Sample records for farmyards backyards patios

  1. In Our Backyard December 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    In Our Backyard December 2009 How to Increase Renewable Energy Production on Big Buildings Backyard: How to Increase Renewable Energy Production on Big Buildings and Other Local Spaces Berkeley Law \\ UCLA Law #12;1Berkeley Law \\ UCLA Law In Our Backyard: How to Increase Renewable Energy Production

  2. Jamaica Bay New York's Conflicted Backyard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Jamaica Bay ­ New York's Conflicted Backyard Kevin Olsen Drew Symposium October 2008 #12;Why Study Jamaica Bay's History? Jamaica Bay has served many uses for the people of New York. At one time or another shoals, mudflats, sand bars, open water (littoral zone), intertidal zones (low and high marshes

  3. Air Potato Management in Your Backyard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Air Potato Management in Your Backyard Ridding your property of air potatoes is no easy task - Collect air potatoes that have fallen to the ground. They may still be attached to dead vines, so pulling the vines down could result in more potatoes falling. SPRING - Look for newly sprouting vines and follow

  4. Constructed farm wetlands (CFWs) designed for remediation of farmyard runoff: an evaluation of their water treatment efficiency, ecological value, costs and benefits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouriveau, Fabrice

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Farmyard runoff, i.e. the effluent generated by the rain falling over farmyards, tracks and roofs, is a significant and overlooked source of nutrients and pathogens which degrades aquatic ecosystems through eutrophication, ...

  5. Backyard Production of Meat Rabbits in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukefahr, Steven D.; Paschal, Joseph C.; Ford, John E.

    1998-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    and timely manage- ment, the enterprise goal of year-round fryer production is certainly possible. One or more of these three basic necessities is usually lacking when poor fertility or produc- tion problems occur. Commercial Meat Stock Commercially bred... bred stock, have more vigor and are more productive (for example, have higher fertility, kindle larger litters, and pro- duce meatier fryers). For the backyard meat rabbit enter- prise, purebred or fancy stock may not produce as well as the commercial...

  6. CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, ECOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH, UK E-mail: fabrice.gouriveau@ed.ac.uk Summary: This research evaluates the treatment efficiency, ecological value and cost-effectiveness of two Scottish Constructed Farm Wetlands (CFW 1 & 2

  7. Backyard Leaf Composting Franklin Flower, Extension Specialist Emeritus in Environmental Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    Backyard Leaf Composting Franklin Flower, Extension Specialist Emeritus in Environmental Science. Thisprocessinvolves primarily the microbial decomposition of organic matter. Compost - the end result - is a dark. The Composting Process Compostingspeedsnaturaldecompositionundersemi- controlled conditions. Raw organic

  8. Second Edition A single-purpose stormwater conveyance system. Note that this feature is along the backyards of these

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for a stormwater treatment wetland, transforming an area with little beauty or functionality into a community the backyards of these residences. A drain like this provides no water quality treatment and likely detracts is just as artificial as that in the photo above, but the wetland edges clean water and add to the value

  9. .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems AnalysisVOLUME I A1/19/10 ProtocolWays to Save40.3RFI | Department of

  10. In My Backyard | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms AHefeiHydroenergy Company

  11. Backyard Farms Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France: Energy ResourcesBurleyBLMUSFWSBPBYDBackyard

  12. In My Backyard | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua New EnergyIT PowerImagine Energy Inc

  13. Comments of the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association on the U.S. Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment. CashDay-June 22, 2015Policyof Energy theof

  14. Yes in My Backyard: Mobilizing the Market for Secondary Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapple, Karen; Wegmann, Jake; Nemirow, Alison; Dentel-Post, Colin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0.7 cars after joining a car sharing service, and 55% of carAlternative Transportation Car sharing has proven attractivesecond mode on weekends. Car sharing is a supporting mode,

  15. In My Backyard: Presentation for March 24 TAP Webinar

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf05 Identified Patent WaiverSmart Grid:DepartmentJanuary 19,

  16. Not in your backyard : transitive compellence, base states, and violent non-state groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraiman, Keren Eva (Fraiman Stieber)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Violent non-state actors have consistently served as a destabilizing force within the international system. These groups create a base within a state's sovereign territory, the "base state," and utilize this platform to ...

  17. User-Friendly Model Puts Solar Energy in Your Backyard | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLCEnergy) Redirect pageonBeowawe Geothermal Field

  18. Protecting Environmentally-Sensitive Areas and Promoting Tourism in "The Back Patio of the United States:" Thoughts about Shared Responsibilities in Ecosystem and Biodiversity Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Colin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1/3 of the island of Hispaniola, namely Haiti, nearly 90% ofonly on the island of Hispaniola, has been in existence for

  19. En Medio De Un Gran Circo: La Ciudad De México A Tráves De Las Crónicas Musicales De Maldita Vecindad Y Los Hijos Del 5º Patio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lujan, Soledad

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    y económicos causados por el sismo: “Se habló de un númeropasadas dos semanas del sismo; entre cien y ciento cincuentadel terremoto declara que “El sismo reveló que de todos los

  20. Calabuig, C.P., Green, A.J., Menegheti, J.O., Muriel, R. y Patio, J. 2010. Fenologa del Coscoroba (Coscoroba coscoroba) en el sur de Brasil y sus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Andy J.

    (Coscoroba coscoroba) en el sur de Brasil y sus movimientos hacia Argentina (Phenology of Coscoroba Swan (COSCOROBA COSCOROBA) EN EL SUR DE BRASIL Y SUS MOVIMIENTOS HACIA ARGENTINA Cecilia P. Calabuig¹, ², Andy J João Paetzel 964/303, 91330ñ281- Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. E-mail: cecicalabuig

  1. Scaling up Secondary Unit Production in the East Bay: Impacts and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wegmann, Jake; Nemirow, Alison; Chapple, Karen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    smart  growth,  alternative  transportation,  the  economy,  and  city  cities,  backyard  cottages  could  represent  an   important  smart  

  2. Adressen er Via del Capannone 7 Pisa. Det er vis a vis Kirka i bydel Barbaricina. -1the entrance to the backyard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    The refrigerator must be started by plugging the electricity back the kitchen furniture. Gas must be opened (2

  3. nparticulier consulte un architecte pour la construc-tion d'une maison. Plusieurs options lui sont offertes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monasson, Rémi

    sont offertes : une maison de plain-pied ou à un étage, un patio, une terrasse et un garage. Ses goûts et son ban- quier lui dictent plusieurs contraintes : il faut qu'il y ait un étage ou une terrasse, mais pas les deux ; il faut qu'il y ait un garage ou un patio, mais pas les deux ; s'il y a un patio

  4. HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment The Hearth, Patio...

  5. Car-Free Housing Developments: Toward Sustainable Smart Growth and Urban Regeneration Through Car-Free Zoning, Car-Free Redevelopment, Pedestrian Improvement Districts, and New Urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, James A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    garden and patio for solar panels to generate electricity.installation of roof solar panels. Negotiations are underwayfi- nancing available for solar panels. Saarlandstraf3e in

  6. Evaluation Framework and Tools for Distributed Energy Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gumerman, Etan Z.; Bharvirkar, Ranjit R.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prices megawatt (10 watts) natural gas combined cycle not in my backyard nitrogen oxides particulate matter photovoltaic

  7. The hidden world of Asian tiger mosquitoes: immature Aedes albopictus (Skuse) dominate in rainwater corrugated extension spouts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in residential backyards include tires, buckets, bird baths, plant saucers, recycle bins, etc.7­10 This variety

  8. Friends of the Lake Erie Center (FOLEC) Newsletter Summer 2013 Upcoming Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledo, University of

    will head outside for some solar observing (weather-permitting). Special thanks to our event partner: UT pollinators in your own backyard. 7:00 p.m., Thur., Aug. 15: Plants and backyard birds: the good, the bad, and the invasive. Birding expert Dr. Elliot Tramer will cover ways to attract a variety of birds to your backyard

  9. SPARTANS ABROAD 2011 entries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Normal Backyard Copenhagen - Denmark Architecture #12;Grand Mosque Abu Dhabi ­ United Arab Emirates Architecture #12;Deutschland United Berlin - Germany Architecture #12;Experience Others' Reality Cuernavaca

  10. Urban sunspaces : ecology of atria and arcades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glässel, Joachim W

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, atria were protected interior patios; well perceived for their climate tempering and spatial amenity to the building; matching a peaceful private outdoor with the yearly climate cycles. Public buildings adopted ...

  11. Move In/Out Checklist A publication of the Cornell University Office of Fraternities, Sororities & Independent Living

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    a charge for removal of abandoned personal items from the apartment or the apartment building. It is also Patio/balcony Storage space Stairs/Rails Windows condition cracked/broken? Laundry facilities #12;Move

  12. Aerial Surveillance and the Fourth Amendment – California v. Ciraolo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corse, John

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Facts and Case History Acting upon an anonymous telephone tip, the Santa Clara police went to the defendant's house to determine if marijuana was, in fact, growing in his backyard. The police were unable to observe the contents of defendant's backyard..., the police were able to observe, without visual aids, marijuana plants growing in the backyard. On the basis of this naked-eye observation, the police obtained a search warrant and seized the marijuana plants. 3 0 The defendant moved to suppress the evidence...

  13. Producing Quail for Home Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornberry, Fredrick D.

    1998-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Hobby and backyard producers are becoming interested in producing quail for home consumption. This publication gives tips on housing and brooding, nutrition, lighting, cannibalism, health and slaughter. It includes three recipes....

  14. Building Fertile Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Ann

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Backyard Guide to Healthy Soil and Higher Yields, by JohnInstitute. Start with the Soil, by Grace Gershuny. Emmaus,Institute. 1993. The Soul of Soil: A Guide to Ecological

  15. Clemson Impacts Fall 2014 1 Farm-City Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    classroom Watering melons CLEMSON Farming goes back to the backyard #12;Vice President's Message Celebrate of beans to be a farmer. You don't need a vast expanse of pasture, dozens of head of cattle

  16. Increased nitrogen availability in soil after repeated compost applications: use of the PASTIS model to separate short and long-term effects.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Increased nitrogen availability in soil after repeated compost applications: use of the PASTIS : 10.1016/j.soilbio.2013.05.023 #12;2 Abstract Regular application of composts on cropped soils has composts on the nitrogen (N) dynamics in a cropped loamy soil was compared to farmyard manure application

  17. Regulating Constructed Wetlands in Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    / minewater treatment ­ Stormwater management wetlands (SUDS) ­ Reedbeds for "polishing" farmyard runoff of a treatment system · CAR Engineering licence ­ if wetland associated with river/loch ­ Environmental service · Improved riparian habitat Insh Marshes, River Spey #12;23/05/2012 5 Wetlands for Sewage Treatment

  18. Estimado/a Isabel Abril Snchez: En primer lugar, queremos agradecerle la participacin en la decimoquinta edicin de Ciencia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    decimoquinta edición de Ciencia en Acción, en la modalidad "Física en la Sociedad". El jurado ha evaluado el trabajo presentado por usted titulado "El Patio de la Ciencia" y ha sido seleccionado como uno de los, verdaderos protagonistas del concurso, Ciencia en Acción se consolida y aumenta su prestigio año tras año. Si

  19. University of California, Davis Student Housing UC Davis Student Housing. University of California. One Shields Avenue. Davis, CA 95606-8712

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    beverages allowed in private space, which is defined as the residence interior, enclosed courtyards, fenced private yards and patios. Private space does not include such areas as exposed porches and balconies result in cancellation of the event or future events and/or appropriate University disciplinary action

  20. University of California, Davis Student Housing UC Davis Student Housing. University of California. One Shields Avenue. Davis, CA 95606-8712

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    or older: 1) Consumption and storage of alcoholic beverages allowed in private space, which is defined as the residence interior, enclosed courtyards, fenced private yards and patios. Private space does not include disciplinary action. Attendance at the event and during the entire period alcohol is served is required

  1. A U G U S T 2 0 1 4 Upcoming events!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    beautiful front patio to showcase the play Salt Water Moon & Photographer Karen Taylor had her guests seated lunch Grilled vegetable, black bean & corn chili Orange glazed duck wings Whiskey BBQ pulled pork Crispy paninis Fresh local yellow beans Roasted garlic & thyme, potato hash Assorted salads Local peach pies $18

  2. Survey of Trends in Search and Seizure Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Emil A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In Ciraolo, police received a tip that the defendant was growing marijuana in his backyard. The backyard was completely enclosed by two tall fences. The police flew over the yard in public airspace and, without visual assistance, observed vegetation..., 143 (1978). 6 466 U.S. 170 (1QR^ 4 8 K A N S A S C R I M I N A L P R O C E D U R E R E V I E W [ V o l . 4 In Oliver, narcotics agents received reports that the defendant was raising marijuana on his farm. The agents conducted a warrantless search...

  3. A magnetic spectrometer measurement of the charge ratio of energetic cosmic ray muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Benjamin Jefferson

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MAGNETIC SPECTROIIETER MEASUREPIENT OF THE CHARGE PATIO OF ENEIFGFTIC COSMIC RAY MUONS A Thesis BENJAMIN JEF1'EIHSON BATFIKN, JR. Submdtted to the Graduate College of the Texas AAM University in Daltial full'Ills, 'ent of the requirellents... magnet ~ 2 Schematic representation of the magnets, counters and spark chambers to form a spectrometer-telescope. A typical muon trajectory is shown. . . . . . . . ~ 3 End view of the eighteen-lamina magnet. 4 The winding process 5 The complete...

  4. Fish Fingers and Custard Issue 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    man again (well, he was wearing a skirt) and return him to his Doctor, but the Sultanas had kidnapped him and hidden him in that big old house I could see from my backyard, the one with the big palm trees out the front, which could only mean one...

  5. Welcome to Bug Bytes, a bimonthly podcast from Texas A&M University's Department of Entomology in collaboration with Solpugid Productions. This podcast series takes you on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    % of landfills. But more and more Americans are starting to recycle organic waste through backyard composting planet through the breakdown of organic waste. We've included a link on the website to a great article of soil. Give you a hint: mind-boggling. But, composting is the controlled decomposition of organic waste

  6. Why Become a Master By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    Why Become a Master Composter? By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle organic waste % of a typical household's waste can be recycled right in our own backyards. This significantly reduces Service Matt Freund, Freund's Farm Bob Jacquier, Laurelbrook Farm Connecticut Recycling Coalition

  7. Why Become a Master By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Why Become a Master Composter? By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle organic waste % of a typical household's waste can be recycled right in our own backyards. This significantly reduces Service Ken Longo, Manchester Recycling Center Matt Freund, Freund's Farm Bob Jacquier, Laurelbrook Farm

  8. Cathole Mountain Development Threatens Landscapes of National Significance. Peter M. LeTourneau, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeTourneau, Peter M.

    for federal recognition speaks for itself. It is now Meriden's turn to preserve its own backyard. Quite simply, the residents, politicians, lawmakers, and regulatory agencies do not recognize the enormous potential -- the construction of the Enron affiliated "peaking plant" that never produced a single watt of electricity. Standing

  9. News Microbe powered, An electrifying discovery made by UMass team file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/pbrown/My%20Documents/sto... 1 of 2 6/27/2005 2:57 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    beneath rivers, swamps and backyard gardens, raising new possibilities for miniaturized electronic devices storage media, he said. The U.S. Department of Defense sees the potential for undersea bio-warfare of the microbial nanowires in electronic devices, as well as the process for biologically producing them, Lovley

  10. Launching a Cornell Examination of the Marcellus System The issues related to the development of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are emblematic of a whole family of extremely complicated Energy. The development plans for the Marcellus Shale are unfolding immediately in our backyards and require of different ways of developing the Marcellus Shale and the economics of not developing the Marcellus Shale. We

  11. New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    harvesting. The results of this research will help to develop guidelines for water testing and best management practices for applying harvested rain water to backyard and community gardens. In the secondNew Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 New Jersey Water

  12. MARY PARK HALL THE VILLAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plants on a cooperative plot. Organic food grown straight from your backyard. For More Information: http: Shop for local, fresh food and produce everyThursday from 10am-3pm. For More Information: http://sfbike.org/download/map.pdf Habitat Gardens: The Campus maintains gardens with over 150 species of native plants that provide food

  13. Modeling Multi-Reservoir Hydropower Systems in the Sierra Nevada with Environmental Requirements and Climate Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Modeling Multi-Reservoir Hydropower Systems in the Sierra Nevada with Environmental Requirements and the Sierra Nevada, their majestic backyard. #12;iii Abstract Hydropower systems and other river regulation that ecosystems have historically depended on. These effects are compounded at regional scales. As hydropower

  14. AGRY 598/FNR 598 Ecological Footprints, Spring 2010 Pfendler 203, TTh, 1:30 -2:45 pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Scott A.

    that residents of Tippecanoe County can use to quantify their stormwater footprint, carbon footprint and backyard this tool. Students will learn how to: o Quantify a stormwater footprint o Quantify a carbon footprint o1/5 Syllabus AGRY 598/FNR 598 Ecological Footprints, Spring 2010 Pfendler 203, TTh, 1:30 - 2:45 pm

  15. You might be surprised when you meet one of our 300-plus researchers. Our world-renowned scientists are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    production, energy advancements and environmental protection. Along the way, their discoveries have played. FOOD ENERGY ENVIRONMENT agbioresearch.msu.edu The quotes in this pamphlet were originally published in your own backyard." -- Dave Burgdorf, winery owner and wine maker #12;We're proud of what we

  16. Issue 6 March-April 2010 Notes from the campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    - Spirit of Place 4 Quick Takes - Tales from my Backyard 8 Update - Eco-friendly Infrastructure 11 at the beach, or on a ship and has seen far into the horizon on a clear day, it must be a difficult fact be appropriate to disclose the formulation of a policy for "Eco-Campus". Our place as a premier academic

  17. Estimation of ammonia volatilization from surface-applied urea as indicated by bermudagrass N-use efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drwal, John Matthew

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from surface-applied urea plus p-benzoquinone was zero while that of unamended soil and farmyard manure amended soil was 6. 2 and 8. 1 kg N ha respectively, during the first 4 days after application. Jackson and Burton (1962) found that burning a... on soil N content. Jackson and Burton (1962) observed that urea applied to burned bermudagrass sod gave significantly higher yields and produced more protein per acre than urea applied to unburned sod. Burning the sod increased the efficiency of urea...

  18. The Absent House: The Ecological House of Puerto Rico

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Vega Alta, PR The Absent House takes advantage of the benevolent climate of the humid tropics of Puerto Rico to play with the ambiguity of interior and exterior spaces. Main spaces include: a kitchenette and master bathroom suite; a guest tower with a bedroom, bathroom, and small library; an open, public pavilion for cooking, dining, and porch activities; a bathroom for visitors; an infrastructure pavilion for electricity and water consumption management; and an organic garden. The Patio of the Sun and the Stars, the most important s

  19. Coping with Hot Work Environments (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    patios, jardines y cocinas calurosas o en trabajos industriales tambi?n est?n expuestas a estas condiciones. Un ambiente de trabajo caluroso puede perjudicar la seguridad y la salud. Tanto los empleados como los empleadores son responsables de tomar... el cuerpo. Entonces, el cerebro env?a una se?al a las gl?ndulas sudor?paras para que liberen l?quido en forma de transpiraci?n, lo que a su vez refresca el cuerpo mientras se evapora de la piel. En condiciones h?medas, refrescar el cuerpo por medio...

  20. The Texas Two-Step Method: Do-It-Yourself Fire Ant Control for Homes and Neighborhoods (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, Bastiaan M.; Merchant, Michael E.

    2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    . Cuando se aplica debidamente, este m?todo supone un riesgo m?nimo para las personas, las mascotas o el medio ambiente. Que coman cebo El primer paso es aplicar a voleo por todo el patio un cebo para hormigas bravas (un producto que contenga alimento adem.... ?Respete nuestro medio ambiente! ? ?Nunca use gasolina ni ning?n otro producto de petr?leo para el control de las hormigas bravas! Aunque la gasolina mata las hormigas bravas, es sumamente inflamable y peligrosa para usted y el medio ambiente. ? No deje gr...

  1. Quality of Life Assessment as a Preliminary Study on the Spatial Appraisal and Valuation of Environment and Ecosystems Methodology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ross Hunter

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Resource Management System NIMBY Not In My Backyard QOL Quality of Life SAVEE Spatial Appraisal and Valuation of Environment and Ecosystems SLD Straight Line Distance USDA United States Department of Agriculture viii TABLE OF CONTENTS.... 3.5.7 EUCLIDEAN STRAIGHT LINE DISTANCE After the QOL factor data has been added into ArcGIS? and the aforementioned processes carried out, the next step is to use Euclidean Straight Line Distance (SLD). SLD is a tool found within the Spatial...

  2. Good Meals Every Day.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Maeona; Reasonover, Frances; Harris, Jimmie Nell; Mason, Louise

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Toast Cups Milk Tea or Coffee Dinner Fried Chicken Gravy Mashed Potatoes Fresh Peas Tomato and Cottage Cheese Salad Whole Wheat Biscuits Butter or Margarine Angel Food Cake with Strawberries and Cream Milk Tea Supper (In Backyard) Broiled... Berries Prunes Figs Nectarines Calories for energy Whole wheat flour Whole grain corn-meal Whole wheat bread Oats Brown rice Rye bread Certain ready- to-eat and uncooked cereals Popcorn Millet bread Pumpernickel bread Enriched corn...

  3. Gille-ESYS 10 1 Is I had a billion dollars to save the ozone layer ....

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    Gille-ESYS 10 1 Is I had a billion dollars to save the ozone layer .... The scene: A backyard-destroying metered dose inhalers? If I had a billion dollars to save the ozone layer, I'd spend it all to get rid to save the ozone layer, I'd worry more about methyl bromide, which is not only an ozone destroyer

  4. The dilemma of siting a high-level nuclear waste repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easterline, D.; Kunreuther, H.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This books presents a siting process that the authors believe will prove successful within the adversarial world that characterizes most attempts to build waste-disposal facilities. They come to the following conclusions: a volunatary siting process stands the best chance of breaking the `not-in-my-backyard` problem; and without public acknowledgement that a facility is needed, any proposal to build a high-level nuclear waste storage facility will meet with opposition.

  5. Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 87-371-2000, Technical Assistance to the Jamaican Ministry of Health, Kingston, Jamaica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matte, T.D.; Burr, G.A.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the Jamaican Ministry of Health, a study was made of possible health hazards existing due to the operation of a secondary lead smelter in Saint Catherine Parish, Jamaica. Emission controls at the site were upgraded in 1974. A cottage industry of clandestine backyard smelters was also in operation in the area. The survey investigated the health of residents in 58 households in the Red Pond Road community and 21 households in Ebony Vale. Soil lead levels in Red Pond exceeded 500 parts per million at 24% of the households tested. Ten paint samples taken from Red Pond homes exceeded 1% lead by weight. The geometric mean blood lead level of those tested in Red Pond was more than twice the level found in those tested in Ebony Vale. Forty four percent of the children under 6 years of age in Red Pond had blood lead levels above 25 micrograms/deciliter. Soil lead contamination was the strongest predictor of blood lead levels among the Red Pond subjects under 12 years of age. Lead smelter work was an important predictor in the older subjects. The authors conclude that the backyard smelters in combination with the secondary smelter caused a high lead poisoning risk for area residents. The authors recommend that residents stop the backyard smelting operations, and that efforts be made to reduce exposure through hazard abatement, education, and establishment of clean play areas for children.

  6. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH04, Shiprock, New Mexico, September-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiological assessment conducted at the Shiprock vicinity property SH04 by the ANL Radiological Survey Group indicated background levels of radioactivity within the residential structure. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL (or 20 mWL) limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12(b)(1)). The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. Twelve discrete hot spots or localized areas were found in the backyard, most associated with small slabs of decorative flagstone. Radiochemical analyses of the stone sample collected from one of the localized areas indicated the presence of natural uranium ore. Radiochemical analysis of the soil sample collected from one other of the localized areas indicated a radium concentration of 33 +- 3 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, as specified in Section 192.12(a)(1) of the EPA Standard. From the analyses of the samples and the history of the site, the contaminating material in the general area at the backyard and alleyway, in the area in the frontyard, and at several of the discrete locations in the backyard appears to be residual radioactive material under the provisions of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 in the form of radium-enhanced material (i.e., tailings) and natural uranium ore. Since the surface soil contamination levels exceed the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered. 10 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  7. The tenth conference on solid waste management & materials policy and the New York State solid waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proceedings of the Tenth Conference on Solid Waste Management and Materials Policy and the New York State Solid Waste Management held February 19-22, 1995 in New York City are presented. Such topics as recycling, resource recovery, emission characteristics of burn barrels, ash management, controlling landfill closure costs, flow control and federalism, composting programs, air pollutant emissions from MSW landfills, backyard waste management, waste-based manufacturing, and scrap tire management are covered. A separate abstract and indexing were prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH16, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 ..mu..R/h above background limit. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. Three localized areas, or discrete hot spots, were found within the backyard. A general area of elevated radioactivity was found at the back alleyway, encompassing about 1200 ft/sup 2/. Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from the backyard indicated a radium concentration of 14 +- 1 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background. Analyses of surface soil samples collected at the alleyway from nearly vicinity property sites also indicated radium concentrations in excess of the limit. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered.

  9. Side-by-Side Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To examine the energy, air leakage, and thermal performance of highly insulating windows, a field evaluation was undertaken in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built “Lab Homes” located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The “baseline” Lab Home B was retrofitted with “standard” double-pane clear aluminum-frame slider windows and patio doors, while the “experimental” Lab Home A was retrofitted with Jeld-Wen® triple-pane vinyl-frame slider windows and patio doors with a U-factor of 0.2 and solar heat gain coefficient of 0.19. To assess the window, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2012 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The measured energy savings in Lab Home B averaged 5,821 watt-hours per day (Wh/day) during the heating season and 6,518 Wh/day during the cooling season. The overall whole-house energy savings of Lab Home B compared to Lab Home A are 11.6% ± 1.53% for the heating season and 18.4 ± 2.06% for the cooling season for identical occupancy conditions with no window coverings deployed. Extrapolating these energy savings numbers based on typical average heating degree days and cooling degree days per year yields an estimated annual energy savings of 12.2%, or 1,784 kWh/yr. The data suggest that highly insulating windows are an effective energy-saving measure that should be considered for high-performance new homes and in existing retrofits. However, the cost effectiveness of the measure, as determined by the simple payback period, suggests that highly insulating window costs continue to make windows difficult to justify on a cost basis alone. Additional reductions in costs via improvements in manufacturing and/or market penetration that continue to drive down costs will make highly insulating windows much more viable as a cost-effective energy efficiency measure. This study also illustrates that highly insulating windows have important impacts on peak load, occupant comfort, and condensation potential, which are not captured in the energy savings calculation. More consistent and uniform interior temperature distributions suggest that highly insulated windows, as part of a high performance building envelope, may enable more centralized duct design and downsized HVAC systems. Shorter, more centralized duct systems and smaller HVAC systems to yield additional cost savings, making highly insulating windows more cost effective as part of a package of new construction or retrofit measures which achieve significant reductions in home energy use.

  10. What Will the Neighbors Think? Building Large-Scale Science Projects Around the World

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Craig Jones, Christian Mrotzek, Nobu Toge and Doug Sarno

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Public participation is an essential ingredient for turning the International Linear Collider into a reality. Wherever the proposed particle accelerator is sited in the world, its neighbors -- in any country -- will have something to say about hosting a 35-kilometer-long collider in their backyards. When it comes to building large-scale physics projects, almost every laboratory has a story to tell. Three case studies from Japan, Germany and the US will be presented to examine how community relations are handled in different parts of the world. How do particle physics laboratories interact with their local communities? How do neighbors react to building large-scale projects in each region? How can the lessons learned from past experiences help in building the next big project? These and other questions will be discussed to engage the audience in an active dialogue about how a large-scale project like the ILC can be a good neighbor.

  11. Solid waste management of temple floral offerings by vermicomposting using Eisenia fetida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Akanksha, E-mail: bhuaks29@gmail.com [Department of Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India); Jain, Akansha, E-mail: akansha007@rediffmail.com [Department of Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India); Sarma, Birinchi K., E-mail: birinchi_ks@yahoo.com [Department of Mycology and Plant Pathology, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India); Abhilash, P.C., E-mail: pca.iesd@bhu.ac.in [Institute for Environment and Sustainable Development, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India); Singh, Harikesh B., E-mail: hbs1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mycology and Plant Pathology, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Effective management of temple floral offerings using E. fetida. ? Physico-chemical properties in TW VC were better especially EC, C/N, C/P and TK. ? TW VC as plant growth promoter at much lower application rates than KW and FYW VC. - Abstract: Recycling of temple waste (TW) mainly comprising of floral offerings was done through vermitechnology using Eisenia fetida and its impact on seed germination and plant growth parameters was studied by comparing with kitchen waste (KW) and farmyard waste (FYW) vermicompost (VC). The worm biomass was found to be maximum in TW VC compared to KW and FYW VCs at both 40 and 120 days old VCs. Physico-chemical analysis of worm-worked substrates showed better results in TW VC especially in terms of electrical conductivity, C/N, C/P and TK. 10% TW VC–water extract (VCE) showed stimulatory effect on germination percentage of chickpea seeds while KW and FYW VCE proved effective at higher concentration. Variation in growth parameters was also observed with change in the VC–soil ratio and TW VC showed enhanced shoot length, root length, number of secondary roots and total biomass at 12.5% VC compared to KW and FYW VC.

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH08, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were, for the most part, landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 ..mu..R/h above background limit. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background. The assessment did indicate elevated levels of radioactivity at a few areas in the outside environs. A general area of elevated radioactivity was found at the west edge of the property, paralleling the roadway and encompassing an area of about 70 ft/sup 2/; and another general area of contamination was found in the backyard, encompassing about 960 ft/sup 2/, and extending into the alleyway, encompassing a general area of about 1100 ft/sup 2/ there. Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from the general area in the backyard indicated a radium concentration of 6.7 +- 0.7 pCi/g, which cannot be confidently interpreted to be below the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface. However, analyses of surface soil samples collected at the alleyway from nearby vicinity property sites indicated radium concentrations in excess of those limits. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered.

  13. Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Waste oils offer a tremendous recycling potential. An important, dwindling natural resource of great economic and industrial value, oil products are a cornerstone of our modern industrial society. Petroleum is processed into a wide variety of products: gasoline, fuel oil, diesel oil, synthetic rubber, solvents, pesticides, synthetic fibres, lubricating oil, drugs and many more ' (see Figure 1 1. The boilers of Amercian industries presently consume about 40 % of the used lubricating oils collected. In Ontario, the percentage varies from 20 to 30%. Road oiling is the other major use of collected waste oils. Five to seven million gallons (50-70 % of the waste oil col1ected)is spread on dusty Ontario roads each summer. The practice is both a wasteful use of a dwindling resource and an environmental hazard. The waste oil, with its load of heavy metals, particularly lead, additives including dangerous polynuclear aromatics and PCBs, is carried into the natural environment by runoff and dust to contaminate soils and water courses.2 The largest portion of used oils is never collected, but disappears into sewers, landfill sites and backyards. In Ontario alone, approximately 22 million gallons of potentially recyclable lube oil simply vanish each year. While oil recycling has ad-114 Oil

  14. QER- Comment of Peter Cross

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To whom it may concern: We live in Orange, MA, which is one of the towns through which a natural gas pipeline (Kinder Morgan Co.) is proposed to go on its way to Dracut, MA. We are aware that these 30-inch pipelines have on average one leak every 8 miles or so, and we know there will be more than 8 miles of the line in our town if it is approved. Although we are not abutting property owners, we are opposed to the fracking techniques used to extract the gas that will be in this pipeline, primarily because of danger to water supplies. Additionally, we feel as though we're enabling and supporting these techniques by not speaking out about transporting the products of this process. And, just in case you think we are "not in my backyard "people, we SUPPORT both wind and solar power installations - we have both rather close to us! Thanks for taking our opinions into consideration. Peter and Candace Cross, Orange, MA

  15. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Clearing C-trees along the south side of the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The project involves controlling all tall growing trees (C-Trees) within the right-of-way. All work is to be done on the south side of centerline. Target vegetation is the tall growing Firs along the edge of the ROW, all of which is located within the back yards of the property owners along the right-of-way. The density of vegetation is low and consists of C-Trees located within backyards, with the branches growing towards the lines. Due to lack of access and past verbal agreements with the landowners, permission/agreement has been difficult to obtain from the property owners. Permission has now been obtained to remove the C-Trees within their back yards which, will soon be a hazard to our transmission line facility. We are working with the landowners to get them to plant low growing scrubs and ornamentals within the right-of-way and adjacent to the right-of-way. A follow up herbicide treatment is not planned because the trees being cut will not re-sprout. This right-of-way or project area is on a three to four year maintenance schedule. Little or no treatment should be required in the immediate future.

  16. Development of a Smart MicroGrid Testbed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Wei-Jen; Wetz, David

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand for electricity is rapidly increasing thereby applying pressure to expand generation and distribution capacity worldwide. The expansion of traditional services not only imposes burdens on financial resources but also encounters many challenges from community residents who oppose the construction of new power generation plants or transmission facilities in their backyard. From the integrated resource planning point of view, a feasible and economical remedy is, therefore, to utilize existing dispersed generation capacity known as distributed generation (DG) and/or renewable energy resources that may exist in the vicinity of the load centers. The main criteria for selecting the type of fuel source for a DG is its local availability, conversion system technological advancement, impact on the environment, and operating cost. DG’s have existed in the market for many years. Large diesel or gas powered generation sets are used in stand-by mode to power up vital services such as hospitals, financial and commercial compounds, telecommunication centers and industrial premises. Wind turbines, photovoltaic energy sources, and fuel cells are new comers that are now competing in size and efficiency with many standard generating sets. With this in mind, they are being used in many places not only as stand-by units but as the prime source of power particularly when the $/kWhr rate is high[1-5].

  17. Air pathway report: Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 1 of the air-pathway portion of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the 10 counties nearest the Hanford Site from atmospheric releases of iodine-131 from the site from 1944--1947. Phase 1 demonstrated the following: HEDR-calculated source-term estimates of iodine-131 releases to the atmosphere were within 20% of previously published estimates; calculated vegetation concentrations of iodine-131 agree well with previously published measurements; the highest of the Phase 1 preliminary dose estimates to the thyroid are consistent with independent, previously published estimates of doses to maximally exposed individuals; and, relatively crude, previously published measurements of thyroid burdens for Hanford workers are in the range of average burdens that the HEDR model estimated for similar reference individuals'' for the period 1944--1947. Preliminary median dose estimates summed over the year 1945--1947 for the primary pathway, air-pasture-cow-milk-thyroid, ranged from low median values of 0.006 rad for upwind adults who obtained milk from backyard cows not on pasture to high median values of 68.0 rad for downwind infants who drank milk from pasture-fed cows. Extremes of the estimated range are a low of essentially zero to upwind adults and a high of almost 3000 rem to downwind infants. 37 refs., 37 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Special Issue on geophysics applied to detection and discrimination of unexploded ordnance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasperikova, Erika; Gasperikova, Erika; Beard, Les P.

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Unexploded ordnance (UXO) presents serious problems in Europe, Asia, as well as in the United States. Explosives and mines from World War I and World War II still turn up at European and Asian construction sites, backyard gardens, beaches, wildlife preserves and former military training grounds. The high rate of failure among munitions from 60-90 years ago is cited as one of the main reasons for such a high level of contamination. Apart from war activities, military training has resulted in many uncovered ordnance. It is especially true in the United States, where most UXO has resulted from decades of military training, exercises, and testing of weapons systems. Such UXO contamination prevents civilian land use, threatens public safety, and causes significant environmental concern. In light of this problem, there has been considerable interest shown by federal, state, and local authorities in UXO remediation at former U.S. Department of Defense sites. The ultimate goal of UXO remediation is to permit safe public use of contaminated lands. A Defense Science Board Task Force Report from 1998 lists some 1,500 sites, comprising approximately 15 million acres, that potentially contain UXO. The UXO-related activity for these sites consists of identifying the subareas that actually contain UXO, and then locating and removing the UXO, or fencing the hazardous areas off from the public. The criteria for clearance depend on the intended land end-use and residual hazard risk that is deemed acceptable. Success in detecting UXO depends on the ordnance's size, metal content, and depth of burial, as well as on the ability of geophysical systems to detect ordnance in the presence of metallic fragments from exploded UXO and other metal clutter.

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH15, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The lands in the unlandscaped east section contained a large garden plot and a dirt driveway leading to the back easement. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 ..mu..R/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity in the outside environs. General areas of contamination were found in the backyard, along the back easement and encompassing about 1200 ft/sup 2/ of land area there, and extending into the unlandscaped east section, encompassing about 2400 ft/sup 2/ there. Several discrete hot spots or localized areas were found within these general areas. Radiochemical analysis of the soil samples collected from the areas indicated radium concentrations of 64 +- 6 and 82 +- 8 pCi/g, which are in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is now known. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered.

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH07, Shiprock, New Mexico, September-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were, for the most part, landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 ..mu..R/h above background limit. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background. The assessment did indicate elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. A general area of elevated radioactivity was found in the frontyard and alleyway, encompassing about 2300 ft/sup 2/. Elevated levels were also found in the northwest corner of the property, encompassing about 320 ft/sup 2/, and in the southeast corner, encompassing about 39 ft/sup 2/. An area of elevated radioactivity was found at a backyard slab, constructed of decorative flagstone and encompassing about 160 ft/sup 2/. Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from the southeast corner indicated a radium concentration of 41 +- 5 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background. Analyses of a surface soil sample collected in the alley from an adjacent vicinity property site also indicated a radium concentration in excess of those limits. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered.

  1. Radiological re-survey results at 146 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ034)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, M.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from 1916 to 1959. During the early years of operation, MCW stored wastes and residues in low-lying areas west of the processing facilities and consequently some of the residuals containing radioactive materials migrated offsite to the surrounding area. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated for remedial action the old MCW property and several vicinity properties. Additionally, in 1984, the property at 146 West Central Ave., Maywood, New Jersey and properties in its vicinity were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. In 1987 and 1988, at the request of DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a radiological survey on this property. A report describing this survey was published in 1989. A second radiological survey by ORNL was conducted on this property in May 1993 at the request of DOE after an ad hoc radiological survey, requested by the property owner and conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), identified some contamination not previously found by ORNL. The purpose of the second ORNL survey was to determine whether radioactive materials from the old MCW were present on the property, and if so, if radioactive materials present were above guidelines. A certified civil survey was requisitioned by ORNL to determine actual property boundaries before beginning the radiological re-survey. The re-survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of a large number of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of this survey demonstrated that although elevated residual thorium-232 contamination was present in a few isolated spots on the southern end of the backyard, it did not exceed DOE guidelines.

  2. Urandium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH06, Shiprock, New Mexico, August-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiological assessment conducted at the Shiprock vicinity property SH06 by the ANL Radiological Survey Group indicated background levels of radioactivity within the residential structure. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 ..mu..R/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12(b)(2)). Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL (or 20 mWL) limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12(b)(1)). The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. General areas of elevated radioactivity were found over almost the entire frontyard, encompassing about 1300 ft/sup 2/ (120 m/sup 2/), and at the west side of the residence, encompassing about 460 ft/sup 2/ (43 m/sup 2/). Radiochemical analysis of the soil sample collected from the frontyard near the residence indicated a radium concentration of 24 +- 2 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, as specified in Section 192.12(a)(1) of the EPA Standard. Elevated levels were also found at a 37-ft/sup 2/ (3.4-m/sup 2/) strip of land along the east property line, and in the backyard, at a small shack encompassing about 21 ft/sup 2/ (2.0 m/sup 2/) of land. From soil sample analyses and the history of the site, the contaminating material appears to be residual radioactive material under the provisions of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 in the form of radium-enhanced material (i.e., tailings). Since the surface soil contamination levels exceed the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered. 9 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  3. QER- Comment of Liberty Goodwin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As suggested by Sen. Jack Reed, below and attached are my comments on energy policy for now and the future: ***************************************************************************** AN OUTLINE FOR PRACTICAL & FRUITFUL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT WITH SPECIAL ATTENTION TO SENSIBLE PUBLIC INVESTMENT (Thoughts on intelligent action for energy that is abundant, affordable, associated with many jobs and economic health in New England and the nation) ** CLINGING TO OUTMODED & DESTRUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES – WE DON'T NEED TO ARGUE ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE TO SEE THE WAY FORWARD 1. Fossil fuels and nuclear have clear and present dangers and damaging effects, on human and environmental health. This includes the uncontestable pollution involved in production and use, and the risks of greater disasters, along with concerns about toxic waste that can contaminate our water and more. 2. Renewable sources offer a vast number of possibilities for energy production for a variety of uses. To not explore them is wasteful. To stick to same-old, same-old is foolish, and will leave us at the rear of the pack re: future energy development. **SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL – LESS RISKY – MORE PRODUCTIVE – MORE LOCAL 1 Solyndra is the bad apple that makes the point. Because something costs millions, or even billions of dollars doesn't mean it is the way to achieve huge results. The only thing that is huge about propping up mega-corporations is the risk. 2 Making the money available in far smaller amounts to a variety of solar efforts is both less risky and more promising – gives more chance of positive results. And, to anyone who can do the math – millions of small installations is as productive as one giant. 3 Smaller projects tend to be more labor-intensive – and offer local employment in a bunch of different places, benefiting the economies of all. **BENEFICIAL INNOVATION IS NOT BORN IN A CORPORATE THINK TANK, BUT IN THE MINDS OF INDIVIDUAL GENIUSES. 1. History tells us that great inventions have been developed by unknowns working in garages, bike shops, etc. We need to look beyond the elite in corporate money tanks and prestigious academia to find the gems in our own backyards. 2. One such, Paul Klinkman, has at least 50 inventions on hand, is developing several, has one patent and a few more in process, most related to alternative energy production. 3. The point is that we would find many like him – if we would only look. 4. Also, we should be seeking not just new technologies, but new business models. Check out the example from our greenhouse flyer, below. **SAVVY INVESTORS DON'T PUT THE BULK OF THEIR FORTUNES IN JUST A COUPLE OF STOCKS. THEY SPREAD THE RISK BY DIVERSIFYING. LET US BE LIKEWISE SMART IN USE OF PUBLIC MONEY 1 "Renewable energy" is not just about electricity, or even that and hot water. It is not even just those and wind, and certainly more than "solar panels". 2 We need to explore and use the many different types of alternatives, just as we do in most other aspects of our society. 3 Taking the kind of money that was allocated to Solyndra (or even to 38 Studios here in Rhode Island, and instead investing it in even 10 small projects, is a much wiser choice than betting it on another big boondoggle. **WHAT TO DO? PUT OUR MONEY INTO SUPPORT FOR WIDESPREAD USE OF CURRENT "GREEN" ENERGY TECHNOLOGY, AND EVALUATION & DEVELOPMENT OF NEW, TRULY INNOVATIVE OPTIONS 1 Make renewable energy credits available for all solar, wind and other technologies that show promise for meeting our energy needs. 2 Consider setting up an Important Innovations Center like the one described on the other side. TWO EXAMPLES OF NEW & EXCITING RESEARCH & BUSINESS MODELS A. PROPOSED NEW KSD NON-PROFIT IMPORTANT INNOVATIONS CENTER PURPOSES **Provide a place where small inventors can get help in evaluating and developing their ideas. **Provide a place which will focus specifically on inventions that have the potential to benefit the world and its people. **Provide a place which will especially focus on solutions to energy needs – and to environmental pollution and other