Solar Energy — Capturing and Using Power and Heat from the Sun

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technical Assistance Project (TAP) for state and local officials TAP Webinar presentation by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Geographic Information System (GIS) Developer Christopher Helm on the In My Backyard estimator for PV output at a given location in the United States.

  10. The Absent House: The Ecological House of Puerto Rico

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Vega Alta, PR The Absent House takes advantage of the benevolent climate of the humid tropics of Puerto Rico to play with the ambiguity of interior and exterior spaces. Main spaces include: a kitchenette and master bathroom suite; a guest tower with a bedroom, bathroom, and small library; an open, public pavilion for cooking, dining, and porch activities; a bathroom for visitors; an infrastructure pavilion for electricity and water consumption management; and an organic garden. The Patio of the Sun and the Stars, the most important s

  11. Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy This is in reply to comments filed by the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) urging the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to repeal its energy conservation standards for direct heating equipment as applied to decorative vented gas fireplaces. I support HPBA's comments because I do not believe that decorative vented gas fireplaces were ever meant to be included under the term "direct heating equipment" as that term appears in the Energy Policy and Conservation

  12. Microsoft Word - LMI 2013-03 Annual Meeting Agenda v7 - Feb 28.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LMI-EFRC Annual Meeting and Webinar California Institute of Technology March 7-8, 2013 Thursday, March 7, 2013 Cahill Center and Winnett Lounge 7:30-8:15 Breakfast Cahill Center, Back Patio 8:30-10:30 Approaches to Ultrahigh Efficiency Solar Energy Conversion Public Webinar, Hameetman Auditorium at the Cahill Center 8:30-9:00 Harry Atwater, "Photonic Design Principles for Ultrahigh-Efficiency Photovoltaics" 9:00-9:30 John Rogers, "Microscale Solar Cells for Macroscale Power

  13. Digging Into Efficient Landscaping This Spring | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Digging Into Efficient Landscaping This Spring Digging Into Efficient Landscaping This Spring March 7, 2012 - 1:40pm Addthis Amanda McAlpin Preparing for its seasonal cycle, the warmth from the sun is growing stronger, and with temperatures slowly increasing, I was able to dine on the patio at my local coffee shop this weekend. It's evident the days of winter are almost past, and springtime planting around the house will soon begin. Trees, shrubs, and other vegetation thriving around your home

  14. For Immediate Release

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7, 2011 Daniel Cohen, Esq. Office of General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 RE: Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 Dear Mr. Cohen: This is in reply to comments filed by the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) urging the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to repeal its energy conservation standards for direct heating equipment as applied to decorative vented gas fireplaces. I support HPBA's comments because

  15. iBlank Portrait Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    22209-1728 Phone: (703) 522-0086 | Fax: (703) 522-0548 Email: hpbamail@hpba.org Web Site: www.hpba.org HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment Docket No. EERE-2011-BT-STD-0047 RIN 1904-AC56 October 14, 2011 The Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) provides these comments in response to the Department of Energy (DOE) Notice of Proposed Rulemaking entitled "Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating

  16. The early days of incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenti, M.

    1995-05-01

    Landfills reaching capacity, beaches fouled with trash, neighborhood residents protesting waste disposal sites in their backyards, and municipalities forced to recycle. Sound familiar? These issues might have been taken from today`s headlines, but they were also problems facing mechanical engineers a century ago. Conditions such as these were what led engineers to design the first incinerators for reducing the volume of municipal garbage, as well as for producing heat and electricity. The paper discusses these early days.

  17. Fermilab Today | Result of the Week | Archive - 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO CMS Result Archive - 2012 December 14, 2012 Hidden valleys in our own backyard November 30, 2012 Subatomic excitement November 09, 2012 Subatomic signatures October 26, 2012 Gravity and the Standard Model October 12, 2012 Hunting for the platypus particle September 28, 2012 Matter = antimatter? September 14, 2012 Precision smashing August 31, 2012 Science in action August 17, 2012 Taking them all on at once August 03, 2012

  18. Jefferson Lab, ODU team up for center | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab, ODU team up for center Michael Schwartz Inside Business, October 6-12, 2008 It pays to have a world renowned subatomic particle accelerator in your backyard. Old Dominion University, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, better known as Jefferson Lab in Newport News, announced last week the creation of the Center for Accelerator Science, an academic entity that puts ODU in the same company as institutions the likes of Cornell,

  19. Mass-burn WTE plant takes trash burning into new era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    An arsenal of state-of-the-art air-pollution-control equipment and demonstration of a 1,300-psig steam cycle characterize this facility, which efficiently produces clean power from trash. A successful waste-to-energy (WTE) project has been completely redefined in this ``not-in-my-backyard`` era. This new definition of success is no longer limited to achieving desired performance, capacity, availability, and profitability goals. According to William Taylor, plant manager, a successful project must also meet the nebulous requirement of ``being a good neighbor,`` which is often the more difficult challenge to meet.

  20. Employee Spotlight: José Valdez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    José Valdez June 24, 2014 Most evenings, and certainly most weekends, find José Valdez in his garage, intensely focused on his hobby of refurbishing classic cars, preferably from the 1930s to early 1960s. By day a technician in the Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Valdez enjoys all aspects of the car restoration process, from finding an old, beat-up wreck sitting neglected in someone's backyard to putting the poor thing on his jack stand to see how much work it will take to

  1. Bluebirds

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bluebirds Friday, March 4, 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Learn how to attract bluebirds by providing the preferred food, water, shelter, and nesting sites. The bluebird's color, musical warbling song, and insectivorous diet make them welcome guests to any backyard! Salamander Meander Saturday, March 5, 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Salamanders spend the majority of their lives hidden under forest soils and leaf litter. However, this time of year they are moving from their wintering sites to wetlands where

  2. Solid-waste contracting: Questions and answers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The increasing complexity of local government responsibilities is nowhere better illustrated than in solid waste management. In the past, when the adverse effects of waste disposal were less recognized, garbage was simply taken to local public dumps, or burned in backyard barrels or apartment building incinerators. Local governments must modernize their solid waste programs and operate within growing federal and state regulations. The changing regulatory environment of solid waste management presents a golden opportunity to contract with the private sector if interest of the community can be protected.

  3. Side-by-Side Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-08-01

    To examine the energy, air leakage, and thermal performance of highly insulating windows, a field evaluation was undertaken in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built Lab Homes located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The baseline Lab Home B was retrofitted with standard double-pane clear aluminum-frame slider windows and patio doors, while the experimental Lab Home A was retrofitted with Jeld-Wen triple-pane vinyl-frame slider windows and patio doors with a U-factor of 0.2 and solar heat gain coefficient of 0.19. To assess the window, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2012 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The measured energy savings in Lab Home B averaged 5,821 watt-hours per day (Wh/day) during the heating season and 6,518 Wh/day during the cooling season. The overall whole-house energy savings of Lab Home B compared to Lab Home A are 11.6% 1.53% for the heating season and 18.4 2.06% for the cooling season for identical occupancy conditions with no window coverings deployed. Extrapolating these energy savings numbers based on typical average heating degree days and cooling degree days per year yields an estimated annual energy savings of 12.2%, or 1,784 kWh/yr. The data suggest that highly insulating windows are an effective energy-saving measure that should be considered for high-performance new homes and in existing retrofits. However, the cost effectiveness of the measure, as determined by the simple payback period, suggests that highly insulating window costs continue to make windows difficult to justify on a cost basis alone. Additional reductions in costs via improvements in manufacturing and/or market penetration that continue to drive down costs will make highly insulating windows much more viable as a cost-effective energy efficiency measure. This study also illustrates that highly insulating windows have important impacts on peak load, occupant comfort, and condensation potential, which are not captured in the energy savings calculation. More consistent and uniform interior temperature distributions suggest that highly insulated windows, as part of a high performance building envelope, may enable more centralized duct design and downsized HVAC systems. Shorter, more centralized duct systems and smaller HVAC systems to yield additional cost savings, making highly insulating windows more cost effective as part of a package of new construction or retrofit measures which achieve significant reductions in home energy use.

  4. What Will the Neighbors Think? Building Large-Scale Science Projects Around the World

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jones, Craig; Mrotzek, Christian; Toge, Nobu; Sarno, Doug

    2010-01-08

    Public participation is an essential ingredient for turning the International Linear Collider into a reality. Wherever the proposed particle accelerator is sited in the world, its neighbors -- in any country -- will have something to say about hosting a 35-kilometer-long collider in their backyards. When it comes to building large-scale physics projects, almost every laboratory has a story to tell. Three case studies from Japan, Germany and the US will be presented to examine how community relations are handled in different parts of the world. How do particle physics laboratories interact with their local communities? How do neighbors react to building large-scale projects in each region? How can the lessons learned from past experiences help in building the next big project? These and other questions will be discussed to engage the audience in an active dialogue about how a large-scale project like the ILC can be a good neighbor.

  5. Gen Purpose 1-D Finite Element Network Fluid Flow Heat Transfer System Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-08-02

    SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow Simulator) is a FORTRAN computer program to simulate the integrated performance of systems involving fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and reactor dynamics. SAFSIM provides sufficient versatility to allow the engineering simulation of almost any system, from a backyard sprinkler system to a clustered nuclear reactor propulsion system. In addition to versatility, speed and robustness are primary SAFSIM development goals. SAFSIM contains three basic physics modules: (1) a one-dimensional finite element fluid mechanicsmore » module with multiple flow network capability; (2) a one-dimensional finite element structure heat transfer module with multiple convection and radiation exchange capability; and (3) a point reactor dynamics module with reactivity feedback and decay heat capability. SAFSIM can be used for compressible and incompressible, single-phase, multicomponent flow systems.« less

  6. Chautauqua radio workshop project. Final report, July 1, 1980-October 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-25

    Chautauqua is a daily call-in radio show (260 hour-long shows) broadcast over Public Radio Station WOUB fm, Athens, Ohio. This radio series covers a wide range of topics such as: energy conservation, developing small scale alternative energy sources (like windpower, solar energy, wood heat, alcohol production, earth-sheltered home construction, etc.), backyard vegetable production, and food preservation. The program's information is generated by the guests, listeners, and the show's host. An outline of the proposed steps to accomplish the proliferation of the Chautauqua radio concept throughout the US is presented. The Final Report from the Chautauqua Radio Workshop Project is presented along with the Chautauqua Notebook: appropriate technology on radio. (MCW)

  7. Emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans from the open burning of household waste in barrels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemieux, P.M.; Lutes, C.C.; Abbott, J.A.; Aldous, K.M.

    2000-02-01

    Backyard burning of household waste in barrels is a common waste disposal practice for which pollutant emissions have not been well characterized. This study measured the emissions of several pollutants, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), from burning mixtures designed to simulate waste generated by a recycling and a nonrecycling family in a 208-L (55-gal) burn barrel at the EPA's Open Burning Test Facility. This paper focuses on the PCDD/PCDF emissions and discusses the factors influencing PCDD/PCDF formation for different test burns. Four test burns were made in which the amount of waste placed in the barrel varied from 6.4 to 13.6 kg and the amount actually burned varied from 46.6% to 68.1%. Emissions of total PCDDs/PCDFs ranged between 0.0046 and 0.48 mg/kg of waste burned. Emissions are also presented in terms of 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents. Emissions of PCDDs/PCDFs appear to correlate with both copper and hydrochloric acid emissions. The results of this study indicate that backyard burning emits more PCDDs/PCDFs on a mass of refuse burned basis than various types of municipal waste combustors (MWCs). Comparison of burn barrel emissions to emissions from a hypothetical modern MWC equipped with high-efficiency flue gas cleaning technology indicates that about 2--40 households burning their trash daily in barrels can produce average PCDD/PCDF emissions comparable to a 182,000 kg/day (200 ton/day) MWC facility. This study provides important data on a potentially significant source of emissions of PCDDs/PCDFs.

  8. Brick manufacture with fly ash from Illinois coals. Quarterly technical report, September 1, 1994--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.E.; Dreher, G.; Frost, J.; Moore, D.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Fiocchi, T.; Swartz, D.

    1995-03-01

    This investigation seeks to utilize fly ash in fired-clay products such as building and patio bricks, ceramic blocks, field and sewer tile, and flower pots. This goal is accomplished by (1) one or more plant-scale, 5000-brick tests with fly ash mixed with brick clays at the 20% or higher level; (2) a laboratory-scale study to measure the firing reactions of a range of compositions of clay and fly ash mixtures; (3) a technical and economic study to evaluate the potential environmental and economic benefits of brick manufacture with fly ash. Bricks and feed materials will be tested for compliance with market specifications and for leachability of pollutants derived from fly ash. The laboratory study will combine ISGS databases, ICCI-supported characterization methods, and published information to improve predictions of the firing characteristics of Illinois fly ash and brick clay mixtures. Because identical methods are used to test clay firing and coal ash fusion, and because melting mechanisms are the same, improved coal ash fusion predictions are an expected result of this research. If successful, this project should convert an environmental problem (fly ash) into valuable products - bricks. During this quarter, the authors set up the manufacturing run at Colonial Brick Co., provided an expanded NEPA questionnaire for DOE, made preliminary arrangements for a larger brick manufacturing run at Marseilles Brick Co., revised laboratory procedures for selective dissolution analysis, and began characterization of brick clays that could be mixed with fly ash for fired-clay products.

  9. QER- Comment of Peter Cross

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To whom it may concern: We live in Orange, MA, which is one of the towns through which a natural gas pipeline (Kinder Morgan Co.) is proposed to go on its way to Dracut, MA. We are aware that these 30-inch pipelines have on average one leak every 8 miles or so, and we know there will be more than 8 miles of the line in our town if it is approved. Although we are not abutting property owners, we are opposed to the fracking techniques used to extract the gas that will be in this pipeline, primarily because of danger to water supplies. Additionally, we feel as though we're enabling and supporting these techniques by not speaking out about transporting the products of this process. And, just in case you think we are "not in my backyard "people, we SUPPORT both wind and solar power installations - we have both rather close to us! Thanks for taking our opinions into consideration. Peter and Candace Cross, Orange, MA

  10. Sources and management of hazardous waste in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, K.

    1996-12-31

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) has considerable mineral wealth, especially in gold and copper. Large-scale mining takes place, and these activities are the source of most of PNG`s hazardous waste. Most people live in small farming communities throughout the region. Those living adjacent to mining areas have experienced some negative impacts from river ecosystem damage and erosion of their lands. Industry is centered mainly in urban areas and Generates waste composed of various products. Agricultural products, pesticide residues, and chemicals used for preserving timber and other forestry products also produce hazardous waste. Most municipal waste comes from domestic and commercial premises; it consists mainly of combustibles, noncombustibles, and other wastes. Hospitals generate pathogenic organisms, radioactive materials, and chemical and pharmaceutical laboratory waste. Little is known about the actual treatment of waste before disposal in PNG. Traditional low-cost waste disposal methods are usually practiced, such as use of landfills; storage in surface impoundments; and disposal in public sewers, rivers, and the sea. Indiscriminate burning of domestic waste in backyards is also commonly practiced in urban and rural areas. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Development of a Smart MicroGrid Testbed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Wei-Jen; Wetz, David

    2013-04-25

    Demand for electricity is rapidly increasing thereby applying pressure to expand generation and distribution capacity worldwide. The expansion of traditional services not only imposes burdens on financial resources but also encounters many challenges from community residents who oppose the construction of new power generation plants or transmission facilities in their backyard. From the integrated resource planning point of view, a feasible and economical remedy is, therefore, to utilize existing dispersed generation capacity known as distributed generation (DG) and/or renewable energy resources that may exist in the vicinity of the load centers. The main criteria for selecting the type of fuel source for a DG is its local availability, conversion system technological advancement, impact on the environment, and operating cost. DG’s have existed in the market for many years. Large diesel or gas powered generation sets are used in stand-by mode to power up vital services such as hospitals, financial and commercial compounds, telecommunication centers and industrial premises. Wind turbines, photovoltaic energy sources, and fuel cells are new comers that are now competing in size and efficiency with many standard generating sets. With this in mind, they are being used in many places not only as stand-by units but as the prime source of power particularly when the $/kWhr rate is high[1-5].

  12. Constructing rigorous and broad biosurveillance networks for detecting emerging zoonotic outbreaks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Mac; Moore, Leslie; McMahon, Benjamin; Powell, Dennis; LaBute, Montiago; Hyman, James M.; Rivas, Ariel; Jankowski, Mark; Berendzen, Joel; Loeppky, Jason; et al

    2015-05-06

    Determining optimal surveillance networks for an emerging pathogen is difficult since it is not known beforehand what the characteristics of a pathogen will be or where it will emerge. The resources for surveillance of infectious diseases in animals and wildlife are often limited and mathematical modeling can play a supporting role in examining a wide range of scenarios of pathogen spread. We demonstrate how a hierarchy of mathematical and statistical tools can be used in surveillance planning help guide successful surveillance and mitigation policies for a wide range of zoonotic pathogens. The model forecasts can help clarify the complexities ofmore » potential scenarios, and optimize biosurveillance programs for rapidly detecting infectious diseases. Using the highly pathogenic zoonotic H5N1 avian influenza 2006-2007 epidemic in Nigeria as an example, we determined the risk for infection for localized areas in an outbreak and designed biosurveillance stations that are effective for different pathogen strains and a range of possible outbreak locations. We created a general multi-scale, multi-host stochastic SEIR epidemiological network model, with both short and long-range movement, to simulate the spread of an infectious disease through Nigerian human, poultry, backyard duck, and wild bird populations. We chose parameter ranges specific to avian influenza (but not to a particular strain) and used a Latin hypercube sample experimental design to investigate epidemic predictions in a thousand simulations. We ranked the risk of local regions by the number of times they became infected in the ensemble of simulations. These spatial statistics were then complied into a potential risk map of infection. Finally, we validated the results with a known outbreak, using spatial analysis of all the simulation runs to show the progression matched closely with the observed location of the farms infected in the 2006-2007 epidemic.« less

  13. QER- Comment of Liberty Goodwin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As suggested by Sen. Jack Reed, below and attached are my comments on energy policy for now and the future: ***************************************************************************** AN OUTLINE FOR PRACTICAL & FRUITFUL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT WITH SPECIAL ATTENTION TO SENSIBLE PUBLIC INVESTMENT (Thoughts on intelligent action for energy that is abundant, affordable, associated with many jobs and economic health in New England and the nation) ** CLINGING TO OUTMODED & DESTRUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES – WE DON'T NEED TO ARGUE ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE TO SEE THE WAY FORWARD 1. Fossil fuels and nuclear have clear and present dangers and damaging effects, on human and environmental health. This includes the uncontestable pollution involved in production and use, and the risks of greater disasters, along with concerns about toxic waste that can contaminate our water and more. 2. Renewable sources offer a vast number of possibilities for energy production for a variety of uses. To not explore them is wasteful. To stick to same-old, same-old is foolish, and will leave us at the rear of the pack re: future energy development. **SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL – LESS RISKY – MORE PRODUCTIVE – MORE LOCAL 1 Solyndra is the bad apple that makes the point. Because something costs millions, or even billions of dollars doesn't mean it is the way to achieve huge results. The only thing that is huge about propping up mega-corporations is the risk. 2 Making the money available in far smaller amounts to a variety of solar efforts is both less risky and more promising – gives more chance of positive results. And, to anyone who can do the math – millions of small installations is as productive as one giant. 3 Smaller projects tend to be more labor-intensive – and offer local employment in a bunch of different places, benefiting the economies of all. **BENEFICIAL INNOVATION IS NOT BORN IN A CORPORATE THINK TANK, BUT IN THE MINDS OF INDIVIDUAL GENIUSES. 1. History tells us that great inventions have been developed by unknowns working in garages, bike shops, etc. We need to look beyond the elite in corporate money tanks and prestigious academia to find the gems in our own backyards. 2. One such, Paul Klinkman, has at least 50 inventions on hand, is developing several, has one patent and a few more in process, most related to alternative energy production. 3. The point is that we would find many like him – if we would only look. 4. Also, we should be seeking not just new technologies, but new business models. Check out the example from our greenhouse flyer, below. **SAVVY INVESTORS DON'T PUT THE BULK OF THEIR FORTUNES IN JUST A COUPLE OF STOCKS. THEY SPREAD THE RISK BY DIVERSIFYING. LET US BE LIKEWISE SMART IN USE OF PUBLIC MONEY 1 "Renewable energy" is not just about electricity, or even that and hot water. It is not even just those and wind, and certainly more than "solar panels". 2 We need to explore and use the many different types of alternatives, just as we do in most other aspects of our society. 3 Taking the kind of money that was allocated to Solyndra (or even to 38 Studios here in Rhode Island, and instead investing it in even 10 small projects, is a much wiser choice than betting it on another big boondoggle. **WHAT TO DO? PUT OUR MONEY INTO SUPPORT FOR WIDESPREAD USE OF CURRENT "GREEN" ENERGY TECHNOLOGY, AND EVALUATION & DEVELOPMENT OF NEW, TRULY INNOVATIVE OPTIONS 1 Make renewable energy credits available for all solar, wind and other technologies that show promise for meeting our energy needs. 2 Consider setting up an Important Innovations Center like the one described on the other side. TWO EXAMPLES OF NEW & EXCITING RESEARCH & BUSINESS MODELS A. PROPOSED NEW KSD NON-PROFIT IMPORTANT INNOVATIONS CENTER PURPOSES **Provide a place where small inventors can get help in evaluating and developing their ideas. **Provide a place which will focus specifically on inventions that have the potential to benefit the world and its people. **Provide a place which will especially focus on solutions to energy needs – and to environmental pollution and other damage. **Provide a place to enable people interested in doing good rather than getting rich to network and cooperate on accomplishing this kind of change in our world. MEANS **Invite ideas to be submitted and considered. **Focus on those inventors who don't have a large corporation or prestigious university behind them. **Vet the submissions for both efficacy and social value. **Locate funding sources that will support such work. **Locate local and regional businesses interested in marketing and/or manufacturing new and beneficial designs and products. **Connect resources with inventors and their ideas. **Support projects that utilize such innovations for good. WHAT NOT TO DO: Turn these to large multi-national corporations to exploit for their own gain. ****************************************************************************** **** B. THE UNIQUE KSD BUSINESS MODEL FOR SOLAR GREENHOUSE DEVELOPMENT **Provide a KSD design package kit that will allow farmers & other handy people to build their own greenhouses **Include expert consultation & tech support to assist them throughout the process of building.. **Train able local people as helpers to do the on-site assistance in various parts of the country. **Provide training to locally owned small businesses such as sheet metal shops to manufacture desired parts, such as the solar concentrating collectors. **Work to develop a network of local resources that could market, manufacture & install greenhouses. Some might also produce & sell biofuel from algae. **Include non-profit organizations, as partners that could raise money from selling the kits & subsidize or give units to community gardens, food banks, etc.) **Develop a residential version that could provide gardening & sun space, as well as supplementary heat to an adjacent house. ****************************************************************************** ********* SUBMITTED BY: LIBERTY GOODWIN, CO-OWNER, (WITH PAUL KLINKMAN) KLINKMAN SOLAR DESIGN (KSD), P.O. Box 40572, Providence, RI 02940, Tel. 401-351-9193, E-Mail: info@klinkmansolar.com, Website: www.klinkmansolar.com ******************************************************************************