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1

PORFLOW Modeling Supporting The H-Tank Farm Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vadose and saturated zones have been conducted using the PORFLOW code in support of an overall Performance Assessment (PA) of the H-Tank Farm. This report provides technical detail on selected aspects of PORFLOW model development and describes the structure of the associated electronic files. The PORFLOW models for the H-Tank Farm PA, Rev. 1 were updated with grout, solubility, and inventory changes. The aquifer model was refined. In addition, a set of flow sensitivity runs were performed to allow flow to be varied in the related probabilistic GoldSim models. The final PORFLOW concentration values are used as input into a GoldSim dose calculator.

Jordan, J. M.; Flach, G. P.; Westbrook, M. L.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site The PAs are used to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment and provide the Department Of Energy with reasonable assurance that the removal from service of the Savannah River Site tank farm underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment will meet defined performance objectives for the protection of human health and the environment into the future. First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 1 First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 2

3

F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 Draft Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site. In accordance with NDAA Section 3116, certain waste from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is not high-level waste if the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, determines that the criteria in NDAA Section 3116(a) are met. This Draft FTF 3116 Basis Document shows that those criteria are satisfied, to support a potential determination by the Secretary pursuant Section 3116. This Draft FTF 3116 Basis Document concerns the stabilized residuals in waste tanks and ancillary structures, those waste tanks, and the ancillary structures (including integral equipment) at the SRS FTF at the time of closure.

4

F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 Draft Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site. In accordance with NDAA Section 3116, certain waste from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is not high-level waste if the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, determines that the criteria in NDAA Section 3116(a) are met. This Draft FTF 3116 Basis Document shows that those criteria are satisfied, to support a potential determination by the Secretary pursuant Section 3116. This Draft FTF 3116 Basis Document concerns the stabilized residuals in waste tanks and ancillary structures, those waste tanks, and the ancillary structures (including integral equipment) at the SRS FTF at the time of closure.

5

Savannah River Site H-Area Tank Farm Performance Assessment Scoping Meeting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

H-Area Tank Farm Performance Assessment Scoping Meeting April 20-22, 2010 230 Green Blvd. Aiken Design Center Building Village at Woodside Aiken, SC DRAFT MEETING NOTES Tuesday, April 20, 2010 (8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) Welcome and introductions made by Tom Gutmann, DOE-SR and Ginger Dickert, SRR. The meeting proceeded with discussion of the topics as identified in the Agenda. Review of General Information Package Consider development of functional requirements/key assumptions tracking process. Evaluate use of Hanford tool for tracking assumptions. Evaluate TRS IAEA-364 for potential updates to some factors (recently published). NRC will provide to DOE and SRR. Consider Features Events Processes (FEPs) style analysis to provide additional

6

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SRR-CWDA-2010-00128 SRR-CWDA-2010-00128 Revision 0 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT for the H-AREA TANK FARM at the SAVANNAH RIVER SITE March 2011 Prepared by: Savannah River Remediation LLC Closure & Waste Disposal Authority Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract No. DE-AC09-09SR22505 Performance Assessment for the SRR-CWDA-2010-00128 H-Area Tank Farm at the Revision 0 Savannah River Site March 2011 Page ii of 864 REVISION SUMMARY REV. # DESCRIPTION DATE OF ISSUE 0a Initial issue to DOE-SR 09/17/2010

7

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 of 864 8 of 864 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This Performance Assessment (PA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) was prepared to support the eventual removal from service of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. This PA provides the technical basis and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements identified below for removal from service and eventual final closure of the HTF.  U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 Change 1  Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61 Subpart C as identified in "Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005," Section 3116  South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)

8

Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6064 (2) Revision Number: 0 (3) Effective Date: 04/15/2010 6064 (2) Revision Number: 0 (3) Effective Date: 04/15/2010 (4) Document Type: [I Digital Image ElHard copy (a) Number of pages (including the DRF) or 15 Z PDF Video number of digital images (5) Release Type 0 New l Cancel 11: Page Change l complete Revision (6) Document Title: Meeting Minutes for the WMA C PA Features, Events, and Processes Working Session (7) Change/Release Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Description: Waste Management Area C performance assessment on Features, Events, and Processes (8) Change N/A Justification: (9) Associated (a) Structure Location: (c) Building Number: Structure, System, and Component N/A N/A (SSC) and Building (b) System Designator: (d) Equipment ID Number (EIN): Number:

9

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

66 of 864 66 of 864 3.0 DISPOSAL FACILITY CHARACTERISTICS Section 3.1 provides information regarding site characteristics including detailed information furnished for those characteristics that influence the contaminant transport modeling assumptions provided in Chapter 4.  Section 3.1.1 provides a general description and layout of the site and the HTF to orient the reader and includes the current (as of 2009) estimated population distribution of the surrounding area as well as future land use planning for information purposes.  Section 3.1.2 describes meteorological and climatological data collection at SRS. This data collection determines appropriate modeling assumptions related to rainfall and temperature to assess the performance of the HTF closure cap presented in SRNL-ESB-

10

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

238 of 864 238 of 864 4.0 ANALYSIS OF PERFORMANCE The purpose of this section is to provide the technical basis for the analyses of performance for the closed HTF facilities over time based on the total remaining inventory. Section 4.1 provides an overview of the ICM comprised of three components: 1) closure cap, 2) vadose zone, and 3) saturated zone. Section 4.2 describes the ICM approach for contaminant release.  4.2.1 presents details of the source term release, the analyses performed to estimate the leaching of contaminants from the CZ by the pore fluid, based on solubility controls used for modeling the transport of contaminants from their initial closure locations within the waste tanks and ancillary equipment to the underground aquifers.

11

Multilevel and multi-user sustainability assessment of farming systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sustainability assessment is needed to build sustainable farming systems. A broad range of sustainability concepts, methodologies and applications already exists. They differ in level, focus, orientation, measurement, scale, presentation and intended end-users. In this paper we illustrate that a smart combination of existing methods with different levels of application can make sustainability assessment more profound, and that it can broaden the insights of different end-user groups. An overview of sustainability assessment tools on different levels and for different end-users shows the complementarities and the opportunities of using different methods. In a case-study, a combination of the sustainable value approach (SVA) and MOTIFS is used to perform a sustainability evaluation of farming systems in Flanders. SVA is used to evaluate sustainability at sector level, and is especially useful to support policy makers, while MOTIFS is used to support and guide farmers towards sustainability at farm level. The combined use of the two methods with complementary goals can widen the insights of both farmers and policy makers, without losing the particularities of the different approaches. To stimulate and support further research and applications, we propose guidelines for multilevel and multi-user sustainability assessments. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We give an overview of sustainability assessment tools for agricultural systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SVA and MOTIFS are used to evaluate the sustainability of dairy farming in Flanders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of methods with different levels broadens the insights of different end-user groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose guidelines for multilevel and multi-user sustainability assessments.

Van Passel, Steven, E-mail: Steven.vanpassel@uhasselt.be [Hasselt University, Faculty of Business Economics, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan, Building D, 3590, Diepenbeek (Belgium); University of Antwerp, Department Bioscience Engineering, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Meul, Marijke [University College Ghent, Department of Biosciences and Landscape Architecture, Campus Schoonmeersen, Building C, Schoonmeersstraat 52, 9000, Gent (Belgium)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Assessing the impact of marine wind farms on birds through movement modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...post-construction of the Danish Nysted offshore wind farm were used to parameterize competing...Somateria mollissima |Nysted offshore wind farm| 1. Introduction Many countries...post-construction assessment of an offshore wind farm, and to quantitatively describe...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - February 2009 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

February 2009 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - February 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank...

14

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - March 2010 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

March 2010 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - March 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Meeting Summary for...

15

Life Cycle Assessment of Chinese Shrimp Farming Systems Targeted for Export and Domestic Sales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(14) The objectives of this study are to (1) identify key stages and hotspots with highest contribution to overall impacts and assess the most significant environmental impacts, (2) compare how these two market-oriented production systems (intensive and semi-intensive) differ in their environmental performance, (3) evaluate the contribution to overall environmental performance of transporting frozen shrimp products to export markets, and (4) use the LCA results as basis to formulate strategies to minimize environmental impacts and promote more sustainable shrimp production. ... (15) The main system boundary of our study was from cradle to farm-gate, including feed production, production of larvae at hatcheries, and production of marketable-size shrimp at the farm level (Figure 1). ... diesel (L) ...

Ling Cao; James S. Diana; Gregory A. Keoleian; Qiuming Lai

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

16

Context for performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In developing its recommendations on performance assessment for disposal of low-level radioactive waste, Scientific committee 87-3 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has considered a number of topics that provide a context for the development of suitable approaches to performance assessment. This paper summarizes the Committee` discussions on these topics, including (1) the definition of low-level waste and its sources and properties, as they affect the variety of wastes that must be considered, (2) fundamental objectives and principles of radioactive waste disposal and their application to low-level waste, (3) current performance objectives for low-level waste disposal in the US, with particular emphasis on such unresolved issues of importance to performance assessment as the time frame for compliance, requirements for protection of groundwater and surface water, inclusion of doses from radon, demonstrating compliance with fixed performance objectives using highly uncertain model projections, and application of the principle that releases to the environment should be maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (4) the role of active and passive institutional controls over disposal sites, (5) the role of the inadvertent human intruder in low-level waste disposal, (6) model validation and confidence in model outcomes, and (7) the concept of reasonable assurance of compliance.

Kocher, D.C.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2010 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

10 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting...

18

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

09 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting...

19

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2011 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

January 2011 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2011 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm...

20

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - July 2010 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

July 2010 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - July 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2010 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

0 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting...

22

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - October 2009 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

October 2009 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - October 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm...

23

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2010 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

January 2010 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm...

24

Visual impact assessment of offshore wind farms and prior experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy planners have shifted their attention towards offshore wind power generation and the decision is supported by the public in general, which in the literature has a positive attitude towards offshore wind generation. However, globally only a few offshore wind farms are operating. As more wind farms start operating and more people become experienced with especially the visual impacts from offshore wind farms, the public positive attitude could change if the experienced impacts are different from the initially perceived visual interference. Using a binary logit model, the present paper investigates the relation between different levels of prior experience with visual disamenities from offshore wind farms and perception of visual impacts from offshore wind farms. The differences in prior experience are systematically controlled for sampling respondents living in the areas close to the large scale offshore wind farms Nysted and Horns Rev and by sampling the a group of respondents representing the Danish population, which has little experience with offshore wind farms. Compared to previous results in the literature, the present paper finds that perception of wind power generation is influenced by prior experience. More specifically, the results show that people with experience from offshore wind farms located far from the coast have a significant more positive perception of the visual impacts from offshore wind farms than people with experience from wind farms located closer to the coast. These results are noteworthy on two levels. First of all, the results show that perceptions of offshore wind generation are systematically significantly influenced by prior experience with offshore wind farms. Secondly, and in a policy context, the results indicate that the future acceptance of future offshore wind farms is not independent of the location of existing and new offshore wind farms. This poses for caution in relation to locating offshore wind farms too close to the coast.

Jacob Ladenburg

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Assessment of Algal Farm Designs using a Dynamic Modular Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The notion of renewable energy provides an importantmechanism for diversifying an energy portfolio,which ultimately would have numerous benefits including increased energy resilience, reduced reliance on foreign energysupplies, reduced GHG emissions, development of a green energy sector that contributes to economic growth,and providing a sustainable energy supply. The conversion of autotrophic algae to liquid transportation fuels is the basis of several decades of research to competitively bring energy-scale production into reality; however, many challenges still remain for making algal biofuels economically viable. Addressing current challenges associatedwith algal production systems, in part, requires the ability to assess spatial and temporal variability, rapidly evaluate alternative algal production system designs, and perform large-scale assessments considering multiple scenarios for thousands of potential sites. We introduce the development and application of the Algae Logistics Model (ALM) which is tailored to help address these challenges. The flexible nature of the ALM architecture allows the model to: 1) interface with external biomass production and resource assessment models, as well as other relevant datasets including those with spatiotemporal granularity; 2) interchange design processes to enable operational and economic assessments ofmultiple design configurations, including the integration of current and new innovative technologies; and 3) conduct trade-off analysis to help understand the site-specific techno-economic trade-offs and inform technology decisions. This study uses the ALM to investigate a baseline open-pond production system determined by model harmonization efforts conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Six sites in the U.S. southern-tierwere sub-selected and assessed using daily site-specific algaebiomass productivity data to determine the economic viability of large-scale open-pond systems. Results show that costs can vary significantly depending on location and biomass productivity and that integration of novel dewatering equipment, order of operations, and equipment scaling can also have significant impacts on economics.

Jared M. Abodeely; Daniel M. Stevens; Allison E. Ray; Deborah T. Newby; Andre M. Coleman; Kara G. Cafferty

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Assessment of Algal Farm Designs Using a Dynamic Modular Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The notion of renewable energy provides an important mechanism for diversifying an energy portfolio, which ultimately would have numerous benefits including increased energy resilience, reduction of foreign energy supplies, reduced GHG emissions, development of a green energy sector that contributes to economic growth, and providing a sustainable energy supply. The conversion of autotrophic algae to liquid transportation fuels is the basis of several decades of research to competitively bring energy-scale production into reality; however, many challenges still remain for making algal biofuels economically viable. Addressing current challenges associated with algal production systems, in part, requires the ability to assess spatial and temporal variability, rapidly evaluate alternative algal production system designs, and perform large-scale assessments considering multiple scenarios for thousands of potential sites. We introduce the Algae Logistics Model (ALM) which helps to address these challenges. The flexible nature of the ALM architecture allows the model to: 1) interface with external biomass production and resource assessment models, as well as other relevant datasets including those with spatiotemporal granularity; 2) interchange design processes to enable operational and economic assessments of multiple design configurations, including the integration of current and new innovative technologies; and 3) conduct trade-off analysis to help understand the site-specific techno-economic trade-offs and inform technology decisions. This study uses the ALM to investigate a baseline open-pond production system determined by model harmonization efforts conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Six sites in the U.S. southern-tier were sub-selected and assessed using daily site-specific algae biomass productivity data to determine the economic viability of large-scale open-pond systems. Results show that costs can vary significantly depending on location and biomass productivity and that integration of novel dewatering equipment, order of operations, and equipment scaling can also have significant impacts on economics.

Abodeely, Jared; Coleman, Andre M.; Stevens, Daniel M.; Ray, Allison E.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Newby, Deborah T.

2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach an approach for Environmental Impact Assessment through the use of geolocalized LCA approach, for fixed of environmental impacts of different sources of energy. This paper described the geolocalized LCA approach

Boyer, Edmond

28

Final Report DE-EE0005380- Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report that assesses possible interference to various kinds of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed.

29

Performance Assessment Community of Practice  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

L L l W t C t B d High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Community of Practice Community of Practice John E. Marra, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director Associate Laboratory Director 5 March 2009 DOE EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Phoenix, Arizona DOE-EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Performance Assessment Process Community of Practice Background EM Senior Management would like to have g improved consistency in the execution of the Performance Assessment* process; Originally formed a sub-committee to draft a guidance document for practitioners; Th b itt b li C it f The sub-committee now believes a Community of Practice having broader scope should replace it; Draft Charter in review and presented for Draft Charter in review and presented for discussion. * Performance Assessment (PA) is used broadly to encompass assessments for LLW

30

Life cycle assessment framework in agriculture on the farm level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a method that can be used to assess the environmental impact of agriculture, but impact categories and the functional unit of classical LCAs must be adapted to the specific ... as ...

Guido Haas; Frank Wetterich

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Assessing the impact of changes in the electricity price structure on dairy farm energy costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study aims to provide information on the changes in electricity consumption and costs on dairy farms, through the simulation of various electricity tariffs that may exist in the future and how these tariffs interact with changes in farm management (i.e. shifting the milking operation to an earlier or later time of the day). A previously developed model capable of simulating electricity consumption and costs on dairy farms (MECD) was used to simulate five different electricity tariffs (Flat, Day&Night, Time of Use Tariff 1 (TOU1), TOU2 and Real Time Pricing (RTP)) on three representative Irish dairy farms: a small farm (SF), a medium farm (MF) and a large farm (LF). The Flat tariff consisted of one electricity price for all time periods, the Day&Night tariff consisted of two electricity prices, a high rate from 09:00 to 00:00h and a low rate thereafter. The TOU tariff structure was similar to that of the Day&Night tariff except that a peak price band was introduced between 17:00 and 19:00h. The RTP tariff varied dynamically according to the electricity demand on the national grid. The model used in these simulations was a mechanistic mathematical representation of the electricity consumption that simulated farm equipment under the following headings; milk cooling system, water heating system, milking machine system, lighting systems, water pump systems and the winter housing facilities. The effect of milking start time was simulated to determine the effect on electricity consumption and costs at farm level. The earliest AM milking start time and the latest PM milking start time resulted in the lowest energy consumption. The difference between the lowest and highest electricity consumption within a farm was 7% for SF, 5% for MF and 5% for LF. This difference was accounted for by the variation in the milk cooling system coefficient of performance. The greatest scope to reduce total annual electricity costs by adjusting milking start times was on TOU2 (39%, 34% and 33% of total annual electricity costs on the SF, MF and LF) and the least scope for reductions using this method was on the Flat tariff (7%, 5% and 7% of total annual electricity costs). The potential for reduction of annual electricity consumption and related costs per litre of milk produced by adjusting milking times was higher for the LF than the SF or MF across all electricity tariffs. It is anticipated that these results and the use of the MECD will help support the decision-making process at farm level around increasing energy efficiency and electricity cost forecasts in future electricity pricing tariff structures.

J. Upton; M. Murphy; L. Shalloo; P.W.G. Groot Koerkamp; I.J.M. De Boer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Inequalities in Taxation of Farm Lands and City Property Due to Scope and Method of Assessment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIERARY. A & M COLLEGE, CAWPUS. E39-932-10M-L180 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 458 SEI -- . -. Inequalities in Taxation of Farm Lands and City Property Due... are the assessed values of properties comparable, both of the same and different kinds in the same and in different governmental 6 BULLETIN NO. 458, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION units? What is the effect of partial property assessments and inequalities...

Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

Masden, Elizabeth A., E-mail: e.masden.1@research.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom) and Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fox, Anthony D., E-mail: tfo@dmu.d [Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Kalo, Grenavej 14, 8410 Ronde (Denmark); Furness, Robert W., E-mail: r.furness@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bullman, Rhys, E-mail: rhys.bullman@rpsgroup.co [Scottish Natural Heritage, The Beta Centre, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4NF (United Kingdom); Haydon, Daniel T., E-mail: d.haydon@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Quantifying the sensitivity of wind farm performance to array layout options using large-eddy simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of array layout on the performance of offshore wind farms. Array layout is characterized by the spacing between wind turbines (along and across the prevailing wind direction) and by their alignment and is coupled with an actuator line model to simulate the effects of the rotating wind turbine blades. A control

35

Not All Salmon Are Created Equal: Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Global Salmon Farming Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Not All Salmon Are Created Equal: Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Global Salmon Farming Systems ... Life cycle assessment (LCA) is an ISO-standardized biophysical accounting framework used to (1) compile an inventory of material and energy inputs and outputs characteristic of each stage of a product life cycle and (2) quantify its contributions to a specified suite of resource use and emissions-related environmental impact categories (8, 9). ... System boundaries for a cradle-to-farm-gate LCA of live-weight salmon production in Norway, the UK, Canada, and Chile (gray font denotes background system data derived from the EcoInvent database, modified as appropriate to conform to regional conditions). ...

Nathan Pelletier; Peter Tyedmers; Ulf Sonesson; Astrid Scholz; Friederike Ziegler; Anna Flysjo; Sarah Kruse; Beatriz Cancino; Howard Silverman

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

36

Preliminary melter performance assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melter Performance Assessment activity, a component of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) effort, was designed to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) melter. The melter performance assessment consisted of several activities, including a literature review of all work done with noble metals in glass, gradient furnace testing to study the behavior of noble metals during the melting process, research-scale and engineering-scale melter testing to evaluate effects of noble metals on melter operation, and computer modeling that used the experimental data to predict effects of noble metals on the full-scale melter. Feed used in these tests simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) feed. This report summarizes the results of the melter performance assessment and predicts the lifetime of the HWVP melter. It should be noted that this work was conducted before the recent Tri-Party Agreement changes, so the reference melter referred to here is the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter design.

Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Mahoney, L.A.; Cooper, M.F.; Whitney, L.D.; Shafer, P.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Performance assessment of cogeneration plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, performance assessment of various building cogeneration systems is conducted through energy and exergy efficiencies. The cogeneration plants considered include steam-turbine system, gas-turbine system, diesel-engine system, and geothermal system. Here, the cogeneration operation refers to the simultaneous generation of electrical power and heating for buildings (especially for space heating and hot water). Selected actual operating data are employed for analysis and performance assessment. The same amount of electrical and thermal product outputs is considered for all systems, except the diesel, to facilitate comparisons. Also, the effects of certain operating parameters (e.g., steam pressure, water temperature) on the energy and exergy efficiencies are investigated. The diesel-engine and geothermal systems appear to be thermodynamically more attractive, in that they have higher exergy efficiencies, than steam-turbine and gas-turbine systems. The results demonstrate that exergy analysis is a useful tool in performance assessments of cogeneration systems and permits meaningful comparisons of different cogeneration systems based on their merits. Such results can allow the efficiency of cogeneration systems to be increased, and the applications of cogeneration in larger energy systems to be configured more beneficially, leading to reductions in fuel use and environmental emissions.

Mehmet Kanoglu; Ibrahim Dincer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Office of River Protection Assessment of Contractor Quality Assurance and Operational Awareness at Tank Farms, June 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HIAR-HANFORD-2013-06-17 HIAR-HANFORD-2013-06-17 Site: Hanford, Office of River Protection Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Office of River Protection (ORP) Assessment of Contractor Quality Assurance, Operational Awareness at Hanford Tank Farms Dates of Activity : June 17-20, 2013 Report Preparer: Robert E. Farrell Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (Independent Oversight) Site Lead conducted an operational awareness visit to the ORP Hanford Tank Farms, observed a Tank Farms morning meeting, toured the C Tank Farm, and observed a heavy (34,000 pound) lift. Result: Independent Oversight, together with the ORP Facility Representative, toured the C Tank Farm to observe workers setting

39

Performance Assessment Report Domain CHP System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Assessment Report for the Domain CHP System November 2005 By Burns & McDonnell Engineering #12;Domain CHP System Performance Assessment Report for the Packaged Cooling, Heating and Power

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

40

The effect of stone retention walls on soil productivity and crop performance on selected hillside farms in southern Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF STONE RETENTION WALLS ON SOIL PRODUCTIVITY AND CROP PERFORMANCE ON SELECTED HILLSIDE FARMS IN SOUTHERN HONDURAS A Thesis by MARC ELLERY THOMPSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject Soil Science THE EFFECT OF STONE RETENTION WALLS ON SOIL PRODUCTIVITY AND CROP PERFORMANCE ON SELECTED HILLSIDE FARMS IN SOUTHERN HONDURAS A Thesis by MARC...

Thompson, Marc Ellery

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

South African farm workers' interpretation of risk assessment data expressed as pictograms on pesticide labels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pesticide companies and regulators in developing countries use the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) recommended pictograms on pesticide labels to communicate risk information based on toxicological and environmental risk assessment data. The pesticide label not only is often the only access people have to pesticide risk information, but also in many countries is a legally binding document. As a result of the crucial role pesticide labels play in protecting health and the environment and as a legal instrument, pictograms are used to overcome literacy challenges in transmitting pesticide risk information. Yet, this risk communication tool is often prone to misinterpretations of the risk information which results in hazardous exposures to pesticides for farm workers and end-users generally. In this paper, results are presented from a study with 115 farm workers on commercial vineyards in the Western Cape, South Africa, assessing their interpretations of 10 commonly used pictograms. A standardized questionnaire based on four commonly used pesticide labels was administered. Overall, 50% or more of the study farm workers had misleading, incorrect and critically confused interpretations of the label pictograms. Interpretations often reflected farm workers' social and cultural frames of reference rather than the technically intended risk information. For example, the pictogram indicating a pesticide's toxicity requires boots must be worn, evoked interpretations of 'dangerous to pedestrians' and 'don't walk through pesticides'. Furthermore, there was a gender variation in pictogram comprehension whereby males generally had more correct interpretations than females. This is a result both of a lack of training for women who are assumed to not work with pesticides, as well as a lack of pictograms relevant for female exposures. These findings challenge the viability of the United Nations current initiative to globally harmonize pictograms used on all chemical labels under the new Globally Harmonized System for the Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). Particularly as the GHS pictograms were not piloted prior to adoption of the system and represent complex risk assessment data such as chronic hazards. Public health and pesticide policy, backed by relevant research, need to address developing applicable and effective pesticide risk communication tools, particularly for developing country populations. Merely providing risk assessment derived information in a pictogram does not ensure that an end-user will interpret the message as intended and be able to make risk decisions which mitigate risks from exposures to pesticides or chemicals in general.

Rother, Hanna-Andrea [Occupational and Environmental Health Research Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925 Cape Town (South Africa)], E-mail: andrea.rother@uct.ac.za

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Assessment of Concrete Repair Techniques for Radiologically Contaminated Tank Farm Pump and Valve Pits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the scope of Project W-314, ''Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations,'' the condition of pump and valve pit walls and floors is being assessed, and repairs made as needed, to support upgrading the infrastructure necessary to safely transfer tank waste for treatment. Flaws in the surfaces of the pits (e.g., concrete crack/faults, protective coating deterioration) must be repaired to ensure containment integrity and to facilitate future decontamination of the pits. This engineering study presents a cost/risk/benefit evaluation of concrete and protective coating repair methods in pump and valve pits using various manual and remote tool systems.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

43

Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation] [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Assessment of the acoustic effects on marine animals by an offshore wind farm.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of the planning for an offshore wind farm in Rhode Island coastal waters an assessment of the potential acoustic effects on the ecosystem is being conducted. The developer has proposed to initially deploy eight 3.6?MW wind turbines within 3 nm of Block Island. Two passive aquatic listener (PAL) systems were deployed south of Block Island from October 6 to November 11 2008. Using data from the PALs ambient noise histograms were computed for this pre?construction phase. The largest sources of noise in the area at low frequencies were found to be from shipping wind rain and biological sources. In addition transmission loss measurements were also made in the region to calibrate a geoacoustic model. Measurements of airborne noise from a 1.5?MW land?based wind turbine already in operation in Rhode Island were made in 1/3?octave bands and near the proposed windfarm site. A preliminary assessment of the effects of the offshore wind farm on marine animals at these sites will be presented. A plan for monitoring the noise field and potential biological effects during construction and operation of the windfarm is presented. [Funding provided by the RI Office of Energy Resources.

James H. Miller; Gopu R. Potty; Kathleen Vigness Raposa; David Casagrande; Lisa A. Miller; Jeffrey A. Nystuen; Peter M. Scheifele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on April 13-14, 2010. The Performance Assessment Community of Practice has been chartered to advise the Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board regarding performance assessments and performance assessment-like analyses, promote consistency in the preparation of performance assessments across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, foster exchange of information among performance assessment practitioners, and develop appropriate guidance for performance assessments such that they are based on sound science and are defensible. The purpose of this technical exchange is to provide a venue for performance assessment and risk assessment practitioners, managers and regulators, and contributors to the Cementitious Barriers Partnership and Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management project to share plans and experiences and share ideas for future performance assessment and risk assessment modeling. The technical exchange will include a combination of plenary presentations and discussions with breakout sessions for specific topics. Discussions will emphasize areas for improved consistency and solicit suggestions for future developments related to modeling tools. A breakout discussion session is also planned to address: DOE Order 435.1 Update, regulatory challenges for performance and risk assessment modeling, and other topical areas. Arrangements have also been made for a GoldSim modeling roundtable at the conclusion of the workshop for participants who are interested in sharing experiences related to the use of GoldSim for their simulations.

46

Life cycle assessment of an onshore wind farm located at the northeastern coast of Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article assesses the life cycle emissions of a fictive onshore wind power station consisting of 141.5-MW wind turbines situated on the northeastern coast of Brazil. The objective is to identify the main sources of CO2(eq)-emissions during the life cycle of the wind farm. The novelty of this work lies in the focus on Brazil and its emerging national manufacturing industry. With an electricity matrix that is primarily based on renewable energy sources (87% in 2010), this country emits eight times less CO2 for the production of 1kWh of electricity than the global average. Although this fact jeopardizes the CO2 mitigation potential of wind power projects, it also reduces the carbon footprint of parts and components manufactured in Brazil. The analysis showed that reduced CO2-emissions in the material production stage and the low emissions of the component production stage led to a favorable CO2-intensity of 7.1g CO2/kWh. The bulk of the emissions, a share of over 90%, were unambiguously caused by the production stage, and the transportation stage was responsible for another 6% of the CO2-emissions. The small contributions from the construction and operation phases could be neglected. Within the manufacturing process, the steel tower was identified as the source responsible for more than half of the emissions. The environmental impacts of the wind farm are small in terms of CO2-emissions, which can be credited to a green electricity mix. This scenario presents an advantage for the country and for further production sites, particularly in the surroundings of the preferred wind farm sites in Brazil, which should be favored to reduce CO2 emissions to an even greater extent.

Kerstin B. Oebels; Sergio Pacca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

numerical models & information Systems, Nice: France (2013)" Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. This paper presents an approach for Environmental Impact Assessment through the use of geolocalized LCA approach, for fixed and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EUsponsored EnerGEO project, aiming at providing a versatile modeling platform for stakeholders allowing calculation, forecasting and monitoring of environmental impacts of different sources of energy. This paper described the geolocalized LCA approach, and its use for the evaluation of environmental impacts of wind energy. The effects of offshore wind farms on global environnemental impacts are evaluated though the LCA approach. It takes into account the type of wind farm, the construction phase, all technical aspects, the operation and maintenance scheme and the decommissioning. It also includes geolocalized information such as wind resources, bathymetry, accessibility Environmental impact parameters are accessible through a web service helping the decision makers in assessing the environnemental impacts. 1

Catherine Guermont; Lionel Mnard; Isabelle Blanc

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Assessing hygiene proficiency on organic and conventional pig farms regarding pork safety: A pilot study in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A key element in the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) will be a single farm payment system that is linked to compliance with rules on, for instance hygiene standards. However, there are no recommended methods for assessing the hygiene proficiency of pig production farms. The present study was undertaken to develop a method for this purpose. A first implementation was done on pilot scale; with a set of both conventional and organic pig farms (N=15). Fifty hygiene-related factors were selected, especially with reference to the possible proliferation of enteric pathogens Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The factors were allocated into 8 evaluation categories: (1) general production management, (2) animal density, (3) the outdoor area for pigs, (4) pest and pet animals, (5) general hygiene in the piggery, (6) pen hygiene, (7) feed production hygiene, and (8) feeding hygiene. A farm questionnaire and a supplementary on-site observation form were devised, and one arbitrary scale of hygiene points assigned for each factor. In addition to the mailed questionnaires, one person subsequently visited all the farms, perused the questionnaire with the owners and completed the observation form. The hygiene scores of the farms in each evaluation category were compared both without weighting and with weighting based on expert opinions. The method proved to be feasible and applicable to different types of production.

K.-M. Siekkinen; L. Nuotio; J. Ranta; R. Laukkanen; S. Hellstrm; H. Korkeala; R. Maijala

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF MODEL PREDICTIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL THROUGH VARIANCE/CONSTRAINT TUNING advanced process control (APC) strategies to deal with multivariable constrained control problems with an ultimate objective towards economic optimization. Any attempt to evaluate MPC performance should therefore

Huang, Biao

50

Effects of offshore wind farms on marine wildlifea generalized impact assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marine management plans over the world express high expectations to the development of offshore wind energy. This would obviously contribute to renewable energy production, but potential conflicts with other usages of the marine landscape, as well as conservation interests, are evident. The present study synthesizes the current state of understanding on the effects of offshore wind farms on marine wildlife, in order to identify general versus local conclusions in published studies. The results were translated into a generalized impact assessment for coastal waters in Sweden, which covers a range of salinity conditions from marine to nearly fresh waters. Hence, the conclusions are potentially applicable to marine planning situations in various aquatic ecosystems. The assessment considered impact with respect to temporal and spatial extent of the pressure, effect within each ecosystem component, and level of certainty. Research on the environmental effects of offshore wind farms has gone through a rapid maturation and learning process, with the bulk of knowledge being developed within the past ten years. The studies showed a high level of consensus with respect to the construction phase, indicating that potential impacts on marine life should be carefully considered in marine spatial planning. Potential impacts during the operational phase were more locally variable, and could be either negative or positive depending on biological conditions as well as prevailing management goals. There was paucity in studies on cumulative impacts and long-term effects on the food web, as well as on combined effects with other human activities, such as the fisheries. These aspects remain key open issues for a sustainable marine spatial planning.

Lena Bergstrm; Lena Kautsky; Torleif Malm; Rutger Rosenberg; Magnus Wahlberg; Nastassja strand Capetillo; Dan Wilhelmsson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Triple bottom line assessment of transport options for the UBC farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Triple bottom line and analyzes viable vehicle options to be used at the UBC Farm using Triple bottom line assessment. These options include powering the vehicle with the traditional fossil fuels, natural gas, biodiesel, or use

52

Modelling the energy performance of a farm-scale cellulose to ethanol process with on-site cellulase production and anaerobic digestion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A farm-scale process for converting wheat straw to ethanol was modelled to assess its energy performance. The process incorporates the on-site production of crude unprocessed liquid cellulase produced via solid-state fermentation, and the anaerobic digestion of process residues to supply heat and electricity. Results include energy yield ratios from 6 to 9, reductions of 8090 % in the energy required to produce and transport the cellulase compared to commercial preparations, and a net surplus of on-site heat and electricity. From these improvements in process efficiency, environmental benefits follow.

Mitchell Lever

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Northern Wind Farm  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a draft environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed interconnection of the Northern Wind Farm (Project) in Roberts County, near the city of Summit, South Dakota. Northern Wind,...

54

Campbell County Wind Farm  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed interconnection of the Campbell County Wind Farm (Project) in Campbell County, near the city of Pollock, South Dakota. Dakota...

55

Hurricane wind fields needed to assess risk to offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Scatterplot of maximum landfall winds at wind farm locations (y axis) compared with the peak life cycle wind speed for the same hurricane while...Quantifying the hurricane risk to offshore wind turbines . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 : 3247...

Mark D. Powell; Steven Cocke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DOE Order 435.1 - Performance Assessments and Waste Incidental...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Performance Assessment DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessments Savannah River Site West Valley Demonstration Project DOE Manual 435.1-1 Waste Incidental to Reprocessing...

57

COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF MATERIAL PERFORMANCE IN DEMO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for sufficient time. Reliable estimates of component lifetimes are an important part of power plant design The basic DEMO design used in the present study is a 1.8 GW device (2.2 GW total thermal power ­ including simulation models and capabilities to assess material performance under the neutron irradiation conditions

58

Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Assessing marketing performance: history and challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While assessing the marketing performance of an organisation is increasingly important, it is also increasingly difficult due to the nature of the discipline and several challenges facing researchers and managers. This article reviews the long history of marketing performance assessment and the nature of those challenges. The earliest work in this area examined the productivity of marketing, traditionally defined as financial output per marketing input. Later writers have explored non-financial outputs, and looked at an expanded concept of marketing activities and assets as they lead to business outcomes. I briefly review four measures that have attracted substantial attention in the past ten years - market orientation, customer satisfaction, customer loyalty and brand equity - and conclude with a discussion of challenges for the better measurement and understanding of performance in marketing.

Bruce H. Clark

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Farm level technology assessment in Sub-Saharan Africa: a case study in Mali  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the effect that risk has on the potential outcomes of proposed technology. The objective of this research was to evaluate the farm level impacts of implementing new technologies in Sub-Saharan Africa explicitly incorporating risk into the future outcomes...

Feldman, Paul A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Models for Assessing Power Fluctuations from Large Wind Farms N. A. Cutululis1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

typical and worst case power fluctuations using the geographical sitting of wind turbines as an input comprehensive, with one year of wind speeds and power from all individual wind turbines in the wind farms of the fluctuating nature of wind speeds, the increasing use of wind turbines for power generation has caused more

62

Ecological-economic assessment of farms using multi-input multi-output models: life cycle assessment with multiple paired comparisons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multi-input multi-output model is developed by extending the life cycle assessment framework for analysing the relationship between agricultural production and environmental impacts. The inputs include farmland and materials such as fertilisers, pesticides and animals. The outputs are of two types: one is agro-economic production, such as crop yields, and the other is environmental impacts, including greenhouse gas emissions. Additive and ratio models are defined for analysing the relationship between management intensity, land productivity and environmental impacts based on the farm model. After the framework of multiple paired comparisons is illustrated, the multi-input multi-output model is applied to rice farming in Japan. The results indicate that the additive and ratio models can be used for detecting the directions of changes. These models can be extended for analysing the land-use competition between food and energy production.

Kiyotada Hayashi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Performance viewing and editing in ASSESS Outsider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Analytic System and Software for Evaluation of Safeguards and Security (ASSESS) Facility module records site information in the path elements and areas of an Adversary Sequence Diagram. The ASSESS Outsider evaluation module takes this information and first calculates performance values describing how much detection and delay is assigned at each path element and then uses the performance values to determine most-vulnerable paths. This paper discusses new Outsider capabilities that allow the user to view how elements are being defeated and to modify some of these values in Outsider. Outsider now displays how different path element segments are defeated and contrasts the probability of detection for alternate methods of defeating a door (e.g., the lock or the door face itself). The user can also override element segment delays and detection probabilities directly during analysis in Outsider. These capabilities allow users to compare element performance and to verify correct path element performance for all elements, not just those on the most-vulnerable path as is the case currently. Improvements or reductions in protection can be easily checked without creating a set of new facility files to accomplish it.

Snell, M.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Key, B.; Bingham, B. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Guidance for performing preliminary assessments under CERCLA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EPA headquarters and a national site assessment workgroup produced this guidance for Regional, State, and contractor staff who manage or perform preliminary assessments (PAs). EPA has focused this guidance on the types of sites and site conditions most commonly encountered. The PA approach described in this guidance is generally applicable to a wide variety of sites. However, because of the variability among sites, the amount of information available, and the level of investigative effort required, it is not possible to provide guidance that is equally applicable to all sites. PA investigators should recognize this and be aware that variation from this guidance may be necessary for some sites, particularly for PAs performed at Federal facilities, PAs conducted under EPA`s Environmental Priorities Initiative (EPI), and PAs at sites that have previously been extensively investigated by EPA or others. The purpose of this guidance is to provide instructions for conducting a PA and reporting results. This guidance discusses the information required to evaluate a site and how to obtain it, how to score a site, and reporting requirements. This document also provides guidelines and instruction on PA evaluation, scoring, and the use of standard PA scoresheets. The overall goal of this guidance is to assist PA investigators in conducting high-quality assessments that result in correct site screening or further action recommendations on a nationally consistent basis.

NONE

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment The Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment cover informal discussions between representatives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and involvement with Tribal Nations, State of Oregon, and the Hanford Advisory Board to support DOE's preparation of a new performance assessment (PA) for the Hanford Site C Tank Farm (CTF). These discussions will include the underlying assumptions, input parameters, and modeling approaches to be taken in

66

Performance assessment task team progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters EM-35, established a Performance Assessment Task Team (referred to as the Team) to integrate the activities of the sites that are preparing performance assessments (PAs) for disposal of new low-level waste, as required by Chapter III of DOE Order 5820.2A, {open_quotes}Low-Level Waste Management{close_quotes}. The intent of the Team is to achieve a degree of consistency among these PAs as the analyses proceed at the disposal sites. The Team`s purpose is to recommend policy and guidance to the DOE on issues that impact the PAs, including release scenarios and parameters, so that the approaches are as consistent as possible across the DOE complex. The Team has identified issues requiring attention and developed discussion papers for those issues. Some issues have been completed, and the recommendations are provided in this document. Other issues are still being discussed, and the status summaries are provided in this document. A major initiative was to establish a subteam to develop a set of test scenarios and parameters for benchmarking codes in use at the various sites. The activities of the Team are reported here through December 1993.

Wood, D.E.; Curl, R.U.; Armstrong, D.R.; Cook, J.R.; Dolenc, M.R.; Kocher, D.C.; Owens, K.W.; Regnier, E.P.; Roles, G.W.; Seitz, R.R. [and others

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

An assessment of underground and aboveground steam system failures in the SRS waste tank farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground steam system failures in waste tank farms at the Savannah River Site (SRS) increased significantly in the 3--4 year period prior to 1995. The primary safety issues created by the failures were the formation of sub-surface voids in soil and the loss of steam jet transfer and waste evaporation capability, and the loss of heating and ventilation to the tanks. The average annual cost for excavation and repair of the underground steam system was estimated to be several million dollars. These factors prompted engineering personnel to re-consider long-term solutions to the problem. The primary cause of these failures was the inadequate thermal insulation utilized for steam lines associated with older tanks. The failure mechanisms were either pitting or localized general corrosion on the exterior of the pipe beneath the thermal insulation. The most realistic and practical solution is to replace the underground lines by installing aboveground steam systems, although this option will incur significant initial capital costs. Steam system components, installed aboveground in other areas of the tank farms have experienced few failures, while in continuous use. As a result, piecewise installation of temporary aboveground steam systems have been implemented in F-area whenever opportunities, i.e., failures, present themselves.

Hsu, T.C.; Shurrab, M.S.; Wiersma, B.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Performing Probabilistic Risk Assessment Through RAVEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENviroment (RAVEN) code is a software tool that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing engine for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. RAVEN is now a multi-purpose Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) software framework that allows dispatching different functionalities: Derive and actuate the control logic required to simulate the plant control system and operator actions (guided procedures), allowing on-line monitoring/controlling in the Phase Space Perform both Monte-Carlo sampling of random distributed events and Dynamic Event Tree based analysis Facilitate the input/output handling through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a post-processing data mining module

A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Kinoshita

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Models for source term, flow, transport and dose assessment in NRC`s Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The core consequence modules for the recently completed Phase 2 Iterative Performance Assessment (IPA) of the Yucca Mountain repository for high-level nuclear waste depend on models for releases from the engineered barrier system (source term), flow of liquid and gas, transport of radionuclides in the geosphere and assessment of dose to target populations. The source term model includes temperature and moisture phenomena in the near-field environment, general, pitting and crevice corrosion, contact of the waste form by water, dissolution and oxidation of the waste form, and transport of dissolved and gaseous radionuclides from the waste package by advection and diffusion. The liquid flow and transport models describe water flow through fractures and matrix in both the unsaturated and saturated zones. Models for flow of gas and transport of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} released from the engineered barrier system to the atmosphere take into account repository heat and the geothermal gradient. The dose assessment model calculates doses to a regional population and a farm family for an assumed reference biosphere in the vicinity of the repository. The Phase 2 IPA led to a number of suggestions for model improvement: (1) improve the ability of the models to include spatial and temporal variability in the parameters; (2) improve the coupling among processes, especially the effects of changing environments in the waste packages; (3) develop more mechanistic models, but abstracted for use in total system performance assessment; and (4) use more site specific parameters, especially for the dose assessments.

McCartin, T.; Codell, R.; Neel, R.; Ford, W.; Wescott, R.; Bradbury, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Sagar, B.; Walton, J. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

71

Summit Wind Farm, Summit, SD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a draft environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed interconnection of the Summit Wind Farm (Project) in Roberts County, near the city of Summit, South Dakota. SummitWind,...

72

CARD No. 33 Consideration of Drilling Events in Performance Assessments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Table 1 of 40 CFR Part 191. Assessment of the likelihood that the WIPP will meet the Appendix A release limits is conducted through the use of a process known as "performance assessment" (PA). The WIPP PA). For information on the natural and man-made events that were considered in the scope of the performance assessment

73

Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind farms: lessons learned and recommendations for the future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore wind power provides a valuable source of renewable ... literature and our experience with assessing impacts of offshore wind developments on marine mammals and seabirds, and ... for future monitoring and...

Helen Bailey; Kate L Brookes; Paul M Thompson

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Farm Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... is intended to guide the American farmer and agricultural student in designing and constructing farm buildings. It is stated that farm ... . It is stated that farm buildings have had their most rapid development in America in the years since 1910. Prior ...

1923-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

75

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

76

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

77

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website: www.emt-india.netBook4Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentenergy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment...

78

Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) The CPAR assesses a contractor's performance, both positive and negative, and provides a record on a given contract during a specified period of time. Each assessment must be based on objective data (or measurable, subjective data when objective data is not available) supportable by program and contract management data. The CPARS process is designed with a series of checks-and-balances to facilitate the objective and consistent evaluation of contractor performance. Both Government and contractor perspectives are captured on the CPAR form. The opportunity to review/comment on the CPAR by the designated Government and contractor personnel together makes a complete CPAR.

80

Use of synthetic aperture radar for offshore wind resource assessment and wind farm development in the UK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The UK has an abundant offshore wind resource with offshore wind farming set to grow rapidly over the coming years. Optimisation of energy production is of the utmost importance and accurate estimates of wind speed distributions are critical...

Cameron, Iain Dickson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Level Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee John E. Marra, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director November 6, 2008 Richland, WA DOE-EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Background - Performance Assessment Process Performance assessments are the fundamental risk assessment tool used by the DOE to evaluate and communicate the effectiveness and long-term impact of waste management and cleanup decisions. This includes demonstrations of compliance, NEPA analyses, and decisions about technologies and 2 analyses, and decisions about technologies and waste forms. Background - Process Perception EM-2 'Precepts' for Improved High-Level Waste Management (HLW Corporate Board Meeting - April 2008) Improved Performance Assessments (PA) The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the 3 The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the major HLW sites PA

82

Management Challenges in Developing Performance Assessments and Effectively Communicating Their Results - 13612  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War has left a legacy of approximately 37 million gallons of radioactive waste in the aging waste tanks at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). A robust program is in place to remove waste from these tanks, treat the waste to separate into a relatively small volume of high level waste and a large volume of low-level waste, and to actively dispose of the low-level waste on-site and close the cleaned waste tanks and associated ancillary structures. To support performance-based, risk-informed decision making, performance assessments have been developed for the low-level waste disposal facility and for the SRS Tank Farms. Although these performance assessments share many similar features, the nature of the hazards and associated containments differ. As a management team, we are challenged to effectively communicate both the similarities and differences of these performance assessments, how they should be used to support sound decision making for treatment, disposal and waste tank cleaning decisions, and in defending their respective assumptions to the regulatory community and the public but, equally important, to our own corporate decision makers and operations personnel. Effective development and defense of these performance assessments, and effective interpretation and communication of the results are key to making cost-effective, pragmatic decisions for the safe disposal of the low-level waste and stabilization and operational closure of the cleaned tanks and associated structures. This paper will focus on the importance and challenges in communicating key attributes, conclusions and operational implications within a company. (authors)

Thomas, Steve; Mahoney, Mark [Savannah River Remediations LLC, Building 705-1C, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediations LLC, Building 705-1C, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Thorium fuel performance assessment in \\{HTRs\\}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thorium as a nuclear fuel is receiving renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium. After 1980, most HTR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium. After completing fuel development for AVR and THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded efforts on a new program utilizing thorium and high-enriched uranium TRISO coated particles for advanced HTR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of LTI inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with HTI-BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th,U)O2 TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300C in normal operations and 1600C in accidents, with burnups up to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8נ1025m?2 (E>16fJ), the results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR Modul concept, which were: <6.5נ10?5 for manufacturing; <2נ10?4 for normal operating conditions; and <5נ10?4 for accident conditions. These performance statistics for the HEU (Th,U)O2 TRISO fuel system are in good agreement with similar results for the LEU UO2 TRISO fuel system.

H.-J. Allelein; M.J. Kania; H. Nabielek; K. Verfondern

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Performance assessment implementation plan for the geologic repository program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations of repository-system performance to access compliance with regulations and to support the development of the geologic repository. To define the strategy for these evaluations, the DOE has developed this performance assessment strategy plan. This document discusses the need for such a strategy, the objectives and scope of the strategy plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans. Additionally, it defines performance assessment and describes the roles of performance assessment in this program, discusses concepts and general strategies needed for performance assessment, outlines the content of the Safety Analysis Report, summarizes the requirements for the repository Environmental Impact Statement, discusses the requirements that apply to the site-suitability analyses and describes the site characterization. 10 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility 2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility This Performance Assessment (PA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) was prepared to support the operation and eventual closure of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). This PA was prepared to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Change 1, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter IV, and Title 10, of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Subpart C as required by the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, Section 3116. [DOE O 435.1-1, 10 CFR 61, NDAA_3116]

86

Assessing the performance of recent density functionals for bulk solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assess the performance of recent density functionals for the exchange-correlation energy of a nonmolecular solid, by applying accurate calculations with the GAUSSIAN, BAND, and VASP codes to a test set of 24 solid metals ...

Csonka, Gabor I.

87

Synchronous and Cogged Fan Belt Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GSA Regional GPG Team commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to perform monitoring of cogged V-belts and synchronous belts on both a constant volume and a variable air volume fan at the Byron G. Rodgers Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Denver, Colorado. These motor/fan combinations were tested with their original, standard V-belts (appropriately tensioned by an operation and maintenance professional) to obtain a baseline for standard operation. They were then switched to the cogged V-belts, and finally to synchronous belts. The power consumption by the motor was normalized for both fan speed and air density changes. This was necessary to ensure that the power readings were not influenced by a change in rotational fan speed or by the power required to push denser air. Finally, energy savings and operation and maintenance savings were compiled into an economic life-cycle cost analysis of the different belt options.

Cutler, D.; Dean, J.; Acosta, J.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single- and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and its performance as early as possible in the project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

Mann, F.M.

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

Mann, F.M.

1997-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

Transition from Consultation to Monitoring-NRC's Increasingly Focused Review of Factors Important to F-Area Tank Farm Facility Performance - 13153  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In consultation with the NRC, DOE issued a waste determination for the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) facility in March 2012. The FTF consists of 22 underground tanks, each 2.8 to 4.9 million liters in capacity, used to store liquid high-level waste generated as a result of spent fuel reprocessing. The waste determination concluded stabilized waste residuals and associated tanks and auxiliary components at the time of closure are not high-level and can be disposed of as LLW. Prior to issuance of the final waste determination, during the consultation phase, NRC staff reviewed and provided comments on DOE's revision 0 and revision 1 FTF PAs that supported the waste determination and produced a technical evaluation report documenting the results of its multi-year review in October 2011. Following issuance of the waste determination, NRC began to monitor DOE disposal actions to assess compliance with the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C. To facilitate its monitoring responsibilities, NRC developed a plan to monitor DOE disposal actions. NRC staff was challenged in developing a focused monitoring plan to ensure limited resources are spent in the most cost-effective manner practical. To address this challenge, NRC prioritized monitoring areas and factors in terms of risk significance and timing. This prioritization was informed by NRC staff's review of DOE's PA documentation, independent probabilistic modeling conducted by NRC staff, and NRC-sponsored research conducted by the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses in San Antonio, TX. (authors)

Barr, Cynthia; Grossman, Christopher; Alexander, George; Parks, Leah; Fuhrmann, Mark; Shaffner, James; McKenney, Christepher [U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States)] [U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States); Pabalan, Roberto; Pickett, David [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Dinwiddie, Cynthia [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2009 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2009 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance...

92

Performance Assessment Program for the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Facilities - 13610  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Liquid Waste facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) are operated by Liquid Waste Operations contractor Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR). A separate Performance Assessment (PA) is prepared to support disposal operations at the Saltstone Disposal Facility and closure evaluations for the two liquid waste tank farm facilities at SRS, F-Tank Farm and H-Tank Farm. A PA provides the technical basis and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements identified in operations and closure regulatory guidance. The Saltstone Disposal Facility is subject to a State of South Carolina industrial solid waste landfill permit and the tank farms are subject to a state industrial waste water permit. The three Liquid Waste facilities are also subject to a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Due to the regulatory structure, a PA is a key technical document reviewed by the DOE, the State of South Carolina and the EPA. As the waste material disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility and the residual material in the closed tank farms is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is also a reviewing agency for the PAs. Pursuant to the Act, the NRC also has a continuing role to monitor disposal actions to assess compliance with stated performance objectives. The Liquid Waste PA program at SRS represents a continual process over the life of the disposal and closure operations. When the need for a PA or PA revision is identified, the first step is to develop a conceptual model to best represent the facility conditions. The conceptual model will include physical dimensions of the closed system, both the engineered and natural system, and modeling input parameters associated with the modeled features, both initial values (at the time of facility closure) and degradation rates/values. During the development of the PA, evaluations are conducted to reflect not only the results associated with the best available information at the time but also to evaluate potential uncertainties and sensitivities associated with the modeled system. While the PA will reflect the modeled system results from the best available information, it will also identify areas for future work to reduce overall PA uncertainties moving forward. DOE requires a PA Maintenance Program such that work continues to reduce model uncertainties, thus bolstering confidence in PA results that support regulatory decisions. This maintenance work may include new Research and Development activities or modeling as informed by previous PA results and other new information that becomes available. As new information becomes available, it is evaluated against previous PAs and appropriate actions are taken to ensure continued confidence in the regulatory decisions. Therefore, the PA program is a continual process that is not just the development of a PA but seeks to incorporate new information to reduce overall model uncertainty and provide continuing confidence in regulatory decisions. (author)

Rosenberger, Kent H. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Building 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Building 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM recently completed its tenth Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) since piloting the TRA process in 2006. A TRA is an intensive peer review process through which the maturity of a technology is evaluated. A TRA utilizes the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale pioneered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

94

EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM recently completed its tenth Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) since piloting the TRA process in 2006. A TRA is an intensive peer review process through which the maturity of a technology is evaluated. A TRA utilizes the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale pioneered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

95

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

Hansen, René Rydhof

96

Wind Farm  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

97

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Simulated Performance Speaker(s): Emanuele Naboni Date: May 29, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Opaque ventilated façade systems are increasingly used in buildings, even though their effects on the overall thermal performance of buildings have not yet been fully understood. The research reported in this presentation focuses on the modeling of such systems with EnergyPlus. Ventilated façade systems are modeled in EnergyPlus with module "Exterior Naturally Vented Cavity." Not all façade systems can be modeled with this module; this research defined the types of systems that can be modeled, and the limitations of such simulation. The performance of a ventilated façade

98

White paper updating conclusions of 1998 ILAW performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a comparison of the estimated immobilized low-activity waste (LAW) disposal system performance against established performance objectives using the beat estimates for parameters and models to describe the system. The principal advances in knowledge since the last performance assessment (known as the 1998 ILAW PA [Mann 1998a]) have been in site specific information and data on the waste form performance for BNFL, Inc. relevant glass formulations. The white paper also estimates the maximum release rates for technetium and other key radionuclides and chemicals from the waste form. Finally, this white paper provides limited information on the impact of changes in waste form loading.

MANN, F.M.

2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

Assessing Plant Performance for Energy Savings | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessing Plant Performance for Energy Savings Assessing Plant Performance for Energy Savings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

100

Thermodynamic data management system for nuclear waste disposal performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermodynamic property values for use in assessing the performance of a nuclear waste repository are described. More emphasis is on a computerized data base management system which facilitates use of the thermodynamic data in sensitivity analysis and other studies which critically assess the performance of disposal sites. Examples are given of critical evaluation procedures; comparison of apparent equilibrium constants calculated from the data base, with other work; and of correlations useful in estimating missing values of both free energy and enthalpy of formation for aqueous species. 49 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

Phillips, S.L.; Hale, F.V.; Siegel, M.D.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Radionuclide release rates from spent fuel for performance assessment modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a scenario of aqueous transport from a high-level radioactive waste repository, the concentration of radionuclides in water in contact with the waste constitutes the source term for transport models, and as such represents a fundamental component of all performance assessment models. Many laboratory experiments have been done to characterize release rates and understand processes influencing radionuclide release rates from irradiated nuclear fuel. Natural analogues of these waste forms have been studied to obtain information regarding the long-term stability of potential waste forms in complex natural systems. This information from diverse sources must be brought together to develop and defend methods used to define source terms for performance assessment models. In this manuscript examples of measures of radionuclide release rates from spent nuclear fuel or analogues of nuclear fuel are presented. Each example represents a very different approach to obtaining a numerical measure and each has its limitations. There is no way to obtain an unambiguous measure of this or any parameter used in performance assessment codes for evaluating the effects of processes operative over many millennia. The examples are intended to suggest by example that in the absence of the ability to evaluate accuracy and precision, consistency of a broadly based set of data can be used as circumstantial evidence to defend the choice of parameters used in performance assessments.

Curtis, D.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.emt-india.net/Book4/Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: "Energy Standards,Upgrade Requirements" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

103

Cool Farm Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cool Farm Tool Cool Farm Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Cool Farm Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Unilever Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.unilever.com/aboutus/supplier/sustainablesourcing/tools/?WT.LHNAV= Cost: Free Language: English Cool Farm Tool Screenshot References: Cool Farm Tool [1] Overview "The Cool Farm Tool is a new greenhouse gas calculator for farming. It's easy to use and gives instant results that invite users to try out alternatives and ask 'what if' questions. The tool was commissioned by Unilever from the University of Aberdeen The tool is ideal for farmers, supply chain managers and companies interested in quantifying their

104

Construction integrity assessment report (ETN-98-0005) S-Farm overground transfer (OGT) system valve pit 241-S-B to valve pit 241-S-D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The S-Farm overground transfer (OGT) line will bypass the existing line(s), between valve pits 241-S-B and 241-S-D that no longer meet system requirements. The new OGT line will provide a waste transfer pipeline between these valve pits in support of saltwell pumping activities. The length of the OGT line is approximately 180 ft from pit to pit. The primary pipe is nominal 1-in. diameter stainless steel (SST) braided Ethylene-propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) hose. The encasement pipe is a nominal 3-in., flanged, SST pipe made up of several different length pipe spool pieces (drawing H-2-829564, sh. 1 and sh. 2). The OGT line slopes from valve pit 241-S-B toward valve pit 241-S-D. At each end, the primary and encasement pipe connect to a pit entry spool piece. The pit entry spool pieces are constructed of prefabricated SST materials. These spool pieces allow for the separation of the primary and encasement pipelines after the pipes have entered the valve pits (drawing H-2-818280, sh. 2). The pit entry spool pieces also allow for leak detection of the encasement pipe at each end (drawing H-2-829564, sh. 2). The OGT encasement pipeline is supported above ground by adjustable height unistrut brackets and precast concrete bases (drawing H-2-829654, sh. 1). The pipeline is heat-traced and insulated. The heat tracing and insulation supply and retain latent heat that prevents waste solidification during transfers and provides freeze protection. The total length of the pipeline is above ground, thereby negating the need for cathodic corrosion protection. This Construction Integrity Assessment Report (CIAR) is prepared by Fluor Daniel Northwest for Numatec Hanford Corporation/Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, the operations contractor, and the U. S. Department of Energy, the system owner. The CIAR is intended to verify that construction was performed in accordance with the provisions of Washington Administrative Code, WAC-173-303-640 (3) (c), (e), (f) and (h).

HICKS, D.F.

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

105

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3622, Rev. 0 3622, Rev. 0 Summary Notes from 1 - 3 September 2009 Office of River Protection Waste Management Area C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Input Meeting MP Connelly Washington River Protection Solutions LLC Richland, WA 99352 U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC27-08RV1 4800 EDT/ECN: DRF UC: Cost Center: Charge Code: B&R Code: Total Pages: 13 Key Words: Waste Management Area C, Performance Assessment, tank closure, waste inventory Abstract: Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Waste Management Area C performance assessment TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

106

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1878, Rev. 0 1878, Rev. 0 Summary Notes from 5 - 7 May 2009 Office of River Protection Waste Management Area C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Input Meeting MP Connelly Washington River Protection Solutions LLC Richland, WA 99352 U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC27-08RV14800 EDT/EON: DRF UC: Cost Center: Charge Code: B&R Code: Total Pages: 15 Key Words: Waste Management Area C, Performance Assessment, tank closure, waste inventory Abstract: Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Waste Management Area C performance assessment TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

107

Consideration of liners and covers in performance assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management due to the radioactive waste. The USDOE-Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these CERCLA disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to CERCLA risk assessments and DOE Order 435.1 performance assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement, respectively. One of the issues considered by the working group, which is addressed in this report, was how to appropriately consider the performance of covers and liners/leachate collections systems in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 performance assessment (PA). This same information may be appropriate for consideration within CERCLA risk assessments for these facilities. These OSDCs are generally developed to meet hazardous waste (HW) disposal design standards under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as well as the DOE Order 435.1 performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. To meet the standards for HW, the facilities typically include engineered covers and liner/leachate collection systems. Thus, when considering such facilities in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 PA, there is a need to address the evolution of performance of covers and liner/leachate collection systems in the context of meeting a performance standard considering time frames of 1,000 years for compliance and potentially thousands of years based on the wastes to test the robustness of the system. Experience has shown that there are a range of expectations and perspectives from the different regulators involved at different sites when reviewing assumptions related to cover and liner/leachate collection system performance. However for HW disposal alone under RCRA the design standards are typically considered sufficient by the regulators without a requirement to assess long-term performance thus avoiding the need to consider the details addressed in this report. This report provides suggestions for a general approach to address covers and liners/leachate collection systems in a DOE Order 435.1 PA and how to integrate assessments with defense-in-depth considerations such as design, operations, and waste acceptance criteria to address uncertainties. The emphasis is on water balances and management in such assessments. Specific information and references are provided for details needed to address the evolution of individual components of cover and liner/leachate collection systems. This information was then synthesized into suggestions for best practices for cover and liner system design and examples of approaches to address the performance of covers and liners as part of a performance assessment of the disposal system. Numerous references are provided for sources of information to help describe the basis for performance of individual components of cover and liner systems.

Phifer, Mark A. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Seitz, Robert R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [USDOE Enviromental Management, Washington, DC (United States)

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

108

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms - April 2013 | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 2013 April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms - April 2013 April 2013 Review of Management of Safety Systems at the Hanford Tank Farms The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the management of safety class or safety significant structures, systems and components (hereinafter referred to as safety systems) at the Hanford Site Tank Farms. The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations. The purpose of this Independent Oversight targeted assessment effort is to evaluate processes for monitoring, maintaining, and operating safety systems to ensure their continued reliable capability to perform the

109

Wakes in very large wind farms and the effect of neighbouring wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the first analysis of wake losses in some of the largest offshore wind farms built to date. In addition, we give an example of the external wake losses that can be imposed by a neighbouring wind farm. Both situations lend insights to the wake phenomena in large offshore wind farm clusters. A simple wake model is compared to the data to assess the need for a more detailed physical description of large wind farm wakes.

Nicolai Gayle Nygaard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Methodology for assessing performance of waste management systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the methodology provided in this report is to select the optimal way to manage particular sets of waste streams from generation to disposal in a safe and cost-effective manner. The methodology described is designed to review the entire waste management system, assess its performance, ensure that the performance objectives are met, compare different LLW management alternatives, and select the optimal alternative. The methodology is based on decision analysis approach, in which costs and risk are considered for various LLW management alternatives, a comparison of costs, risks, and benefits is made, and an optimal system is selected which minimizes costs and risks and maximizes benefits. A ''zoom-lens'' approach is suggested, i.e., one begins by looking at gross features and gradually proceeds to more and more detail. Performance assessment requires certain information about the characteristics of the waste streams and about the various components of the waste management system. Waste acceptance criteria must be known for each component of the waste management system. Performance assessment for each component requires data about properties of the waste streams and operational and design characteristics of the processing or disposal components. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Meshkov, N.K.; Herzenberg, C.L.; Camasta, S.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

MAESTRO HELPS SMALL MISSOURI FARMS SAVE BIG | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

technologies; and an energy management plan that more comprehensively assessed farms' energy usage. Once farmers underwent energy assessments, they could take advantage of...

112

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Title Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5545E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Delp, William W., and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Science & Technology Volume 46 Issue 11 Pagination 6167-6173 Date Published 05/08/2012 Keywords Range Hood Test Facility Abstract This study assessed the performance of seven new residential cooking exhaust hoods representing common U.S. designs. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine fan curves relating airflow to duct static pressure, sound levels, and exhaust gas capture efficiency for front and back cooktop burners and the oven. Airflow rate sensitivity to duct flow resistance was higher for axial fan devices than for centrifugal fan devices. Pollutant capture efficiency (CE) ranged from 98%, varying across hoods and with airflow and burner position for each hood. CE was higher for back burners relative to front burners, presumably because most hoods covered only part of the front burners. Open hoods had higher CE than those with grease screen and metal-covered bottoms. The device with the highest CE-exceeding 80% for oven and front burners-had a large, open hood that covered most of the front burners. The airflow rate for this hood surpassed the industry-recommended level of 118 L·s-1 (250 cfm) and produced sound levels too high for normal conversation. For hoods meeting the sound and fan efficacy criteria for Energy Star, CE was <30% for front and oven burners.

114

Health assessment for Medley Farms Site, Cherokee County, Gaffney, South Carolina, Region 4. CERCLIS No. SCD980558142. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Medley Farms site is proposed for inclusion on the National Priorities List. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) had not permitted the use of the property for disposal of hazardous materials. Approximately 5,300 55-gallon drums and 15-gallon containers were discovered during an investigation by SCDHEC staff. After the Environmental Protection Agency's 1983 emergency clean-up activities, on-site groundwater samples were collected in 1984 and 1986. Contaminants found in these samples were as follows: methylene chloride, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. From the information reviewed, the site is concluded to be of potential health concern because of the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations which may result in adverse health effects.

Not Available

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Farm Ponds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Farm Ponds Farm Ponds Nature Bulletin No. 410-A March 13, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FARM PONDS Since colonial times, farmers have been scooping out reservoirs or damming small watercourses to impound water for their livestock or satisfy a hankering for a private fishing hole. Such a pond was usually too shallow and was rarely fenced. In hot weather, cattle stood belly- deep in the water and hogs wallowed in the shallows. The shores were trampled bare of vegetation. It served as a swimming place for a flock of tame ducks and the youngsters of the family but, other than bullheads, a few fish could live in it. In most cases the dam was made of earth dug with a team and "slip scraper" to deepen the hole, without a proper spillway for the overflow during heavy rains. As a result, or because of holes tunneled through them by muskrats and crawfish, these dams eventually washed out. A number of them in our Palos preserves, built by early settlers, have been enlarged, provided with adequate spillways, and serve as harbors for fish and wildlife.

116

Amigo Bob Cantisano: Organic Farming Advisor, Founder, Ecological Farming Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grandpa was your only farm advisor. Cantisano: Yes, really.Holt Organic Farming Advisor Founder, Eco-Farm Conferenceonly independent organic farming advisor on the West Coast.

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the planned disposal of the vitrified low-level fraction of waste presently contained in Hanford Site tanks. The tank waste is the by-product of separating special nuclear materials from irradiated nuclear fuels over the past 50 years. This waste has been stored in underground single and double-shell tanks. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low and high-activity fractions, and then immobilized by private vendors. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will receive the vitrified waste from private vendors and plans to dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The high-level fraction will be stored at Hanford until a national repository is approved. This report provides the site-specific long-term environmental information needed by the DOE to issue a Disposal Authorization Statement that would allow the modification of the four existing concrete disposal vaults to provide better access for emplacement of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) containers; filling of the modified vaults with the approximately 5,000 ILAW containers and filler material with the intent to dispose of the containers; construction of the first set of next-generation disposal facilities. The performance assessment activity will continue beyond this assessment. The activity will collect additional data on the geotechnical features of the disposal sites, the disposal facility design and construction, and the long-term performance of the waste. Better estimates of long-term performance will be produced and reviewed on a regular basis. Performance assessments supporting closure of filled facilities will be issued seeking approval of those actions necessary to conclude active disposal facility operations. This report also analyzes the long-term performance of the currently planned disposal system as a basis to set requirements on the waste form and the facility design that will protect the long-term public health and safety and protect the environment.

Mann, F.M.

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Tjaden Farms Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tjaden Farms Wind Farm Tjaden Farms Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Tjaden Farms Wind Farm Facility Tjaden Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Tjaden Farms Energy Purchaser Tjaden Farms Location Charles City IA Coordinates 43.170337°, -92.58944° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.170337,"lon":-92.58944,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

119

WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) test phase plan: Performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing the disposition of transuranic (TRU) wastes resulting from nuclear weapons production activities of the United States. These wastes are currently stored nationwide at several of the DOE's waste generating/storage sites. The goal is to eliminate interim waste storage and achieve environmentally and institutionally acceptable permanent disposal of these TRU wastes. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico is being considered as a disposal facility for these TRU wastes. This document describes the first of the following two major programs planned for the Test Phase of WIPP: Performance Assessment -- determination of the long-term performance of the WIPP disposal system in accordance with the requirements of the EPA Standard; and Operations Demonstration -- evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of the DOE TRU waste management system's ability to emplace design throughput quantities of TRU waste in the WIPP underground facility. 120 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Strategy for experimental validation of waste package performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A strategy for the experimental validation of waste package performance assessment has been developed as part of a program supported by the Repository Technology Program. The strategy was developed by reviewing the results of laboratory analog experiments, in-situ tests, repository simulation tests, and material interaction tests. As a result of the review, a listing of dependent and independent variables that influence the ingress of water into the near-field environment, the reaction between water and the waste form, and the transport of radionuclides from the near-field environment was developed. The variables necessary to incorporate into an experimental validation strategy were chosen by identifying those which had the greatest effect of each of the three major events, i.e., groundwater ingress, waste package reactions, and radionuclide transport. The methodology to perform validation experiments was examined by utilizing an existing laboratory analog approach developed for unsaturated testing of glass waste forms. 185 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Gerding, T.J.; Seils, C.A.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

offshore wind farm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

offshore wind farm, wind farm [Wind park which one may find on the ... engineers and should not be used. A wind farm consists of a network of wind turbines] ? Windkraftanlage f, Windpark m; Offshore

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following analogous characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site: (1) Analogous source--UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geology--(i.e. fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs); (3) Analogous climate--Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous setting--Volcanic tuffs overlie carbonate rocks; and (5) Analogous geochemistry--Oxidizing conditions Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table.

G. Saulnier and W. Statham

2006-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hanford A and AX-Farm Leak Assessments Report: 241-A-103, 241-A-104, 241-A-105, 241-AX-102, 241-AX-104 and Unplanned Waste Releases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes information on historical waste loss events associated with tanks and piplines in the 241-A and 241-AX tank farms.

Johnson, Michael E.; Field, Jim G.

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

124

Assessing current vehicle performance and simulating the performance of hydrogen and hybrid cars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A measure of the efficiency in transforming energy input into transport work is defined and applied to road vehicles as well as to sea, air and rail vehicles for passenger or freight transportation. The insight obtained with this measure is compared with the results of applying the conventional measure of kilometres per unit of energy for current fleets of vehicles. Then, simulation methods are used to assess the performance of fuel cell vehicles, electric vehicles and hybrids between the two. The latter are found to provide an optimum performance for a small, efficient passenger car.

Bent Srensen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Performance Assessment for e-Government Services: An Experience Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transformation and integration of government services, enabled by the use of new technologies such as application servers and Web services, is fundamental to reduce the cost of government and improving service outcomes to citizens. Many core Government information systems comprise applications running on legacy mainframes, databases and transaction processing monitors. As Governments worldwide provide direct access over the Internet to these legacy applications from the general public, they may be exposed to workloads well above the origin design parameters of these back-end systems. This creates a significant risk of high profile failures for Government agencies whose newly integrated systems become overloaded. In this paper we describe how we conducted a performance assessment of a business-critical, Internet-facing Web services that integrated new and legacy systems from two Australian Government agencies. We leveraged prototype tools from our own research along with known techniques in performance modeling. We were able to clearly demonstrate that the existing hardware and software would be adequate to handle the predicted workload for the next financial year. We were also able to do what-if analysis and predict how the system can perform with alternative strategies to scale the system. We conclude by summarizing the lessons learnt, including the importance of architecture visibility, benchmarking data quality, and measurement feasibility due to issues of outsourcing, privacy legislation and cross-agency involvement.

Liu, Yan; Zhu, Liming; Gorton, Ian

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

Performance assessment for the class L-II disposal facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This draft radiological performance assessment (PA) for the proposed Class L-II Disposal Facility (CIIDF) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. This PA considers the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) over the operating life of the facility and the long-term performance of the facility in providing protection to public health and the environment. The performance objectives contained in the order require that the facility be managed to accomplish the following: (1) Protect public health and safety in accordance with standards specified in environmental health orders and other DOE orders. (2) Ensure that external exposure to the waste and concentrations of radioactive material that may be released into surface water, groundwater, soil, plants, and animals results in an effective dose equivalent (EDE) that does not exceed 25 mrem/year to a member of the public. Releases to the atmosphere shall meet the requirements of 40 CFR Pt. 61. Reasonable effort should be made to maintain releases of radioactivity in effluents to the general environment as low as reasonably achievable. (1) Ensure that the committed EDEs received by individual who inadvertently may intrude into the facility after the loss of active institutional control (100 years) will not exceed 100 mrem/year for continuous exposure of 500 mrem for a single acute exposure. (4) Protect groundwater resources, consistent with federal, state, and local requirements.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performing Energy Security Assessments - Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers ii Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................ v 1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Facilities to be Assessed...........................................................................................................................1 2. BEGINNING THE ENERGY SECURITY ASSESSMENT PROCESS ............................... 2 2.1 Assign an Energy Security Manager .........................................................................................................2 2.2 Define the Mission of the Installation

128

Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performing Energy Security Assessments - Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers ii Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................ v 1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Facilities to be Assessed...........................................................................................................................1 2. BEGINNING THE ENERGY SECURITY ASSESSMENT PROCESS ............................... 2 2.1 Assign an Energy Security Manager .........................................................................................................2 2.2 Define the Mission of the Installation

129

2011 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE TECHNICAL EXCHANGE - SUMMARY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) was developed in 2008 to improve consistency and quality in the preparation of performance assessments (PAs) and risk assessments across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The term, PA, is used to represent all of these modeling applications in this report. The PA CoP goals are to foster the exchange of information among PA practitioners and to share lessons learned from PAs conducted for DOE, commercial disposal facilities, and international entities. Technical exchanges and workshops are a cornerstone of PA CoP activities. Previous technical exchanges have addressed Engineered Barriers (2009 - http://www.cresp.org/education/workshops/pacop/), the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management and the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (2010 - http://srnl.doe.gov/copexchange/links.htm). Each technical exchange also includes summary presentations regarding activities at DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other organizations (e.g., International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)) as well as a number of presentations from selected sites to provide insight and perspective from on-going modeling activities. Through the deployment of PA Assistance Teams, the PA CoP has also been engaged in the development of new PAs across the DOE Complex. As a way of improving consistency in the preparation of new PAs, the teams provide technical advice and share experiences, noteworthy practices, and lessons learned from previous Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) reviews. Teams have provided support for PAs at Hanford, Idaho, Paducah and Portsmouth. The third annual PA CoP Technical Exchange was held on May 25-26, 2011 in Atlanta, GA. The PA CoP Steering Committee Meeting held its first meeting on May 24 prior to the Technical Exchange. Decision making using models and software quality assurance were the topical emphasis for the exchange. A new feature at the 2011 technical exchange was the use of panel discussions to solicit feedback from regulators and practitioners. This report summarizes discussions and recommendations from the steering committee meeting and presentations and feedback obtained at the technical exchange. Appendix I includes the steering committee meeting agenda and Appendix II includes the agenda for the technical exchange and a screenshot of the presentations and video files that are available online.

Seitz, R.

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Kas Farms Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kas Farms Wind Farm Kas Farms Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Kas Farms Wind Farm Facility Kas Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kas Brothers Developer Kas Brothers with Dan Juhl Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Pipestone County MN Coordinates 43.9948°, -96.3175° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.9948,"lon":-96.3175,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

131

A Dynamic Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment Tool - 12490  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Performance Assessment (PA) methodology comprises a toolbox used to demonstrate regulatory compliance of the repository after facility closure. The PA framework rests upon an extensive suite of computational codes. In some cases, significant alteration of code inputs is a tedious and difficult task. Due to the nature of the application for which they are used, PA codes used in support of WIPP regulatory compliance demonstration must satisfy stringent quality assurance requirements. Consequently, many of the coding practices used during original code development are still implemented today. A more efficient workflow configuration has the potential to alleviate difficulties associated with extensive code input modifications. Here, this potential is assessed via an implementation of a more flexible scientific workflow system for a subset of the codes used in WIPP PA. The scientific workflow approach taken here for a dynamic PA system enables users from disparate backgrounds to dramatically shorten the time between hypothesis and analysis by decreasing the amount of a priori knowledge, from a range of disciplines, needed to execute the code. Having smaller iteration times allows for more ideas to be tested and explored, which leads to safer and more optimized systems. Note that these high-level, dynamic tools are intended only for initial scoping studies on the personal computer of a researcher. Full, regulatory compliance calculations may occur only within a qualified computing environment. However, the WIPP PA tools here may guide future research and indicate regions of the analysis space that are worth further study. This next generation of PA software provides the ability to perform scoping investigations of repository performance quickly and easily, and has an accessible and useful interface to a variety of users, such as fuel cycle systems designers, domain experts such as repository modelers, and policy makers. The purview of this project allows for many opportunities for future work. Foremost among these is the desire to implement the full BRAGFLO suite within the workflow. This will entail porting or wrapping Genmesh, Matset, LHS, and ICSet within Python. Moreover, unifying the two GUIs into a single driver application would be a natural next step. Once the BRAGFLO suite is completed, other portions of WIPP PA could be implemented with corresponding and inter-operable work-flows. Likely first candidates for this are those codes that are similarly computationally intensive, such as the one used to generate complementary cumulative distribution functions used to demonstrate regulatory compliance (code CCDFGF). (authors)

Scopatz, Anthony M.; March, Jonathan; Weckesser, Warren; Jones, Eric [Enthought Inc, Austin, Texas, 78701 (United States); Lee, Moo; Camphouse, Chris [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM, 88220 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Energy Revolving Loan Fund- Farm Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In January 2010, Michigan enacted the Public Act 242 of 2009, which established the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Revolving Loan Fund Program. The Farm Energy Audit/Assessment portion of...

133

Performance assessment handbook for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessments of proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities must be conducted to support licensing. This handbook provides a reference document that can be used as a resource by management and staff responsible for performance assessments. Brief discussions describe the performance assessment process and emphasize selected critical aspects of the process. References are also provided for additional information on many aspects of the performance assessment process. The user's manual for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program's Performance Assessment Center (PAC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cray computer is included as Appendix A. The PAC provides users an opportunity to experiment with a number of performance assessment computer codes on a Cray computer. Appendix B describes input data required for 22 performance assessment codes.

Seitz, R.R.; Garcia, R.S.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Starmer, R.J.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms- June 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Office of River Protection Assessment of Contractor Quality Assurance, Operational Awareness at the Hanford Tank Farms [HIAR NNSS-2012-12-03

135

On the use of noise budgets to assess the effects of offshore wind farms on marine life.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An oceannoise budget is a list of sources of noise along with their average intensity in a particular frequency band [Frisk et al. (2003)]. The budget can be calculated from acoustic data collected by the passive aquatic listener (PAL) systems [Nystuen and Howe (2005); Miller et al. (2008)]. In the far field the average acoustic intensity of plane waves can be computed in 1/3?octave bands over some duration. The assumption is made that the noise in the band at any one time is dominated by a single identifiable source such as wind rain shipping fish marine mammals etc. The duration and instantaneous intensity of the acoustic signal is used to calculate the average. Identification is carried out using the ratios of various spectral levels as outlined in the work of Ma et al. [(2005)]. We apply the concept of noise budgets to the assessment of the impact of long term noise from offshore wind turbines on marine life. A developer has proposed to construct more than 200 wind turbines south of Rhode Island. A noise budget has been calculated for the region from data collected on PALs. The addition of the 200 turbines will be incorporated into the budget parametrized on source level.

James H. Miller; Gopu R. Potty; David S. Casagrande; Kathleen J. Vigness Raposa; Lisa A. Miller; Jeffrey A. Nystuen; Peter M. Scheifele; John Greer Clark

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

High Performance Lipoprotein Profiling for Cardiovascular Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the severity of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the related mortality rate to this disease, new methods are necessary for risk assessment and treatment prior to the onset of the disease. The current paradigm in CVD risk assessment has shifted...

Larner, Craig

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

137

Performance Assessment Modeling for Savannah River Glass HLW Disposal in a Potential Repository at Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance assessment (PA) simulates the long-term performance of a conceptual geological repository for nuclear waste or the performance of a subsystem such as the engineered barrier system (drifts, waste pa...

W. J. OConnell; W. L. Bourcier; J. Gansemer

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT TO SUPPORT CLOSURE OF SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTE MANAGEMENT AREA C AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current proposed regulatory agreements (Consent Decree) at the Hanford Site call for closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C in the year 2019. WMA C is part of the SST system in 200 East area ofthe Hanford Site and is one of the first tank farm areas built in mid-1940s. In order to close WMA C, both tank and facility closure activities and corrective actions associated with existing soil and groundwater contamination must be performed. Remedial activities for WMA C and corrective actions for soils and groundwater within that system will be supported by various types of risk assessments and interim performance assessments (PA). The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the State ofWashington Department of Ecology (Ecology) are sponsoring a series of working sessions with regulators and stakeholders to solicit input and to obtain a common understanding concerning the scope, methods, and data to be used in the planned risk assessments and PAs to support closure of WMA C. In addition to DOE-ORP and Ecology staff and contractors, working session members include representatives from the U.S. Enviromnental Protection Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), interested tribal nations, other stakeholders groups, and members of the interested public. NRC staff involvement in the working sessions is as a technical resource to assess whether required waste determinations by DOE for waste incidental to reprocessing are based on sound technical assumptions, analyses, and conclusions relative to applicable incidental waste criteria.

BERGERON MP

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

139

FACSIM/MRS-2: Storage and shipping performance assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a performance assessment of the designs for the storage and shipping operations of the MRS facility. These activities, referred to as back-end operations, including handling canistered spent fuel and secondary waste in the shielded canyon cell, in onsite yard storage, and in repository shipping cask loading areas. This analysis verified that the MRS facility back-end operations as designed are capable of handling 3600 metric tons of uranium (MTU) per year if the facility operates seven days per week (24-hour days). The cask cart utilization rate is highest, in use about 50% of the operating year. Cask cart utilization refers to the utilization of the shielded canyon cell repository shipping cask loadout port (also referred to as the exit port) and the cask cart that serves that port. The receiving and handling facility design specifies two loadout ports, one for each side of the facility. This analysis also determined that a throughput rate of 3000 MTU per year could be achieved with five-day week facility operation.

Hostick, C.J.; Otis, P.T.; Chockie, A.D.; Sovers, R.A; Huber, H.D.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has monitored groundwater on the Hanford Site since the 1940s to help determine what chemical and radiological contaminants have made their way into the groundwater. As regulatory requirements for monitoring increased in the 1980s, there began to be some overlap between various programs. DOE established the Groundwater Performance Assessment Project (groundwater project) in 1996 to ensure protection of the public and the environment while improving the efficiency of monitoring activities. The groundwater project is designed to support all groundwater monitoring needs at the site, eliminate redundant sampling and analysis, and establish a cost-effective hierarchy for groundwater monitoring activities. This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the groundwater project. This QA Plan is based on the QA requirements of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830, Subpart A--General Provisions/Quality Assurance Requirements as delineated in Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys Standards-Based Management System. In addition, the groundwater project is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA/240/B-01/003, QA/R-5). The groundwater project has determined that the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68) apply to portions of this project and to the subcontractors. HASQARD requirements are discussed within applicable sections of this plan.

Luttrell, Stuart P.

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Regulatory basis for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the first operational repository designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste from the defense programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for certifications and regulation of the WIPP facility for the radioactive components of the waste. The EPA has promulgated general radioactive waste disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 191. and WIPP-specific criteria to implement and interpret the generic disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 194. In October 1996. the DOE submitted its Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the EPA to demonstrate compliance with the disposal standards at Subparts B and C of 40 CFR Part 191. This paper summarizes the development of the overall legal framework for radioactive waste disposal at the WIPP, the parallel development of the WIPP performance assessment (PA), and how the EPA disposal standards and implementing criteria formed the basis for the CCA WIPP PA. The CCA resulted in a certification in May 1998 by the EPA of the WIPP'S compliance with the EPA's disposal standard, thus enabling the WIPP to begin radioactive waste disposal.

HOWARD,BRYAN A.; CRAWFORD,M.B.; GALSON,D.A.; MARIETTA,MELVIN G.

2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

A residence-time-based transport approach for the groundwater pathway in performance assessment models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the theoretical development and numerical implementation of a new modeling approach for representing the groundwater pathway in risk assessment or performance assessment model of a contaminant transport system. The model developed ... Keywords: Groundwater pathway, Mixing model, Performance assessment, Residence time distribution

Bruce A. Robinson; Shaoping Chu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-BY and 241-TY Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-BY Tank Farm (BY Farm) and 241-TY Tank Farm (TY Farm) lead causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-BY-103, 241-TY-103, 241-TY-104, 241-TY-105 and 241-TY-106) identified in RPP-RPT-43704, Hanford BY Farm Leak Assessments Report, and in RPP-RPT-42296, Hanford TY Farm Leak Assessments Report. This document satisfies the BY and TY Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

144

Assessment and analysis of indirect lightning performance of overhead lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an efficient method for the assessment of the indirect lightning performance of overhead power lines and analyses the influence of some relevant parameters on the flashover rate. The method is based on a formula to calculate the peak value of lightning-induced voltages in overhead lines over a lossy ground, which considers the front-time of the channel-base current. The results of the method are validated by comparison with results available in the literature. The method is then used to investigate the effect of subsequent strokes on the line flashover rate, leading to the conclusion that their contribution is negligible, as long as no correlation is assumed between front-time and peak value of the strokes (first and subsequent). In the following, the method is used to analyze the influence of some parameters on the lightning performance of overhead lines. The results show that the stroke current front-time influence decreases as the soil resistivity increases, and that a higher front-time leads to a lower flashover rate. It is shown that the use of a fixed front-time T=5.63?s for the first strokes leads to results that match well the results obtained from Cigrs front-time probabilistic distribution. Regarding the return stroke velocity, the results show that, for soils with resistivity higher than 100?m, the flashover rate increases as the return stroke velocity increases. The results also show that a relative velocity vr=0.4 leads to flashover rates that match well the results obtained considering some correlations between return stroke velocity and peak current proposed in the literature. The influence of the correlation between current peak value and front-time for first strokes is also analyzed and it is shown that the correlation reduces the flashover rate. It is also shown that considering this correlation for first strokes and not for subsequent strokes increases the contribution of the latter to the flashover rate, especially for good conducting soils.

J.O.S. Paulino; C.F. Barbosa; I.J.S. Lopes; W.C. Boaventura

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Cost Estimation Methodology for NETL Assessments of Power Plant Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Q Q Q U U A A L L I I T T Y Y G G U U I I D D E E L L I I N N E E S S F F O O R R E E N N E E R R G G Y Y S S Y Y S S T T E E M M S S T T U U D D I I E E S S C C o o s s t t E E s s t t i i m m a a t t i i o o n n M M e e t t h h o o d d o o l l o o g g y y f f o o r r N N E E T T L L A A s s s s e e s s s s m m e e n n t t s s o o f f P P o o w w e e r r P P l l a a n n t t P P e e r r f f o o r r m m a a n n c c e e March 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/???? April 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1455 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Program Planning and Analysis 2 Power Plant Cost Estimation Methodology Quality Guidelines for Energy Systems Studies April 2011 Quality Guidelines for Energy Systems Studies Cost Estimation Methodology for NETL Assessments of Power Plant Performance Introduction This paper summarizes the costing methodology employed by NETL in its costing models and baseline reports. Further, it defines the specific levels of capital cost as well as outlines the costing metrics by which

146

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - June 2013 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - June Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - June 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - June 2013 June 2013 Office of River Protection Assessment of Contractor Quality Assurance, Operational Awareness at the Hanford Tank Farms [HIAR NNSS-2012-12-03] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (Independent Oversight) Site Lead conducted an operational awareness visit to the ORP Hanford Tank Farms, observed a Tank Farms morning meeting, toured the C Tank Farm, and observed a heavy (34,000 pound) lift. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - June 2013 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Office of River Protection Waste Treatment

147

Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,* , Kisup Leeb building, but cannot provide detailed flow information in a room. The zonal model can be useful when a user ventilation systems for buildings requires a suitable model to assess system performance. The performance can

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

148

A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems proposes a framework for reliability and dynamic performance assessment of wind energy conversion systems--Reliability, Dynamic Performance, Wind Power, Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS), Doubly-Fed Induction Generator

Liberzon, Daniel

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment performance assessment Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF ENGINEERING CYBERNETICS AND ROBOTICS, 60 Summary: , 60 2009 Sofia Service Oriented Architecture of Assessment Model1 Adelina Aleksieva... Assessment Model. To achieve...

150

Carbon Sequestration in Organic Farming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic farming has been developed as a new mode of farming vs. conventional farming. Evidence showed that organic farming management can well maintain the soil carbon up to 23 times higher in organic matter ...

Raymond Liu; Jianming M. Xu; C. Edward Clapp

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Evolution of US DOE Performance Assessments Over 20 Years - 13597  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessments (PAs) have been used for many years for the analysis of post-closure hazards associated with a radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide a reasonable expectation of the ability of the site and facility design to meet objectives for the protection of members of the public and the environment. The use of PA to support decision-making for LLW disposal facilities has been mandated in United States Department of Energy (US DOE) directives governing radioactive waste management since 1988 (currently DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management). Prior to that time, PAs were also used in a less formal role. Over the past 20+ years, the US DOE approach to conduct, review and apply PAs has evolved into an efficient, rigorous and mature process that includes specific requirements for continuous improvement and independent reviews. The PA process has evolved through refinement of a graded and iterative approach designed to help focus efforts on those aspects of the problem expected to have the greatest influence on the decision being made. Many of the evolutionary changes to the PA process are linked to the refinement of the PA maintenance concept that has proven to be an important element of US DOE PA requirements in the context of supporting decision-making for safe disposal of LLW. The PA maintenance concept is central to the evolution of the graded and iterative philosophy and has helped to drive the evolution of PAs from a deterministic compliance calculation into a systematic approach that helps to focus on critical aspects of the disposal system in a manner designed to provide a more informed basis for decision-making throughout the life of a disposal facility (e.g., monitoring, research and testing, waste acceptance criteria, design improvements, data collection, model refinements). A significant evolution in PA modeling has been associated with improved use of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques to support efficient implementation of the graded and iterative approach. Rather than attempt to exactly predict the migration of radionuclides in a disposal unit, the best PAs have evolved into tools that provide a range of results to guide decision-makers in planning the most efficient, cost effective, and safe disposal of radionuclides. (authors)

Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, 19901 Germantown Rd, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, 19901 Germantown Rd, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States); Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Performance assessment of low-energy buildings in central Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results obtained from the energy and thermal performance assessment of residential and non-residential low-energy buildings that were designed to minimize fossil energy use. They are located in the province of La Pampa, central Argentina, in a temperate continental climate that shows extreme hot and cold records during the summer and winter seasons, respectively. The common applied technologies for saving energy were passive solar heating, natural ventilation for cooling and daylighting. The glazing area in the principal functional spaces facing to the North oscillates between 11 and 17% of the building useful areas. All the studied buildings are massive, with the exception of an auditorium that was designed with a lightweight insulated technology. The mean thermal transmittance of the envelope is 0.45W/(m2K). Double glazing and hermetic carpentry were used to reduce thermal losses (U-value=2.8W/(m2K)). The volumetric heat loss coefficient (G-value) oscillates between 0.90 and 1.00W/(m3K). During the design and thermal simulation convective-radiative heat transfer coefficients were estimated through a dimensional equation (h=5.7+3.8ws, wind speed). On internal surfaces, convective-radiative heat transfer coefficients of 8 and 6W/(m2C) (for surfaces with and without solar gain, respectively) were applied. The monitoring process provided information on the energy and thermal behaviour under use and non-use conditions. The measured value of energy consumption was similar to the expected value that was used during the pre-design stage. Building technologies work well during the winter season, allowing 5080% of energy savings. However, overheating is still an unresolved problem during the summer. Interviews with occupants revealed that they need both, information about functional details, and good-practice guidance to manage thermal issues of the building. In most cases, the annual consumption of energy was lower than those established by the Low Energy Housing German Standards and the Minirgie Switzerland Certificate. Despite their relative cost increase during the last years, the use of insulation technology and the application of passive solar devices involved an extra cost of only 3% in our works. Provided the expected depletion of natural gas production in the coming decade, the importance of applying energy-efficiency guidelines will increase very soon in Argentina in order to match the requirements of a new national energy matrix.

C. Filippn; A. Beascochea

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory analysis of the saturated zone water chemistry. The results of the field investigations and laboratory analyses of rock and water samples collected at Nopal I are used to calibrate the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model.

G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

Farm Buildings in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the Government does not think that a case has been established for a Government farm buildings research centre, but the Agricultural Research Council is undertaking a survey of farm ... research centre, but the Agricultural Research Council is undertaking a survey of farm buildings in Great Britain and is issuing a bibliography of research publications on the subject. ...

1961-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

92 of 864 92 of 864 5.0 RESULTS OF ANALYSIS The purpose of this section is to present the results for the analyses described in Section 4 of this PA. Section 5.1 presents the Source Term Analysis and Release results process. Section 5.2 presents peak groundwater concentrations for the radionuclides and chemicals discussed in Section 3.3. Section 5.3 presents the Air Pathway and Radon release results. Section 5.4 presents individual Biotic Pathway formulas used to calculate the doses to MOP. Section 5.5 presents the results of the MOP Dose Analyses. Section 5.6 presents the UA/SA. Section 5.7 presents the Risk Analyses. Section 5.8 presents the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Analyses. 5.1 Source Term Analysis and Release Results Process

156

Assessment of humidity management effects on PEM fuel cell performance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The electrical energy output and the performance of a PEM fuel cell is dependent on the ion transfer in the fuel cell. The ion (more)

Osamudiamen Ose Micah, Ose Micah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

ORP Tank Farms Unreviewed Safety Question Process Implementation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 Report Number: HIAR-HORP-2011-04-18 0 Report Number: HIAR-HORP-2011-04-18 Site: Office of River Protection Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Selected Aspects of Tank Farms Unreviewed Safety Question Process Implementation Dates of Activity 02/21/2011 - 04/18/2011 Report Preparer Shivaji S. Seth Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of the activity, which was performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection's (ORP's) nuclear safety assessment and oversight, was to review and evaluate selected aspects of the Tank Farms Operating Contractor's (TOC's) implementation of the recently revised unreviewed safety question (USQ) procedure. A major aspect of the revised implemented process (Ref. 1) was to eliminate

158

MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION IN FRACTURED ROCK FOR THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORIES F. Cadini1 , J. De Sanctis1 , I. Bertoli1 , E. Zio1,2 1 Dipartimento di Energia is a fundamental task in any performance assessment aimed at verifying the protection offered by radioactive waste for chemical or low-level radioactive wastes, or the Performance Assessment (PA) of geological repositories

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E. (comps.)

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms - December 2012...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

This targeted review was performed at the Hanford Site during the period of October 22-26, 2012. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms - December 2012 More Documents...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hydro Review: Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This review covers the BioPA method used to analyze the biological performance of proposed designs to help ensure the safety of fish passing through the turbines at the Priest Rapids Dam in Grant County, Washington.

162

The power balance method For aerodynamic performance assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the use of the power balance method for performance estimation of aircraft configurations. In this method, mechanical power production and mechanical power consumption of the aircraft are balanced, ...

Sato, Sho, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Least-cost greenhouse gas mitigation on New Zealand dairy farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A whole-farm model is used to assess least-cost methods of mitigating GHG-e from dairy farms of different production intensity across five diverse regions of New Zealand. Mitigation costs can be significant, w...

Graeme J. Doole

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Attraction of Wild Coastal Fishes to an Atlantic Subtropical Cage Fish Farms, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assessed the influence of two commercial fish farms on the local aggregation of coastal wild fishes through a 'post-impact' sampling design at Gran Canaria Island (Canary Islands). At each farm...

Arturo Boyra; Pablo Sanchez-Jerez; Fernando Tuya

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Models Used to Assess the Performance of Photovoltaic Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization.

166

Historical Relationship Between Performance Assessment for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Other Types of Risk Assessment in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of the process for assessing the hazards of a geologic disposal system for radioactive waste and, similarly, nuclear power reactors, and the relationship of this process with other assessments of risk, particularly assessments of hazards from manufactured carcinogenic chemicals during use and disposal. This perspective reviews the common history of scientific concepts for risk assessment developed to the 1950s. Computational tools and techniques developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to analyze the reliability of nuclear weapon delivery systems were adopted in the early 1970s for probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power reactors, a technology for which behavior was unknown. In turn, these analyses became an important foundation for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the late 1970s. The evaluation of risk to human health and the environment from chemical hazards is built upon methods for assessing the dose response of radionuclides in the 1950s. Despite a shared background, however, societal events, often in the form of legislation, have affected the development path for risk assessment for human health, producing dissimilarities between these risk assessments and those for nuclear facilities. An important difference is the regulator's interest in accounting for uncertainty and the tools used to evaluate it.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

167

Financing a Farm Business.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. WATKINS, Administrative Advisor I Southern Farm Management Extension Comnliif: .SOUTHERN FARM MANAGEMENT EXTENSION PUBLICATION NO. 8 May, 1958 Sponsored by the Agricultural Extension Services of Alabama, Arkansas, Florid: Georgia, Louisiana... look ahead, plan ahead, h opportunities as they come to you. YM : * Future Belongs to Those Who Plan for it. SOUTHERN FARM MANAGEMENT EXTENSION COMMITTEE Administrative Advisor Secretary M. 0. Watkins, Florida C. C. Moxley, Florida State Members...

Love, Harry M.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Dale Coke: Coke Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dale Coke Photo by Benjamin J. Myers.2009. Coke FarmDale Coke grew up on an apricot orchard in Californias

Farmer, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Models used to assess the performance of photovoltaic systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization. Energy storage plays an important role in reducing PV intermittency and battery storage models are used to understand the best configurations and technologies to store PV generated electricity. Other researcher's models used by SNL are discussed including some widely known models that incorporate algorithms developed at SNL. There are other models included in the discussion that are not used by or were not adopted from SNL research but may provide some benefit to researchers working on PV array performance, hybrid system models and energy storage. The paper is organized into three sections to describe the different software models as applied to photovoltaic performance, hybrid systems, and battery storage. For each model, there is a description which includes where to find the model, whether it is currently maintained and any references that may be available. Modeling improvements underway at SNL include quantifying the uncertainty of individual system components, the overall uncertainty in modeled vs. measured results and modeling large PV systems. SNL is also conducting research into the overall reliability of PV systems.

Stein, Joshua S.; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Residential commissioning to assess envelope and HVAC system performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. For example, Walker et al. (1998a) found large variations in thermal distribution system efficiency, as much as a factor of two even between side-by-side houses with the same system design and installation crew. This and other studies (e.g., Jump et al. 1996) indicate that duct leakage testing and sealing can readily achieve a 25 to 30% reduction in installed cooling capacity and energy consumption. As another example, consider that the building industry has recognized for at least 20 years the substantial impact that envelope airtightness has on thermal loads, energy use, comfort, and indoor air quality. However, Walker et al. (1998a) found 50% variances in airtightness for houses with the same design and construction crews, within the same subdivision. A substantial reason for these problems is that few houses are now built or retrofitted using formal design procedures, most are field assembled from a large number of components, and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Solving the problems requires field performance evaluations of houses using appropriate and agreed upon procedures. Many procedural elements already exist in a fragmented environment; some are ready now to be integrated into a new process called residential commissioning (Wray et al. 2000). For example, California's Title 24 energy code already provides some commissioning elements for evaluating the energy performance of new houses. A house consists of components and systems that need to be commissioned, such as building envelopes, air distribution systems, cooling equipment, heat pumps, combustion appliances, controls, and other electrical appliances. For simplicity and practicality, these components and systems are usually evaluated individually, but we need to bear in mind that many of them interact. Therefore, commissioning must not only identify the energy and non-energy benefits associated with improving the performance of a component, it must also indicate how individual components interact in the complete building system. For this paper, we limit our discussion to diagnostics in areas of particular concern with significant interactions: envelope and HVAC systems. These areas include insulation quality, windows, airtightness, envelope moisture, fan and duct system airflows, duct leakage, cooling equipment charge, and combustion appliance backdrafting with spillage. The remainder of this paper first describes what residential commissioning is, its characteristic elements, and how one might structure its process. Subsequent sections describe a consolidated set of practical diagnostics that the building industry can use now. Where possible, we also discuss the accuracy and usability of these diagnostics, based on recent laboratory work and field studies. We conclude by describing areas in need of research and development, such as practical field diagnostics for envelope thermal conductance and combustion safety. There are several potential benefits for builders, consumers, code officials, utilities, and energy planners of commissioning houses using a consistent set of validated methods. Builders and/or commissioning agents will be able to optimize system performance and reduce consumer costs associated with building energy use. Consumers will be more likely to get what they paid for and builders can show they delivered what was expected. Code officials will be better able to enforce existing and future energy codes. As energy reduction measures are more effectively incorporated into the housing stock, utilities and energy planners will benefit through greater confidence in predicting demand and greater assurance that demand reductions will actually occur. Performance improvements will also reduce emissions from electricity generating plants and residential combustion equipment. Research to characterize these benefits is underway.

Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Assessment of operating parameter variation on electrostatic precipitator performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lignite coal were collected and resistivity analysis performed for varying conditions of temperature and humidity. As a result of the laboratory analysis, it was determined that moisture and temperature conditioning of Texas lignite coal fly ash...verized coal 1 25 50 Electric ~ower Fly ash from ~clc f f c 6 60 B5 0. 7 Cement Ki1n dust 1 20 40 10 Steel Blast furnace 5 30 60 Steel 9 N -h th f f. 90 98 99 Nonferrous Copper roaster smelters dust 10 Nonferrous Converter fur- smelters nace...

Gunn, Roam Anthony

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Jeff Larkey: Route One Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Bay Area. And then Coke Farms, who brokers my producetalking about marketing. You said Coke Farms has a cooler.Larkey: Coke Farms has a cooler, and they not only broker,

Farmer, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Cynthia Sandberg: Love Apple Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

me about the name, Love Apple Farm. Where does that comegrowbetterveggies/about-love-apple-farm.html See http://Photo by Tana Butler Love Apple Farm Cynthia Sandberg is

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Maintenance Plan for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plan for maintaining the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (PA) is described. The plan includes expected work on PA reviews and revisions, waste reports, monitoring, other operational activities, etc.

MANN, F.M.

2000-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

175

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This paper focuses on the business value of Superior Energy Performance (SEP) and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors.

176

Assessment of durability performance of "Early-Opening-to-Traffic" Portland Cement Concrete pavement and patches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-thaw, shrinkage, chemical attack, abrasion resistance, fatigue life, volumetric expansion, practicality, and concrete costs. The assessment discusses material combinations, mixture designs, and construction practices on performance. A computer program using...

Shrestha, Pradhumna Babu

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site Performance Assessments (PA) are analyses conducted for low level radioactive waste disposal facilities (or appropriate CERCLA documentation for a low level radioactive waste disposal facility), and are critical in determining the nature and extent of the controls that need to be put in place at the facility being evaluated. There are specific requirements for the protection of the public, workers, and environment that are critical to maintaining safe and effective disposal of radioactive waste and the PA is a risk analysis of the potential hazards of disposing of low level radioactive waste. The review and approval of these evaluations is

178

Assessment of performing an MST strike in Tank 21H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tank mixing studies performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project have shown that 3 Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) installed in Tank 41 are sufficient to support actinide removal by MST sorption as well as subsequent resuspension and removal of settled solids. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is pursuing MST addition into Tank 21 as part of the Large Tank Strike (LTS) project. The preliminary scope for LTS involves the use of three standard slurry pumps (installed in N, SE, and SW risers) in a Type IV tank. Due to the differences in tank size, internal interferences, and pump design, a separate mixing evaluation is required to determine if the proposed configuration will allow for MST suspension and strontium and actinide sorption. The author performed the analysis by reviewing drawings for Tank 21 [W231023] and determining the required cleaning radius or zone of influence for the pumps. This requirement was compared with previous pilot-scale MST suspension data collected for SCIX that determined the cleaning radius, or zone of influence, as a function of pump operating parameters. The author also reviewed a previous Tank 50 mixing analysis that examined the ability of standard slurry pumps to suspend sludge particles. Based on a review of the pilot-scale SCIX mixing tests and Tank 50 pump operating experience, three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend sludge and MST to effectively sorb strontium and actinides onto the MST. Using the SCIX data requires an assumption about the impact of cooling coils on slurry pump mixing. The basis for this assumption is described in this report. Using the Tank 50 operating experience shows three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend solids if the shear strength of the settled solids is less than 160 Pa. Because Tank 21 does not contain cooling coils, the shear strength could be larger.

Poirier, Michael R.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

179

Data used in preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (1990)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the data available as of August 1990 and used by the Performance Assessment Division of Sandia National Laboratories in its December 1990 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Parameter values are presented in table form for the geologic subsystem, engineered barriers, borehole flow properties, climate variability, and intrusion characteristics. Sources for the data and a brief discussion of each parameter are provided. 101 refs., 72 figs., 21 tabs.

Rechard, R.P (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Luzzolino, H. (Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Sandha, J.S. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Annual summary of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment for 2003 Incorporating the Integrated Disposal Facility Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To Erik Olds 09/30/03 - An annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a full performance assessment is not issued.

MANN, F M

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

An appraisal of the 1992 preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The WIPP Project, located in southeastern New Mexico, is being constructed as a repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes generated by the national defense programs. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has reviewed the WIPP 1992 Performance Assessment (Sandia WIPP Performance Assessment Department, 1992). Although this performance assessment was released after the October 1992 passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (PL 102-579), the work preceded the Act. For individual and ground-water protection, calculations have been done for 1000 years post closure, whereas the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Standards (40 CFR 191) issued in 1993 require calculations for 10,000 years. The 1992 Performance Assessment continues to assimilate improved understanding of the geology and hydrogeology of the site, and evolving conceptual models of natural barriers. Progress has been made towards assessing WIPP`s compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Standards (40 CFR 191). The 1992 Performance Assessment has addressed several items of major concern to EEG, outlined in the July 1992 review of the 1991 performance assessment (Neill et al., 1992). In particular, the authors are pleased that some key results in this performance assessment deal with sensitivity of the calculated complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDF) to alterative conceptual models proposed by EEG -- that flow in the Culebra be treated as single-porosity fracture-flow; with no sorption retardation unless substantiated by experimental data.

Lee, W.W.L.; Chaturvedi, L.; Silva, M.K.; Weiner, R.; Neill, R.H. [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Environmental Evaluation Group, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Exposure to transmission line electric fields during farming operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an analysis of exposure to transmission line electric fields during typical farming operations. This analysis makes use of experimentally determined ''activity factors'' and time budget information for typical farms as compiled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. A detailed exposure assessment for 18 ''typical farms'' (as defined by USDA) is provided for a base case 345 kV design. Exposure estimates for transmission lines ranging from 115-765 kV are provided for a representative farm.

Silva, M.; Huber, D.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Configuration Management Plan for the Tank Farm Contractor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Configuration Management Plan for the Tank Farm Contractor describes configuration management the contractor uses to manage and integrate its technical baseline with the programmatic and functional operations to perform work. The Configuration Management Plan for the Tank Farm Contractor supports the management of the project baseline by providing the mechanisms to identify, document, and control the technical characteristics of the products, processes, and structures, systems, and components (SSC). This plan is one of the tools used to identify and provide controls for the technical baseline of the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC). The configuration management plan is listed in the management process documents for TFC as depicted in Attachment 1, TFC Document Structure. The configuration management plan is an integrated approach for control of technical, schedule, cost, and administrative processes necessary to manage the mission of the TFC. Configuration management encompasses the five functional elements of: (1) configuration management administration, (2) configuration identification, (3) configuration status accounting, (4) change control, and (5 ) configuration management assessments.

WEIR, W.R.

2000-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

186

List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Discussion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Discussion

187

Durability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High Performance Computing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the viscoelastic parameters; 3D FEM analysis using High Performance Computing (parallel and vector features) to run Performance Computing. E. M. R. Fairbairn, E. Goulart, A. L. G. A. Coutinho, N. F. F. Ebecken COPPEDurability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High

Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

188

Historical Background on the Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the U.S. Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a Research and development facility for the safe management storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and after site selection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance. assessment conducted in 1996, which is summarized in this special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This paper provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.

1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

Integrated approaches to farming systems research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ecological aspects · Assesses renewable, non- renewable and purchased resources · Based on a common currency SI = Utilises renewable resources readily · Spring barley is exploiting resources more efficiently · Winter oilseed is more reliant on non-renewable resources · What we plan to do next: ­ Compare farm

190

COMPLETION OF THE TRANSURANIC GREATER CONFINEMENT DISPOSAL BOREHOLE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Classified transuranic material that cannot be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico is stored in Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. A performance assessment was completed for the transuranic inventory in the boreholes and submitted to the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group. The performance assessment was prepared by Sandia National Laboratories on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office using an iterative methodology that assessed radiological releases from the intermediate depth disposal configuration against the regulatory requirements of the 1985 version of 40 CFR 191 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The transuranic materials are stored at 21 to 37 m depth (70 to 120 ft) in large diameter boreholes constructed in the unsaturated alluvial deposits of Frenchman Flat. Hydrologic processes that affect long- term isolation of the radionuclides are dominated by extremely slow upward rates of liquid/vapor advection and diffusion; there is no downward pathway under current climatic conditions and there is no recharge to groundwater under future ''glacial'' climatic conditions. A Federal Review Team appointed by the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group reviewed the Greater Confinement Disposal performance assessment and found that the site met the majority of the regulatory criteria of the 1985 and portions of the 1993 versions of 40 CFR 191. A number of technical and procedural issues required development of supplemental information that was incorporated into a final revision of the performance assessment. These issues include inclusion of radiological releases into the complementary cumulative distribution function for the containment requirements associated with drill cuttings from inadvertent human intrusion, verification of mathematical models used in the performance assessment, inclusion of dose calculations from collocated low-level waste in the boreholes for the individual protection requirements, further assessments of engineered barriers and conditions associated with the assurance requirements, and expansion of documentation provided for assessing the groundwater protection requirements. The Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group approved the performance assessment for Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in 2001 and did not approve the Application of the Assurance Requirements. Remaining issues concerned with engineered barriers and the multiple aspects of the Assurance Requirements will be resolved at the time of closure of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. This is the first completion and acceptance of a performance assessment for transuranic materials under the U.S. Department of Energy self-regulation. The Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes are only the second waste disposal configuration to meet the safety regulatory requirements of 40 CFR 191.

Colarusso, Angela; Crowe, Bruce; Cochran, John R.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

Wind farm noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arrays of small wind turbines recently coined as wind farms offer several advantages over single larger wind turbines producing the same electrical power. Noise source characteristics of wind farms are also different from those associated with a single wind turbine. One?third octave band noise measurements from 2 Hz to 10 kHz have been made and will be compared to measurements of noise produced by a single large wind turbine. [J. R. Balombin Technical Memorandum 81486.

Gregory C. Tocci; Brion G. Koning

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-T Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-T Tank Farm (T Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-T-106 and 241-T-111) identified in RPP-RPT-55084, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-T Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the T Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-C Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-C Tank Farm (C Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-C-101 and 241-C-105) identified in RPP-RPT-33418, Rev. 2, Hanford C-Farm Leak Inventory Assessments Report. This document satisfies the C Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hanford Single Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-TX Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-TX Tank Farm (TX Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-TX-107 and 241-TX-114) identified in RPP-RPT-50870, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-TX Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the TX Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, C. L.; Harlow, D> G.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

195

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms - November 2011 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Review, Hanford Tank Farms - November 2011 Review, Hanford Tank Farms - November 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms - November 2011 November 2011 Review of Hanford Tank Farms Safety Basis Amendment for Double-Shell Tank Ventilation System Upgrades The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent oversight review of the draft amendment to the Hanford Tank Farms safety basis for upgrading the double-shell tank (DST) primary tank ventilation (PTV) systems to safety-significant designation. The Tank Farms are Hazard Category 2 DOE nuclear facilities. The review was performed during the period July 25 - August 12, 2011 by the HSS Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management

196

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Jeff Tappen; M.A. Wasiolek; D.W. Wu; J.F. Schmitt

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

198

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Tappen, J. J.; Wasiolek, M. A.; Wu, D. W.; Schmitt, J. F.; Smith, A. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

199

DOE/EA-1837:Final Environmental Assessment for the Performance Verification Laboratory (January 2011)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment for the Performance Verification Laboratory January 2011 DOE/EA-1837 This page left intentionally blank. Performance Verification Laboratory DOE/EA-1837 U.S. Department of Energy Final Environmental Assessment National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2011 i National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is proposing to construct and operate a Performance Verification Laboratory (PVL) facility to be located on the Morgantown NETL site in West Virginia. NETL would design, construct, and make operational a DOE PVL facility for verifying the energy performance of selected appliances and equipment to facilitate improved enforcement of DOE energy conservation

200

Strategies for Assessment of the Biological Performance and Design of Hydroturbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biological response of fish to turbine passage has been of concern for several decades and emphasized recently by consideration of hydro as a 'green' power source. The current state-of-the-art of hydro-turbine biological performance assessment, while still inadequate, has advanced considerably the past 10 years. For example, the importance of assessment of exposure to pressure changes during turbine passage has been emphasized by findings of laboratory studies of rapid decompression. It is now very clear that hydroturbine biological assessment must consider the physiological state and behavior of fish at turbine entry and changes in physiological state that drive aspects of behavior during tailrace passage. Such considerations are in addition to concerns about exposure of fish to mechanical and pressure sources of injury during turbine passage. Experimental designs and assessment tools have evolved for acclimation of test fish, observation of test fish behavior at approach and upon exit from the turbine environment, and precise estimation of turbine passage mortality. Fish condition assessment continues to improve permitting better classification of observed injuries to injury mechanisms. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and other computer models permit detailed investigation of the turbine passage environment and development of hypotheses that can be tested in field studies using live fish. Risk assessment techniques permit synthesis of laboratory and in-field study findings and estimation of population level effects over a wide range of turbine operation scenarios. Risk assessment is also evolving to provide input to turbine runner design. These developments, and others, have resulted in more productive biological performance assessment studies and will continue to evolve and improve the quantity and quality of information obtained from costly live fish hydroturbine passage studies. This paper reviews the history of hydro-turbine biological assessment, presents the current state-of-the-art, and identify areas needing improvement.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Potential of Establishment of Wind Farms in Western Province of Saudi Arabia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present study, the economic feasibility of development of 15 MW wind power plant (wind farm) at Taif, Western Province of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (K.S.A) has been investigated by analyzing long-term wind speed data. Western province has relatively better wind energy resources. Data analysis indicates that monthly average wind speeds of Taif (21 29 N, 40 32 E) range from 3.1 to 4.8 m/s at 10 m height. The wind farms simulated consist of different combinations of 600kW commercial wind machines (50 m hub-height). NREL's (HOMER Energy's) HOMER software has been employed to perform the techno-economic assessment. The study presents monthly variations of wind speed, cumulative frequency distribution (CFD) profiles of wind speed, monthly and yearly amount of energy generated from the 15 MW wind farm (50 m hub-height), cost of generating energy (COE, $/kWh), capacity factor (%), etc. The CFD indicates that the wind speeds are less than 3 m/s for 46% of the time during the year. This implies that wind electric conversion systems (WECS) will not produce energy for about 46% of the time during the year. The annual energy produced by 15 MW wind farm (50 m hub-height) has been found to be 19939 MWh. The cost of wind-based electricity by using 600kW (50m hub-height) commercial WECS has been found to be 0.0576 US$/kWh. With the development of 15 MW wind farm, about 453 tons/year of carbon emissions can be avoided entering into the local atmospheric. The paper also attempts to address various aspects (such as: effect of hub-height, etc.) of wind farm establishment

S.M. Shaahid; Luai M. Al-Hadhrami; M.K. Rahman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Offshore Wind Farms the Impact on Wind Farm Planning and Cost of Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rates of planning and construction of new wind farms. Offshore wind farms typically offer the benefits

Jacob Ladeburg; Sanja Lutzeyer

203

Attack Injection for Performance and Dependability Assessment of Ad hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attack Injection for Performance and Dependability Assessment of Ad hoc Networks Jes´us Friginal, ddandres, pgil}@disca.upv.es Abstract Ad hoc networks are wireless, self-configuring and self- maintaining in this domain has been based on simulation, thus obviating aspects influencing the behav- ior of real ad hoc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

204

Maintenance policy performance assessment in presence of imprecision based on Dempster-Shafer Theory of Evidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to assess the performance of a maintenance policy when a stochastic model of the life of the component of interest is known, but relies on parameters that are imprecisely known, and only through information elicited from experts. ... Keywords: Dempster-Shafer Theory of Evidence (DSTE), Maintenance, Uncertainty

P. Baraldi; M. Compare; E. Zio

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Automated Performance Assessment for Service-Oriented Middleware: a Case Study on BPEL Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automated Performance Assessment for Service-Oriented Middleware: a Case Study on BPEL Engines Middleware for Web service compositions, such as BPEL engines, provides the execution environment of service-oriented middleware components. From an engineer- ing point of view, one of the key activities

Binder, Walter

206

A Method for Impact Assessment of Faults on the Performance of Field-Oriented Control Drives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, reliability of a motor drive can be explored via the emerging field of thermo- electrical analysis [3A Method for Impact Assessment of Faults on the Performance of Field-Oriented Control Drives Grainger Center for Electric Machinery and Electromechanics Department of Electrical and Computer

Liberzon, Daniel

207

POST-EPS WINDSCATTEROMETER CONCEPT TRADE-OFFS AND WIND RETRIEVAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POST-EPS WINDSCATTEROMETER CONCEPT TRADE-OFFS AND WIND RETRIEVAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT C.C. Lin1 GK De Bilt, The Netherlands Abstract The Post-EPS (or EPS-Second Generation) mission will be deployed in the 2018 ­ 2020 timeframe in order to ensure continuity of the EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) observation

Haak, Hein

208

Computational structure of a performance assessment involving stochastic and subjective uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recent performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy for the geologic disposal of transuranic waste, is used to illustrate the computational structure of a large analysis ...

Jon C. Helton

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Assessment of the Performance of Fuzzy Cluster Analysis in the Classification of RFC Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a relevance measure of other documents to the ones that are part of the defined tracks. The questionAssessment of the Performance of Fuzzy Cluster Analysis in the Classification of RFC Documents M. E of finding knowledge from meta-data. A collection of RFC documents has been used to analyse the behaviour

Haddadi, Hamed

210

Fusion Engineering and Design 80 (2006) 99110 Nuclear performance assessment of ARIES-AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion Engineering and Design 80 (2006) 99­110 Nuclear performance assessment of ARIES-AT L.A. El-Guebaly, The ARIES Team Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison ARIES design always involves a significant change in the engineering system with emphasis on high

California at San Diego, University of

211

Estimating farm machinery complements based on cropmix and farm size  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machinery complement information is used in farm simulation models such as the FLIPSIM model when studying of the impacts of agricultural policies on representative farms. Since acquiring machinery complement data for FLIPSIM simulations is a...

Barrera, Anna Marie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

High level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document phase 1 assessment corrective actions/compliance schedule approval report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) Phase I Assessment Corrective Actions/Compliance Schedule Approval Report for the subject facility, contains the corrective actions required to bring the facility into compliance as a result of an Administrative Assessment to determine whether S/RID requirements are fully addressed by existing policies, plans or procedures. These actions are delineated in the Compliance Schedule Approvals which also contain; noncompliances, risks, compensatory measures, schedules for corrective actions, justifications for approval, and resource impacts.

Biebesheimer, E.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis in Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the geologic (deep underground) disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. This development has been supported by a sequence of performance assessments (PAs) carried out by Sandla National Laboratories (SNL) to assess what is known about the WIPP and to provide .tidance for future DOE research and development activities. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis procedures based on Latin hypercube sampling and regression techniques play an important role in these PAs by providing an assessment of the uncertainty in important analysis outcomes and identi~ing the sources of thk uncertainty. Performance assessments for the WIPP are conceptually and computational] y interesting due to regulatory requirements to assess and display the effects of both stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty, where stochastic uncertainty arises from the possible disruptions that could occur over the 10,000 yr regulatory period associated with the WIPP and subjective uncertainty arises from an inability to unambi-aously characterize the many models and associated parameters required in a PA for the WIPP. The interplay between uncertainty analysis, sensitivity analysis, stochastic uncertainty and subjective uncertainty are discussed and illustrated in the context of a recent PA carried out by SNL to support an application by the DOE to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the certification of the WIPP for the disposal of TRU waste.

Helton, J.C.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

215

Proposed Evanston Offshore Wind Farm  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evanston Offshore Wind Farm Evanston Offshore Wind Farm August 1, 2011 Monday, August 1, 2011 Off Shore Wind Farm FAQ Document available from http://www.greenerevanston.org/ at the Renewable Energy Task Force tab Monday, August 1, 2011 City Manager Commits to City to sign onto Kyoto emissions reduction goals Wind Farm Timeline April 2006 Summer 2007 Fall 2008 February 2008 April 2010 March 2011 July 2011 Network for Evanston's Future proposes joint climate planning effort CGE Formed and Renewable Energy Task Force formed - Wind farm concept begun ECAP passed by City Council with 1st version of proposed Offshore Wind Farm included Offshore Wind Farm RFI unanimously passed by City Council Mayor Tisdahl appointments Committee on the Wind Farm City Council

216

Farming: A Climate Change Culprit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 | Tags:...

217

Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporations Caon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporations Canon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill (April 2005)

218

Status of Art & Practice of Performance Assessment within the DOE Complex  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- - Status of Art and Practice Roger R. Seitz Advisory Scientist 05 March 2009 Phoenix, Arizona USA High-Level Waste Corporate Board SRNL-MS-2009-00036 2 High-Level Waste Corporate Board - March 5, 2009 Background Performance (Safety) Assessment Process has a long history of successful use around the world Relatively good agreement about fundamental process, technical approaches continually evolving Essential blend of regulatory and science and engineering Managing uncertainties associated with complex systems over long time frames is primary challenge Emphasize iterative process rather than calculations 1. Assessment context 2. Describe system 3. Develop and justify scenarios 4. Formulate and implement models 5. Run analyses 7. Compare

219

Development of an ASTM standard guide on performing vulnerability assessments for nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an effort undertaken by subcommittee C26.12 (Safeguards) of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) to develop a standard guide for performing vulnerability assessments (VAs). VAs are performed to determine the effectiveness of safeguards and security systems for both domestic and international nuclear facilities. These assessments address a range of threats, including theft of nuclear material and sabotage, and use an array of methods. The approach to performing and documenting VAs is varied and is largely dependent upon the tools used to perform them. This diversity can lead to tools being misused, making validation of VAs more difficult. The development of a standard guide for performing VAs would, if generally accepted, alleviate these concerns. ASTM provides a forum for developing guides that includes a high level of peer review to assure that the result is acceptable to all potential users. Additionally, the ASTM is widely recognized for setting standards, and endorsement by the Society may increase the likelihood of acceptance by the nuclear community. The goal of this work is to develop a guide that is independent of the tools being used to perform the VA and applicable to the spectrum of threats described above.

Wilkey, D.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Historical Background on Assessment the Performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the US Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a research and development facility for the safe management, storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and 25 years after site selection, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance assessment conducted in 1996. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This report provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project. For example, the federal requirement to provide environmental impact statements and negotiated agreements with the State of New Mexico influenced the type of scientific areas that were investigated and the engineering analysis prior to 1989 for the WIPP.

Rechard, R.P.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Farm Buildings Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE first supplement, 1958-61, of Part 3, Buildings for Poultry, issued by the Agricultural Research Council, has recently been published (Pp. ... . 71. London: Agricultural Research Council, 1963. 4s.). This bibliography of farm buildings research provides important basic information: in the past, much waste has occurred from the ...

1963-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

222

San Gorgonio Farms (repower) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

repower) Wind Farm repower) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name San Gorgonio Farms (repower) Wind Farm Facility San Gorgonio Farms (repower) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner San Gorgonio Farms Developer San Gorgonio Farms Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

223

High Pressure Water Jet System Performance Assessment Project A-2A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessment for canister cleaning system in the KE Basin. Information obtained from this assessment will be used to design any additional equipment used to clean canisters. After thorough review of the design, maintenance history and operational characteristics of the 105 K East (KE) canister cleaning system, Bartlett recommends that the high pressure water jet system (HPWJS) be modified as outlined in section 5.0, and retained for future use. Further, it is recommended that Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project consider use of a graded approach for canister cleaning, based on individual canister type and characteristics. This approach would allow a simple method to be used on canisters not needing the more rigorous, high-pressure method. Justification is provided in section 5.0. Although Bartlett has provided some preliminary cost estimates, it is recommended that SNF Project perform a detailed cost-benefit analysis to weigh the alternatives presented.

FARWICK, C.C.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

224

A formal expert judgment procedure for performance assessments of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an experimental facility located in southeastern New Mexico. It has been designed to determine the feasibility of the geologic disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in a deep bedded-salt formation. The WIPP was also designed for disposal and will operate in that capacity if approved. The WIPP Performance Assessment Department at Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting analyses to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. These analyses sometimes require the use of expert judgment. This Department has convened several expert-judgment panels and from that experience has developed an internal quality-assurance procedure to guide the formal elicitation of expert judgment. This protocol is based on the principles found in the decision-analysis literature.

Trauth, K.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guzowski, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States). Business Administration & Economics Div.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Performance assessment overview for subseabed disposal of high level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Subseabed Disposal Project (SDP) was part of an international program that investigated the feasibility of high-level radioactive waste disposal in the deep ocean sediments. This report briefly describes the seven-step iterative performance assessment procedures used in this study and presents representative results of the last iteration. The results of the performance are compared to interim standards developed for the SDP, to other conceptual repositories, and to related metrics. The attributes, limitations, uncertainties, and remaining tasks in the SDP feasibility phase are discussed.

Klett, R.D.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

directly, rather than through simplified abstractions. It also a llows for complex representations of the source term, e.g., the explicit representation of many individual waste packages (i.e., meter - scale detail of an entire waste emplacement drift). This report fulfills the Generic Disposal System Analysis Work Packa ge Level 3 Milestone - Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts (M 3 FT - 1 4 SN08080 3 2 ).

Sevougian, S. David; Freeze, Geoffrey A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Gardner, William Payton [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Mariner, Paul [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

An integrated multivariate approach for performance assessment and optimisation of electricity transmission systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article introduces an integrated approach based on data envelopment analysis (DEA) and principal component analysis (PCA) for efficiency assessment, and optimisation in transmission systems that have been responsible for the transmission of electricity in Iran to show its applicability and superiority. Performance of 16 regional electricity companies was evaluated using the non-parametric technique of DEA. The result indicates that the performance of several companies is sub-optimal, suggesting the potential for significant cost reduction and reduction in employee number. The optimisation procedure in this article is followed from two different viewpoints, i.e. input efficiency and -cost. The result of DEA model is verified and validated by PCA through Spearman correlation experiment. Moreover, the proposed approach uses the measure-specific super-efficiency DEA model for sensitivity analysis to determine the critical inputs based on efficiency and cost allocation super-efficiency DEA model to determine the critical inputs based on cost. The unique feature of this study is utilisation of DEA model for assessment and determination of critical inputs and optimisation for the critical inputs from two different viewpoints, i.e. input-efficiency and -cost. This is the first study that introduces a total approach for performance assessment and optimisation of electricity transmission companies.

Ali Azadeh; Somayeh Ahmadi Movaghar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Paramount Farms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Paramount Farms Paramount Farms Jump to: navigation, search Name Paramount Farms Place Los Angeles, California Zip 90064 Product Grower and processor of almonds and pistachios, with a 1.1MW PV installation for captive power. References Paramount Farms[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Paramount Farms is a company located in Los Angeles, California . References ↑ "Paramount Farms" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Paramount_Farms&oldid=349598" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load)

229

Turbulence Characteristics in Offshore Wind Farms from LES Simulations of Lillgrund Wind Farm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of wind turbine wakes in large offshore wind energy arrays can be a substantial factor in affecting the performance of turbines inside the array. Turbulent mixing plays a key role in the wake recovery, having a significant effect on the length over which the wake is strong enough to affect the performance of other turbines significantly. We highlight how turbulence affects wind turbine wakes using results from LES simulations of Lillgrund offshore wind farm in the context of SCADA data selected to mirror the wind conditions simulated. The analysis here concentrated on temporal spectra of wind velocities measured by the turbine's nacelle anemometer and calculated at the turbine locations in the computational model. The effect of the wind turbine rotor on the downstream flow is quantified by analysing the change in spectral features of turbines within the wind farm compared to turbines at the side of the farm exposed to the wind.

Wolf-Gerrit Frh; Angus C.W. Creech; A. Eoghan Maguire

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE?s contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEP-certified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

Therkelsen, Peter; McKane, Aimee; Sabouini, Ridah; Evans, Tracy

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Title Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-6349E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Therkelsen, Peter, Aimee T. McKane, Ridah Sabouni, and Tracy Evans Conference Name American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 07/2013 Keywords ACEEE Conference Paper, energy efficiency, Energy Performance Program Abstract Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE's contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEPcertified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

232

Farm Income Taxation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the filing status of the taxpayer. Finally, the tax liability is determined by reducing the tax imposed by various credits. Reporting Farm Income Methods of accounting. Almost all farmers and ranchers operate on the cash method of accounting. This means... basis taxpayers must take income into account when it is actually received as well as when it is constructively received. The constructive receipt doctrine can be a concern for farmers and ranchers, especially with respect to government price...

McEowen, Roger A.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Tank Farm Operations Contract- November 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether the Tank Farm Operations Contract is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

234

Key performance indicators: A useful tool to assess Smart Grid goals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the last few years, the Smart Grid concept has gained ground in the power utility scope. However, due to its multidisciplinary character (involving a stack of technologies) it is very difficult to assess the overall project success. Due to this a metric is required. In this paper, the authors review the existing metrics and (based on their experience within the Smart Grid demonstration project Smartcity Malaga), propose a new approach of business intelligence to bring about a new metric or set of key performance indicators for its rating. An advantage of this metric is its capacity to assist in this task. Its usefulness is also complemented with a planning tool that enables us to assess the effects of each technology under potential scenarios. This information is useful for planning projects, allowing us to make the most appropriate decisions each moment. Ultimately, this usefulness is clearly demonstrated through two case studies.

Enrique Personal; Juan Ignacio Guerrero; Antonio Garcia; Manuel Pea; Carlos Leon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Performance assessment methodology and preliminary results for low-level radioactive waste disposal in Taiwan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Taiwan's Institute for Nuclear Energy Research (INER) have teamed together to evaluate several candidate sites for Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Taiwan currently has three nuclear power plants, with another under construction. Taiwan also has a research reactor, as well as medical and industrial wastes to contend with. Eventually the reactors will be decomissioned. Operational and decommissioning wastes will need to be disposed in a licensed disposal facility starting in 2014. Taiwan has adopted regulations similar to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) low-level radioactive waste rules (10 CFR 61) to govern the disposal of LLW. Taiwan has proposed several potential sites for the final disposal of LLW that is now in temporary storage on Lanyu Island and on-site at operating nuclear power plants, and for waste generated in the future through 2045. The planned final disposal facility will have a capacity of approximately 966,000 55-gallon drums. Taiwan is in the process of evaluating the best candidate site to pursue for licensing. Among these proposed sites there are basically two disposal concepts: shallow land burial and cavern disposal. A representative potential site for shallow land burial is located on a small island in the Taiwan Strait with basalt bedrock and interbedded sedimentary rocks. An engineered cover system would be constructed to limit infiltration for shallow land burial. A representative potential site for cavern disposal is located along the southeastern coast of Taiwan in a tunnel system that would be about 500 to 800 m below the surface. Bedrock at this site consists of argillite and meta-sedimentary rocks. Performance assessment analyses will be performed to evaluate future performance of the facility and the potential dose/risk to exposed populations. Preliminary performance assessment analyses will be used in the site-selection process and to aid in design of the disposal system. Final performance assessment analyses will be used in the regulatory process of licensing a site. The SNL/INER team has developed a performance assessment methodology that is used to simulate processes associated with the potential release of radionuclides to evaluate these sites. The following software codes are utilized in the performance assessment methodology: GoldSim (to implement a probabilistic analysis that will explicitly address uncertainties); the NRC's Breach, Leach, and Transport - Multiple Species (BLT-MS) code (to simulate waste-container degradation, waste-form leaching, and transport through the host rock); the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer code (FEHM) (to simulate groundwater flow and estimate flow velocities); the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill performance Model (HELP) code (to evaluate infiltration through the disposal cover); the AMBER code (to evaluate human health exposures); and the NRC's Disposal Unit Source Term -- Multiple Species (DUST-MS) code (to screen applicable radionuclides). Preliminary results of the evaluations of the two disposal concept sites are presented.

Arnold, Bill Walter; Chang, Fu-lin (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Mattie, Patrick D.; Knowlton, Robert G.; Chuang, W-S (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Chi, L-M (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Jow, Hong-Nian; Tien, Norman C. (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Intersection of Farm Credit and Farm Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication examines the way the 2008 Farm Bill and the uncertain credit market may affect each other. It discusses the connection between credit and policy....

Knapek, George M.; Klose, Steven; Raulston, James M.

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

237

Modeling and Quantification of Team Performance in Human Reliability Analysis for Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) are important technical contributors to the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC) risk-informed and performance based approach to regulating U.S. commercial nuclear activities. Furthermore, all currently operating commercial NPPs in the U.S. are required by federal regulation to be staffed with crews of operators. Yet, aspects of team performance are underspecified in most HRA methods that are widely used in the nuclear industry. There are a variety of "emergent" team cognition and teamwork errors (e.g., communication errors) that are 1) distinct from individual human errors, and 2) important to understand from a PRA perspective. The lack of robust models or quantification of team performance is an issue that affects the accuracy and validity of HRA methods and models, leading to significant uncertainty in estimating HEPs. This paper describes research that has the objective to model and quantify team dynamics and teamwork within NPP control room crews for risk informed applications, thereby improving the technical basis of HRA, which improves the risk-informed approach the NRC uses to regulate the U.S. commercial nuclear industry.

Jeffrey C. JOe; Ronald L. Boring

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Second performance assessment iteration of the Greater Confinement Disposal facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) facility was established in Area 5 at the Nevada Test Site for containment of waste inappropriate for shallow land burial. Some transuranic (TRU) waste has been disposed of at the GCD facility, and compliance of this disposal system with EPA regulation 40 CFR 191 must be evaluated. We have adopted an iterative approach in which performance assessment results guide site data collection, which in turn influences the parameters and models used in performance assessment. The first iteration was based upon readily available data, and indicated that the GCD facility would likely comply with 40 CFR 191 and that the downward flux of water through the vadose zone (recharge) had a major influence on the results. Very large recharge rates, such as might occur under a cooler, wetter climate, could result in noncompliance. A project was initiated to study recharge in Area 5 by use of three environmental tracers. The recharge rate is so small that the nearest groundwater aquifer will not be contaminated in less than 10,000 years. Thus upward liquid diffusion of radionuclides remained as the sole release pathway. This second assessment iteration refined the upward pathway models and updated the parameter distributions based upon new site information. A new plant uptake model was introduced to the upward diffusion pathway; adsorption and erosion were also incorporated into the model. Several modifications were also made to the gas phase radon transport model. Plutonium solubility and sorption coefficient distributions were changed based upon new information, and on-site measurements were used to update the moisture content distributions. The results of the assessment using these models indicate that the GCD facility is likely to comply with all sections of 40 CFR 191 under undisturbed conditions.

Baer, T.A.; Emery, J.N. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Price, L.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olague, N.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (doseresponse) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

240

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms - December 2012 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 2012 December 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms - December 2012 December 2012 Review of the Hanford Tank Farms Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation This report documents an independent review by the Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of radiological protection program (RPP) activity-level implementation at the Hanford Tank Farms. The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations. The purpose of this Independent Oversight targeted review effort is to evaluate the flowdown of occupational radiation protection requirements, as expressed in facility RPPs, to work planning, control, and execution processes, such as

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241

Wind Farm | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Farm Wind Farm Wind Farm The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal building in Greensburg. Technical assistance provided by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was influential in helping Greensburg and its partners build the wind farm. The town uses only about 1/4 to 1/3 of the power generated to reach its "100% renewable energy, 100% of the time" goal. Excess power is placed back on the grid and offered as renewable energy credits for other Kansas Power Pool and Native Energy customers. The Greenburg Wind Farm continues to have an impact, inspiring Sunflower

242

Proposal of an environmental performance index to assess solid waste treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proposal of a new concept in waste management: Cleaner Treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of an index to assess quantitatively waste treatment technologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delphi Method was carried out so as to define environmental indicators. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental performance evaluation of waste-to-energy plants. - Abstract: Although the concern with sustainable development and environment protection has considerably grown in the last years it is noted that the majority of decision making models and tools are still either excessively tied to economic aspects or geared to the production process. Moreover, existing models focus on the priority steps of solid waste management, beyond waste energy recovery and disposal. So, in order to help the lack of models and tools aiming at the waste treatment and final disposal, a new concept is proposed: the Cleaner Treatment, which is based on the Cleaner Production principles. This paper focuses on the development and validation of the Cleaner Treatment Index (CTI), to assess environmental performance of waste treatment technologies based on the Cleaner Treatment concept. The index is formed by aggregation (summation or product) of several indicators that consists in operational parameters. The weights of the indicator were established by Delphi Method and Brazilian Environmental Laws. In addition, sensitivity analyses were carried out comparing both aggregation methods. Finally, index validation was carried out by applying the CTI to 10 waste-to-energy plants data. From sensitivity analysis and validation results it is possible to infer that summation model is the most suitable aggregation method. For summation method, CTI results were superior to 0.5 (in a scale from 0 to 1) for most facilities evaluated. So, this study demonstrates that CTI is a simple and robust tool to assess and compare the environmental performance of different treatment plants being an excellent quantitative tool to support Cleaner Treatment implementation.

Goulart Coelho, Hosmanny Mauro, E-mail: hosmanny@hotmail.com [Federal University of Minas Gerais, School of Engineering, Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Bloco 2, Sala 4628, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, CEP 30.270-901 (Brazil); Lange, Lisete Celina [Federal University of Minas Gerais, School of Engineering, Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Bloco 2, Sala 4628, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, CEP 30.270-901 (Brazil); Coelho, Lineker Max Goulart [Ecole des Ponts ParisTech 6 et 8 avenue Blaise-Pascal, Cite Descartes Champs-sur-Marne, 77455, Marne-la-Vallee (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 3, Model parameters: Sandia WIPP Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume documents model parameters chosen as of July 1992 that were used by the Performance Assessment Department of Sandia National Laboratories in its 1992 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Ranges and distributions for about 300 modeling parameters in the current secondary data base are presented in tables for the geologic and engineered barriers, global materials (e.g., fluid properties), and agents that act upon the WIPP disposal system such as climate variability and human-intrusion boreholes. The 49 parameters sampled in the 1992 Preliminary Performance Assessment are given special emphasis with tables and graphics that provide insight and sources of data for each parameter.

Not Available

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

244

Integrating farming and wastewater management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Source separating wastewater systems are often motivated by their integration with farming. It is thus important to scrutinise the critical factors associated with such integration. (more)

Tidker, Pernilla

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Performance Assessment of a Desiccant Cooling System in a CHP Application with an IC Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance of a desiccant cooling system was evaluated in the context of combined heat and power (CHP). The baseline system incorporated a desiccant dehumidifier, a heat exchanger, an indirect evaporative cooler, and a direct evaporative cooler. The desiccant unit was regenerated through heat recovery from a gas-fired reciprocating internal combustion engine. The system offered sufficient sensible and latent cooling capacities for a wide range of climatic conditions, while allowing influx of outside air in excess of what is typically required for commercial buildings. Energy and water efficiencies of the desiccant cooling system were also evaluated and compared with those of a conventional system. The results of parametric assessments revealed the importance of using a heat exchanger for concurrent desiccant post cooling and regeneration air preheating. These functions resulted in enhancement of both the cooling performance and the thermal efficiency, which are essential for fuel utilization improvement. Two approaches for mixing of the return air and outside air were examined, and their impact on the system cooling performance and thermal efficiency was demonstrated. The scope of the parametric analyses also encompassed the impact of improving the indirect evaporative cooling effectiveness on the overall cooling system performance.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.; Slayzak, S.; Judkoff, R.; Schaffhauser, T.; DeBlasio, R.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Incorporating long-term climate change in performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico for the disposal of transuranic wastes generated by defense programs. Applicable regulations (40 CFR 191) require the DOE to evaluate disposal-system performance for 10,000 yr. Climatic changes may affect performance by altering groundwater flow. Paleoclimatic data from southeastern New Mexico and the surrounding area indicate that the wettest and coolest Quaternary climate at the site can be represented by that at the last glacial maximum, when mean annual precipitation was approximately twice that of the present. The hottest and driest climates have been similar to that of the present. The regularity of global glacial cycles during the late Pleistocene confirms that the climate of the last glacial maximum is suitable for use as a cooler and wetter bound for variability during the next 10,000 yr. Climate variability is incorporated into groundwater-flow modeling for WIPP PA by causing hydraulic head in a portion of the model-domain boundary to rise to the ground surface with hypothetical increases in precipitation during the next 10,000 yr. Variability in modeled disposal-system performance introduced by allowing had values to vary over this range is insignificant compared to variability resulting from other causes, including incomplete understanding of transport processes. Preliminary performance assessments suggest that climate variability will not affect regulatory compliance.

Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baker, B.L. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Economy, K. [Ecodynamics Research Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garner, J.W. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Rudeen, D.K. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Measurement of Exterior Foundation Insulation to Assess Durability in Energy-Saving Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The foundation of a house is a sometimes ignored component of the building because of its low visibility. It is increasingly evident, however, that attention to good foundation design and construction significantly benefits the homeowner and the builder by mitigating future problems. Good foundation design and construction practice involves not only insulating to save energy but also providing effective structural design as well as moisture, termite, and radon control techniques as appropriate. Energy efficiency in housing is augmented by use of exterior slab and basement insulation, but high moisture content in the insulation material has led to concerns about its durability. The activity under this task was to extract six different exterior insulation systems that were characterized at installation and have been in the ground for 9 months to 15 years. R-value and moisture content were measured and inspections conducted for evidence of termite intrusion or deterioration. Based on the results, the durability of the various systems has been documented and assessments made of which systems appear to be best practice. Heat flux and temperature measurement data had been archived for some of the exterior insulation tests, thereby providing a unique opportunity to assess energy-saving performance and durability over the long term. The results show that the durability of foundation insulation systems depends on insulation type as well as on foundation type and local boundary conditions, the latter of which may have a marked influence on the durability of energy-saving performance.

Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Christian, Jeff [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A comparative application of the Repository Integration Program (RIP) to Total System Performance Assessment, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year (FY) 1991 and FY 1992, Sandia National Laboratory and Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory were assigned the responsibility to generate initial Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) of the Yucca Mountain site. The analyses performed by these organizations (called TSPA-1991) are reported in Barnard et al(1992) and Eslinger et al. (1993). During this same time period, Golder Associates Inc. was assigned the task of generating a model capable of analyzing the total system performance of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The developed model, called Repository Integration Program (RIP), is documented in Kossik and Hachey (1993), Miller et al. (1993), and Golder Associates Inc. (1993). In FY 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of TSPA-2. Prior to initiating the next TSPA iteration, it was decided that it would be valuable to evaluate the applicability of RIP for use in this iteration. Therefore, analyses were conducted to compare the results generated by RIP to those reported in TSPA-1991. In particular, the aim was to generate a RIP input data set as equivalent as possible to that documented in Barnard et al. (1992) and to analyze the total system performance (as well as the performance of the individual subsystem components of the waste package/Engineered Barrier System (EBS), unsaturated gaseous flow and transport, unsaturated aqueous flow and transport, saturated flow and transport, and disruptive processes/events). The performance measure for comparison with the results of TSPA-1991 is the cumulative release of radionuclides to the accessible environment over a 10,000-year period following closure normalized to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) release limits specified in 40 CFR 191.

NONE

1993-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

249

Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Ryou, Albert S [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

San Gorgonio Farms Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Gorgonio Farms Wind Farm I San Gorgonio Farms Wind Farm I Facility San Gorgonio Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

251

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

Shott, G. J.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

How expensive is Big Science? Consequences of using simple publication counts in performance assessment of large scientific facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the nuclear era and the Cold War superpower competition have long since passed, governments are still investing in Big Science, although these large facilities are nowadays mostly geared towards areas of use closer to utility. Investments in ... Keywords: Big Science, Performance assessment, Productivity, Publication counts, Quality assessment

Olof Hallonsten

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Program Plan for Revision of the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Saltstone Project, are embarking on the next revision to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) performance assessment (PA). This program plan has been prepared to outline the general approach, scope, schedule and resources for the PA revision. The plan briefly describes the task elements of the PA process. It discusses critical PA considerations in the development of conceptual models and interpretation of results. Applicable quality assurance (QA) requirements are identified and the methods for implementing QA for both software and documentation are described. The plan identifies project resources supporting the core team and providing project oversight. Program issues and risks are identified as well as mitigation of those risks. Finally, a preliminary program schedule has been developed and key deliverables identified. A number of significant changes have been implemented since the last PA revision resulting in a new design for future SDF disposal units. This revision will encompass the existing and planned disposal units, PA critical radionuclides and exposure pathways important to SDF performance. An integrated analysis of the overall facility layout, including all disposal units, will be performed to assess the impact of plume overlap on PA results. Finally, a rigorous treatment of uncertainty will be undertaken using probabilistic simulations. This analysis will be reviewed and approved by DOE-SR, DOE-HQ and potentially the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This revision will be completed and ready for the start of the DOE review at the end of December 2006. This work supports a Saltstone Vault 2 fee-bearing milestone. This milestone includes completion of the Vault 2 module of the PA revision by the end of FY06.

Cook, James R.

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

E AREA LOW LEVEL WASTE FACILITY DOE 435.1 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Performance Assessment for the Savannah River Site E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility was prepared to meet requirements of Chapter IV of the Department of Energy Order 435.1-1. The Order specifies that a Performance Assessment should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The Order also requires assessments of impacts to water resources and to hypothetical inadvertent intruders for purposes of establishing limits on radionuclides that may be disposed near-surface. According to the Order, calculations of potential doses and releases from the facility should address a 1,000-year period after facility closure. The point of compliance for the performance measures relevant to the all pathways and air pathway performance objective, as well as to the impact on water resources assessment requirement, must correspond to the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste following the assumed end of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure. During the operational and institutional control periods, the point of compliance for the all pathways and air pathway performance measures is the SRS boundary. However, for the water resources impact assessment, the point of compliance remains the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste during the operational and institutional control periods. For performance measures relevant to radon and inadvertent intruders, the points of compliance are the disposal facility surface for all time periods and the disposal facility after the assumed loss of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure, respectively. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is located in the central region of the SRS known as the General Separations Area. It is an elbow-shaped, cleared area, which curves to the northwest, situated immediately north of the Mixed Waste Management Facility. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is comprised of 200 acres for waste disposal and a surrounding buffer zone that extends out to the 100-m point of compliance. Disposal units within the footprint of the low-level waste facilities include the Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Component-in-Grout Trenches, the Low-Activity Waste Vault, the Intermediate-Level Vault, and the Naval Reactor Component Disposal Area. Radiological waste disposal operations at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility began in 1994. E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility closure will be conducted in three phases: operational closure, interim closure, and final closure. Operational closure will be conducted during the 25-year operation period (30-year period for Slit and Engineered Trenches) as disposal units are filled; interim closure measures will be taken for some units. Interim closure will take place following the end of operations and will consist of an area-wide runoff cover along with additional grading over the trench units. Final closure of all disposal units in the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility will take place at the end of the 100-year institutional control period and will consist of the installation of an integrated closure system designed to minimize moisture contact with the waste and to serve as a deterrent to intruders. Radiological dose to human receptors is analyzed in this PA in the all-pathways analysis, the inadvertent intruder analysis and the air pathway analysis, and the results are compared to the relevant performance measures. For the all-pathways analysis, the performance measure of relevance is a 25-mrem/yr EDE to representative members of the public, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. For the inadvertent intruder, the applicable performance measures are 100-mrem/yr EDE and 500 mrem/yr EDE for chronic and exposure scenarios, respectively. The relevant performance measure for the air pathway is 10-mrem/yr EDE via the air pathway, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. Protecti

Wilhite, E

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Beef Cattle Performance at Bluebonnet Farm.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the same experiment, compute heritability as 72 percent. Patterson, et al. (1949 reported on the rate of gain of animals tested 21 the Balmorhea substation of the Texas Agricul., tural Experiment Station for a period of 7 year; Six to 10 bull progeny... and the TPXRS Ranire Ststion. a11 test~d anim"1~ A~D suhiect tn reaictratinn. nllr- ina tho fiwf 4 vo~r~ POVPT~~ hv thi~ ~n-alv~ic! . the , anjmglq werp in airp nrnaenv ornilns nf 7 nr mnre The rennirement of a minimi~m nnvber ner cirp g.roun fnr br...

Cartwright, T. C. (Thomas Campbell); Warwick, B. L. (Bruce Lester); Hazen, M. W. (Marian William)

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Geochemical data package for the Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment (ILAW PA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as low-activity waste is to vitrify the liquid/slurry and place the solid product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the porewater of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the disposal facility, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and the thermodynamic solubility product (K{sub sp}), respectively. In this data package, the authors approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. In future geochemical data packages, they will determine whether a more rigorous measure of solubility is necessary or warranted based on the dose predictions emanating from the ILAW 2001 PA and reviewers' comments. The K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the ILAW system. In addition to the best-estimate K{sub d}s, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. They assume that K{sub d} values are log normally distributed over the cited ranges. Currently, they do not give estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, they supply different values for both the K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the ILAW system and supply time-varying K{sub d}s for the concrete zone, should the final repository design include concrete vaults or cement amendments to buffer the system pH.

DI Kaplan; RJ Serne

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

257

Cooper Farms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooper Farms Cooper Farms Jump to: navigation, search Name Cooper Farms Facility Cooper Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner V.H. Cooper and Co Inc Developer One Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Cooper Farms Location Van Wert OH Coordinates 40.9061044°, -84.5719964° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9061044,"lon":-84.5719964,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

258

Superior Farms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Superior Farms Superior Farms Jump to: navigation, search Name Superior Farms Facility Superior Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Foundation Windpower Developer Foundation Windpower Energy Purchaser Superior Farms Location Dixon CA Coordinates 38.420103°, -121.817506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.420103,"lon":-121.817506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

259

Performance Assessment Uncertainty Analysis for Japan's HLW Program Feasibility Study (H12)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most HLW programs in the world recognize that any estimate of long-term radiological performance must be couched in terms of the uncertainties derived from natural variation, changes through time and lack of knowledge about the essential processes. The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute followed a relatively standard procedure to address two major categories of uncertainty. First, a FEatures, Events and Processes (FEPs) listing, screening and grouping activity was pursued in order to define the range of uncertainty in system processes as well as possible variations in engineering design. A reference and many alternative cases representing various groups of FEPs were defined and individual numerical simulations performed for each to quantify the range of conceptual uncertainty. Second, parameter distributions were developed for the reference case to represent the uncertainty in the strength of these processes, the sequencing of activities and geometric variations. Both point estimates using high and low values for individual parameters as well as a probabilistic analysis were performed to estimate parameter uncertainty. A brief description of the conceptual model uncertainty analysis is presented. This paper focuses on presenting the details of the probabilistic parameter uncertainty assessment.

BABA,T.; ISHIGURO,K.; ISHIHARA,Y.; SAWADA,A.; UMEKI,H.; WAKASUGI,K.; WEBB,ERIK K.

1999-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Performance Assessment of Single Electrode-Supported Solid Oxide Cells Operating in the Steam Electrolysis Mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm{sup 2} per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes ({approx}10 {mu}m thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes ({approx}1400 {mu}m thick), and modified LSM or LSCF air-side electrodes ({approx}90 {mu}m thick). The purpose of the present study is to document and compare the performance and degradation rates of these cells in the fuel cell mode and in the electrolysis mode under various operating conditions. Initial performance was documented through a series of voltage-current (VI) sweeps and AC impedance spectroscopy measurements. Degradation was determined through long-term testing, first in the fuel cell mode, then in the electrolysis mode. Results generally indicate accelerated degradation rates in the electrolysis mode compared to the fuel cell mode, possibly due to electrode delamination. The paper also includes details of an improved single-cell test apparatus developed specifically for these experiments.

X. Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; N. Petigny

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Life Cycle Assessment of a Wind Farm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the next step of the LCA, specific energy expenditures and produced emissions were linked to the inventory analysis result. The database of the Swiss Center for Life Cycle Inventories Ecoinvent lists over 4,00...

Hermann-Josef Wagner; Jyotirmay Mathur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Property Tax Assessment for Commercial Wind Farms  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Pennsylvania enacted legislation in November 2006 providing that wind turbines and related equipment (including towers and foundations) may not be counted by tax assessors when setting property...

263

Feed and Farm Supply Store Managers' Perceptions of Employee Training as a Contributor to Competitive Advantage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to assess the perception held by managers of feed and farm supply stores in Texas regarding the contribution of employee training to the competitiveness of the firm, determine if managers of feed and farm supply stores...

Springfield, Henry C., III

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Microsoft Word - West TN Solar Farm_Final EA.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 10-088(E)/010511 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT WEST TENNESSEE SOLAR FARM PROJECT HAYWOOD COUNTY, TENNESSEE U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh, PA February 2011 DOE/EA-1706 10-088(E)/010511 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT West Tennessee Solar Farm Project Haywood County, Tennessee February 2011 Environmental Assessment for the West Tennessee Solar Farm Project Table of Contents i Table of Contents 1 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................. 1 1.1 VOLUNTEER STATE SOLAR INITIATIVE ....................................................................... 1 1.1.1 Tennessee Solar Institute ........................................................................................ 1

265

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-SX Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-SX Tank Farm (SX Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114, and 241-SX-115) identified in RPP-ENV-39658, Rev. 0, Hanford SX-Farm Leak Assessments Report. This document satisfies the SX Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L. [Washington River Protection Solutions (United States); Harlow, Donald G. [Washington River Protection Solutions (United States)

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

266

Characterization of subjective uncertainty in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1996 performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) maintains a separation between stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty, with stochastic uncertainty arising from the possible disruptions that could occur at the WIPP over the 10,000 yr regulatory period specified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 191,40 CFR 194) and subjective uncertainty arising from an inability to uniquely characterize many of the inputs required in the 1996 WIPP PA. The characterization of subjective uncertainty is discussed, including assignment of distributions, uncertain variables selected for inclusion in analysis, correlation control, sample size, statistical confidence on mean complementary cumulative distribution functions, generation of Latin hypercube samples, sensitivity analysis techniques, and scenarios involving stochastic and subjective uncertainty.

HELTON,JON CRAIG; MARTELL,MARY-ALENA; TIERNEY,MARTIN S.

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

267

PORFLOW MODELING FOR A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE PERFORMANCE OF NEW SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT DESIGNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of Savannah River Remediation (SRR), SRNL has analyzed the expected performance obtained from using seven 32 million gallon Saltstone Disposal Units (SDUs) in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) to store future saltstone grout. The analysis was based on preliminary SDU final design specifications. The analysis used PORFLOW modeling to calculate the release of 20 radionuclides from an SDU and transport of the radionuclides and daughters through the vadose zone. Results from this vadose zone analysis were combined with previously calculated releases from existing saltstone vaults and FDCs and a second PORFLOW model run to calculate aquifer transport to assessment points located along a boundary 100 m from the nearest edge of the SDF sources. Peak concentrations within 12 sectors spaced along the 100 m boundary were determined over a period of evaluation extending 20,000 years after SDF closure cap placement. These peak concentrations were provided to SRR to use as input for dose calculations.

Smith, F.

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Performance of corrosion inhibiting admixtures for structural concrete -- assessment methods and predictive modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past fifteen years corrosion inhibiting admixtures (CIAs) have become increasingly popular for protection of reinforced components of highway bridges and other structures from damage induced by chlorides. However, there remains considerable debate about the benefits of CIAs in concrete. A variety of testing methods to assess the performance of CIA have been reported in the literature, ranging from tests in simulated pore solutions to long-term exposures of concrete slabs. The paper reviews the published techniques and recommends the methods which would make up a comprehensive CIA effectiveness testing program. The results of this set of tests would provide the data which can be used to rank the presently commercially available CIA and future candidate formulations utilizing a proposed predictive model. The model is based on relatively short-term laboratory testing and considers several phases of a service life of a structure (corrosion initiation, corrosion propagation without damage, and damage to the structure).

Yunovich, M.; Thompson, N.G. [CC Technologies Labs., Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Recharge Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assisted CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., (CHG) by providing estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The IDF will be located in the 200 East Area at the Hanford Site and will receive several types of waste including immobilized low-activity waste. The recharge estimates for each scenario were derived from lysimeter and tracer data collected by the IDF PA Project and from modeling studies conducted for the project. Recharge estimates were provided for three specific site features (the surface barrier; possible barrier side slopes; and the surrounding soil) and four specific time periods (pre-Hanford; Hanford operations; surface barrier design life; post-barrier design life). CHG plans to conduct a performance assessment of the latest IDF design and call it the IDF 2005 PA; this recharge data package supports the upcoming IDF 2005 PA.

Fayer, Michael J.; Szecsody, Jim E.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Performance assessment modeling of high level nuclear wasteforms from the pyroprocess fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several performance assessment (PA) analyses have been completed to estimate the release to the accessible environment of radionuclides from spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel emplaced in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Probabilistic methods were utilized based on the complexity of the repository system. Recent investigations have been conducted to identify the merits of a pyroprocess fuel cycle. This cycle utilizes high temperature molten salts and metals to partially separate actinides and fission products. In a closed liquid metal reactor (LMR) fuel cycle, this allows recycling of nearly all of the actinides. In a once-through cycle, this isolates the actinides for storage into a wasteform which can be specifically tailored for their retention. With appropriate front-end treatment, this Process can also be used to treat LWR spent fuel.

Nutt, W.M.; Hill, R.N. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bullen, D.B. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Translating sustainability concerns at plant level asset operations: industrial performance assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The global society is threatened by the amount of plant level asset exploitation needed to satisfy the growing energy demand. The availability of a plentiful and affordable supply of energy is a requirement for the economic and societal pillars of sustainable development. In this context, the oil and gas industry will play a major role in the global energy mix for many years until alternate sources of energy become available and economically viable. During this transition period, the oil and gas industry has a vital responsibility for managing asset operations at the plant level safely and economically whilst minimising the burden to society and the environment. This manuscript reviews current trends toward sustainable asset performance. It also presents a framework and a model for implementing the framework. The suggested model enables industrial practitioners to assess the gaps between corporate level sustainability concerns and plant level execution of them.

R.M. Chandima Ratnayake

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment Charley Yu*, Argonne National Laboratory ; Emmanuel Gnanapragasam, Argonne National Laboratory; Carlos Corredor, U.S. Department of Energy; W. Alexander Williams, U.S. Department of Energy Abstract: The RESRAD-OFFSITE code was developed to evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of initial (primary) contamination. The primary contamination, which is the source of all releases modeled by the code, is assumed to be a layer of soil. The code considers the release of contamination from the source to the atmosphere, to surface runoff, and to groundwater. The radionuclide leaching was modeled as a first order (without transport) release using radionuclide distribution coefficient and infiltration rate calculated from water balance (precipitation, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, etc.). Recently, a new source term model was added the RESRAD-OFFSITE code so that it can be applied to the evaluation of Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal facility performance assessment. This new improved source term model include (1) first order with transport, (2) equilibrium desorption (rinse) release, and (3) uniform release (constant dissolution). With these new source release options, it is possible to simulate both uncontainerized (soil) contamination and containerized (waste drums) contamination. A delay time in the source release was also added to the code. This allows modeling the LLW container degradation as a function of time. The RESRAD-OFFSITE code also allows linking to other codes using improved flux and concentration input options. Additional source release model such as diffusion release may be added later. In addition, radionuclide database with 1252 radionuclides (ICRP 107) and the corresponding dose coefficients (DCFPAK 3.02) and the Department of Energys new gender- and age-averaged Reference Person dose coefficients (DOE-STD-1196-2011) which is based on the US census data will be added to the next version of RESRAD-OFFSITE code.

273

Performance assessment of a zeolite treatment wall for removing Sr-90 from groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory and modeling studies were conducted to assess the potential performance of a permeable reactive barrier constructed of a natural zeolite material at the West Valley Demonstration Project in western New York State. The results of laboratory column tests indicated that the barrier material would be effective at removing strontium from groundwater under natural gradient conditions. Two one-dimensional contaminant transport models were developed to interpret the data. A single-solute retardation factor model provided good agreement with the column test data, but time-consuming extraction and analysis of the zeolite material was required to parameterize the model. A preliminary six-solute model was also developed based on the assumption of competitive cation exchange as the primary removal mechanism. Both models yielded similar predictions of the long-term performance of the barrier, but the cation exchange model predicted higher effluent concentrations during the first 1000 pore volumes of operation. The cation exchange framework has several advantages, including the ability to calibrate the model using only data from column effluent samples, and the ability to account for site-specific differences in the groundwater cation composition. However, additional laboratory work is needed to develop a suitably robust model.

Alan J. Rabideau; John Van Benschoten; Amita Patel; Karl Bandilla

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 2, Technical basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume, Volume 2, contains the technical basis for the 1992 PA. Specifically, it describes the conceptual basis for consequence modeling and the PA methodology, including the selection of scenarios for analysis, the determination of scenario probabilities, and the estimation of scenario consequences using a Monte Carlo technique and a linked system of computational models. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume I contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with the long-term requirements of the EPA`s Environmental Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses related to the preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191B. Volume 5 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance. Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Conceptual structure of performance assessments conducted for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico is being developed by the US Department of Energy as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. In support of this project, Sandia National Laboratories is conducting an ongoing performance assessment (PA) for the WIPP. The ordered triple representation for risk proposed by Kaplan and Garrick is used to provide a clear conceptual structure for this PA. This presentation describes how the preceding representation provides a basis in the WIPP PA for (1) the definition of scenarios and the calculation of scenario probabilities and consequences, (2) the separation of subjective and stochastic uncertainties, (3) the construction of the complementary cumulative distribution functions required in comparisons with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (i.e., 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B), and (4) the performance of uncertainty and sensitivity studies. Results obtained in a preliminary PA for the WIPP completed in December of 1991 are used for illustration.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Marietta, M.G.; Rechard, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Assessment of SFR fuel pin performance codes under advanced fuel for minor actinide transmutation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. In the SUPERFACT Experiment four different oxide fuels containing high and low concentrations of {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, representing the homogeneous and heterogeneous in-pile recycling concepts, were irradiated in the PHENIX reactor. The behavior of advanced fuel materials with minor actinide needs to be fully characterized, understood and modeled in order to optimize the design of this kind of fuel elements and to evaluate its performances. This paper assesses the current predictability of fuel performance codes TRANSURANUS and GERMINAL V2 on the basis of post irradiation examinations of the SUPERFACT experiment for pins with low minor actinide content. Their predictions have been compared to measured data in terms of geometrical changes of fuel and cladding, fission gases behavior and actinide and fission product distributions. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results, although improvements are also pointed out for further studies, especially if larger content of minor actinide will be taken into account in the codes. (authors)

Bouineau, V.; Lainet, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pelletier, M. [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission - CEA, CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Di Marcello, V.; Van Uffelen, P.; Walker, C. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D- 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Performance Assessment in Support of the 1996 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conceptual and computational structure of a performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is described. Important parts of thk structure are @ maintenance of a separation between stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertain, with stochastic uncefinty arising from the many possible disruptions that could occur over the 10,000 Y regulatory period fiat applies to the WIPP and subjective uncertainty arising from `the imprecision with which many of the quantities rquired in tie `hdysis are known, (ii) use of Latin hypercttbe sampling to incorporate the effects of subjective uncefirtty, (iii) use of Monte Carlo (i.e., random) sampling to incorporate the effects of stochastic uncetinty, and OV) efficient use of tie necessarily limited number of mechanistic calculations that can be performed to SUPPOII the analysis. The WIPP is under development by the U.S. Department of Ener~ (DOE) for the geologic (i.e., deep underground) disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste, with the indicated PA supporting a ~Compliance Certification Application (CCA) by the DOE to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996 for tie necessary certifications for the WIPP to begin operation. If certified, the WIPP will be the first operational faciliv in tie United States for the geologic disposal of ra&oactive waste.

Anderson, D.R.; Basabilvazo, G.; Helton, J.C.; Jow, H.-N.; Marietta, M.G.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

Software quality assurance in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeast New Mexico, is a deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of transuranic waste generated by DOE defense-related activities. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), in its role as scientific advisor to the DOE, is responsible for evaluating the long-term performance of the WIPP. This risk-based Performance Assessment (PA) is accomplished in part through the use of numerous scientific modeling codes, which rely for some of their inputs on data gathered during characterization of the site. The PA is subject to formal requirements set forth in federal regulations. In particular, the components of the calculation fall under the configuration management and software quality assurance aegis of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers(ASME) Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA) requirements. This paper describes SNL's implementation of the NQA requirements regarding software quality assurance (SQA). The description of the implementation of SQA for a PA calculation addresses not only the interpretation of the NQA requirements, it also discusses roles, deliverables, and the resources necessary for effective implementation. Finally, examples are given which illustrate the effectiveness of SNL's SQA program, followed by a detailed discussion of lessons learned.

FROEHLICH,GARY K.; OGDEN,HARVEY C.; BYLE,KATHLEEN A.

2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

279

Performance Assessment Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site Low-Level Burial Grounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, requires a disposal authorization statement authorizing operation (or continued operation) for low-level waste disposal facilities. In fulfillment of these requirements, a disposal authorization statement was issued on October 25, 1999, authorizing the Hanford Site to transfer, receive, possess, and dispose of low-level radioactive waste at the 200 East Area burial grounds and the 200 West Area burial grounds. One of the conditions is that monitoring plans for the 200 East Area and 200 West Area low-level burial grounds be written and approved by the Richland Operations Office. As a result of a record of decision for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Program and acceptance of the Hanford Site Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement, the use of the low-level burial ground (LLBG) as a disposal facility for low-level and mixed low-level wastes has been restricted to lined trenches and the Navy reactor-compartment trench only. Hence, as of July 2004, only the two lined trenches in burial ground 218-W-5 (trenches 31 and 34, see Appendix A) and the Navy reactor-compartment trench in burial ground 218 E 12B (trench 94) are allowed to receive waste. When the two lined trenches are filled, the LLBG will cease to operate except for reactor compartment disposal at trench 94. Remaining operational lifetime of the LLBG is dependent on waste volume disposal rates. Existing programs for air sampling and analyses and subsidence monitoring are currently adequate for performance assessment at the LLBG. The waste disposal authorization for the Hanford Site is based (in part) on the post-closure performance assessments for the LLBG. In order to maintain a useful link between operational monitoring (e.g., Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA], Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, and State Waste Discharge Permits), constituents, monitoring frequencies, and boundaries require regular review and comparison. The annual reports discussed here are the primary sources for these reviews. The pathways of interest are air and groundwater for both operational and post-closure conditions at the LLBG, with groundwater considered to be the most significant long-term exposure pathway. Constituents that contributed at least 0.1% of the total relative hazard were selected as target analytes for monitoring. These are technetium-99, uranium, and iodine-129. Because of its environmental unavailability, carbon 14 was removed from the list of constituents. Given the potential uncertainties in inventories at the 200 Area LLBG and the usefulness of tritium as a contaminant indicator, tritium will be monitored as a constituent of concern at all burial grounds. Preexisting contamination plumes in groundwater beneath low-level waste management areas are attributed to other past-practice liquid waste disposal sites. Groundwater and air will be sampled and analyzed for radiogenic components. Subsidence monitoring will also be performed on a regular basis. The existing near-facility and surveillance air monitoring programs are sufficient to satisfy the performance assessment monitoring. Groundwater monitoring will utilize the existing network of wells at the LLBG, and co-sampling with RCRA groundwater monitoring, to be sampled semiannually. Installation of additional wells is currently underway to replace wells that have gone dry.

None

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Advancing Performance Assessment for Disposal of Depleted Uranium at Clive Utah - 12493  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Performance Assessment (PA) for disposal of depleted uranium (DU) waste has recently been completed for a potential disposal facility at Clive in northwestern Utah. For the purposes of this PA, 'DU waste' includes uranium oxides of all naturally-occurring isotopes, though depleted in U-235, varying quantities of other radionuclides introduced to the uranium enrichment process in the form of used nuclear reactor fuel (reactor returns), and decay products of all of these radionuclides. The PA will be used by the State of Utah to inform an approval decision for disposal of DU waste at the facility, and will be available to federal regulators as they revisit rulemaking for the disposal of DU. The specific performance objectives of the Clive DU PA relate to annual individual radiation dose within a 10,000-year performance period, groundwater concentrations of specific radionuclides within a 500-year compliance period, and site stability in the longer term. Fate and transport processes that underlie the PA model include radioactive decay and ingrowth, diffusion in gaseous and water phases, water advection in unsaturated and saturated zones, transport caused by plant and animal activity, cover naturalization, natural and anthropogenic erosion, and air dispersion. Fate and transport models were used to support the dose assessment and the evaluation of groundwater concentrations. Exposure assessment was based on site-specific scenarios, since the traditional human exposure scenarios suggested by DOE and NRC guidance are unrealistic for this site. Because the U-238 in DU waste reaches peak radioactivity (secular equilibrium) after 2 million years (My) following its separation, the PA must also evaluate the impact of climate change cycles, including the return of pluvial lakes such as Lake Bonneville. The first draft of the PA has been submitted to the State of Utah for review. The results of this preliminary analysis indicate that doses are very low for the site-specific receptors for the 10,000-year compliance period. This is primarily because DU waste is not highly radioactive within this time frame, the DU waste is assumed to be buried beneath zones exposed by erosion, groundwater concentrations of DU waste constituents do not exceed groundwater protection limits with in the 500-year compliance period, and the first deep lake occurrence will disperse DU waste across a large area, and will ultimately be covered by lake-derived sediment. A probabilistic PA model was constructed that considered DU waste and decay product doses to site-specific receptors for a 10,000-yr performance period, as well as deep-time effects. The quantitative results are summarized in Table VII. Doses (as TEDE) are always less than 5 mSv in a year, and doses to the offsite receptors are always much less than 0.25 mSv in a year. Groundwater concentrations of Tc-99 are always less than its GWPL except when the Tc-99 contaminated waste is disposed below grade. Even in this case, the median groundwater concentration is only 4.18 Bq/L (113 pCi/L), which is more than one order of magnitude less than the GWPL for Tc-99. The results overall suggest that there are disposal configurations that can be used to dispose of the proposed quantities of DU waste that are adequately protective of human health. (authors)

Black, Paul; Tauxe, John; Perona, Ralph; Lee, Robert; Catlett, Kate; Balshi, Mike; Fitzgerald, Mark; McDermott, Greg [Neptune and Company, Inc., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Shrum, Dan; McCandless, Sean; Sobocinski, Robert; Rogers, Vern [EnergySolutions, LLC, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CONMOW: Condition Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practice the European project CONMOW (Condition Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms) was started in November

Edwin Wiggelinkhuizen; Theo Verbruggen; Henk Braam; Luc Rademakers; Miguel Catalin Tipluica; Andrew Maclean; Axel Juhl Christensen; Edwin Becker; Pr?ftechnik Cm Gmbh (d; Dirk Scheffler; Nordex Energy Gmbh (d

282

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NERSC 2011 High Performance Computing Facility Operationalby providing high-performance computing, information, data,s deep knowledge of high performance computing to overcome

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Shelburne Farms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shelburne Farms Shelburne Farms Jump to: navigation, search Name Shelburne Farms Place Shelburne, Vermont Zip VT 05482 Product Shelburne Farms is a membership-supported, nonprofit environmental education center and National Historic Landmark in Shelburne, Vermont Coordinates 44.376075°, -73.226054° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.376075,"lon":-73.226054,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

284

Roeder Farms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Roeder Farms Roeder Farms Jump to: navigation, search Name Roeder Farms Facility Roeder Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner 5045 Wind Partners Developer 5045 Wind Partners Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Des Moines IA Coordinates 43.29729211°, -93.28315258° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.29729211,"lon":-93.28315258,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

285

Frey Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Frey Farm Frey Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Frey Farm Facility Frey Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPL Renewable Energy Developer PPL Renewable Energy LLC / Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority Energy Purchaser Turkey Hill Dairy Location Conestoga PA Coordinates 39.95904681°, -76.45606756° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.95904681,"lon":-76.45606756,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

286

Carsten Farms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carsten Farms Carsten Farms Jump to: navigation, search Name Carsten Farms Facility Carsten Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Location Shelby IA Coordinates 41.4013022°, -94.60524023° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4013022,"lon":-94.60524023,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

287

Assessment of cathode active materials from the perspective of integrating environmental impact with electrochemical performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A method was brought forward for assessing cathode active materials from a perspective that accounts for the environmental impact and the electrochemical performance. Then the integrated performance, referred to as the final environmental impact, was quantified into a dimensionless score, \\{EIc\\} (see Eq. (2)). Subsequently, four types of cathode active materials LiFePO4/C, LiFe0.98Mn0.02PO4/C, LiFe0.98Ti0.02PO4/C, and FeF3(H2O)3/C were assessed. The results were: (1) the \\{EIc\\} sequence was LiFePO4/C (1.76E-02Pt) > LiFe0.98Ti0.02PO4/C (1.74E-02 Pt) > LiFe0.98Ti0.02PO4/C (1.66E-02Pt) >FeF3(H2O)3/C (4.98E-03 Pt), which meant FeF3(H2O)3/C was the optimal material and had the minimal final environmental impact. (2) With regard to the eleven impact categories, the category respiratory effects exerted by inorganics made up the largest percentage of the \\{EIc\\} for the four materials. (3) In the aspects of \\{EIm\\} (EI (Eco-indicator) value of a 1 kg cathode active material), average specific discharge capacity, and cycle life, the sub-optimal materials' sequence of theoretical potential for optimization was as follows: LiFe0.98Ti0.02PO4/C > LiFe0.98Mn0.02PO4/C > LiFePO4/C. This meant that the final environmental impact of LiFePO4/C was the most difficult to reduce, and the impact of LiFe0.98Ti0.02PO4/C could not be reduced very easily. (4) To reduce the final environmental impact, the following concrete measures were recommended: (a) the optimization of the synthesis processes for smaller particle diameters; (b) the adoption of other surface-coating agents, utilizing (other) dopants; (c) the substitution of the energy-efficient instruments for the energy-intensive instruments; (d) the optimization of the synthesis processes to contain fewer electricity-intensive steps.

Yajuan Yu; Dong Wang; Kai Huang; Xiang Wang; Yuhan Liang; Weijun Sun; Bo Chen; Shi Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, Germantown, MD (United States); Phifer, Mark [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

An integrated environmental modeling framework for performing Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Standardized methods are often used to assess the likelihood of a human-health effect from exposure to a specified hazard, and inform opinions and decisions about risk management and communication. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is specifically ... Keywords: Integrated environmental modeling, Manure, Pathogens, QMRA, Risk assessment, Watershed modeling

Gene Whelan, Keewook Kim, Mitch A. Pelton, Jeffrey A. Soller, Karl J. Castleton, Marirosa Molina, Yakov Pachepsky, Richard Zepp

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

RESEARCH ARTICLE Higher sustainability performance of intensive grazing versus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flemish dairy farms on the use of nutrients and energy, pro- ductivity and profitability, labor input and discussion with farmers and farm advisors. Results show that, on average, the zero-grazing farms performed cows is an integral part of dairy farming in many European countries, farmers today more often choose

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

291

Implementation of Localized Corrosion in the Performance Assessment Model for Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total system performance assessment (TSPA) model has been developed to analyze the ability of the natural and engineered barriers of the Yucca Mountain repository to isolate nuclear waste over the 10,000-year period following repository closure. The principal features of the engineered barrier system (EBS) are emplacement tunnels (or ''drifts'') containing a two-layer waste package (WP) for waste containment and a titanium drip shield to protect the waste package from seeping water and falling rock, The 20-mm-thick outer shell of the WP is composed of Alloy 22, a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The barrier function of the EBS is to isolate the waste from migrating water. The water and its associated chemical conditions eventually lead to degradation of the waste packages and mobilization of the radionuclides within the packages. There are five possible waste package degradation modes of the Alloy 22: general corrosion, microbially influenced corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, early failure due to manufacturing defects, and localized corrosion. This paper specifically examines the incorporation of the Alloy-22 localized corrosion model into the Yucca Mountain TSPA model, particularly the abstraction and modeling methodology, as well as issues dealing with scaling, spatial variability, uncertainty, and coupling to other sub-models that are part of the total system model.

Vivek Jain, S. David Sevougian, Patrick D. Mattie, Kevin G. Mon, and Robert J. Mackinnon

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Assessment of the use of oxygenated fuels on emissions and performance of a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Requirements as torque, power, specific fuel consumption and emitted compounds are highly influenced by the chemical composition of the fuel being burned. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the use of oxygenated fuels on emissions of NOx, CO, HC, CO2 and particle number and size distribution (11.5diesel engine coupled to a dynamometer bench was used, where three types of fuels were employed, B5 (diesel with 5% of biodiesel); B5E6 (ternary composition containing 89% diesel, 5% of biodiesel and 6% of ethanol); and B100 (100% of biodiesel). The performance of a diesel engine was also evaluated to see the impact of the oxygenated fuels in this kind of engine. The use of ethanol with high latent heat of vaporization and low cetane number added to the binary blend (B5) shown an increase in the HC emissions and a reduction in \\{NOx\\} emissions when compared to B5. The use of pure biodiesel (B100) with high oxygen content showed a reduction in the HC emissions, but presented the highest emissions for both \\{NOx\\} and particle number of smaller diameter among the studied fuels. The use of more oxygenated fuels reduced the power output and increased the fuel consumption, but the exergy analysis showed that the energy efficiency of these fuels could be considered similar to the B5 fuel.

Llian Lefol Nani Guarieiro; Egdio Teixeira de Almeida Guerreiro; Keize Katiane dos Santos Amparo; Victor Bonfim Manera; Ana Carla D. Regis; Aldenor Gomes Santos; Vitor P. Ferreira; Danilo J. Leo; Ednildo A. Torres; Jailson B. de Andrade

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Waste Form Release Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package documents the experimentally derived input data on the representative waste glasses; LAWA44, LAWB45, and LAWC22. This data will be used for Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases (STORM) simulations of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) for immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The STORM code will be used to provide the near-field radionuclide release source term for a performance assessment to be issued in July 2005. Documented in this data package are data related to 1) kinetic rate law parameters for glass dissolution, 2) alkali (Na+)-hydrogen (H+) ion exchange rate, 3) chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form in accelerated weathering tests, and 4) thermodynamic equilibrium constants assigned to these secondary phases. The kinetic rate law and Na+-H+ ion exchange rate were determined from single-pass flow-through experiments. Pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) and product consistency (PCT) tests where used for accelerated weathering or aging of the glasses in order to determine a chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form. The majority of the thermodynamic data used in this data package were extracted from the thermody-namic database package shipped with the geochemical code EQ3/6, version 8.0. Because of the expected importance of 129I release from secondary waste streams being sent to IDF from various thermal treatment processes, parameter estimates for diffusional release and solubility-controlled release from cementitious waste forms were estimated from the available literature.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Saripalli, Prasad; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, P. F.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Reed, Lunde R.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Probability, conditional probability and complementary cumulative distribution functions in performance assessment for radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A formal description of the structure of several recent performance assessments (PAs) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is given in terms of the following three components: a probability space (S{sub st}, S{sub st}, p{sub st}) for stochastic uncertainty, a probability space (S{sub su}, S{sub su}, p{sub su}) for subjective uncertainty and a function (i.e., a random variable) defined on the product space associated with (S{sub st}, S{sub st}, p{sub st}) and (S{sub su}, S{sub su}, p{sub su}). The explicit recognition of the existence of these three components allows a careful description of the use of probability, conditional probability and complementary cumulative distribution functions within the WIPP PA. This usage is illustrated in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). The paradigm described in this presentation can also be used to impose a logically consistent structure on PAs for other complex systems.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Grouting at the Idaho National Laboratory Tank Farm Facility, R. Mark Shaw  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grouting at the Grouting at the Idaho National Laboratory Tank Farm Facility R. Mark Shaw, U. S. Department of Energy safety v performance v cleanup v closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 2 Topics/Agenda * Tank Farm Overview * Tank and Vault Grouting * Cooling Coil and Transfer Line Grouting safety v performance v cleanup v closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 3 INTEC TANK FARM CLOSURE INTEC TANK FARM CLOSURE VES-WM-103 VES-WM-104 VES-WM-105 VES-WM-106 182 183 185 186 187 189 190 188 184 181 180 Tank Farm Facility Octagon Vaults: WM-180, WM-181 Pillar and Panel Vaults: WM-182, WM-183, WM-184, WM-185, WM-186 Square Vaults: WM-187, WM-188, WM-189, WM-190 GV99 0008 safety v performance v cleanup v closure M E Environmental Management

296

Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

Kaplan, D

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2011 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2011 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary More Documents & Publications Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September...

298

PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF THE CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITYWIND TURBINE AND CHARACTERIZATION OF WIND AVAILABILITY.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??To better understand the behavior of wind turbines placed in an urban environment, a study was performed to characterize the wind availability and performance of (more)

Wo, Chung

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing landfill performance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and WTE waste management options... Transfer Stations (MTS); Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Landfill Gas (LFG): Geographic Wormation Systems (GIS... . Care has been taken to...

300

Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Abstract: The RESRAD-OFFSITE code was developed to evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of initial (primary) contamination. The primary contamination, which is the source of all releases modeled by the code, is assumed to be a layer of soil. The code considers the release of contamination from the source to the atmosphere, to surface runoff, and to groundwater. The radionuclide leaching was modeled as a first order (without transport) release using radionuclide distribution coefficient and infiltration rate calculated from water balance (precipitation, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, etc.). Recently, a new source term model was added the RESRAD-OFFSITE code so that it can be applied to the evaluation of Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal facility performance assessment. This new improved source term model include (1) first order with transport, (2) equilibrium desorption (rinse) release, and (3) uniform release (constant dissolution). With these new source release options, it is possible to simulate both uncontainerized (soil) contamination and containerized (waste drums) contamination. A delay time in the source release was also added to the code. This allows modeling the LLW container degradation as a function of time. The RESRAD-OFFSITE code also allows linking to other codes using improved flux and concentration input options. Additional source release model such as diffusion release may be added later. In addition, radionuclide database with 1252 radionuclides (ICRP 107) and the corresponding dose coefficients (DCFPAK 3.02) and the Department of Energys new gender- and age-averaged Reference Person dose coefficients (DOE-STD-1196-2011) which is based on the US census data will be added to the next version of RESRAD-OFFSITE code

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Waste Form Release Data Package for the 2001 Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package documents the experimentally derived input data on the representative waste glasses LAWABP1 and HLP-31 that will be used for simulations of the immobilized lowactivity waste disposal system with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code. The STORM code will be used to provide the near-field radionuclide release source term for a performance assessment to be issued in March of 2001. Documented in this data package are data related to 1) kinetic rate law parameters for glass dissolution, 2) alkali-H ion exchange rate, 3) chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form in accelerated weathering tests, and 4) thermodynamic equilibrium constants assigned to these secondary phases. The kinetic rate law and Na+-H+ ion exchange rate were determined from single-pass flow-through experiments. Pressurized unsaturated flow and vapor hydration experiments were used for accelerated weathering or aging of the glasses. The majority of the thermodynamic data were extracted from the thermodynamic database package shipped with the geochemical code EQ3/6. However, several secondary reaction products identified from laboratory tests with prototypical LAW glasses were not included in this database, nor are the thermodynamic data available in the open literature. One of these phases, herschelite, was determined to have a potentially significant impact on the release calculations and so a solubility product was estimated using a polymer structure model developed for zeolites. Although this data package is relatively complete, final selection of ILAW glass compositions has not been done by the waste treatment plant contractor. Consequently, revisions to this data package to address new ILAW glass formulations are to be regularly expected.

McGrail, B. Peter; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Martin, Paul F.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Rodriguez, Eugenio; Steele, Jackie L.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Characterization, propagation and analysis of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 2008 performance assessment (PA) for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, illustrates the conceptual structure of risk assessments for complex systems. The 2008 YM PA is based on the following three ...

Clifford W. Hansen; Jon C. Helton; Cdric J. Sallaberry

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Butchering Day on the Farm  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Butchering Day on the Farm Butchering Day on the Farm Nature Bulletin No. 734 November 30, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor BUTCHERING DAY ON THE FARM In the old days, on a farm, we seldom had much money but we had a lot of fun. At threshing time, for instance, horseplay and fun erupted amidst sweaty spells of hard work. Another big event in farm life when neighbors got together, worked hard and had fun, was butchering day. Most of us butchered at least twice during winter. The number of times and the number of hogs depended upon the size of each family. We ate pork three times a day, six days a week, and chicken on Sunday. Beef steaks and roasts were rare treats enjoyed when we ate with friends or relatives in town. We had no refrigeration, no way to keep a side of beef; whereas hog meat could be smoked, "salted down", pickled, or preserved in big jars of lard.

304

Farm-level simulation of alternative resource-conserving production systems for representative crop farms in the Northern Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irrigated and dryland conditions, and sprinkler irrigation with and without a low energy precision application (LEPA) system. With dryland conditions, participation in the Conservation Reserve Program was evaluated. Farm situations werc. simulated over a... farm program provisions. This latter assumption was adopted in order to assess potential of alternative crop rotations. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I express my sincere appreciation to Dr. James W. Richardson, my advisor and chairman of the committee...

De Brey, Cristobal J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources for Developing-Country Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance variations. Incandescent and fluorescent lightbetter than the common incandescent lamp. Off-grid lighting

Mills, Evan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Performance and thermo-economic assessments of geothermal district heating system: A case study in Afyon, Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study energy, exergy and exergoeconomic analysis of the Afyon geothermal district heating system (AGDHS) in Afyon, Turkey is performed through thermodynamic performances and thermo-economic assessments. In the analysis, actual system data are used to assess the district heating system performance, energy and exergy efficiencies, exergy losses and loss cost rates. Energy and exergy losses throughout the AGDHS are quantified and illustrated in the flow diagram. The energy and exergy efficiencies of the overall system are found to be 37.59% and 47.54%, respectively. The largest exergy loss occurs in the heat exchangers with 14.59% and then in the reinjection wells with 14.09%. Besides, thermo-economic evaluations of the AGDHS are given in table. Energy and exergy loss rates for the AGDHS are estimated to be 5.36kW/$ and 0.2 kW/$, respectively.

Ali Keeba?

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Types of Farming in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1860's, it spread rapidly to serve much oI the Suu Farming spread out from the main streams to the interior with the development of the railroad systems ant1 in response to broadening markets. However, [;ittle were being trailed out of Texas across... 1860's, it spread rapidly to serve much oI the Suu Farming spread out from the main streams to the interior with the development of the railroad systems ant1 in response to broadening markets. However, [;ittle were being trailed out of Texas across...

Bonnen, C. A.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Assessment of the fuel magnetisation capacity to improve fuel economy and enhance performance in a four-stroke SI engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the effect of fuel magnetisation on the overall performance of a four-stroke Spark Ignition (SI) engine. To achieve this objective, we have designed a set of experiments using the Mitsubishi 1.5 L (4G15) SI engine. Each experiment is performed in two phases: with and without the fuel magnetisation. The collected data was analysed to assess the overall performance of the engine at several operating conditions. Our study shows that fuel magnetiser can enhance the overall performance of a typical SI engine. However, the enhancement greatly depends on the operating condition of the engine. Specifically, the best-observed performance enhancement in the tested engine owing to the usage of the fuel magnetiser was to reduce the Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC) by 9% increase the Brake Power (BP) by 9% and boost the brake thermal efficiency (?b) from 29% to 31%.

Raed Kafafy; Wajdi Bin Ali; Waleed Faris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Characterization, Propagation and Analysis of Aleatory and Epistemic Uncertainty in the 2008 Performance Assessment for the Proposed Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 2008 performance assessment (PA) for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, illustrates the conceptual...

Clifford W. Hansen; Jon C. Helton; Cdric J. Sallaberry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

WM2014 Conference- Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions - 14575

311

Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Analysis of the low-level waste radionuclide inventory for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a study to improve the estimates of the radionuclides in the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) inventory which is buried in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The work is done to support the RWMC draft performance assessment (PA). Improved radionuclide inventory estimates are provided for the INEL LLW generators. Engineering, environmental assessment or other research areas may find use for the information in this report. It may also serve as a LLW inventory baseline for data quality assurance. The individual INEL LLW generators, their history and their activities are also described in detail.

Plansky, L.E.; Hoiland, S.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

US Farms Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farms Inc Farms Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name US Farms Inc Place San Diego, California Zip 92106 Product US Farms produces and distributes horticultural products through a number of subsidiaries. References US Farms Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. US Farms Inc is a company located in San Diego, California . References ↑ "US Farms Inc" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=US_Farms_Inc&oldid=352607" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

314

White Wind Farms Strategic Communications Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White Wind Farms is a small, startup Kansas winery located in Paola. The goal of this project was to develop a strategic marketing communications plan to assist in the growth and development of the White Wind Farms brand.....

Ford, Gina; Noulles, Mary; James, Jessica

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Financial Implications of Intergenerational Farm Transfers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study seeks to address the challenge of family farm succession. A recursive, stochastic, simulation model is employed to estimate the financial impacts and accompanying risk incurred through the intergenerational transfer of farm assets...

Peterson, Devin Richard

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

316

2014 Farm Progress Show | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Farm Progress Show 2014 Farm Progress Show August 26, 2014 12:00PM EDT to August 28, 2014 9:00PM EDT Boone, Iowa http:farmprogressshow.com...

317

Development and Implementation of a Statistical Risk Assessment Method for New Aircraft Performance at XYZ Corporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At XYZ Corporation (XYZ), the standard method of creating aircraft performance guarantees does not incorporate engineering risk or uncertainty. Since performance guarantees are a contractual agreement to the customer, the customer is not obligated...

Schroeder, Christopher R.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

318

Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S{sub c,p}) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S{sub c,p} within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone, respectively. Furthermore, volume averaging of the IC can be observed for the 5 mm aperture where it differs by as much as 9.1% compared to the PSD measurement. The angular dependency of the UD is also observed, unveiled by an under-response around 2.5% of both 5 and 35 mm apertures. Conclusions: Output Factors and dose profiles measurements performed, respectively, with the PSD and the PSDCA were in agreement with those obtained with the UD and EBT2 films. For stereotactic radiosurgery treatment verification, the PSD gives accurate results compared to the planning system and the IC once the latter is corrected to compensate for the averaging effect of the IC. The PSD provides precise results when used as a single detector or in a dense array, resulting in a great potential for stereotactic radiosurgery QA measurements.

Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Life-Cycle Assessment of Highway Pavement Alternatives in Aspects of Economic, Environmental, and Social Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Input Output Life Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA) provides economic transactions, environmental emissions, and energy use throughout a product's life cycle based on a dollar amount of the product. A custom EIO-LCA model was conducted to compare...

Mao, Zhuting

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

Performing Energy Security Assessments- A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Guide describes the best practices and recommended process for federal facility managers to prepare for the following sections of a facilitys energy security plan: vulnerability assessments, energy preparedness and operations plans, and remedial action plans.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Assessing performance : an analytical framework for the San Jos McEnery Convention Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study first outlines three major factors that limit the assessments of convention centers: high uncertainty in the convention industry, complex institutional structures and operational priorities, and plethora of ...

Lee, Kai-yan, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Performance Assessment of Ejector Augmented Pulsed Detonation Rockets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in a device such as a scramjet, the ejector offers a viable alternative for improving performance at low

Texas at Arlington, University of

323

Part-Time Farming in Northeast Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JANUARY THE AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION. TEXAS IN COOPERATION WITH THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 632320 - This analysis of part-the farming... is part of a broad the income levels, income sources and farm and human patterns of the.88,W rural o area of Northeast Texas (Tearas Agricultural Bulletin 940, Incomes of Rural Families in No A major farm adjustmen part-time farming, or a greater...

Martin, James R.; Southern, John H.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Assessment of compliance with ground water protection standards in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the assessment of compliance with ground water protection standards in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) regulatory background, (ii) analysis structure including characterization of uncertainty, and (iii) analysis results for each of the ground water protection standards. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian; M. Wasiolek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Fish farming: Eat your veg  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... world's food supply, but there's a hidden cost behind some of the farmed fish on supermarket shelves. Many, including the popular salmon, trout and cod, are fed ... shelves. Many, including the popular salmon, trout and cod, are fed on wild fish. Lots of wild ...

Kendall Powell

2003-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

Airborne sound propagation over sea during offshore wind farm piling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore piling for wind farm construction has attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to the extremely high noise emission levels associated with such operations. While underwater noise levels were shown to be harmful for the marine biology the propagation of airborne piling noise over sea has not been studied in detail before. In this study detailed numerical calculations have been performed with the Green's Function Parabolic Equation (GFPE) method to estimate noise levels up to a distance of 10?km. Measured noise emission levels during piling of pinpiles for a jacket-foundation wind turbine were assessed and used together with combinations of the sea surface state and idealized vertical sound speed profiles (downwind sound propagation). Effective impedances were found and used to represent non-flat sea surfaces at low-wind sea states 2 3 and 4. Calculations show that scattering by a rough sea surface which decreases sound pressure levels exceeds refractive effects which increase sound pressure levels under downwind conditions. This suggests that the presence of wind even when blowing downwind to potential receivers is beneficial to increase the attenuation of piling sound over the sea. A fully flat sea surface therefore represents a worst-case scenario.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The prevalence of off-farm employment among married farm women residing in Texas: a human ecological approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that various changes in the farm structure tend to be associated with certain forms of adaptation. Indicators of such forms of adaptation are gross farm sales, number of farms, energy expenditures, hired farm labor, and part-time farming. Albrecht (1988... correlated with lower gross farm sales, fewer farms, reduced energy expenditures, and fewer farm workers in nonmetropolitan counties of the Great Plains. Further, in an ecological analysis of the impacts 25 of irrigation, Albrecht and Murdock (1986b...

Schiflett, Kathy Lynn

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Simulation Research of Smes With Fuzzy Logic Controller for Improving the Transient Stability in Wind Farm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mathematic models for wind power generator and superconducting magnetic energy storage ... of SMES in improving the operation performance of wind farms is studied. The simulation results show that the propose...

Huang Xiaohua; Xiao Liye

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Blown in the wind: bats and wind farms in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The number of wind turbines in operation in Brazil will triple in five years, raising concern for the conservation of Brazilian bats. We analyzed the status of bat species richness and occurrence in areas with high wind potential in Brazil. By crossing datasets on species records and wind potential we identified 21 hotspots and 226 data gap areas. Overall, 70% of the areas with the highest wind potential are data gaps, lacking elementary information about species presence. Current Environment Impact Assessments system for wind farms in Brazil has relaxed regulations and questionable effectiveness. Environmental agencies should require de facto Environment Impact Assessments in data gap areas, with technical rigor proportional to the investment under course. At least for bats, the Brazilian wind power sector must raise the bar, adopting a more rigorous licensing. Alliances to minimize bat mortality at wind farms are necessary and this goal should be pursued in Brazil.

Enrico Bernard; Adriana Paese; Ricardo Bomfim Machado; Ludmilla Moura de Souza Aguiar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Quantitative assessment of socio-economic performance measures measures accounting for seismic damage to buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUMMARY: This paper presents a model to evaluate systemic performance metrics, such as casualties the buildings damage state, the combined residual service level in the utility networks, as well as the weather conditions, all together play a role in the evaluation of the performance metrics. This novel feature

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

331

Human Resources Staffing Plan for the Tank Farm Contractor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Resources Staffing Plan quantified the equivalent staffing needs required for the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) and its subcontractors to execute the readiness to proceed baseline between FY 2000-2008. The TFC staffing needs were assessed along with the staffings needs of Fluor Hanford and the privatization contractor. The plan then addressed the staffing needs and recruitment strategies required to execute the baseline.

BOSLEY, J.W.

2000-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

332

Assessing selected technologies and operational strategies for improving the environmental performance of future aircraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aviation industry is expected to grow at a rate of 4-5% in the next 20 years. Such a growth rate may have important impacts on local air quality, climate change and community noise. This work assesses selected technologies ...

Mahashabde, Anuja (Anuja Anil)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A realistic coupled nonlinear artificial ECG, BP and respiratory signal generator for assessing noise performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A realistic coupled nonlinear artificial ECG, BP and respiratory signal generator for assessing differential equations is capable of generating realistic synthetic electrocardiograms (ECGs). Open source code with realistic inter-signal coupling between the respiration, BP and ECG time series. The time-varying surface

McSharry, Patrick E.

334

Investigation of Wind Turbine Rotor Concepts for Offshore Wind Farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current plans in offshore wind energy developments call for further reduction of cost of energy. In order to contribute to this goal, several wind turbine rotor concepts have been investigated. Assuming the future offshore wind turbines will operate only in the offshore wind farms, the rotor concepts are not only evaluated for their stand-alone performances and their potential in reducing the loads, but also for their performance in an offshore wind farm. In order to do that, the 10MW reference wind turbine designed in Innwind.EU project is chosen as baseline. Several rotor parameters have been modified and their influences are investigated for offshore wind turbine design purposes. This investigation is carried out as a conceptual parametrical study. All concepts are evaluated numerically with BOT (Blade optimisation tool) software in wind turbine level and with Farmflow software in wind farm level for two wind farm layouts. At the end, all these concepts are compared with each other in terms of their advantages and disadvantages.

zlem Ceyhan; Francesco Grasso

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Performance assessment of XACML authorizations for Supply Chain Traceability Web Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Web Services (WS) offer advanced flexibility and interoperability capabilities. However they imply significant performance overheads that need to be carefully considered. Supply Chain ...

Pardal, Miguel L.

336

Assessment of the performance of a natural gas liquefaction cycle using natural refrigerants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study proposed a new cascade liquefaction cycle that uses CO2C2H6N2 and CO2N2, analyzed its performance and exergy using HYSYS which is the liquefaction process simulator, and checked its applicability. ...

Jung-In Yoon; Kwang-Hwan Choi; Ho-Sang Lee; Hyeon-Ju Kim

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Seismic Performance Assessment and Probabilistic Repair Cost Analysis of Precast Concrete Cladding Systems for Multistory Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov. 8- 9. Arnold, C. 2008. Seismic Safety of the BuildingTab Connections for Gravity and Seismic Loads. Steel Tips,and Brown, A.T. 1995a. Seismic Performance of Architectural

Hunt, Jeffrey Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Double-shell tank integrity assessments ultrasonic test equipment performance test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A double-shell tank (DST) inspection (DSTI) system was performance tested over three months until August 1995 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, completing a contract initiated in February 1993 to design, fabricate, and test an ultrasonic inspection system intended to provide ultrasonic test (UT) and visual data to determine the integrity of 28 DSTs at Hanford. The DSTs are approximately one-million-gallon underground radioactive-waste storage tanks. The test was performed in accordance with a procedure (Jensen 1995) that included requirements described in the contract specification (Pfluger 1995). This report documents the results of tests conducted to evaluate the performance of the DSTI system against the requirements of the contract specification. The test of the DSTI system also reflects the performance of qualified personnel and operating procedures.

Pfluger, D.C.

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

339

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Presentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Nine companies certified under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program have shown an average energy performance improvement of 10% in the first 18 months of implementing SEP with an average payback of 1.7 years. These findings and other results were presented at the July 2013 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry hosted by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy

340

Performance assessment for the disposal of low-level waste in the 200 West Area Burial Grounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the findings of a performance assessment (PA) analysis for the disposal of solid low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in the 200 West Area Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in the northwest corner of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This PA analysis is required by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A (DOE 1988a) to demonstrate that a given disposal practice is in compliance with a set of performance objectives quantified in the order. These performance objectives are applicable to the disposal of DOE-generated LLW at any DOE-operated site after the finalization of the order in September 1988. At the Hanford Site, DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) has issued a site-specific supplement to DOE Order 5820.2A, DOE-RL 5820.2A (DOE 1993), which provides additiona I ce objectives that must be satisfied.

Wood, M.I.; Khaleel, R.; Rittmann, P.D.; Lu, A.H.; Finfrock, S.H.; DeLorenzo, T.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R.J.; Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nuclear waste transmutation performance assessment of an accelerator driven subcritical reactor for waste transmutation (ADS-NWT)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As a concept of leadbismuth cooled accelerator driven sub-critical reactor, ADS-NWT was proposed for nuclear waste transmutation by FDS Team. In this paper, preliminary transmutation performance assessment on ADS-NWT was performed by using metallic dispersion fuel and metal alloy fuel. The studies were committed to improving the Discharge Transmutation Support Ratio (DTSR) under three key design constraints. Subject to the design constraints on the effective multiplication factor, the peak linear power and the peak fast neutron fluence, the design studies had been performed for ADS-NWT blanket. From these studies, the results showed that the maximum DTSR was primarily related to the MA/Pu ratio, the peak fast neutron fluence and fuel design under imposed design constraints. The maximum DTSR could be ?47 in one refueling cycle time when the thermal power was fixed to 1000MW and the effective multiplication factor was 0.98 based on the specific design.

Zhong Chen; Yican Wu; Baoxin Yuan; Dongmei Pan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment of the Surveillance Program of the High-Level Waste Storage Tanks at Hanford :.I LALI iE REJ 163 ROOM 1t 4 F77L. -77 .:earmn OfEeg Asitn Sertr fo niomn 4 z. r...

343

Hurricanes and Offshore Wind Farms  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Hurricanes and Offshore Wind Farms Hurricanes and Offshore Wind Farms July 17, 2013 Man: Please continue to stand by. Today's conference will begin momentarily. Thank you. Coordinator: Welcome, and think you for standing by. At this time, all participants are in a listen only mode for the duration of today's call. Today's conference is being recorded. If you have any objections, you may disconnect at this time. Now I would like to turn the meeting over to Mr. Jonathan Bartlett. Sir you may begin. Jonathan Bartlett: Thank you. Good afternoon, this is Jonathan Bartlett. I'm speaking to you from the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C. Welcome everyone to the July Edition of the Wind Power in America webinar. This month we have two speakers, Joel Cline and Mark Powell will discuss the impacts of

344

Farm ACW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ACW ACW Jump to: navigation, search Name Farm ACW Place Fallbrook, California Zip 92028 Product A farm producing avocados. Coordinates 33.384659°, -117.253124° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.384659,"lon":-117.253124,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

345

The Farm and Ranch Corporation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by a board of directors consisting of one or more members. The number of directors is elected in the manner provided in the articles of incorporation or the bylaws. REASONS FOR INCORPORATION Farmers and ranchers incorporate for several reasons... have farmers and ranchers looked to the corporate organization as a vehicle to accom plish other objectives. Incorporating the family farm 4 may not be advantageous for all farmers and ranchers. Specific objectives and individual situa tions...

Brints, Norman; Sartin, Marvin

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Stochastic and Deterministic Performance Assessment of PID and MPC Controllers: Application to a Hydrotreater Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrotreating processes are very important in petroleum refineries due to environmental reasons. However, the hydrotreater operational costs are very high, being increased when there is not an optimization on the catalyst lifetime, which is harmed by an inefficient control. At the same time, a control system tends to lose performance over time if its response is not monitored and thus there is no support information on how to adjust it. Enhanced controller projects have complementary systems to identify and diagnose performance reduction and also to implement predetermined solutions vis--vis the desirable type of output. When selecting the controller design and strategy, the thorough simulation of the underlying process is important in order to draw a greater number of possible alternatives of control and their application on this simulator, thus conferring more information for the decision. The goal of this paper was to investigate the response of feedback controllers in contrast with model predictive ones applied to the first bed of a diesel hydrotreating reactor, which was simulated using a phenomenological model, and to asset their deterministic and stochastic performances. The deterministic performance was evaluated through the integral of time multiplied by the absolute error (ITAE) and the quadratic variation of the control action; the stochastic performance was analyzed based on the normalized Harris index and on the variability and quadratic variation of the control actions. The predictive control algorithm used in this paper was the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) one, developed by Clarke et al. in 1987. Besides comparing different controller designs, this work also analyzed the impact of the changes in the tuning parameters. The feedback controllers were tuned by different heuristic and model based methods. The relation between predictive control performance and variations in reference trajectory and internal model was investigated. This study adds background information on deterministic and stochastic performances of process controllers, through the application of different designs and strategies of controllers to a hydrotreating complex reactional process.

Alain C. Carelli; Mauricio B. de Souza Jr.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Land tenure and farm management efficiency: The case of smallholder rubber production in customary land areas of Sumatra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study assesses the impact of land tenure institutions on the efficiency of farm management based on a case study of rubber production in customary land areas of Sumatra, Indonesia ... rates of return to tree...

S. Suyanto; T. P. Tomich; K. Otsuka

348

Assessment of Cost-optimal Energy Performance Requirements for the Italian Residential Building Stock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Directive 2010/31/EU establishes that Member States must ensure that minimum energy performance requirements for buildings are set with a view to achieve cost-optimal levels. The paper presents a methodology for identifying the cost-optimal levels for the Italian residential building stock, following the Guidelines accompanying the Commission Delegated Regulation No. 244/2012. The methodology is applied to a reference building of the IEE-TABULA project and considering different energy efficiency measures. The energy performance and the global cost calculations are performed according to UNI/TS 11300 and UNI EN 15459, respectively. A new cost optimisation procedure based on a sequential search-optimisation technique considering discrete options is applied.

Vincenzo Corrado; Ilaria Ballarini; Simona Paduos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Re-Assessing Green Building Performance: A Post Occupancy Evaluation of 22 GSA Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2nd report on the performance of GSA's sustainably designed buildings. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of measured whole building performance as it compares to GSA and industry baselines. The PNNL research team found the data analysis illuminated strengths and weaknesses of individual buildings as well as the portfolio of buildings. This section includes summary data, observations that cross multiple performance metrics, discussion of lessons learned from this research, and opportunities for future research. The summary of annual data for each of the performance metrics is provided in Table 25. The data represent 1 year of measurements and are not associated with any specific design features or strategies. Where available, multiple years of data were examined and there were minimal significant differences between the years. Individually focused post occupancy evaluation (POEs) would allow for more detailed analysis of the buildings. Examining building performance over multiple years could potentially offer a useful diagnostic tool for identifying building operations that are in need of operational changes. Investigating what the connection is between the building performance and the design intent would offer potential design guidance and possible insight into building operation strategies. The 'aggregate operating cost' metric used in this study represents the costs that were available for developing a comparative industry baseline for office buildings. The costs include water utilities, energy utilities, general maintenance, grounds maintenance, waste and recycling, and janitorial costs. Three of the buildings that cost more than the baseline in Figure 45 have higher maintenance costs than the baseline, and one has higher energy costs. Given the volume of data collected and analyzed for this study, the inevitable request is for a simple answer with respect to sustainably designed building performance. As previously stated, compiling the individual building values into single metrics is not statistically valid given the small number of buildings, but it has been done to provide a cursory view of this portfolio of sustainably designed buildings. For all metrics except recycling cost per rentable square foot and CBE survey response rate, the averaged building performance was better than the baseline for the GSA buildings in this study.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.; Henderson, Jordan W.; Kora, Angela R.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

SPECIFICATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF IFC BASED PERFORMANCE METRICS TO SUPPORT BUILDING LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF HYBRID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the introduction of tighter building codes have done little to stem the poor energy performance in commercial on owners to quantify the energy usage of their buildings against benchmarks set by government energy (LBNL), Berkeley, CA, USA ABSTRACT Minimising building life cycle energy consumption is becoming

351

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 5, Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume of the 1992 PA contains results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to migration of gas and brine from the undisturbed repository. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B. Volume 2 describes the technical basis for the performance assessment, including descriptions of the linked computational models used in the Monte Carlo analyses. Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to the EPA`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6. Results of the 1992 uncertainty and sensitivity analyses indicate that, conditional on the modeling assumptions and the assigned parameter-value distributions, the most important parameters for which uncertainty has the potential to affect gas and brine migration from the undisturbed repository are: initial liquid saturation in the waste, anhydrite permeability, biodegradation-reaction stoichiometry, gas-generation rates for both corrosion and biodegradation under inundated conditions, and the permeability of the long-term shaft seal.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Performance assessment in support of the 1996 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: A decision analysis perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is under development by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the geologic disposal of transuranic waste. The primary regulatory requirements (i.e., 40 CFR 191 and 40 CFR 194) placed on the WIPP by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) involve a complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF) for normalized radionuclide releases to the accessible environment. The interpretation and use of this CCDF from a decision analysis perspective is discussed and illustrated with results from the 1996 performance assessment for the WIPP, which was carried out to support a compliance certification application by the DOE to the EPA for the WIPP.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Anderson, D.R.; Jow, H.N.; Marietta, M.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Basabilvazo, G. [Dept. of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modeling and controller performance assessment for a switched reluctance motor drive based on setpoint relay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers the implementation of a current control method for switched reluctance motors (SRMs) and presents a novel approach to the accurate on-line modeling of an SRM drive. A simple autotuning technique for the SRM drives using a PWM controller is considered. Furthermore, conventional PI control and Internal Model Control (IMC) are considered to validate this method and present corresponding robust control analysis for the process. The control structures are comparatively analyzed using standard robustness measures for stability and performance. The proposed PWM controller is simulated and a hardware prototype is then implemented using digital signal processor control to evaluate the method using a 12/8, three-phase SRM. The experimental results of the SRM drive model validates the performance of the current loop.

L.L.N. dos Reis; A.A.R. Coelho; O.M. Almeida; J.C.T. Campos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Burco Farm and Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burco Farm and Feed Burco Farm and Feed Jump to: navigation, search Name Burco Farm and Feed Facility Burco Farm and Feed Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Burco Farm and Feed Energy Purchaser Burco Farm and Feed Location Independence IA Coordinates 42.5638438°, -91.88753486° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5638438,"lon":-91.88753486,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

355

JJN Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

JJN Wind Farm JJN Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name JJN Wind Farm Facility JJN Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner JJNWind Farm Developer JJNWind Farm Location Buffalo Ridge MN Coordinates 44.0039°, -96.0526° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.0039,"lon":-96.0526,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

356

ARM Data Quality Office … Real-Time Assessment of Instrument Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Quality Office Data Quality Office Real-Time Assessment of ARM Data *Ken Kehoe *Randy Peppler *Karen Sonntag *Terra Thompson *Nathan Hiers *Chris Schwarz Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK *Sean Moore ATK Mission Research, Santa Barbara, CA ARM Data Quality History Originally, each Site Scientist and Instrument Mentor was responsible for data quality analysis. This resulted in uneven treatment of instruments at the different ARM climate research facilities. The ARM Infrastructure Review in 1999 decided there was a need for a single data quality "czar" to oversee DQ activities for all sites. In response to this review the ARM DQO was established in July 2000 at The University of Oklahoma. ARM's goal is to provide the best data possible for scientific

357

Coal-Fueled Diesel Technology Assessment Study: systems performance and cost comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the performance of diesel engines operating on coal-based fuels and compares their power generation costs with those of corresponding oil-burning prime movers. Similar performance and cost comparisons are also presented for an alternative prime mover, the direct-fired gas turbine in both a simple-cycle and a regenerative-cycle configuration. The coal-based fuels under consideration include micronized coal, coal slurries, and coal-derived gaseous fuels. The study focuses on medium-speed diesel engines for locomotive, marine, small stationary power, and industrial cogeneration applications in the 1000 to 10,000 kW size range. This report reviews the domestic industrial and transportation markets for medium-speed engines currently using oil or gas. The major problem areas involving the operation of these engines on coal-based fuels are summarized. The characteristics of available coal-based fuels are discussed and the costs of various fuels are compared. Based on performance data from the literature, as well as updated cost estimates originally developed for the Total Energy Technology Alternatives Studies program, power generation costs are determined for both oil-fueled and coal-fueled diesel engines. Similar calculations are also performed for direct-fired gas turbines. The calculations illustrate the sensitivity of the power generation cost to the associated fuel cost for these prime movers. The results also show the importance of reducing the cost of available coal-based fuels, in order to improve the economic competitiveness of coal-fueled prime movers relative to engines operating on oil or gas. 50 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

Holtz, R.E.; Krazinski, J.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generated by offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For wind power generation offshore sites offer significantly better wind conditions compared to onshore. At the same time, the demand for raw materials and therefore the related environmental impacts increase due to technically more demanding wind energy converters and additional components (e.g. substructure) for the balance of plant. Additionally, due to environmental concerns offshore wind farms will be sited farshore (i.e. in deep water) in the future having a significant impact on the operation and maintenance efforts (O&M). Against this background the goal of this analysis is an assessment of the specific GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions as a function of the site conditions, the wind mill technology and the O&M necessities. Therefore, a representative offshore wind farm is defined and subjected to a detailed LCA (life cycle assessment). Based on parameter variations and modifications within the technical and logistical system, promising configurations regarding GHG emissions are determined for different site conditions. Results show, that all parameters related to the energy yield have a distinctive impact on the specific GHG emissions, whereas the distance to shore and the water depth affect the results marginally. By utilizing the given improvement potentials GHG emissions of electricity from offshore wind farms are comparable to those achieved onshore.

Britta Reimers; Burcu zdirik; Martin Kaltschmitt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Department of Energy Continuous Learning Points for the Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Web Based Training Classes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 2010 1 May 2010 1 There are 6 web based training modules for Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS), Architect-Engineer Contract Administration Support Systems (ACASS), Construction Contractor Appraisal Support System (CCASS) and Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS). This on-line web based training is an interactive online classroom for the delivery of live training. There is no investment in software required. Web based training classes and the schedule for CPARS, ACASS, and CCASS classes are at http://www.cpars.csd.disa.mil/allapps/cpartrng/webtrain/webtrain_all.htm. The modules are as follows: 1 - ACASS/CCASS Overview (2 hours) (2 Continuous Learning Points) This training will give the student an overview of the policies and regulations governing

360

Long Island Solar Farm Project Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Island Solar Farm Island Solar Farm Project Overview The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a 32-megawatt solar photovoltaic power plant built through a collaboration including BP Solar, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), and the Department of Energy. The LISF, located on the Brookhaven National Laboratory site, began delivering power to the LIPA grid in November 2011, and is currently the largest solar photovoltaic power plant in the Eastern United States. It is generating enough renewable

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361

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Farms  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Farms Wind Farms When establishing wind farms, wind energy developers generally approach landowners where they want to build. Interest in wind farms is frequently spurred by external pressures such as tax and other financial incentives and legislative mandates. Since each situation is influenced by local policies and permitting, we can only provide general guidance to help you learn about the process of installing wind turbines. Publications Wind Project Development Process Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities: A Handbook. (August 2002). National Wind Coordinating Collaborative. Landowner Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. (August 2003). "State Wind Working Group Handbook." pp. 130-133. Software Wind Energy Finance Calculator Tool for financial analysis of

362

Farm Credit Canada Energy Loan (Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Loan helps Canadian producers or agri-business owners considering renewable energy purchase and install on-farm energy sources, such as:

363

Novel Controls of Photovoltaic (PV) Solar Farms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Solar Farms are absolutely idle in the night and even during daytime operate below capacity in early mornings and late afternoons. Thus, the entire expensive (more)

Rahman, Shah Arifur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Sandia National Laboratories: Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy The Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) research facility will provide...

365

Theoretical Predictions and Experimental Assessments of the Performance of Alumina RF Windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radio frequency (RF) windows are the most likely place for catastrophic failure to occur in input power couplers for particle accelerators. Reliable RF windows are essential for the success of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program because there are over 1000 windows on the accelerator, and it takes more than one day to recover from a window failure. The goals of this research are to analytically predict the lifetime of the windows, to develop a conditioning procedure, and to evaluate the performance of the RF windows. The analytical goal is to predict the lifetime of the windows. The probability of failure is predicted by the combination of a finite element model of the window, Weibull probabilistic analysis, and fracture mechanics. The window assembly is modeled in a finite element electromagnetic code in order to calculate the electric fields in the window. The geometry (i.e. mesh) and electric fields are input into a translator program to generate the mesh and boundary conditions for a finite element thermal structural code. The temperatures and stresses are determined in the thermal/structural code. The geometry and thermal structural results are input into another translator program to generate an input file for the reliability code. Material, geometry and service data are also input into the reliability code. To obtain accurate Weibull and fatigue data for the analytical model, four point bend tests were done. The analytical model is validated by comparing the measurements to the calculations. The lifetime of the windows is then determined using the reliability code. The analytical model shows the window has a good thermal mechanical design and that fast fracture is unlikely to occur below a power level of 9 Mw. The experimental goal is to develop a conditioning procedure and evaluate the performance of RF windows. During the experimental evaluation, much was learned about processing of the windows to improve the RF performance. Methods of processing included grit blasting and using various coatings.

Karen Ann Cummings

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Assessing Soil Vapor Extraction Remediation Performance and Closure: A Review - 12188  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a baseline remediation approach for volatile contaminants. While SVE is generally effective for removal of contaminants from higher permeability portions of the vadose zone, contamination in low-permeability zones can persist due to mass transfer processes that limit the removal effectiveness. Thus, a diminishing rate of contaminant extraction over time is typically observed, yet contamination may remain in low-permeability zones. Under these conditions, SVE performance needs to be evaluated to determine whether the system should be optimized, terminated, or transitioned to another technology to replace or augment SVE. Methodologies have been developed to quantify SVE performance over time and to evaluate the impact of persistent vadose zone contamination sources on groundwater quality. Recently, these methods have applied mass flux/discharge concepts to quantify contaminant source strength. Methods include field measurement techniques using the SVE system to quantify source strength and predictive analyses with analytical and numerical models to evaluate the impact of the contaminant source on groundwater. (authors)

Truex, M.J.; Carroll, K.C.; Oostrom, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Performance assessment for the geological disposal of Deep Burn spent fuel using TTBX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of Deep Burn Modular High Temperature Reactor Spent Fuel (DBSF) is investigated in the Yucca Mountain geological repository (YMR) with respect to the annual dose (Sv/yr) delivered to the Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual (RMEI) from the transport of radionuclides released from the graphite waste matrix. Transport calculations are performed with a novel computer code, TTBX which is capable of modeling transport pathways that pass through heterogeneous geological formations. TTBX is a multi-region extension of the existing single region TTB transport code. Overall the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is seen to be four orders of magnitude lower than the regulatory threshold for exposure, even under pessimistic scenarios. A number of factors contribute to the favorable performance of DBSF. A reduction of one order of magnitude in the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is observed for every order of magnitude increase in the waste matrix lifetime, highlighting the importance of the waste matrix durability and suggesting graphite's utility as a potential waste matrix for the disposal of high-level waste. Furthermore, we see that by incorporating a higher fidelity far-field model the peak annual dose calculated to be received by the RMEI is reduced by two orders of magnitude. By accounting for the heterogeneities of the far field we have simultaneously removed unnecessary conservatisms and improved the fidelity of the transport model. (authors)

Van den Akker, B.P.; Ahn, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Evaluating airborne radionuclide concentrations in the tank farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to determine, through the collection of grab sampling data, that an in-depth resuspension study should or should not be performed. Currently there is not enough data available to determine if a potential health hazard exists due to resuspended contamination in the tank farms. A detailed resuspension study is currently not justified, because the limited quantity of air sample data collected does not indicate the existence of a potential health hazard.

Gleckler, B.P.

1993-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

Tank farm nuclear criticality review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of stored wastes at the Hanford Site Tank Farm Complex was reviewed by a team of senior technical personnel whose expertise covered all appropriate aspects of fissile materials chemistry and physics. The team concluded that the detailed and documented nucleonics-related studies underlying the waste tanks criticality safety basis were sound. The team concluded that, under current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality accident is incredible in any of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SST), double-shell tanks (DST), or double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTS) on the Hanford Site.

Bratzel, D.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

370

Chapter 1 - How Green and Does it Clean: Methodologies for Assessing Cleaning Products for Safety and Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Industrial surface cleaning is performed for a number of reasons. It may be required to prepare the surfaces of parts prior to manufacturing processes such as welding or painting. It may be performed for aesthetic reasons as an aid to marketing and sales. The cleaning process is imperative to perform well and changing from a proved process can seem daunting. However, the change is sometimes necessary as many cleaning products contain harmful chemicals that can have serious adverse effects. Therefore, a systematic method for assessing environmental, health, and safety is an important step in the selection process. There are many tools that exist to make this an easier task. Once a safer alternative is identified, performance testing is needed because if a product is green but does not work, then so what. Nobody is going to use it. Solvents have been used for many years in all fields of cleaning and were often performed via single-species vapor degreasing operation. This streamlined approach was due to traditional solvents superior ability to dissolve organic matter. The alternatives tend to not be one-size-fits-all type of solution and require performance verification. The problem with the way most people evaluate cleaning product effectiveness is that their comparisons tend to be subjective, not scientific. However, well-written test protocols and repeatable science needs to play a key role in choosing cleaning products that work consistently well. Combining these lab-based methods with in-field process-specific testing will result in the identification of safer and effective cleaning alternatives.

Jason P. Marshall; Heidi Wilcox

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

372

Status Update on Action 2c: Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) for Performing Assessments of Activity-level Work Planning and Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Bradley K. Davy, Director, Office of Worker Safety and Health Assistance, HS. Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) for Performing Assessments of Activity- Level Work Planning and Control. DOE CRAD Development Approach.

373

Comprehensive Self-Assessment and Upgrade Program (CSAUP) performance objectives and criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has placed strong emphasis on a new way of doing business patterned on the lessons learned in the nuclear power industry after the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2. The new way relies on strict adherence to policies and procedures, a greatly expanded training program, and much more rigor and formality in operations. Another key element is more visible oversight by upper management and auditability by DOE. Although the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) has functioned in a safe manner since its beginning, the policies and methods of the past are no longer appropriate. Therefore, in accordance with these directives, Chem Tech is improving its operational performance by making a transition to greater formality in the observance of policies and procedures and a more deliberate consideration of the interrelationships between organizations at ORNL. This transition to formality is vitally important because both our staff and our facilities are changing with time. For example, some of the inventors and developers of the processes and facilities in use are now passing the torch'' to the next generation of Chem Tech staff. Our facilities have also served us well for many years, but the newest of these are now over 20 years old All have increasing needs of refurbishment and repair, and some of the older ones need to be replaced. This procedure, based on the lessons learned in the nuclear industry, will enhance Chem Tech's operational performance in some important ways, while maintaining the special factors that have allowed the Chem Tech staff to be creative and successful in the RD D activities.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A suite of metrics for assessing the performance of solar power forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Forecasting solar energy generation is a challenging task because of the variety of solar power systems and weather regimes encountered. Inaccurate forecasts can result in substantial economic losses and power system reliability issues. One of the key challenges is the unavailability of a consistent and robust set of metrics to measure the accuracy of a solar forecast. This paper presents a suite of generally applicable and value-based metrics for solar forecasting for a comprehensive set of scenarios (i.e., different time horizons, geographic locations, and applications) that were developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiatives efforts to improve the accuracy of solar forecasting. In addition, a comprehensive framework is developed to analyze the sensitivity of the proposed metrics to three types of solar forecasting improvements using a design-of-experiments methodology in conjunction with response surface, sensitivity analysis, and nonparametric statistical testing methods. The three types of forecasting improvements are (i) uniform forecasting improvements when there is not a ramp, (ii) ramp forecasting magnitude improvements, and (iii) ramp forecasting threshold changes. Day-ahead and 1-hour-ahead forecasts for both simulated and actual solar power plants are analyzed. The results show that the proposed metrics can efficiently evaluate the quality of solar forecasts and assess the economic and reliability impacts of improved solar forecasting. Sensitivity analysis results show that (i) all proposed metrics are suitable to show the changes in the accuracy of solar forecasts with uniform forecasting improvements, and (ii) the metrics of skewness, kurtosis, and Rnyi entropy are specifically suitable to show the changes in the accuracy of solar forecasts with ramp forecasting improvements and a ramp forecasting threshold.

Jie Zhang; Anthony Florita; Bri-Mathias Hodge; Siyuan Lu; Hendrik F. Hamann; Venkat Banunarayanan; Anna M. Brockway

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: Analysis of residential refrigerator/freezer performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is conducting a large end-use data acquisition program in an effort to understand how energy is utilized in buildings with permanent electric space heating equipment in the Pacific Northwest. The initial portion of effort, known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The collection of detailed end-use data provided an opportunity to analyze the amount of energy consumed by both refrigerators and separate freezers units located in residential buildings. By obtaining this information, the uncertainty of long- term regional end-use forecasting can be improved and potential utility marketing programs for new appliances with a reduced overall energy demand can be identified. It was found that standby loads derived from hourly averages between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m. reflected the minimum consumption needed to maintain interior refrigerator temperatures at a steady-state condition. Next, an average 24-hour consumption that included cooling loads from door openings and cooling food items was also determined. Later, analyses were conducted to develop a model capable of predicting refrigerator standby loads and 24-hour consumption for comparison with national refrigerator label ratings. Data for 140 residential sites with a refrigeration end-use were screened to develop a sample of 119 residences with pure refrigeration for use in this analysis. To identify those refrigerators that were considered to be pure (having no other devices present on the circuit) in terms of their end-use classification, the screening procedure used a statistical clustering technique that was based on standby loads with 24-hour consumption. 5 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Ross, B.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Reliability evaluation for electrical collector systems of wind farm using the section enumeration technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Topology has a significant effect on the reliability performance of an electrical collector system (ECS) of wind farms. Novel indices for the reliability of wind farm ECS are presented based on topological features of wind farm ECS in this paper. The concept of the section for a wind farm ECS is defined. The probability table of multistate capacity (PTMC) for a wind turbine generator (WTG) and the Probability Table of the Number of WTG in Up-state (PTNU) for a section can be created. Based on the PTMC and PTNU PTMC of a wind farm can be established using the state enumeration algorithm and the matrix operations. Therefore the reliability evaluation model considering effects of wind speed and component failures can be built. The proposed model not only considers the multi-failures of ECS components including failures of cable feeder WTG and wind turbine transformer (WTT) but also states of switching devices in failure disconnection and switching processes. Four wind farm ECS topologies i.e. radial topology single-sided ring topology double-sided ring topology and star topology are implemented. Case studies on the reliability evaluation of wind farm ECS are used to verify the feasibility and validity of the proposed technique.

Kaigui Xie; Hejun Yang; Bo Hu; David Yu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in organic and conventional farming systems in the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic agriculture is often considered to contribute to reducing energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, also on a per unit product basis. For energy, this is supported by a large number of studies, but the body of evidence for \\{GHGs\\} is smaller. Dutch agriculture is characterized by relatively intensive land use in both organic and conventional farming, which may affect their performance in terms of energy use and GHG emissions. This paper presents results of a model study on energy use and GHG emissions in Dutch organic and conventional farming systems. Energy use per unit milk in organic dairy is approximately 25% lower than in conventional dairy, while GHG emissions are 5-10% lower. Contrary to dairy farming, energy use and GHG emissions in organic crop production are higher than in conventional crop production. Energy use in organic arable farming is 10-30% and in organic vegetable farming 40-50% higher than in their respective conventional counterparts. GHG emissions in organic arable and vegetable farming are 0-15% and 35-40% higher, respectively. Our results correspond with other studies for dairy farming, but not for crop production. The most likely cause for higher energy use and GHG emissions in Dutch organic crop production is its high intensity level, which is expressed in crop rotations with a large share of high-value crops, relatively high fertiliser inputs and frequent field operations related to weeding.

Jules F.F.P. Bos; Janjo de Haan; Wijnand Sukkel; Ren L.M. Schils

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - March...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tank Farms - March 10-12, 2014 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - March 10-12, 2014 March 10-12, 2014 Hanford Tank Farm Operations HIAR-HANFORD-2014-03-10...

379

John Melendy: Santa Cruz County Farm Advisor, 1947-1976  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Santa Cruz County Farm Advisor: Early Life page 6 Knaster: ISanta Cruz County Farm Advisor: Early Life page 9 matter ofSanta Cruz County Farm Advisor: Early Life page 11 Melendy:

regional History Project, UCSC Library; Melendy, John; Knaster, Meri; Reti, Irene

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Outlook for Farm Products and Inputs Special Articles · Outlook for the National Economy and Agricultural Policies · Smart Growth and Wisconsin Agriculture · The Wisconsin Agricultural Economy: A Broader

Radeloff, Volker C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Assessment of passive safety system performance under gravity driven cooling system drain line break accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A generation III+ Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) which relies on natural circulation has evolved from earlier BWR designs by incorporating passive safety features to improve safety and performance. Natural circulation allows the elimination of emergency injection pump and no operator action or alternating current (AC) power supply. The generation III+ BWR's passive safety systems include the Automatic Depressurization System (ADS), the Suppression Pool (SP), the Standby Liquid Control System (SLCS), the Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS), the Isolation Condenser System (ICS) and the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). The ADS is actuated to rapidly depressurize the reactor leading to the GDCS injection. The large amount of water in the SP condenses steam from the reactor. The SLCS provides makeup water to the reactor. The GDCS injects water into the reactor by gravity head and provides cooling to the core. The ICS and the PCCS are used to remove the decay heat from the reactor. The objective of this paper is to analyze the response of passive safety systems under the Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). A GDCS Drain Line Break (GDLB) test has been conducted in the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA) which is scaled to represent the generation III+ BWR. The main results of PUMA GDLB test were that the reactor coolant level was well above the Top of Active Fuel (TAF) and the reactor containment pressure has remained below the design pressure. In particular, the containment maximum pressure (266kPa) was 36% lower than the safety limit (414kPa). The minimum collapsed water level (1.496m) before the GDCS injection was 8% lower than the TAF (1.623m) but it was ensured that two-phase water level was higher than the TAF with no core uncovery.

J. Lim; J. Yang; S.W. Choi; D.Y. Lee; S. Rassame; T. Hibiki; M. Ishii

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Multi-Methods Approach to HRA and Human Performance Modeling: A Field Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a research reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory is primarily designed and used to test materials to be used in other, larger-scale and prototype reactors. The reactor offers various specialized systems and allows certain experiments to be run at their own temperature and pressure. The ATR Canal temporarily stores completed experiments and used fuel. It also has facilities to conduct underwater operations such as experiment examination or removal. In reviewing the ATR safety basis, a number of concerns were identified involving the ATR canal. A brief study identified ergonomic issues involving the manual handling of fuel elements in the canal that may increase the probability of human error and possible unwanted acute physical outcomes to the operator. In response to this concern, that refined the previous HRA scoping analysis by determining the probability of the inadvertent exposure of a fuel element to the air during fuel movement and inspection was conducted. The HRA analysis employed the SPAR-H method and was supplemented by information gained from a detailed analysis of the fuel inspection and transfer tasks. This latter analysis included ergonomics, work cycles, task duration, and workload imposed by tool and workplace characteristics, personal protective clothing, and operational practices that have the potential to increase physical and mental workload. Part of this analysis consisted of NASA-TLX analyses, combined with operational sequence analysis, computational human performance analysis (CHPA), and 3D graphical modeling to determine task failures and precursors to such failures that have safety implications. Experience in applying multiple analysis techniques in support of HRA methods is discussed.

Jacques Hugo; David I Gertman

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Landfill gas upgrading with pilot-scale water scrubber: Performance assessment with absorption water recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pilot-scale counter current absorption process for upgrading municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill gas to produce vehicle fuel was studied using absorption, desorption and drying units and water as an absorbent. Continuous water recycling was used without adding new water to the system. The process parameters were defined by a previous study made with this pilot system. The effect of pressure (2025bar), temperature (1025C) and water flow speed (5.511l/min) on the upgrading performance, trace compounds (siloxanes, halogenated compounds) and water quality were investigated. Raw landfill gas flow was kept constant at 7.41Nm3/h. Methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) contents in the product gas were 8690% and 4.58.0% with all studied pressures and temperatures. The remaining fraction in product gas was nitrogen (N2) (from 1% to 7%). Organic silicon compounds (siloxanes) were reduced by 16.6% and halogenated compounds similarly by 90.1% by water absorption. From studied process parameters, only water flow speed affected the removal of siloxanes and halogen compounds. The absorbent water pH was between 4.44.9, sulphide concentration between 0.11.0mg/l and carbonate concentration between 5001000mg/l. The product gas drying system reduced the siloxane concentration by 99.1% and halogenated compounds by 99.9% compared to the raw landfill gas. In conclusion, the pilot-scale gas upgrading process studied appears to be able to produce gas with high energy content (approx 8690% methane) using a closed water circulation system. When using a standard gas drying system, all trace compounds can be removed by over 99% compared to raw landfill gas.

J. Lntel; S. Rasi; J. Lehtinen; J. Rintala

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools and resources for next-generation systems.

Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Radiological performance assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The E-Area Vaults (EAVs) located on a 200 acre site immediately north of the current LLW burial site at Savannah River Site will provide a new disposal and storage site for solid, low-level, non-hazardous radioactive waste. The EAV Disposal Facility will contain several large concrete vaults divided into cells. Three types of structures will house four designated waste types. The Intermediate Level Non-Tritium Vaults will receive waste radiating greater than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container. The Intermediate Level Tritium Vaults will receive waste with at least 10 Ci of tritium per package. These two vaults share a similar design, are adjacent, share waste handling equipment, and will be closed as one facility. The second type of structure is the Low Activity Waste Vaults which will receive waste radiating less than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container and containing less than 10 Ci of tritium per package. The third facility, the Long Lived Waste Storage Building, provides covered, long term storage for waste containing long lived isotopes. Two additional types of disposal are proposed: (1) trench disposal of suspect soil, (2) naval reactor component disposal. To evaluate the long-term performance of the EAVs, site-specific conceptual models were developed to consider: (1) exposure pathways and scenarios of potential importance; (2) potential releases from the facility to the environment; (3) effects of degradation of engineered features; (4) transport in the environment; (5) potential doses received from radionuclides of interest in each vault type.

Cook, J.R.; Hunt, P.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

San Gorgonio Farms Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

III III Facility San Gorgonio Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

387

San Gorgonio Farms Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Facility San Gorgonio Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

388

Wallys Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wallys Wind Farm Wallys Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wallys Wind Farm Facility Wallys Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wallys Wind Farm LLC Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Lake Benton MN Coordinates 44.2847°, -96.4256° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.2847,"lon":-96.4256,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

389

Karen Avenue Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farm Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Karen Avenue Wind Farm Facility Karen Avenue Windfarm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner San Gorgonio Farms Developer San Gorgonio Farms Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

390

NREL: Learning - Photovoltaics for Farms and Ranches  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Farms and Ranches Farms and Ranches Photo of cows and a photovoltaic powered water pump. Photovoltaic power can be used to pump water for livestock. The following resources will provide you with more information on the uses of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems on farms and ranches, as well as guides to buying and installing a solar energy system. If you are unfamiliar with this technology, see the introduction to PV systems. General Information Energy Savers: Solar Energy Applications for Farms and Ranches Basic information about using solar energy on farms and ranches from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Own Your Power! A Consumer Guide to Solar Electricity This 16-page booklet from the U.S. Department of Energy provides information about how you can use solar energy at home.

391

Wing River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Wind Farm River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wing River Wind Farm Facility Wing River Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wing River Wind Farm Developer Wing River Wind Farm Location Hewitt MN Coordinates 46.3254°, -95.0864° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.3254,"lon":-95.0864,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

392

Uilk Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uilk Wind Farm Uilk Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Uilk Wind Farm Facility Uilk Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Uilk Wind Farm Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location West of Pipestone MN Coordinates 43.994704°, -96.365232° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.994704,"lon":-96.365232,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

Sandia National Laboratories: Increasing the Scaled Wind Farm...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ClimateECEnergyIncreasing the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility's Power Production Increasing the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility's Power Production DOE Office of...

394

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Tank Farms - February...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

- February 2014 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Tank Farms - February 2014 February 2014 Review of the Hanford Tank Farms Safety Management Program Implementation for...

395

California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

396

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - April 2013...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

tour the Hanford Tank Farms, observe video inspection of single shell and double shell tanks, and observe Tank Farm project and staff meetings. Independent Activity Report,...

397

Sandia National Laboratories: Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ClimateECEnergyScaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Baselining Project Accelerates Work Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Baselining Project Accelerates Work Increasing the...

398

EIS-0485: Interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm, Holt...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm, Holt County, Nebraska EIS-0485: Interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm, Holt County, Nebraska SUMMARY DOE's Western Area...

399

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. As part of this development, a detailed performance assessment (PA) for the YM repository was completed in 2008 and supported a license application by the DOE to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the construction of the YM repository. The following aspects of the 2008 YM PA are described in this presentation: (i) conceptual structure and computational organization, (ii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques in use, (iii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for physical processes, and (iv) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified the NRCs regulations for the YM repository.

Jon C. Helton; Clifford W. Hansen; Cdric J. Sallaberry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process Final Report December 2001 This document is not an official copy and is for informational purposes only. CONTENTS Summary Objectives International perspective Recommendations for future assessments 1 Introduction 1.1 Background to the Yucca Mountain Project 1.2 Terms of reference, objectives and scope of the review 1.3 Conduct of the review 1.4 Organisation of this report 2 General Considerations 2.1 Regulatory perspective 2.2 Performance assessment rationale 2.3 General approach to performance assessment 2.4 Documentation 3 Sub-system methodology 3.1 Repository design

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Economics of Farm Biogas in Cold Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion of farm and dairy waste has been shown to be capital intensive. One way to improve digester economics is to co-digest high-energy substrates together with the dairy manure. Cheese whey for example represents a high-energy substrate that is generated during cheese manufacture. There are currently no quantitative tools available that predict performance of co-digestion farm systems. The goal of this project was to develop a mathematical tool that would (1) predict the impact of co-digestion and (2) determine the best use of the generated biogas for a cheese manufacturing plant. Two models were developed that separately could be used to meet both goals of the project. Given current pricing structures of the most economical use of the generated biogas at the cheese manufacturing plant was as a replacement of fuel oil to generate heat. The developed digester model accurately predicted the performance of 26 farm digesters operating in the North Eastern U.S.

Pragasen Pillay; Stefan Grimberg; Susan E. Powers

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

402

Science Road Map for Phase 2 of the Tank-Farm Vadose Zone Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase 1 of the Tank-Farm Vadose Zone Program (TFVZP) developed information on the nature and extent of vadose zone contamination in the tank farms through field studies, laboratory analyses and experiments, and historical data searches; assembled data and performed tank-farm risk analysis; and initiated interim corrective actions to lessen the impacts of tank leak contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists and external collaborators at universities and U.S. Department of Energy user facilities sampled and analyzed contaminant plumes. These types of activities will continue during Phase 2 of the TFVZP to refine and expand scientific understanding of the subsurface beneath tank farms, especially of water movement, residual waste leaching, and contaminant transport.

Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Mann, Frederick M.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design - working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching.

VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

404

An introduction to the mechanics of performance assessment using examples of calculations done for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant between 1990 and 1992. Revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of the processes used to access the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The quantitative metrics used in the performance-assessment (PA) process are those put forward in the Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, HIgh-LEvel and transuranic radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191).

Rechard, R.P.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Long Island Solar Farm  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This technical report provides an in-depth look at the one SunShot Initiative success story, the Long Island Solar Farm project, which is a utility-scale solar array located at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Eastern Long Island, New York. Three aspects of this project make it remarkable: first, it is the largest utility-scale solar power plant in the Eastern United States; second, it is a commercial project built on federally administered public lands; and third, the project was very unlikely to have started in the first place. It is a valuable resource for solar energy research, which will greatly inform large-scale PV solar development in the East.

406

Performance Assessment of Suture Type, Water Temperature, and Surgeon Skill in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assessed performance of seven suture types in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha implanted with acoustic microtransmitters. Nonabsorbable (Ethilon) and absorbable (Monocryl) monofilament and nonabsorbable (Nurolon, silk) and absorbable (Vicryl, Vicryl Plus, Vicryl Rapide) braided sutures were used to close incisions in Chinook salmon. Monocryl exhibited greater suture retention than all other suture types 7 d after surgery. Both monofilament suture types were retained better than all braided suture types at 14 d. Incision openness and tag retention did not differ among suture types. Wound inflammation was similar for Ethilon, Monocryl, and Nurolon at 7 d. Wound ulceration was lower for Ethilon, Monocryl, and Nurolon than for all other suture types at 14 d post-surgery. Fish held in 12C water had more desirable post-surgery healing characteristics (i.e., higher suture and tag retention and lower incision openness, wound inflammation, and ulceration) at 7 and 14 d after surgery than those held in 17C water. The effect of surgeon was a significant predictor for all response variables at 7 d. This result emphasizes the importance of including surgeon as a variable in telemetry study analyses when multiple surgeons are used. Monocryl performed better with regard to post-surgery healing characteristics in the study fish. The overall results support the conclusion that Monocryl is the best suture material to close incisions created during surgical implantation of acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon.

Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Appendix PA: Performance Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The process that led to the final T-fields used in the PA is discussed below. Geologic data, including (1) depth to the top of the Culebra, (2) reduction in thickness of the...

408

An Economic Analysis of U.S. Farm Programs Including Senate and House Farm Bills on Representative Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural policy continues to play a large role in risk reduction for agricultural producers in the United States. However, current budget deficits and growing national debt has many policy makers looking for ways to change the farm safety net...

Knapek, George M

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

409

A Farm-Level Evaluation of Agricultural Profit and Ground Water Quality: Texas Seymour Aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance standard or a design standard (obtained from the model solution of performance standard) will decrease farm net income (over variable cost) by $6,220 or $5,225 for risk neutral and risk averse case, respectively. Arbitrarily selected design...

Chowdhury, Manzoor; Lacewell, Ronald D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Ozuna, Teofilo Jr.; Benson, Verel W.; Harris, Billy L.; Dyke, Paul T.

410

The Application of Performance Assessment to Make Regulatory and Operational Changes in an Operating Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how performance assessment (PA) is used to support changes to the regulatory basis of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP, located near Carlsbad, New Mexico is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the nation's only deep geologic repository for the disposal of transuranic nuclear waste. In 1998, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP met the performance requirements of 40 CFR Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. A PA analysis of long term (10,000 year) repository performance successfully demonstrated that the probability and consequences of potential long-term releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment would be well below the established limits. These results were key in obtaining WIPP's initial certification, allowing the first shipment and disposal of nuclear waste in March of 1999. As disposal operations have taken place over the last eight years, changes have been identified in the regulatory and operational realms of the facility that would enhance waste disposal efficiency. Such changes, however, cannot be made without prior consent of the EPA. Therefore, changes planned by the DOE must be thoroughly described and supported by varying degrees of the same type of analyses that were conducted to demonstrate the WIPP's containment capabilities as presented in the initial compliance application submitted to EPA in 1996. Such analyses are used to identify the impacts or benefits of implementing the planned change. The DOE has successfully used performance assessment analyses for the approval of changes such as: 1) the disposal of super-compacted waste forms, and; 2) the adoption of new parameters and modeling assumptions In some cases the planned changes are simpler in nature than those listed above, and therefore only require targeted or simplified PA analyses to demonstrate the effect on performance. Targeted analyses have been used to successfully gain approval of the following: 1) a reduction in the amount of magnesium oxide (MgO) chemical buffer backfill that must be emplaced in the repository 2) a change in the repository mining/disposal horizon In addition to these approved changes, the DOE has used PA analyses to support the following planned change requests that await EPA's approval: 1) panel closure redesign 2) further reduction in the MgO-to-waste ratio Finally, this paper will discuss some of the changes that the DOE is currently preparing and plans to submit to the EPA for approval in the near future. This paper will describe how a set of analytical tools initially used to open the WIPP continues to have a role in making the repository more efficient and adaptable as variations in waste streams, operational demands, and other dynamic forces change the operating environment over time. (authors)

Patterson, R. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kirkes, R. [John Hart and Associates, P.A., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms- November 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of Hanford Tank Farms Safety Basis Amendment for Double-Shell Tank Ventilation System Upgrades

412

Sandia National Laboratories performance assessment methodology for long-term environmental programs : the history of nuclear waste management.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the world leader in the development of the detailed science underpinning the application of a probabilistic risk assessment methodology, referred to in this report as performance assessment (PA), for (1) understanding and forecasting the long-term behavior of a radioactive waste disposal system, (2) estimating the ability of the disposal system and its various components to isolate the waste, (3) developing regulations, (4) implementing programs to estimate the safety that the system can afford to individuals and to the environment, and (5) demonstrating compliance with the attendant regulatory requirements. This report documents the evolution of the SNL PA methodology from inception in the mid-1970s, summarizing major SNL PA applications including: the Subseabed Disposal Project PAs for high-level radioactive waste; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant PAs for disposal of defense transuranic waste; the Yucca Mountain Project total system PAs for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; PAs for the Greater Confinement Borehole Disposal boreholes at the Nevada National Security Site; and PA evaluations for disposal of high-level wastes and Department of Energy spent nuclear fuels stored at Idaho National Laboratory. In addition, the report summarizes smaller PA programs for long-term cover systems implemented for the Monticello, Utah, mill-tailings repository; a PA for the SNL Mixed Waste Landfill in support of environmental restoration; PA support for radioactive waste management efforts in Egypt, Iraq, and Taiwan; and, most recently, PAs for analysis of alternative high-level radioactive waste disposal strategies including repositories deep borehole disposal and geologic repositories in shale and granite. Finally, this report summarizes the extension of the PA methodology for radioactive waste disposal toward development of an enhanced PA system for carbon sequestration and storage systems. These efforts have produced a generic PA methodology for the evaluation of waste management systems that has gained wide acceptance within the international community. This report documents how this methodology has been used as an effective management tool to evaluate different disposal designs and sites; inform development of regulatory requirements; identify, prioritize, and guide research aimed at reducing uncertainties for objective estimations of risk; and support safety assessments.

Marietta, Melvin Gary; Anderson, D. Richard; Bonano, Evaristo J.; Meacham, Paul Gregory (Raytheon Ktech, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

An Economic Study of Farm Organization in the Piney Woods Farming Area of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

majority of farms, cotton is the only commercial enterprise of importance; other enterprises are included primarily to supply farm and family requirements for feed and food. The commercial production of tomatoes, sweet potatoes, watermelons, numerous 1... the data from the detailed farm accounts. Records were obtained on the dairy, tomato, sweet potato, pea, and watermelon enter- prises. Information was obtained on the man labor, horse work, material requirements, and cash costs used in production...

Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred); Thibodeaux, B. H.; Criswell, J. F.

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute intruder scenario results comply with all performance objectives (Tables 6 and 7, Figures 5 and 6). The acute construction result for the SLB disposal units decreases significantly with this version. The maximum acute intruder dose occurs at 1,000 y for the SLB disposal units under the acute construction scenario. The acute intruder dose is caused by multiple radionuclides including U-238 (31 percent), Th-229 (28 percent), plutonium-239 (8.6 percent), U-233 (7.8 percent), and U-234 (6.7 percent). All results for radon-222 (Rn-222) flux density comply with the performance objective (Table 8, Figure 7). The mean Pit 13 RaDU flux density is close to the 0.74 Bq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} limit.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

415

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: USDA Farm Bill State Workshop  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Rural Rural Communities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Agricultural & Rural Farm Bill Outreach Articles Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, & Businesses Wind Farms Resources & Tools Native Americans USDA Farm Bill State Workshop Materials The Farm Bill presentations below were used at four Farm Bill Workshops in Montana, February 2004. We encourage state wind working groups to use the presentations below in their state workshops to help farmers, ranchers, and rural small businesses take advantage of the USDA Farm Bill (Section 9006) grants for renewable energy projects. These presentations will help those interested in developing wind projects to organize, write, and submit an application for funding assistance under the Farm Bill. Introduction to Wind Energy Applications

416

Ruthton Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ruthton Wind Farm Ruthton Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ruthton Wind Farm Facility Ruthton Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NAE/Enel North America Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Lincoln County MN Coordinates 44.4039°, -96.2646° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.4039,"lon":-96.2646,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

417

Olsen Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olsen Wind Farm Olsen Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Olsen Wind Farm Facility Olsen Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Olsens Developer Olsens with Dan Juhl Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Near Ihlen MN Coordinates 43.91065°, -96.369853° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.91065,"lon":-96.369853,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

418

Allegheny Ridge Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridge Wind Farm Ridge Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Allegheny Ridge Wind Farm Facility Allegheny Ridge wind farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner GE Energy Developer Gamesa Energy Purchaser First Energy Corp. Location Cambria and Blair Counties PA Coordinates 40.397243°, -78.546156° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.397243,"lon":-78.546156,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

419

Greensburg Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greensburg Wind Farm Greensburg Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Greensburg Wind Farm Facility Greensburg Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Developer John Deere Wind Location Southwest of Greensburg KS Coordinates 37.576188°, -99.320898° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.576188,"lon":-99.320898,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

420

Nobles Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm II Wind Farm II Jump to: navigation, search Name Nobles Wind Farm II Facility Nobles Wind Farm II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Xcel Energy Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Nobles County MN Coordinates 43.682956°, -95.728425° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.682956,"lon":-95.728425,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "farm performance assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Rosiere Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rosiere Wind Farm Rosiere Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rosiere Wind Farm Facility Rosiere Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Madison Gas & Electric Developer Madison Gas & Electric Energy Purchaser Madison Gas & Electric Location Kewaunee County WI Coordinates 44.669395°, -87.627218° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.669395,"lon":-87.627218,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

422

Octotillo Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Octotillo Wind Farm Octotillo Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Octotillo Wind Farm Facility Octotillo Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Duke Energy Carolinas LLC Developer Duke Energy Carolinas LLC Location Howard County TX Coordinates 32.209085°, -101.413704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.209085,"lon":-101.413704,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

423

Elk River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Wind Farm River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Elk River Wind Farm Facility Elk River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser Empire District Electric Co. Location Butler County KS Coordinates 37.586575°, -96.547093° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.586575,"lon":-96.547093,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

424

Elbow Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elbow Creek Wind Farm Elbow Creek Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Elbow Creek Wind Farm Facility Elbow Creek Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Padoma Developer Padoma Location Howard County TX Coordinates 32.133515°, -101.415676° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.133515,"lon":-101.415676,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

425

Paynes Ferry Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Paynes Ferry Wind Farm Paynes Ferry Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Paynes Ferry Wind Farm Facility Paynes Ferry Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exergy Developer Exergy Energy Purchaser Idaho Power Location Twin Falls County ID Coordinates 42.743987°, -114.929464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.743987,"lon":-114.929464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

426

Chandler Hills Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chandler Hills Wind Farm Chandler Hills Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Chandler Hills Wind Farm Facility Chandler Hills Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Terra-Gen Power Energy Purchaser Great River Energy Location Chandler Murray County MN Coordinates 43.916988°, -95.953898° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.916988,"lon":-95.953898,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

427

Spring Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spring Canyon Wind Farm Spring Canyon Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Spring Canyon Wind Farm Facility Spring Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Near Peetz CO Coordinates 40.95366°, -103.166993° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.95366,"lon":-103.166993,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

428

Sibley Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sibley Wind Farm Facility Sibley Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Northern Alternative Energy Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location Sibley IA Coordinates 43.4037°, -95.7417° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.4037,"lon":-95.7417,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

429

Stoney Corners Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Stoney Corners Wind Farm Facility Stoney Corners Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Heritage Sustainable Energy Developer Heritage Sustainable Energy Energy Purchaser DTE Energy Location Missaukee County MI Coordinates 44.208269°, -85.273706° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.208269,"lon":-85.273706,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

430

Long Island Solar Farm | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Long Island Solar Farm Long Island Solar Farm Project Overview The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a 32-megawatt solar photovoltaic power plant built through a collaboration including BP Solar, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), and the Department of Energy. The LISF, located on the Brookhaven National Laboratory site, began delivering power to the LIPA grid in November 2011, and is currently the largest solar photovoltaic power plant in the Eastern United States. It is generating enough renewable energy to power approximately 4,500 homes, and is helping New York State meet its clean energy and carbon reduction goals. Project Developer/Owner/Operator: Long Island Solar Farm, LLC (BP Solar & MetLife) Purchaser of Power: Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) purchases 100

431

South Holt Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holt Wind Farm Holt Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name South Holt Wind Farm Facility South Holt Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Long Island Power Authority Developer Long Island Power Authority Energy Purchaser Long Island Power Authority Location Southold NY Coordinates 41.063297°, -72.454444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.063297,"lon":-72.454444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

432

GSG Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GSG Wind Farm GSG Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name GSG Wind Farm Facility GSG Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown Developer FPC Services Location Lee and LaSalle Counties IL Coordinates 41.710895°, -89.050004° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.710895,"lon":-89.050004,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

433

Broken Bow Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bow Wind Farm Bow Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Broken Bow Wind Farm Facility Broken Bow Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Midwest Wind Energy Developer Midwest Wind Energy Energy Purchaser Nebraska Public Power District Location Custer County, Nebraska Coordinates 41.400029°, -99.573412° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.400029,"lon":-99.573412,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

434

Wege Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wege Wind Farm Wege Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wege Wind Farm Facility Wege Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Developer Steelcase and John Deere Wind Energy Purchaser Southwestern Public Service Location Panhandle TX Coordinates 35.346439°, -101.381375° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.346439,"lon":-101.381375,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

435

Velva Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velva Wind Farm Velva Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Velva Wind Farm Facility Velva Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Acciona Energy Developer Global Renewable Energy Partners/Acciona Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location McHenry County ND Coordinates 48.089928°, -100.907328° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.089928,"lon":-100.907328,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

436

Chestnut Flats Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chestnut Flats Wind Farm Chestnut Flats Wind