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1

Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0397 March 2008 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0397) Responsible Agencies: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA); Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation (Yakama Nation); Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW); U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (USFS), Title of Proposed Project: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project State Involved: Washington (WA) Abstract: BPA proposes to fund modification of the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in

3

DOE/EIS-0397: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (November 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0397 November 2008 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N BON N E V I L L E POW E R AD M I N I S T R A T I O N DOE/BP-3957 November 2008 Lyle Falls Fish Passage Facility Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife U.S.D.A. Forest Service November 2008 Lyle Falls Fish Passage Facility Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) DOE/EIS-0397

4

Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration S-1 Executive Summary S.1 Chapter 1: Purpose of and Need for Action The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation (YN) have requested funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to modify the existing Lyle Falls Fishway located on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, Washington. This fishway is owned by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and operated by the YN. The US Forest Service (USFS) administers portions of the Klickitat River and its corridor under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act). Lyle Falls, at river mile (RM) 2.2 of the Klickitat River, prevents some upstream migrating fish from reaching the upper watershed, especially when flows are low. The

5

White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume I..  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developed to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost ratio of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. 28 figs., 23 tabs.

Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Three-Mile Falls Dam; Umatilla River, Oregon, 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from October 1989 through September 1990 on evaluating juvenile fish bypass and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam on the Umatilla River. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR are: (1) ODFW (Report A): Operate and evaluate the juvenile fish bypass system in the West Extension Irrigation District canal at Three Mile Falls Dam; and (2) CTUIR (Report 8): Examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin that includes restorations of coho salmon Oncorhynchus Wsutch and chinook salmon 0. tshawytscha and enhancement of summer steelhead 0. mytiss.

Nigro, Anthony A.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Washington, Volume IIA, Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dam Fish Passage, 1983 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This engineering feasibility and predesign report on the Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dam Fish Passage Project provides BPA with information for planning purposes and will serve as a discussion document for interested agencies. Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dams, both on the Wenatchee River, were built in the early 1900's as diversions for hydropower, and irrigation and hydropower, respectively. The present fishway facilities at both sites are inadequate to properly pass the anadromous fish runs in the Wenatchee River. These runs include spring and summer chinook salmon, sockeye salmon, coho salmon and steelhead trout. Predesign level drawings are provided in this report that represent fishway schemes capable of adequately passing present and projected fish runs. The effects of present passage facilities on anadromous fish stocks is addressed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The quantitative treatment assesses losses of adult migrants due to the structures and places an estimated value on those fish. The dollar figure is estimated to be between $391,000 and $701,000 per year for both structures. The qualitative approach to benefits deals with the concept of stock vigor, the need for passage improvements to help ensure the health of the anadromous fish stock. 29 references, 27 figures, 5 tables.

Unknown Author

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fish Passage Improvements at Three Mile Falls Diversion Dam, Umatilla River, Oregon, Final Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results and conclusions from the biological assessment and outlines several alternative plans for solving fish passage problems at the dam. A recommended plan, based on consensus of the fisheries agencies and the tribes, is described, and the rationale for that decision is discussed. Data needs for final designs, a tentative construction schedule, and a discussion of operation and maintenance needs are presented.

Unknown Author

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

DOE/EIS-0397: Record of Decision for the Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (2/20/09)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT RECORD OF DECISION Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project SUMMARY The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund modifications to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, Washington. In addition to improving fish passage to the upper part of the Klickitat River watershed, the modifications will facilitate collection and monitoring of biological information for future fishery management and enhance opportunities for adult salmonids to access and utilize habitat in the upper Klickitat River. This decision implements the Proposed Action and Preferred Alternative identified in the Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project (Lyle Falls) EIS (DOE/EIS-0397, November 2008). BPA was

10

Fish passage and protection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report consists of reprints on fish passage and protection topics from: American Fisheries Society; American Society of Civil Engineers; Harza Engineering Company; Hydro Review Magazine; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Independent Energy Magazine; National Hydropower Association; Northwest Hydroelectric Association; United States Army Corps of Engineers; United States Committee on large dams; and the United States Department of the Interior.

Rinehart, B.N.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume III, Appendix B, Fisheries Report; Appendix C, Engineering Alternative Evaluation; Appendix D, Benefit/Cost Analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developd to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. This volume contains appendices of habitat survey data, potential production, resident fish population data, upstream passage designs, and benefit/cost calculations. (ACR)

Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

DOE/EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan for the Lyle Falls Fish...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Bonneville Power Administration Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Washington Department of Fish and...

13

Studies of fish passage through culverts in Montana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and biological criteria. Fish Passage Development andHeritage Program and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks,G.M. 1995. Nonanadromous fish passage in highway culverts.

Blank, Matt; Cahoon, Joel; Burford, Drake; McMahon, Tom; Stein, Otto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

15

Culvert test bed: fish-passage research facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of juvenile salmonids and other fish through culverts is aappropriate hydraulic and fish-passage designs forWashington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Alaska

Pearson, Dr. Walter H.; May, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project, Phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Implementation of the Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project -- Phase 2 would significantly improve the production of anadromous fish in the Yakima River system. The project would provide offsite mitigation and help to compensate for lower Columbia River hydroelectric fishery losses. The Phase 2 screens would allow greater numbers of juvenile anadromous fish to survive. As a consequence, there would be higher returns of adult salmon and steelhead to the Yakima River. The proposed action would play an integral part in the overall Yakima River anadromous fish enhancement program (fish passage improvement, habitat enhancement, hatchery production increases, and harvest management). These would be environmental benefits associated with implementation of the Fish Passage and Protective Facilities Phase 2 Project. Based on the evaluation presented in this assessment, there would be no significant adverse environmental impacts if the proposed action was carried forward. No significant adverse environmental effects have been identified from construction and operation of the Yakima Phase 2 fish passage project. Proper design and implementation of the project will ensure no adverse effects will occur. Based on the information in this environmental analysis, BPA's and Reclamation's proposal to construct these facilities does not constitute a major Federal action that could significantly affect the quality of the human environment. 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fish Passage Center 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The January-July runoff volume above the Dalles Dam in 2007 was 89% of the average runoff volume for the 1971-2000 historical record. The April-July runoff volume at Lower Granite Dam was 68% of the 1971-2000 historical record. Over the 79 year historical record from 1929 through 2007, the 2007 January-July runoff volume at the Dalles was the 50th lowest year out of the 79th year record. The January through July runoff volume at Lower Granite was the 65th lowest runoff year out of 79 on record. This year can be characterized by steadily decreasing snowpack which was below average in the Columbia Basin by the end of April. The combination of runoff volume, decreasing snowpack and reservoir operations resulted in spring migration flows at McNary Dam averaging 239 Kcfs, slightly above the Biological Opinion flow objective of 237 Kcfs. However the spring period migration flows in the Snake River averaged 61 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam, substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 85 Kcfs. Summer migration period Biological Opinion flow objectives averaged 163 Kcfs at McNary Dam, substantially below the summer flow objective of 200 Kcfs. Summer migration period flows in the Snake River at Lower Granite Dam averaged 29 Kcfs, also substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 50 Kcfs. Overall spring migrants in the Columbia River experienced better migration flows than spring migrants in the Snake River reach. Summer migration flow objectives were not achieved in either the Columbia or Snake rivers. The 2007 FCRPS Operations Agreement represents an expanded and improved spill program that goes beyond the measures contained in the 2004 Biological Opinion. During the spring period, spill now occurs for twenty-four hours per day at all projects, except for John Day Dam where the daily program remains at 12 hours. A summer spill program provides spill at all the fish transportation collector projects (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams), whereas prior to 2005 spill was terminated at these projects after the spring period. In addition, the 2007 operations agreement provided regardless of flow conditions. For the first time spill for fish passage was provided in the low flow conditions that prevailed in the Snake River throughout the spring and summer migration periods. Gas bubble trauma (GBT) monitoring continued throughout the spill period. A higher incidence of rank 1, GBT signs were observed in late arriving steelhead smolts arriving after the 95% passage date had occurred. During this time dissolved gas levels were generally below the 110% water quality standard in the forebay where fish were sampled. This occurrence was due to prolonged exposure and extended travel times due to low migration flows. The 2007 migration conditions differed from any year in the historic record. The migration conditions combined low river flows in the Snake River with spill throughout the spring and summer season. The juvenile migration characteristics observed in 2007 were unique compared to past years in that high levels of 24 hour spill for fish passage were provided in low flow conditions, and with a delayed start to the smolt transportation program a smaller proportion of the total run being transported. This resulted in relatively high spring juvenile survival despite the lower flows. The seasonal spring average flow in the Snake River was 61 Kcfs much lower than the spring time average of 120 Kcfs that occurred in 2006. However juvenile steelhead survival through the Lower Granite to McNary reach in 2007 was nearly 70% which was similar to the juvenile steelhead survival seen in 2006 under higher migration flows. The low flows in the May-July period of 2007 were similar to the 2001 low flow year, yet survival for fall chinook juveniles in this period in 2007 was much higher. In 2001 the reach survival estimate for juvenile fall Chinook from Lower Granite to McNary Dam ranged from 0.25-0.34, while survival in the same reach ranged between 0.54-0.60 in 2007. In addition travel time estimat

DeHart, Michele [Fish Passage Center of the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Authority

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

18

Binary fish passage models for uniform and nonuniform flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Binary fish passage models are considered by many fisheries managers to be the best 21 available practice for culvert inventory assessments and for fishway and barrier design. 22 Misunderstandings between different binary passage modeling approaches often arise, 23 however, due to differences in terminology, application and presentation. In this paper 24 one-dimensional binary fish passage models are reviewed and refined to clarify their 25 origins and applications. For uniform flow, a simple exhaustion-threshold (ET) model 26 equation is derived that predicts the flow speed threshold in a fishway or velocity barrier 27 that causes exhaustion at a given maximum distance of ascent. Flow speeds at or above 28 the threshold predict failure to pass (exclusion). Flow speeds below the threshold predict 29 passage. The binary ET model is therefore intuitive and easily applied to predict passage 30 or exclusion. It is also shown to be consistent with the distance-maximizing model. The 31 ET model s limitation to uniform flow is addressed by deriving a passage model that 32 accounts for nonuniform flow conditions more commonly found in the field, including 33 backwater profiles and drawdown curves. Comparison of these models with 34 experimental observations of volitional passage for Gambusia affinis in uniform and 35 nonuniform flows indicates reasonable prediction of binary outcomes (passage or 36 exclusion) if the flow speed is not near the threshold flow velocity. More research is 37 needed on fish behavior, passage strategies under nonuniform flow regimes and 38 stochastic methods that account for individual differences in swimming performance at or 39 near the threshold flow speed. Future experiments should track and measure ground 40 speeds of ascending fish to test nonuniform flow passage strategies and to improve model 41 predictions. Stochastic models, such as Monte-Carlo techniques, that account for 42 different passage performance among individuals and allow prediction of the percentage 43 of fish passing would be particularly useful near flow speed thresholds where binary 44 passage models are clearly limited.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Program 58: Waterpower -- Developments in Upstream and Downstream Fish Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a technical update on the most important peer-reviewed literature on the subject of upstream and downstream passage at hydropower projects in the past calendar year (2011) as well as selected literature published in late 2010. Effective fish passage at hydropower projects is a key environmental challenge for hydropower operation and a continuing R&D topic. Research efforts include: hydrodynamics at the point of entry of a fish bypass, behavioral evaluations in the vicinity of guida...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Program 58: Waterpower - Developments in Upstream and Downstream Fish Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a technical update on the most important peer-reviewed literature on the subject of upstream and downstream passage at hydropower projects in the past calendar year (2012) as well as selected literature published in late 2011. Effective fish passage at hydropower projects is a key environmental challenge for hydropower operation and a continuing R&D topic. Research efforts include: hydrodynamics at the point of entry of a fish bypass, behavioral evaluations in the vicinity ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage Through Bonneville Dam in 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2002. The ERDC contracted with MEVATEC Corporation to provide staff ranging from scientists to technicians to help conduct the study. This study supports the Portland-District goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. In this report, we present results of two studies of juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam that we carried out in the 2002 downstream passage season April 20 through July 15, 2002. The first study of Project-wide FPE provides hourly estimates of fish passage and associated variances for all operating turbine units, spill bays, and the two sluiceway entrances at Powerhouse 1 (B1), as well as estimates of a variety of fish-passage efficiency and effectiveness measures. This was the third consecutive year of full-project hydroacoustic sampling and passage estimation. The second study was more narrowly focused on B2 turbines and had two components: (1) to sample the FGE at two modified turbine intakes and compare them with efficiencies of other B2 units that were sampled in the first study, and (2) to evaluate proportions of fish passing up into gatewell slots versus through screen gaps at a few B2 turbine intakes.

Ploskey, Gene R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schilt, Carl R. (MEVATEC); Kim, J (Lynntech); Escher, Charles (MEVATEC Corporation); Skalski, John R.

2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2001 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accomplishments of the John Day, Umatilla, and Walla Walla Fish Passage and Screening Programs include the following: Operation and maintenance of 364 existing fish screening devices (see Table 4), replacement of 18 outdated fish screening devices that totaled 31 rotary drums (some were multiple drum systems), 4 new screens at unscreened diversions, 26 pump intake fish screens, fabrication of components for 16 additional fish screens for the Rogue basin, construction of two fish passage structures, and participation in other activities. After the replacement or construction of 22 fish screening devices during 2001, we now have 108 screening devices that meet NMFS criteria. Funding for these projects was attained from BPA, NMFS and OWEB. The John Day Fish Passage and Screening Program focused construction efforts into new and replacement fish screening devices for these various programs throughout the state of Oregon. The program also continued to develop and implement innovative designs to meet the diverse and expanding needs for the state of Oregon. Projects completed during this report period meet the current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria. Fish species targeted for protection include ESA Listed Mid-Columbia steelhead, Columbia basin bull trout, anadromous and resident salmonids, and numerous non-game fish species. Priority project locations have been identified as the upper reaches of the Middle Fork, North Fork, South Fork and the Mainstem of the John Day River and their tributaries. These upper reaches contain critical salmon and steelhead spawning and rearing habitat.

Allen, Steve (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage through Bonneville Dam in 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2004. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of four studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 15 and July 15, 2004, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, (2) B2 fish guidance efficiency and gap loss, (3) smolt approach and fate at the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC), and (4) B2 vertical barrier screen head differential.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.; Kim, Jina; Johnson, Peter N.; Hanks, Michael E.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

27

Benefits of fish passage and protection measures at hydroelectric projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s Hydropower Program is engaged in a multi-year study of the costs and benefits of environmental mitigation measures at nonfederal hydroelectric power plants. An initial report (Volume 1) reviewed and surveyed the status of mitigation methods for fish passage, instream flows, and water quality; this paper focuses on the fish passage/protection aspects of the study. Fish ladders were found to be the most common means of passing fish upstream; elevators/lifts were less common, but their use appears to be increasing. A variety of mitigative measures is employed to prevent fish from being drawn into turbine intakes, including spill flows, narrow-mesh intake screens, angled bar racks, and lightor sound-based guidance measures. Performance monitoring and detailed, quantifiable performance criteria were frequently lacking at non-federal hydroelectric projects. Volume 2 considers the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection measures, as illustrated by case studies for which performance monitoring has been conducted. The report estimates the effectiveness of particular measures, the consequent impacts on the fish populations that are being maintained or restored, and the resulting use and non-use values of the maintained or restored fish populations.

Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Effects of hydroelectric turbine passage on fish early life stages  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbine-passage mortality has been studied extensively for juveniles and adults of migratory fish species, but few studies have directly quantified mortality of fish eggs and larvae. An analysis of literature relating to component stresses of turbine passage (i.e., pressure changes, blade contact, and shear) indicates that mortality of early life stages of fish would be relatively low at low-head, bulb turbine installations. The shear forces and pressure regimes normally experienced are insufficient to cause high mortality rates. The probability of contact with turbine blades is related to the size of the fish; less than 5% of entrained ichthyoplankton would be killed by the blades in a bulb turbine. Other sources of mortality (e.g., cavitation and entrainment of fish acclimated to deep water) are controlled by operation of the facility and thus are mitigable. Because turbine-passage mortality among fish early life stages can be very difficult to estimate directly, it may be more fruitful to base the need for mitigation at any given site on detailed knowledge of turbine characteristics and the susceptibility of the fish community to entrainment. 7 refs., 1 fig.

Cada, G.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Fish behavior in relation to modeling fish passage through hydropower turbines: A review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We evaluated the literature on fish behavior as it relates to passage of fish near or through hydropower turbines. The goal was to foster compatibility of engineered systems with the normal behavior patterns of fish species and life stages such that entrainment into turbines and injury in passage are minimized. We focused on aspects of fish behavior that could be used for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of fish trajectories through turbine systems. Downstream-migrating salmon smolts are generally surface oriented and follow flow. Smolts orient to the ceilings of turbine intakes but are horizontally distributed more evenly, except as affected by intake-specific turbulence and vortices. Smolts often enter intakes oriented head-upstream. Non-salmonids are entrained episodically, suggesting accidental capture of schools (often of juveniles or in cold water) and little behavioral control during turbine passage. Models of fish trajectories should not assume neutral buoyancy throughout the time a fish passes through a turbine, largely because of pressure effects on swim bladders. Fish use their lateral line system to sense obstacles and change their orientation, but this sensory-response system may not be effective in the rapid passage times of turbine systems. A Effects of pre-existing stress levels on fish performance in turbine passage are not well known but may be important. There are practical limits of observation and measurement of fish and flows in the proximity of turbine runners that may inhibit development of information germane to developing a more fish-friendly turbine. We provide recommendations for CFD modelers of fish passage and for additional research. 20 refs., 2 figs.

Coutant, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Whitney, R.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fish Passage: A New Tool to Investigate Fish Movement: JSATS  

SciTech Connect

A new system is being used to determine fish mortality issues related to hydroelectric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. Called the juvenile salmon acoustic telemetry system (JSATS), this tool allows researchers to better understand fish movement, behavior, and survival around dams and powerhouses.

McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Eppard, Matthew B.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

31

Upstream and Downstream Fish Passage and Protection Technologies for Hydroelectric Application: A Fish Passage and Protection Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for effective fish passage and protection at water intakes is an important issue confronting industry and resource agency professionals. Project owners often are required to install and evaluate protection devices to meet regulatory requirements that are associated with operating licenses and permits. Many laboratory and field studies have been conducted during the last 50 years in attempts to develop effective technologies. EPRI has previously published reports describing existing technologies ...

2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

32

John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Oregon Screens Project was to implement 20 replacement screens projects in the John Day sub-basin and any projects identified in the Umatilla and Walla Walla sub-basins. A secondary goal is to complete a passage project, if one is identified, in any of the above sub-basins. Mid-Columbia ESU listed steelhead and USF&W listed bull trout inhabit these sub-basins and are present at most locations, along with a variety of resident fish species. We also provide assistance to our Enterprise Screen Shop, in the Grande Ronde/Imnaha sub-basins, if needed. All projects were designed and implemented under current National Marine Fisheries Service screening and passage criteria.

Allen, Steve (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Oregon Screens Project was to implement 20 replacement screens projects in the John Day sub-basin and any projects identified in the Umatilla and Walla Walla sub-basins. A secondary goal is to complete a passage project, if one is identified, in any of the above sub-basins. Mid-Columbia ESU listed steelhead and USF&W listed bull trout inhabit these sub-basins and are present at most locations, along with a variety of resident fish species. We also provide assistance to our Enterprise Screen Shop, in the Grande Ronde/Imnaha subbasins, if needed. All projects were designed and implemented under current National Marine Fisheries Service screening and passage criteria.

Allen, Steve (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Program 58: Waterpower -- Technical Developments in Upstream and Downstream Fish Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brief reviews the most important peer-reviewed literature on the subject of upstream and downstream fish passage at hydropower projects in the past year (2009-2010). Effective fish passage at hydropower projects is a key environmental challenge for hydropower operation. Key recent R&D topics include: hydrodynamics at the point of entry of a fish bypass, behavioral evaluations in the vicinity of guidance/passage structures, tagging/telemetry studies, physiological stresses, and numerical modeling. It...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion measures resulted in very poor in-river migration conditions in 2001. Up to 99% of Snake River yearling chinook and steelhead were transported from the Snake River collection projects. Approximately 96% of Snake River juvenile sub-yearling fall chinook were transported. Of Mid-Columbia origin yearling chinook, 35% were transported, of steelhead 30% were transported and of sub yearling chinook, 59% were transported. Based upon data collected on the run-at-large, the juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam of wild and hatchery yearling chinook and wild and hatchery steelhead were the lowest observed in the last four years. In 2001, as the result of the lowest observed flows in recent years, travel times through the hydro system for spring chinook yearlings and steelhead was approximately twice as long as has been observed historically. Juvenile survival estimates through each index reach of the hydro system for steelhead and chinook juveniles was the lowest observed since the use of PIT tag technology began for estimating survival.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Fish Passage Assessment: Big Canyon Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the fish passage assessment as outlined as part of the Protect and Restore the Big Canyon Creek Watershed project as detailed in the CY2003 Statement of Work (SOW). As part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP), this project is one of Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) many efforts at off-site mitigation for damage to salmon and steelhead runs, their migration, and wildlife habitat caused by the construction and operation of federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The proposed restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed follow the watershed restoration approach mandated by the Fisheries and Watershed Program. Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program vision focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects. We strive toward maximizing historic ecosystem productive health, for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations. The Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program (NPTFWP) sponsors the Protect and Restore the Big Canyon Creek Watershed project. The NPTFWP has the authority to allocate funds under the provisions set forth in their contract with BPA. In the state of Idaho vast numbers of relatively small obstructions, such as road culverts, block thousands of miles of habitat suitable for a variety of fish species. To date, most agencies and land managers have not had sufficient, quantifiable data to adequately address these barrier sites. The ultimate objective of this comprehensive inventory and assessment was to identify all barrier crossings within the watershed. The barriers were then prioritized according to the amount of habitat blocked at each site and the fish life history stages impacted. This assessment protocol will hopefully prove useful to other agencies and become a model for use in other watersheds.

Christian, Richard

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, Oregon is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from August 22, 2001 to September 12, 2002. A total of 5,519 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,146 adult, 1,158 jack, and 970 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawytscha); 22,792 adult and 80 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 5,058 adult and 188 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 261 adult and 14 jack spring chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam for release. There were 5,359 summer steelhead; 622 adult, 1,041 jack and 867 subjack fall chinook; 22,513 adult and 76 jack coho; and 4,061 adult and 123 jack spring chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. In addition, 110 summer steelhead; 462 adult and 24 jack fall chinook; and 560 adult and 28 jack spring chinook were collected for brood. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at rivermile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 141 days between February 22 and July 12, 2002. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 134 days and were trapped 5 days. An estimated 200 pounds of juvenile fish were transported from Westland. Approximately 90% of the juveniles transported were salmonids. No steelhead kelts were hauled from Westland this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened August 16, 2002. The bypass was run until October 31, 2001 with the exception of the period from August 29 to September 16. The bypass was reopened March 7, 2002 and ran until July 8. The juvenile trap was operated from July 8 to July 12 by the Umatilla Passage Evaluation project.

Zimmerman, Brian C. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from August 17, 2002 to September 29, 2003. A total of 3,080 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1716 adult, 617 jack, and 1,709 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawytscha); 3,820 adult and 971 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 3,607 adult and 135 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 6 summer steelhead and 330 adult and 49 jack spring chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 2,882 summer steelhead; 1161 adult, 509 jack and 1,546 subjack fall chinook; 3,704 adult and 915 jack coho; and 2,406 adult and 31 jack spring chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 109 summer steelhead; 532 adult and 32 jack fall chinook; and 560 adult and 28 jack spring chinook were collected for brood. In addition, 282 spring chinook were collected for the outplanting efforts in the Walla Walla Basin. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at rivermile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 159 days between January 27 and July 4, 2003. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 145 days and were trapped 11 days. An estimated 205 pounds of juvenile fish were transported from Westland to the Umatilla River boat ramp (RM 0.5). Approximately 82% of the juveniles transported were salmonids. No steelhead kelts were hauled from Westland this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on September 16, 2002. and continued until November 1, 2002. The bypass was reopened March 3, 2003 and ran until July 3, 2003. The juvenile trap was operated by the Umatilla Passage Evaluation Project.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fish passage mitigation of impacts from hydroelectric power projects in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Obstruction of fish movements by dams continues to be the major environmental issue facing the hydropower industry in the US. Dams block upstream migrations, which can cut off adult fish form their historical spawning grounds and severely curtail reproduction. Conversely, downstream-migrating fish may be entrained into the turbine intake flow and suffer turbine-passage injury or mortality. Hydroelectric projects can interfere with the migrations of a wide variety of fish. Maintenance, restoration or enhancement of populations of these species may require the construction of facilities to allow for upstream and downstream fish passage. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), by law, must give fish and wildlife resources equal consideration with power production in its licensing decisions, must be satisfied that a project is consistent with comprehensive plans for a waterway (including fisheries management plans), and must consider all federal and state resource agency terms and conditions for the protection of fish and wildlife. As a consequence, FERC often requires fish passage mitigation measures as a condition of the hydropower license when such measures are deemed necessary for the protection of fish. Much of the recent research and development efforts of the US Department of Energy`s Hydropower Program have focused on the mitigation of impacts to upstream and downstream fish passage. This paper descries three components of that effort: (1) a survey of environmental mitigation measures at hydropower sites across the country; (2) a critical review of the effectiveness of fish passage mitigation measures at 16 case study sites; and (3) ongoing efforts to develop new turbine designs that minimize turbine-passage mortality.

Cada, G.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine and Regulating Outlet at Cougar Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009–2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish passage conditions through a Francis turbine and a regulating outlet (RO) at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions encountered during passage via specific routes. The RO investigation was performed in December 2009 and the turbine evaluation in January 2010, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision, strike, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Cougar Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 3.7-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine passage. Compared to mainstem Columbia River passage routes, none of the Cougar Dam passage routes as tested are safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

44

Sensor Fish Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through John Day Dam Spillbay 20 with a Modified Flow Deflector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish passage conditions over a modified deflector in Spillbay 20 at John Day Dam were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objectives of the study were to describe and compare passage exposure conditions at two spill discharges, 2.4 and 4.0 thousand cubic feet per second (kcfs), identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes, and to evaluate a low-tailwater condition at the 2.4-kcfs discharge. The study was performed in April 2010 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events; 2) differences in passage conditions between treatments; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Nearly all Sensor Fish significant events were classified as collisions; the most severe occurred at the gate, on the spillbay chute, or at the deflector transition. Collisions in the gate region were observed only during the 2.4-kcfs discharge, when the tainter gate was open 1.2 ft. One shear event was observed during the evaluation, occurring at the deflector transition during passage at the 2.4-kcfs discharge at low tailwater. Flow quality, computed using the Sensor Fish turbulence index, was best for passage at the low-flow low-tailwater condition as well. The worst flow quality was observed for the 4.0-kcfs test condition. Contrasting the passage exposure conditions, the 2.4-kcfs low-tailwater treatment would be most deleterious to fish survival and well-being.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

Improvement of Anadromous Fish Habitat and Passage in Omak Creek, 2008 Annual Report : February 1, 2008 to January 31, 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the 2008 season, projects completed under BPA project 2000-100-00 included installation of riparian fencing, maintenance of existing riparian fencing, monitoring of at-risk culverts and installation of riparian vegetation along impacted sections of Omak Creek. Redd and snorkel surveys were conducted in Omak Creek to determine steelhead production. Canopy closure surveys were conducted to monitor riparian vegetation recovery after exclusion of cattle since 2000 from a study area commonly known as the Moomaw property. Additional redd and fry surveys were conducted above Mission Falls and in the lower portion of Stapaloop Creek to try and determine whether there has been successful passage at Mission Falls. Monitoring adult steelhead trying to navigate the falls resulted in the discovery of shallow pool depth at an upper pool that is preventing many fish from successfully navigating the entire falls. The Omak Creek Habitat and Passage Project has worked with NRCS to obtain additional funds to implement projects in 2009 that will address passage at Mission Falls, culvert replacement, as well as additional riparian planting. The Omak Creek Technical Advisory Group (TAG) is currently revising the Omak Creek Watershed Assessment. In addition, the group is revising strategy to focus efforts in targeted areas to provide a greater positive impact within the watershed. In 2008 the NRCS Riparian Technical Team was supposed to assess areas within the watershed that have unique problems and require special treatments to successfully resolve the issues involved. The technical team will be scheduled for 2009 to assist the TAG in developing strategies for these special areas.

Dasher, Rhonda; Fisher, Christopher [Colville Confederated Tribes

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

46

Environmental mitigation at hydroelectric projects. Volume 2, Benefits and costs of fish passage and protection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study examines envirorunental mitigation practices that provide upstream and downstream fish passage and protection at hydroelectric projects. The study includes a survey of fish passage and protection mitigation practices at 1,825 hydroelectric plants regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to determine frequencies of occurrence, temporal trends, and regional practices based on FERC regions. The study also describes, in general terms, the fish passage/protection mitigation costs at 50 non-Federal hydroelectric projects. Sixteen case studies are used to examine in detail the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection. The 16 case studies include 15 FERC licensed or exempted hydroelectric projects and one Federally-owned and-operated hydroelectric project. The 16 hydroelectric projects are located in 12 states and range in capacity from 400 kilowatts to 840 megawatts. The fish passage and protection mitigation methods at the case studies include fish ladders and lifts, an Eicher screen, spill flows, airburst-cleaned inclined and cylindrical wedgewire screens, vertical barrier screens, and submerged traveling screens. The costs, benefits, monitoring methods, and operating characteristics of these and other mitigation methods used at the 16 case studies are examined.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sommers, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dauble, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hunt, R.T. [Hunt (Richard) Associates, Inc., Concord, NH (United States); Costello, R.J. [Northwest Water Resources Advisory Services (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2004-2005 project year, there were 590 adult summer steelhead, 31 summer steelhead kelts (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 70 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 80 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 13, 2004, and June 16, 2005. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by ODFW in order to enumerate fish passage. Of the total, 143 adult summer steelhead and 15 summer steelhead kelts were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the video efforts between February 4 and May 23, 2005. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine, Spillway, and Regulating Outlet at Detroit Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish passage conditions through two spillways, a Francis turbine, and a regulating outlet (RO) at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes. The study was performed in July, October, and December 2009 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe strike, collision, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Detroit Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 5-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine and spillway passage. However, none of the passage routes tested is safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

Duncan, Joanne P.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

Passage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passage Passage of particles through matter 1 27. PASSAGE OF PARTICLES THROUGH MATTER Revised April 2006 by H. Bichsel (University of Washington), D.E. Groom (LBNL), and S.R. Klein (LBNL). 27.1. Notation Table 27.1: Summary of variables used in this section. The kinematic variables β and γ have their usual meanings. Symbol Definition Units or Value α Fine structure constant 1/137.035 999 11(46) (e 2 /4π 0 c) M Incident particle mass MeV/c 2 E Incident particle energy γM c 2 MeV T Kinetic energy MeV m e c 2 Electron mass × c 2 0.510 998 918(44) MeV r e Classical electron radius 2.817 940 325(28) fm e 2 /4π 0 m e c 2 N A Avogadro's number 6.022 1415(10) × 10 23 mol -1 ze Charge of incident particle Z Atomic number of absorber A Atomic mass of absorber g mol -1 K/A 4πN A r 2 e m e c 2 /A 0.307 075 MeV g -1 cm 2 for A = 1 g mol -1 I Mean excitation energy eV (Nota bene! ) δ(βγ) Density effect correction to ionization

50

Exploring the Role of Shear Stress and Severe Turbulence in Downstream Fish Passage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fish may be exposed to damaging levels of fluid shear stress and turbulence while passing through hydroelectric power plants. The generally assumed locations for such potential damage are the turbine and draft tube passages, although it is possible that fish are also injured during passage over the spillway or through sluiceways and fish bypass outfalls. Unless mitigated, fluid-induced injuries and mortality could frustrate efforts to develop advanced, fish-friendly turbines or to provide safe alternate downstream passages. The effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish are poorly understood, in part because of the difficulties in conceptualizing these phenomena, determining their magnitudes and distribution within hydroelectric systems, and then recreating them in a controlled laboratory environment. We define the fluid phenomena that are relevant to the assessment of effects on fish. The magnitudes of fluid stresses associated with man-altered aquatic environments are often considerably higher than those found in natural environments (e.g., normal river flows). However, levels of shear stresses that occur during flash floods appear to be comparable to those expected within a turbine. Past studies of the effects of shear stress on fish are of limited value, mainly because of their narrow scope and lack of instrumentation to measure velocities on appropriately small scales. A laboratory experiment to study the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish is described.

Cada, G.; Carlson, T.; Ferguson, J.; Richmond, M.; Sale, M.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish-Passage Efficiency at Bonneville Dam in 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that scientists with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) conduct the hydroacoustic fish-passage studies described in this report. The ERDC also contracted with MEVATEC Corporation and Dyntel to provide staff ranging from scientists to technicians for the study. This study supports the Portland-District goal of maximizing fish passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing the Bonneville Project. This report presents results of two hydroacoustic studies of juvenile salmonids. One was a Project-wide study of fish-passage efficiency, and the other was more narrowly focused upon the approach, vertical distribution, and fish-guidance efficiency (FGE) of fish at Unit 15, where the Portland District extensively modified the gatewell and vertical barrier screen to improve gatewell flow and FGE. The goal of the larger of the two studies was to provide project-wide estimates of FPE, spill efficiency, and spill effectiveness for run-of-river fish passing the Bonneville Project during the 2001 out-migration. This type of study also provides estimates of the horizontal, vertical, and diel distributions of fish passage and FGE by turbine unit. These data will provide a baseline for evaluating the performance of future management efforts to improve juvenile fish passage. The goal of the second study was to assess the effect of gatewell and vertical-barrier-screen modifications on the FGE of Unit 15.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Schilt, Carl R.; Hanks, Michael E.; Johnson, Peter N.; Kim, Jina; Skalski, John R.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Nagy, William T.; Lawrence, Larry R.

2002-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Movement of Fall Chinook Salmon Fry Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha : A Comparison of Approach Angles for Fish Bypass in a Modular Rotary Drum Fish Screen.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed tests to determine whether a significant difference in fish passage existed between a 6-ft screening facility built perpendicularly to canal flow and an identical screening facility with the screen mounted at a 45-degree angle to the approach channel. A modular drum screen built by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife was installed at PNNL`s Aquatic Ecology research laboratory in Richland, Washington. Fall chinook salmon fry were introduced into the test system, and their movements were monitored. A total of 14 tests (400 fish per test) that lasted 20 hours were completed during April and May, 1996. There was no significant difference in fish passage rate through the two approach configurations. Attraction flow to the bypass across the face of the screen was more evident for the angled approach, although this did not appear to play a significant role in attracting fish to the bypass. Approach velocities at the face of the screen did not exceed the 0.4 fps criteria for either approach configuration and posed not threat to fish. No fish passed over, around, or through the drum screen during any test.

Neitzel, D.A.; Blanton, S.L.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Daly, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow measures, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2000-2001 project year, there were 624 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 24 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), and 47 spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) counted at the Nursery Bridge Dam adult trap between December 27, 2000 and June 7, 2001. The Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap was not operated this year. The project transported 1600 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility and outplanted 1156 for natural spawning in the basin. The project also provided equipment for transportation of juveniles captured during the construction fish salvage at Nursery Bridge Dam.

Zimmerman, Brian C. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Simulated Passage Through A Modified Kaplan Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). The responses of fall Chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to these two stresses, both singly and in combination, were investigated in the laboratory. A previous test series (Abernethy et al. 2001) evaluated the effects of passage through a Kaplan turbine under the ?worst case? pressure conditions. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a Kaplan turbine under a more ?fish-friendly? mode of operation. The results were compared to results from Abernethy et al. (2001). Fish were exposed to total dissolved gas (TDG) levels of 100%, 120%, or 135% of saturation for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa) or 30 ft (191 kPa) of pressure, then held at surface pressure at 100% saturation for a 48-hour observation period. Sensitivity of fall Chinook salmon to gas supersaturation was slightly higher than in the previous test series, with 15% mortality for surface-acclimated fish at 120% TDG, compared to 0% in the previous tests.

Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G.; Cada, G. F.

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fish Passage Through a Simulated Horizontal Bulb Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to"Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Both fish species were acclimated for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa; 1 atm) or 30 ft (191 kPa; 1.9 atm) of pressure in a hyperbaric chamber before exposure to a pressure scenario simulating passage through a horizontal bulb turbine. The simulation was as follows: gradual pressure increase to about 2 atm of pressure, followed by a sudden (0.4 second) decrease in pressure to either 0.7 or 0.95 atm, followed by gradual return to 1 atm (surface water pressure). Following the exposure, fish were held at surface pressure for a 48-hour post exposure observation period. No fall chinook salmon died during or after exposure to the horizontal bulb turbine passage pressures, and no injuries were observed during the 48-hour post exposure observation period. As with the previous test series, it cannot be determined whether fall chinook salmon acclimated to the greater water pressure during the pretest holding period. For bluegill sunfish exposed to the horizontal bulb turbine turbine-passage pressures, only one fish died and injuries were less severe and less common than for bluegills subjected to either the"worst case" pressure or modified Kaplan turbine pressure conditions in previous tests. Injury rates for bluegills were higher at 0.7 atm nadir than for the 0.95 atm nadir. However, injuries were limited to minor internal hemorrhaging. Bluegills did not suffer swim bladder rupture in any tested scenarios. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

Abernethy, Cary S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Amidan, Brett G. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Cada, G F. (ORNL)

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2003-2004 project year, there were 379 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 36 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 108 adult and 3 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 21, 2003, and June 30, 2004. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by the WWBNPME project in order to radio tag spring chinook adults. A total of 2 adult summer steelhead, 4 bull trout, and 23 adult spring chinook were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the trapping operations between May 6 and May 23, 2004. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported adult spring chinook from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. A total of 239 spring chinook were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Synthesis of Biological Reports on Juvenile Fish Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam through 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a review of available literature on juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam from 1939 through 2005. Studies of interest included project-wide fish-passage efficiency (FPE) studies by radio telemetry and fixed-aspect hydroacoustics, fish survival studies (direct and indirect), FGE studies, powerhouse and unit (by netting, hydroacoustics, and radio telemetry), predation studies in the forebay and tailrace, behavioral studies on forebay approach and egress, and surface-bypass studies. The FPE effort will include a review of available distribution data (horizontal, diel, and vertical) for juvenile salmon. This study does not repeat the results of previous review and synthesis studies but cites them. Where no previous review exists for a subject area, all reports were reviewed and synthesized. The report includes an annotated bibliography summarizing each of the documents reviewed and a DVD disk containing all of the original papers and reports along with an HTML index to the documents.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Giorgi, Albert E.; Johnson, Richard L.; Stevenson, John R.; Schilt, Carl R.; Johnson, Peter N.; Patterson, Deborah S.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater than observed in the past ten years averaged together. In 2002, about 87 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, Tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This represents an increase over the past season, when only 71 million juvenile fish were released into the same area.

DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Review of Downstream Fish Passage and Protection Technology Evaluations and Effectiveness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for effective fish passage and protection at water intakes is an important issue confronting industry and resource agency professionals throughout the world. Project owners often are required to install and evaluate protection devices to meet regulatory requirements that are associated with operating licenses and permits. This report describes recent research that has evaluated existing and emerging technologies since the last EPRI review in 1994.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

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61

Evaluation of Fish Passage Sites in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the Hofer Dam fish screen and provided technical assistance at two other fish passage sites as requested by the Bonneville Power Administration, the Walla Walla Watershed Council, or the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Evaluation of new sites such as Hofer Dam focuses on their design, construction, operation, and maintenance to determine if they effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage through irrigation diversions. There were two requests for technical assistance in 2008. In the first, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requested an evaluation of the Nursery Bridge fish screens associated with the fish ladder on the east side of the Walla Walla River. One set of brushes that clean the screens was broken for an extended period. Underwater videography and water velocity measurements were used to determine there were no potential adverse effects on juvenile salmonids when the west set of screens was clean enough to pass water normally. A second request, received from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Walla Walla Watershed Council, asked for evaluation of water velocities through relatively new head gates above and adjacent to the Eastside Ditch fish screens on the Walla Walla River. Water moving through the head gates and not taken for irrigation is diverted to provide water for the Nursery Bridge fish ladder on the east side of the river. Elevations used in the design of the head gates were incorrect, causing excessive flow through the head gates that closely approached or exceeded the maximum swimming burst speed of juvenile salmonids. Hofer Dam was evaluated in June 2008. PNNL researchers found that conditions at Hofer Dam will not cause impingement or entrainment of juvenile salmonids but may provide habitat for predators and lack strong sweeping flows to encourage juvenile salmonid passage downstream. Further evaluation of velocities at the Eastside Ditch and wasteway gates should occur as changes are made to compensate for the design problems. These evaluations will help determine whether further changes are required. Hofer Dam also should be evaluated again under more normal operating conditions when the river levels are typical of those when fish are emigrating and the metal plate is not affecting flows.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

62

Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from June 7, 2007 to August 11, 2008. A total of 3,133 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,487 adult, 1,067 jack, and 999 subjack fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha); 5,140 adult and 150 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,009 adult, 517 jack, and 128 subjack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 1,442 summer steelhead and 88 adult and 84 jack spring Chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 1,497 summer steelhead; 609 adult, 1,018 jack and 979 subjack fall Chinook; 5,036 adult and 144 jack coho; and 1,117 adult, 386 jack and 125 subjack spring Chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 110 summer steelhead; 878 adult and 43 jack fall Chinook; and 560 adult and 28 jack spring Chinook were collected as broodstock for the Umatilla River hatchery program. In addition, there were 241 adult and 15 jack spring Chinook collected at Threemile Dam for outplanting in the South Fork Walla Walla River and Mill Cr, a tributary of the mainstem Walla Walla River. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at river mile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for out-migrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 158 days between February 11, 2008 and July 18, 2008. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 150 days and were trapped 6 days. There were also 2 days when fish were directed into and held in the canal forebay between the time the bypass was closed and the trap opened. An estimated 64 pounds of fish were transported from the Westland trapping facility. Approximately 25.8% of the fish transported were salmonids. In addition, one adult Pacific lamprey was trapped and released above the Westland ladder this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on March 11, 2008 in conjunction with water deliveries and continued through the summer. West Extension Irrigation District (WEID) discontinued diverting live flow on June 24, 2008 but the bypass remained open throughout the project year. The juvenile trap was not operated this project year.

Bronson, James P.; Loffink, Ken; Duke, Bill

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000) found useful turbine passage survival data for only 30 species. Tests of advanced hydropower turbines have been limited to seven species - Chinook and coho salmon, rainbow trout, alewife, eel, smallmouth bass, and white sturgeon. We are investigating possible approaches for extending experimental results from the few tested fish species to predict turbine passage survival of other, untested species (Cada and Richmond 2011). In this report, we define the causes of injury and mortality to fish tested in laboratory and field studies, based on fish body shape and size, internal and external morphology, and physiology. We have begun to group the large numbers of unstudied species into a small number of categories, e.g., based on phylogenetic relationships or ecological similarities (guilds), so that subsequent studies of a few representative species (potentially including species-specific Biological Index Testing) would yield useful information about the overall fish community. This initial effort focused on modifying approaches that are used in the environmental toxicology field to estimate the toxicity of substances to untested species. Such techniques as the development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) and Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models rely on a considerable amount of data to establish the species-toxicity relationships that can be extended to other organisms. There are far fewer studies of turbine passage stresses from which to derive the turbine passage equivalent of LC{sub 50} values. Whereas the SSD and ICE approaches are useful analogues to predicting turbine passage injury and mortality, too few data are available to support their application without some form of modification or simplification. In this report we explore the potential application of a newer, related technique, the Traits-Based Assessment (TBA), to the prediction of downstream passage mortality at hydropower projects.

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Predicted Fall Chinook Survival and Passage Timing Under BiOp and Alternative Summer Spill Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corps of Engineers, Waterways Experiment Station (WES) as well as additional work done by Columbia Basin are provided in table 1. Hanford Reach fall Chinook 1 #12;were released at river kilometer 593 with a single release profile modeled after the cumulative "1 3 W" pittag releases in the Hanford reach. All stocks were

Washington at Seattle, University of

66

Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from August 19, 2003 to July 8, 2004. A total of 3,388 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,482 adult, 638 jack, and 2,150 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawytscha); 8,319 adult and 667 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,965 adult and 270 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 34 summer steelhead and 31 adult and 9 jack spring chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 3,166 summer steelhead; 1,076 adult, 554 jack and 2,026 subjack fall chinook; 8,213 adult and 647 jack coho; and 2,152 adult and 174 jack spring chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 121 summer steelhead; 388 adult and 19 jack fall chinook; and 561 adult and 29 jack spring chinook were collected for brood. In addition, 239 spring chinook were collected for the outplanting efforts in the Walla Walla Basin. There were also 25 pair hatchery steelhead adults collected for the progeny maker study. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at rivermile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 184 days between January 12 and July 6, 2004. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 173 days and were trapped 10 days. An estimated 44 pounds of juvenile fish were transported from Westland to the Umatilla River boat ramp (RM 0.5). Approximately 84% of the juveniles transported were salmonids. No steelhead kelts were hauled from Westland this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on February 10, 2004 for outmigration sampling and continued until July 7, 2004 when sampling was discontinued. The juvenile bypass ran at the 5 cfs level until the initiation of Phase I on August 15, 2004. The juvenile trap was operated by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) under the Evaluation of Umatilla Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration Project.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Evaluation of Nature-like and Technical Fish Passes for the Passage of Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) at Two Coastal Streams in New England.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nature-like fish passes have been designed with the intent to re-connect river corridors and provide passage for all species occurring in a system. Nature-like fish… (more)

Franklin, Abigail

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this plan, spill hours were increased at Lower Monumental Dam. Spill volume at The Dalles was reduced and daytime spill tests were conducted at John Day and Bonneville Dams. Although provided for fish, most spill that occurred in 2000 was either in excess of project hydraulic capacity or excess generation. This effectively reduced the actual cost of the spill program. For the most part, spill in 2000 was managed to the waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. Hatchery spring chinook returns comprised an estimated 81.4% of the total spring chinook adult return to Lower Granite Dam. Smolt travel time and survival were similar to past years for most Smolt Monitoring Program groups. The notable exceptions were Snake River hatchery steelhead groups and mid-Columbia hatchery sub-yearling groups from Wells and Ringold hatcheries, which had significantly lower survival than previous years. Yearling chinook travel time showed variation from past years, reflecting the atypical flow shape in 2000 which had high flows in April, declining through May.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from August 17, 2000 to July 7, 2001. A total of 3,662 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 643 adult, 437 jack, and 4,948 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawytscha); 4,654 adult and 1,276 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 4,382 adult and 185 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 14 summer steelhead and 847 adult and 74 jack spring chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 3,433 summer steelhead; 71 adult, 298 jack and 4,647 subjack fall chinook; 4,435 adult and 1,180 jack coho; and 2,873 adult and 55 jack spring chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. In addition, 116 summer steelhead; 565 adult and 38 jack fall chinook; and 646 adult and 31 jack spring chinook were collected for brood. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at rivermile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 147 days between February 5 and July 26, 2001. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 127 days and were trapped 18 days. An estimated 350 pounds of juvenile fish were transported from Westland to the Umatilla River boat ramp (RM 0.5). Approximately 92% of the juveniles transported were salmonids. No steelhead kelts were hauled from Westland this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was open throughout the summer of 2000 and continued to run until October 27, 2000. The bypass was reopened March 8, 2001 and ran until July 9, 2001. The juvenile trap was not operated this year.

Zimmerman, Brian C. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Synthesis of Sensor Fish Data for Assessment of Fish Passage Conditions at Turbines, Spillways, and Bypass Facilities – Phase 1: The Dalles Dam Spillway Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the characterization of spillway passage conditions at The Dalles Dam in 2006 and the effort to complete a comprehensive database for data sets from The Dalles Dam spillway Sensor Fish and balloon-tagged live fish experiments. Through The Dalles Dam spillway case study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated the database as an efficient means for accessing and retrieving system-wide data for the U.S Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

Deng, Zhiqun; Serkowski, John A.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Re-Analysis of Hydroacoustic Fish-Passage Data from Bonneville Dam after Spill-Discharge Corrections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to re-analyze four years of fixed-aspect hydroacoustic data after the District made adjustments to spill discharge estimates. In this report, we present new estimates of all major fish-passage metrics for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004, as well as estimates for 2005. This study supports the Portland District and its effort to maximize survival of juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes through Bonneville Dam include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines at Powerhouse 2 (B2) and a sluiceway including the B2 Corner Collector. The original reports and all associated results, discussion, and conclusions for non flow-related metrics remain valid and useful, but effectiveness measures for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004 as reported in previous reports by Ploskey et al. should be superseded with the new estimates reported here. The fish-passage metrics that changed the most were related to effectiveness. Re-analysis produced spill effectiveness estimates that ranged from 12% to 21% higher than previous estimates in spring and 16.7% to 27.5% higher in summer, but the mean spill effectiveness over all years was only slightly above 1:1 (1.17 for spring and 1.29 for summer). Conversely surface-passage effectiveness decreased in the years this metric was measured (by 10.1% in spring and 10.7% in summer of 2002 and 9.5% in spring and 10.2% in summer of 2004). The smallest changes in the re-analysis were in project fish passage efficiency (0%-1%) and spill efficiency (0.9%-3.0%).

Ploskey, Gene R.; Kim, Jina; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

73

Feasibility of Documenting and Estimating Adult Fish Passage at Large Hydroelectric Facilities in the Snake River Using Video Technology; 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A field study was conducted at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River in 1992 to evaluate the feasibility of using time-lapse video technology to document and estimate fish ladder passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, sockeye salmon 0. nerka, and steelhead 0. mykiss using time-lapse video technology. High quality video images were produced with a time-lapse video system operating in 72 h mode from 1 May through 31 December, 1992 and fish were counted from 1 June through 15 December. From the video record we counted 15 sockeye salmon, 3,283 summer chinook salmon, 1,022 fall chinook salmon, and 125,599 steelhead. The composite count of target species generated from the video record was similar (p = 0.617) to the estimate made by on-site counters during identical time periods indicating that the two methods were precise. Comparisons of 24 h video counts and on-site (10 and 16 h) counts showed that a significant (p < 0.001) proportion of target salmonids migrated during the nighttime when on-site counts are not typically made at Lower Granite Dam. The mean sockeye salmon fork length measured from video images was 453 mm. Mean fork-lengths reported for Snake River sockeye salmon between 1953 and 1965 were much greater ({female} = 546 mm {male} = 577 mm). Cost comparisons showed that video costs were less than half those of on-site counting methods. The video method also included the collection of additional data. A computer software demonstration program was developed that graphically illustrated the possibilities of a completely automated, computerized fish counting and identification system.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Pederson, David R.; Schartzberg, Mathew

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Route-Specific Passage Proportions and Survival Rates for Fish Passing through John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report fulfills a request of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland, Oregon, to produce an interim report of estimates of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates for lower Columbia River dams in 2010 and 2011. The estimates are needed to update the Compass Model for the Columbia River Treaty and the new Biological Opinion before detail technical reports are published in late 2012. This report tabulates route-specific fish-passage proportions and survival rates for steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts passing through various sampled routes at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011. Results were compiled from analyses of data acquired in spring 2010 and 2011 studies that were specifically designed to estimate dam-passage and forebay-to-tailrace survival rates, travel time metrics, and spill passage efficiency, as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study designs allowed for estimation of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates as well as estimation of forebay-passage survival, all of which are summarized herein.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

75

Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for fish populations to be negatively impacted by hydrokinetic turbines is a major issue associated with the development and licensing of this type of renewable energy source. Such impacts may include habitat alteration, disruptions in migrations and movements, and injury and mortality to fish that encounter turbines. In particular, there is considerable concern for fish and other aquatic organisms to interact with hydrokinetic turbines in a manner that could lead to alterations in normal b...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Characterization of Pump Flow at the Grand Coulee Pumping Station for Fish Passage, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by PNNL for the Bonneville Power Administration to characterized the conditions fish experience when entrained in pump flow at the Grand Coulee Dam. PNNL used the Sensor Fish to measure the acceleration and pressure conditions that might be experienced by fish who are pulled through the pumps and turbines at Grand Coulee Dam's pump generation station and transported up into the feeder canal leading to Banks Lake. The probability that fish would be struck by the pump generating plant's new 9-bladed turbines was also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. Our measurements showed relatively low turbulence except in the immediate vicinity of the runner environment. The highest pressure experienced by the Sensor Fish was estimated at 157 psi (the pressure gauge saturated at 155 psi). The probability of strike was also calculated, based on the average length of hatchery-reared juvenile kokanee (land-locked sockeye). Strike probabilities ranged from 0.755 for 2.36-inch fish to 0.3890 for 11.8-inch fish. The probability of strike estimates indicate that the majority (77%) of kokanne would be carried through the pump without being struck and most likely without injury resulting from pressure and turbulence exposure. Of the 23% that might be struck it is expected that 60% would arrive in Banks Lake without visible external injuries. Thus more than 90% of entrained fish would be expected to arrive in Banks Lake without injury.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Johnson, Robert L.

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Research on Eco-Hydraulic Principles for Fish Passage and Protection: Fish Guidance at Buchanan Hydropower Plant, 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the responses of downstream-migrating steelhead smolts to hydraulic patterns in a hydropower plant intake canal in April and May 2002. We used existing structures and hydraulic features, as well as an experimental baffle panel (in several configurations), to test the hypothesis that migrating smolts use hydraulic features, especially turbulent flow, to guide their downstream trajectories. Knowledge of the factors that orient smolts should allow design of passage routes that avoid ...

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluation of a Fish Passage Site in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2009 Annual Report : September 2008 - August 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the Touchet Consolidated Facility to determine if it is designed, constructed, operated, and maintained to effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage past the diversion and back to the Touchet River. Completed in 2008, the Touchet Consolidated Facility combined two irrigation diversions with an existing intake for the Touchet Acclimation Facility. The consolidated facility includes a separate fish screen and intake for each user, a pool and chute fishway, and an adult fish trap. The fish screens portions of the facility were evaluated on April 20, 2009, using underwater videography, acoustic Doppler velocimeter measurements, and visual observations while water was diverted to the acclimation facility alone and again as water was diverted to the irrigation system and pond together. The facility is in good condition and is well maintained, although water velocities within the site do not meet the criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Approach velocities above 0.4 ft/s at the upstream end of the facility and decreases in sweep velocity toward the bypass are likely caused by the proximity of the upstream screen to the spill over stoplogs that control flow at the upstream end of the forebay. We recommend working with Touchet Acclimation Facility staff to try different configurations and heights of forebay stoplogs while PNNL staff measure water velocities, allowing real-time monitoring of changes in approach and sweep velocities resulting from the configuration changes. It may be possible to bring approach and sweep velocities more in line with the NMFS criteria for juvenile fish screens. We also recommend evaluating the facility later in the year when river levels are low and the irrigation district is the only water user. During the site visit, it was noted that the upstream end of the fishway has relatively closely spaced louvers that point downstream. During higher river levels such as on April 20, the orientation of the louvers causes a headloss of up to 1 ft or more. Fish must maneuver through this hydraulic jump and between the louvers. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is considering alternatives to this configuration; if needed, we would be available to offer technical assistance.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

Characterizing the Fish Passage Environment at The Dalles Dam Spillway: 2001-2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The spill environment at The Dalles Dam in 2001-2004 was characterized using a field-deployed autonomous sensor (the so-called Sensor Fish), computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, and Lagrangian particle tracking. The sensor fish has a self-contained capability to digitally the record pressure and triaxial accelerations it was exposed to following its release into the spillway. After recovery downstream of the tailrace, the data stored in the memory of the sensor are downloaded and stored for analysis. The spillway, stilling basin, and tailrace hydrodynamics were simulated using an unsteady, free-surface, three-dimensional CFD code that solved the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with a two-equation turbulence model. The results from the CFD simulations were then used in a Lagrangian particle tracking model that included the effects of mass, drag, and buoyancy in the particle equation of motion. A random walk method was used to simulate the effects of small-scale turbulence on the particle motion. Several operational and structural conditions were evaluated using the Sensor Fish, CFD, and particle tracking. Quantifying events such as strike and stilling basin retention time characterized exposure conditions in the spill environment.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Serkowski, John A.; Cook, Chris B.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Perkins, William A.

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The goal of the study was to provide fish passage and distribution data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. During the year-long study period - February 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011the objectives of the hydroacoustic evaluation of fish passage and distribution at LOP were to: 1. Estimate passage rates, run timing, horizontal distribution, and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for smolt-size fish. 2. Estimate passage rates, run timing and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for small-size fish. 3. Estimate passage rates and run timing at the regulating outlets for smolt-size fish. 4. Estimate vertical distribution of smolt-size fish in the forebay near the upstream face of the dam. The fixed-location hydroacoustic technique was used to accomplish the objectives of this study. Transducers (420 kHz) were deployed in each penstock intake, above each RO entrance, and on the dam face; a total of nine transducers (2 single-beam and 7 split-beam) were used. We summarize the findings from the hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011 as follows. • Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> ~90 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. • During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish ± 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. • Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. • Run timing for small-size fish (~65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Downstream passage of small-size juvenile fish was variable, occurring on two days in the spring, eight days in the summer, and at times throughout late fall and winter. A total of 7,017 ± 690 small-size fish passed through the turbine penstock intakes during the study period. • Relatively few fish passed into the ROs when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). • Fish were surface-oriented with 62-80% above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30-60%) was in the 5-10 m depth bin. We draw the following conclusions from the study. • The non-obtrusive hydroacoustic data from this study are reliable because passage estimates and patterns were similar with those observed in the direct capture data from the tailrace screw trap and were consistent with distribution patterns observed in other studies of juvenile salmonid passage at dams. • Fish passage at LOP was apparently affected but not dominated by dam operations and reservoir elevation. • The surface-oriented vertical distribution of fish we observed supports development of surface passage or collector devices. In summary, the high-resolution spatially and temporally data reported herein provide detailed estimates of vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal passage and distributions at LOP during March 2010 through January 2011. This information is applicable to management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collections devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above Lookout Point Dam.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation : Fish Passage and Habitat Improvement in the Upper Flathead River Basin, 1991-1996 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past 50 years, dramatic changes have occurred in the Flathead Lake and River system. Degradation of fishery resources has been evident, in part due to deterioration of aquatic habitat and introduction of non-endemic fish and invertebrate species. Habitat loss has been attributed to many factors including the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam, unsound land use practices, urban development, and other anthropogenic and natural disturbances. Fish migration has also been limited by barriers such as dams and impassible culverts. Cumulatively, these factors have contributed to declines in the distribution and abundance of native fish populations. Recovery of fish populations requires that a watershed approach be developed that incorporates long-term aquatic habitat needs and promotes sound land use practices and cooperation among natural resource management agencies. In this document, the authors (1) describe completed and ongoing habitat improvement and fish passage activities under the Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program, (2) describe recently identified projects that are in the planning stage, and (3) develop a framework for identifying prioritizing, implementing, and evaluating future fish habitat improvement and passage projects.

Knotek, W.Ladd; Deleray, Mark; Marotz, Brian L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Feasibility of Documenting and Estimating Adult Fish Passage at Large Hydroelectric Facilities in the Snake River Using Video Technology; 1993 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River to evaluate the feasibility of using video technology to document and estimate fish ladder passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, sockeye salmon O. nerka, and steelhead O. mykiss. A video system was to produced video images during salmon passage periods. A technician identified and counted fish images from the video record. Fish ladder passage estimates of target species made from the video record were similar to estimates made by on-site counters during daytime periods, indicating that the two methods were relatively precise. We also found that a significant percentage (6.4% and 8.3%) of target salmonids migrated during nighttime periods when on-site counts were not typically made during the two years of study. Analysis of the video record permitted verification of individual sockeye salmon identified and counted by on-site count personnel, and provided data useful to managers of this ESA-listed stock. Analysis of the video record also permitted collection of additional data such as length measurements of individual specimens, which was used to regulate a fishery located upstream.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Pederson, David R.; Fryer, Jeffrey

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE), to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE's Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. We conducted a hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011. Findings from this 1 year of study should be applied carefully because annual variation can be expected due to variability in adult salmon escapement, egg-to-fry and fry-to-smolt survival rates, reservoir rearing and predation, dam operations, and weather. Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> {approx}90 mm and < 300 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. Passage peaks were also evident in early spring, early summer, and late fall. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish {+-} 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. Of this total, 84% passed during December-January. Run timing for small-size fish ({approx}65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. Relatively few fish passed into the Regulating Outlets (ROs) when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). Overall, when the ROs were open, RO efficiency (RO passage divided by total project passage) was 0.004. In linear regression analyses, daily fish passage (turbines and ROs combined) for smolt-size fish was significantly related to project discharge (P<0.001). This relationship was positive, but there was no relationship between total project passage and forebay elevation (P=0.48) or forebay elevation delta, i.e., day-to-day change in forebay elevation (P=0.16). In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed data well. The multiple regression model indicates a positive trend between expected daily fish passage and each of the three variables in the model-Julian day, log(discharge), and log(abs(forebay delta)); i.e., as any of the environmental variables increase, expected daily fish passage increases. For vertical distribution of fish at the face of the dam, fish were surface-oriented with 62%-80% occurring above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30%-60%) was found between 5-10-m-deep. During spring and summer, mean target strengths for the analysis periods ranged from -44.2 to -42.1 dB. These values are indicative of yearling-sized juvenile salmon. In contrast, mean target strengths in fall and winter were about -49.0 dB, which are representative of subyearling-sized fish. The high-resolution spatial and temporal data reported herein provide detailed information about vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal fish passage rates and distributions at LOP from March 2010 through January 2011. This information will support management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above LOP.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Characterization of Pump Flow at the Grand Coulee Dam Pumping Station for Fish Passage, 2004-2005 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Bonneville Power Administration to characterize the conditions fish experience when entrained in pump flow at the Grand Coulee Dam. PNNL conducted field studies at Grand Coulee Dam in 2004 using the Sensor Fish to measure the acceleration and pressure conditions that might be experienced by fish that pass through pumps at Grand Coulee Dam's Pump-Generating Plant and are transported up into the feeder canal leading to Banks Lake. The probability that fish would be struck by the Pump-Generating Plant's new nine-bladed turbines was also estimated. Our measurements showed relatively low turbulence except in the immediate vicinity of the runner environment. The lowest and highest pressures experienced by the Sensor Fish were 6.4 and 155 psi (the pressure gauge saturated at 155 psi). The probability of strike was also calculated, based on the average length of hatchery-reared juvenile kokanee (land-locked sockeye). Strike probabilities ranged from 0.0755 for 2.36-inch fish to 0.3890 for 11.8-inch fish. The probability of strike estimates indicate that the majority (77%) of recently released hatchery kokanee would be carried through the test pump without being struck and most likely with low risk of injury resulting from pressure and turbulence exposure. Of the 23% that might be struck it is expected that 60% would arrive in Banks Lake without visible external injuries. Thus more than 90% of entrained fish could be expected to arrive in Banks Lake without significant injury, assuming that no kokanee were injured or killed by pressure exposure during passage.

Carlson, T.; Duncan, J.; Johnson, R.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design: Analysis of Barriers to Upstream Fish Migration, Volume IV of IV, Investigation of the Physical and Biological Conditions Affecting Fish Passage Success at Culverts and Waterfalls, 1982-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A synopsis of the project components was prepared to provide an overview for persons who are not fisheries scientists or engineers. This short report can be used also by technical persons who are interested in the scope of the project, and as a summary of the three main reports. The contents includes an historical perspective on fishway design which provides the basis for this project. The major project accomplishments and significant additions to the body of knowledge about the analysis and design of fishways are discussed. In the next section the research project organization, objectives and components are presented to familiarize the reader with the scope of this project. The summary report concludes with recommendations for assisting in the enhancement and restoration of fisheries resources from the perspective of fish passage problems and their solution. Promising research topics are included.

Powers, Patrick D.; Orsborn, John F.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Detroit Dam, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Detroit Dam (DET) on the North Santiam River, Oregon for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at DET and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to regulatory requirements necessitated by the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The goal of the study was to provide information of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at DET from February 2011 through February 2012. The results of the hydroacoustic study provide new and, in some cases, first-ever data on passage estimates, run timing, distributions, and relationships between fish passage and environmental variables at the dam. This information will inform management decisions on the design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the North Santiam River watershed above DET. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 182,526 smolt-size fish (±4,660 fish, 95% CI) passed through turbine penstock intakes. Run timing peaked in winter and early spring months. Passage rates were highest during late fall, winter and early spring months and low during summer. Horizontal distribution for hours when both turbine units were operated simultaneously indicated Unit 2 passed almost twice as much fish as Unit 1. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish during the study period was fairly uniform, indicating fish were passing the turbines at all times of the day. A total of 5,083 smolt-size fish (± 312 fish, 95% CI) were estimated passed via the spillway when it was open between June 23 and September 27, 2011. Daily passage was low at the spillway during the June-August period, and increased somewhat in September 2011. When the spillway was operated simultaneously with the turbines, spillway efficiency (efficiency is estimated as spillway passage divided by total project passage) was 0.72 and effectiveness (fish:flow ratio—proportion fish passage at a route (e.g., spillway) divided by proportion water through that route out of the total project) was 2.69. That is, when the spillway was open, 72% of the fish passing the dam used the spillway and 28% passed into the turbine penstocks. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish at the spillway shows a distinct peak in passage between mid-morning and mid-afternoon and low passage at night. We estimated that 23,339 smolt-size fish (± 572 fish, 95% CI) passed via the Regulating Outlet (RO) when it was open from October 29 through November 12, 2011, January 2-6, and January 20 through February 3, 2012. During the October–November period, RO passage peaked at 1,086 fish on November 5, with a second peak on November 7 (1,075 fish). When the RO was operated simultaneously with the turbines, RO efficiency was 0.33 and effectiveness was 0.89. In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed fish passage data well. The best model included forebay temperature at depth, forebay elevation, total discharge, hours of daylight, and the operation period. The vertical distribution of fish in the forebay near the face of the dam where the transducers sampled showed fish were generally distributed throughout the water column during all four operational periods. During the refill and full pool periods, vertical distribution was bi-modal with surface-layer and mid-water modes. Patterns for day and night distributions were variable. Fish were distributed above and below the thermocline when it was present (full pool and drawdown periods).

Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ham, Kenneth D.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hatchery Evaluation Report/Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery - Tule Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery (Tule Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located along the Columbia River at Underwood, Washington, approximately 30 miles upstream of Bonneville Dam. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development IV: fish mortality resulting from turbine passage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents a state-of-the-art review of literature concerning turbine-related fish mortality. The review discusses conventional and, to a lesser degree, pumped-storage (reversible) hydroelectric facilities. Much of the research on conventional facilities discussed in this report deals with studies performed in the Pacific Northwest and covers both prototype and model studies. Research conducted on Kaplan and Francis turbines during the 1950s and 1960s has been extensively reviewed and is discussed. Very little work on turbine-related fish mortality has been undertaken with newer turbine designs developed for more modern small-scale hydropower facilities; however, one study on a bulb unit (Kaplan runner) has recently been released. In discussing turbine-related fish mortality at pumped-storage facilities, much of the literature relates to the Ludington Pumped Storage Power Plant. As such, it is used as the principal facility in discussing research concerning pumped storage.

Turbak, S. C.; Reichle, D. R.; Shriner, C. R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE), to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE's Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. We conducted a hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011. Findings from this 1 year of study should be applied carefully because annual variation can be expected due to variability in adult salmon escapement, egg-to-fry and fry-to-smolt survival rates, reservoir rearing and predation, dam operations, and weather. Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> {approx}90 mm and fish {+-} 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. Of this total, 84% passed during December-January. Run timing for small-size fish ({approx}65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. Relatively few fish passed into the Regulating Outlets (ROs) when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). Overall, when the ROs were open, RO efficiency (RO passage divided by total project passage) was 0.004. In linear regression analyses, daily fish passage (turbines and ROs combined) for smolt-size fish was significantly related to project discharge (Pfish passage and each of the three variables in the model-Julian day, log(discharge), and log(abs(forebay delta)); i.e., as any of the environmental variables increase, expected daily fish passage increases. For vertical distribution of fish at the face of the dam, fish were surface-oriented with 62%-80% occurring above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30%-60%) was found between 5-10-m-deep. During spring and summer, mean target strengths for the analysis periods ranged from -44.2 to -42.1 dB. These values are indicative of yearling-sized juvenile salmon. In contrast, mean target strengths in fall and winter were about -49.0 dB, which are representative of subyearling-sized fish. The high-resolution spatial and temporal data reported herein provide detailed information about vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal fish passage rates and distributions at LOP from March 2010 through January 2011. This information will support management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above LOP.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

91

Determination of Swimming Speeds and Energetic Demands of Upriver Migrating Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha) in the Klickitat River, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program during the fall of 2001. The objective was to study the migration and energy use of adult fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) traveling up the Klickitat River to spawn. The salmon were tagged with either surgically implanted electromyogram (EMG) transmitters or gastrically implanted coded transmitters and were monitored with mobile and stationary receivers. Swim speed and aerobic and anaerobic energy use were determined for the fish as they attempted passage of three waterfalls on the lower Klickitat River and as they traversed free-flowing stretches between, below, and above the falls. Of the 35 EMG-tagged fish released near the mouth of the Klickitat River, 40% passed the first falls, 24% passed the second falls, and 20% made it to Lyle Falls. None of the EMG-tagged fish were able to pass Lyle Falls, either over the falls or via a fishway at Lyle Falls. Mean swimming speeds ranged from as low as 52.6 centimeters per second (cm s{sup -1}) between falls to as high as 189 (cm s{sup -1}) at falls passage. Fish swam above critical swimming speeds while passing the falls more often than while swimming between the falls (58.9% versus 1.7% of the transmitter signals). However, fish expended more energy swimming the stretches between the falls than during actual falls passage (100.7 to 128.2 kilocalories [kcals] to traverse areas between or below falls versus 0.3 to 1.0 kcals to pass falls). Relationships between sex, length, and time of day on the success of falls passage were also examined. Average swimming speeds were highest during the day in all areas except at some waterfalls. There was no apparent relationship between either fish condition or length and successful passage of waterfalls in the lower Klickitat River. Female fall chinook salmon, however, had a much lower likelihood of passing waterfalls than males. The study also examined energy costs and swimming speeds for fish released above Lyle Falls as they migrated to upstream spawning areas. This journey averaged 15.93 days to travel a mean maximum of 37.6 km upstream at a total energy cost of approx 3,971 kcals (34% anaerobic and 66% aerobic) for a sample of five fish. A bioenergetics example was run, which estimated that fall chinook salmon would expend an estimated 1,208 kcal to pass from the mouth of the Columbia River to Bonneville Dam and 874 kcals to pass Bonneville Dam and pool and the three falls on the Lower Klickitat River, plus an additional 2,770 kcals above the falls to reach the spawning grounds, leaving them with approximately 18% (1,089 kcals) of their original energy reserves for spawning. Results of the bioenergetics example suggest that a delay of 9 to 11 days along the lower Klickitat River may deplete their remaining energy reserves (at a rate of about 105 kcal d{sup -1}) resulting in death before spawning would occur.

Brown, Richard S.; Geist, David R.; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Jumping fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jumping fish Name: Roy Bates Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do fish jump more in the summer than in the fall? Replies: One reason may be the number of...

93

Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 1999.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 1999 and years previous. In an effort to provide this information to a wider audience, the individual chapters in this report have been submitted as manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals. These chapters communicate significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Abundance and timing of seaward migration of Snake River fall chinook salmon was indexed using passage data collected at Lower Granite Dam for five years. We used genetic analyses to determine the lineage of fish recaptured at Lower Granite Dam that had been previously PIT tagged. We then used discriminant analysis to determine run membership of PIT-tagged smolts that were not recaptured to enable us to calculate annual run composition and to compared early life history attributes of wild subyearling fall and spring chinook salmon. Because spring chinook salmon made up from 15.1 to 44.4% of the tagged subyearling smolts that were detected passing Lower Granite Dam, subyearling passage data at Lower Granite Dam can only be used to index fall chinook salmon smolt abundance and passage timing if genetic samples are taken to identify run membership of smolts. Otherwise, fall chinook salmon smolt abundance would be overestimated and timing of fall chinook salmon smolt passage would appear to be earlier and more protracted than is the case.

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was initiated to provide empirical data and analyses on the dam passage timing, travel rate, survival, and life history variation of fall Chinook salmon that are produced in the Clearwater River. The area of interest for this study focuses on the lower four miles of the Clearwater River and its confluence with the Snake River because this is an area where many fish delay their seaward migration. The goal of the project is to increase our understanding of the environmental and biological factors that affect juvenile life history of fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River. The following summaries are provided for each of the individual chapters in this report.

Tiffan, Kenneth F. [U.S. Geological Survey; Connor, William P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Enloe Dam Passage Project, Volume I, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses issues related to the provision of fish passage facilities at Enloe Dam and the introduction of anadromous salmonid fish to the upper Similkameen River basin. The species of fish being considered is a summer run of steelhead trout adapted to the upper Columbia basin. (ACR)

Fanning, M.L.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Overwintering Summer Steelhead Fallback and Kelt Passage at The Dalles Dam Turbines, Early Spring 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of overwintering summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fallback and early out-migrating steelhead kelts downstream passage at The Dalles Dam turbines during early spring 2011. The study was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) to investigate whether adult steelhead are passing through turbines during early spring before annual sluiceway operations typically begin. The sluiceway surface flow outlet is the optimal non-turbine route for adult steelhead, although operating the sluiceway reduces hydropower production. This is a follow-up study to similar studies of adult steelhead passage at the sluiceway and turbines we conducted in the fall/winter 2008, early spring 2009, fall/winter 2009, and early spring 2010. The goal of the 2011 study was to characterize adult steelhead passage rates at the turbines while the sluiceway was closed so fisheries managers would have additional information to use in decision-making relative to sluiceway operations. Sluiceway operations were not scheduled to begin until April 10, 2011. However, based on a management decision in late February, sluiceway operations commenced on March 1, 2011. Therefore, this study provided estimates of fish passage rates through the turbines, and not the sluiceway, while the sluiceway was open. The study period was March 1 through April 10, 2011 (41 days total). The study objective was to estimate the number and distribution of adult steelhead and kelt-sized targets passing into turbine units. We obtained fish passage data using fixed-location hydroacoustics with transducers deployed at all 22 main turbine units at The Dalles Dam. Adult steelhead passage through the turbines occurred on 9 days during the study (March 9, 12, 30, and 31 and April 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9). We estimated a total of 215 {+-} 98 (95% confidence interval) adult steelhead targets passed through the turbines between March 1 and April 10, 2011. Horizontal distribution data indicated Main Unit 18 passed the majority of fish. Fish passage occurred throughout the day. We conclude that adult steelhead passed through turbines during early spring 2011 at The Dalles Dam.

Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Reading Comprehension Passages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to Reading Comprehension Passages! Welcome to Reading Comprehension Passages! Select one of the passages listed below. Complete the passage by selecting the words that best fit the context of the passage. Press the 'Check My Answers!' button when you are done to see how you did! Attention Teachers!! Add your own reading comprehension passages for your class to use! If you are reading this, your browser is NOT running JavaScript. JavaScript MUST be enabled for this section of our site to work. Once you have turned JavaScript on, reload this page and this warning will go away. The Scientific Method in the Lab* Charges and Electricity The Earth's Energy Budget The Water Cycle The Water Cycle #2* Minerals* 3rd Grade Resources* Where Plants and Animals Live* Internet Safety Looking for Quarks Inside the Atom

100

Fish elevator and method of elevating fish  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A means and method for transporting fish from a lower body of water to a higher body of water. The means comprises a tubular lock with a gated entrance below the level of the lower body of water through which fish may enter the lock and a discharge passage above the level of the upper body of water. The fish raising means in the lock is a crowder pulled upward by a surface float as water from the upper body of water gravitationally flows into the closed lock filling it to the level of the upper body. Water is then pumped into the lock to raise the level to the discharge passage. The crowder is then caused to float upward the remaining distance through the water to the level of the discharge passage by the introduction of air into a pocket on the underside of the crowder. The fish are then automatically discharged from the lock into the discharge passage by the out of water position of the crowder. The movement of the fish into the discharge passage is aided by the continuous overflow of water still being pumped into the lock. A pipe may be connected to the discharge passage to deliver the fish to a selected location in the upper body of water.

Truebe, Jonathan (Mirror Lake, NH); Drooker, Michael S. (Sanbornville, NH)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

passage.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passage Passage of particles through matter 1 1. PASSAGE OF PARTICLES THROUGH MATTER Revised January 2012 by H. Bichsel (University of Washington), D.E. Groom (LBNL), and S.R. Klein (LBNL). 1.1. Notation Table 1.1: Summary of variables used in this section. The kinematic variables β and γ have their usual meanings. Symbol Definition Units or Value α Fine structure constant 1/137.035 999 11(46) (e 2 /4πǫ 0 c) M Incident particle mass MeV/c 2 E Incident part. energy γM c 2 MeV T Kinetic energy MeV m e c 2 Electron mass × c 2 0.510 998 918(44) MeV r e Classical electron radius 2.817 940 325(28) fm e 2 /4πǫ 0 m e c 2 N A Avogadro's number 6.022 1415(10) × 10 23 mol -1 ze Charge of incident particle Z Atomic number of absorber A Atomic mass of absorber g mol -1 K/A 4πN A r 2 e m e c 2 /A 0.307 075 MeV g -1 cm 2 for A = 1 g mol -1 I Mean excitation energy eV (Nota bene! ) δ(βγ) Density effect correction to ionization energy

107

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Can Fish Morphological Characteristics be Used to Re-design Hydroelectric Turbines?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safe fish passage affects not only migratory species, but also populations of resident fish by altering biomass, biodiversity, and gene flow. Consequently, it is important to estimate turbine passage survival of a wide range of susceptible fish. Although fish-friendly turbines show promise for reducing turbine passage mortality, experimental data on their beneficial effects are limited to only a few species, mainly salmon and trout. For thousands of untested species and sizes of fish, the particular causes of turbine passage mortality and the benefits of fish-friendly turbine designs remain unknown. It is not feasible to measure the turbine-passage survival of every species of fish in every hydroelectric turbine design. We are attempting to predict fish mortality based on an improved understanding of turbine-passage stresses (pressure, shear stress, turbulence, strike) and information about the morphological, behavioral, and physiological characteristics of different fish taxa that make them susceptible to the stresses. Computational fluid dynamics and blade strike models of the turbine environment are re-examined in light of laboratory and field studies of fish passage effects. Comparisons of model-predicted stresses to measured injuries and mortalities will help identify fish survival thresholds and the aspects of turbines that are most in need of re-design. The coupled model and fish morphology evaluations will enable us to make predictions of turbine-passage survival among untested fish species, for both conventional and advanced turbines, and to guide the design of hydroelectric turbines to improve fish passage survival.

Cada, G. F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

109

Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead at McNary Dam, 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead at McNary Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a virtual/paired-release model. This study supports the USACE’s continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Hughes, James S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Batton, George; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Deng, Zhiqun; Etherington, D. J.; Fu, Tao; Greiner, Michael J.; Ingraham, John M.; Kim, Jin A.; Li, Xi; Martinez, Jayson J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Safer Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The successful migration of juvenile salmonids downriver on the Columbia and Snake Rivers to the Pacific Ocean in the United States Pacific Northwest has been challenged due to the multiple hydropower facilities located on these rivers. Because head injury likely results from physical trauma, such as impacting a physical structure or extreme high velocities, the development of a biomarker assay to quickly assess subacute physical injury and recovery is essential to determine the impact of hydropower structures on fish health.

Miracle, Ann L.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

111

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing Through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Tyler; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Spillway, 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine detailed vertical, horizontal, intensive, and diel distributions of juvenile salmonid passage at the spillway at The Dalles Dam from April 12 to July16, 2006. These data are being applied in the Spillway Improvements Program to position release pipes for direct injury and mortality studies and to provide baseline data for assessment of the vortex suppression devices scheduled for deployment in 2007. We estimated fish distributions from hydroacoustic data collected with split-beam transducers arrayed across Bays 1 through 9 and 14. Spill at ~20 kcfs per bay was bulked at Bays 1-6, although the other bays were opened at times during the study to maintain a 40% spill percentage out of total project discharge. The vertical distribution of fish was skewed toward the surface during spring, but during summer, passage peaked at 2-3 m above the spillway ogee. Fish passage rates (number per hour) and fish densities (number per kcfs) were highest at Bay 6, followed by passage at Bay 5. This result comports with spillway horizontal distribution data from radio telemetry and hydroacoustic studies in 2004. The vertical and horizontal distribution of fish passage at bays 5 and 6 was much more variable during spring than summer and more variable at bay 5 than bay 6. Diel distribution data revealed that fish passage was highest during 0600-0700 h in spring; otherwise passage was reasonably uniform on a diel basis. This study substantiates the purpose of the spillway vortex suppression device to re-distribute downstream migrants away from Bay 6 toward Bays 1-5.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Skalski, John R.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon smolts at The Dalles Dam during summer 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 2 km below the dam The forebay-to-tailrace survival estimate satisfies the “BRZ-to-BRZ” survival estimate called for in the Fish Accords. , as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The estimate of dam survival for subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles in 2010 was 0.9404 with an associated standard error of 0.0091.

Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Quantifying mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to simulated hydro-turbine passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proportion of juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids travel through one or more turbines during seaward migration in the Columbia and Snake River every year. Despite this understanding, limited information exists on how these fish respond to hydraulic pressures found during turbine passage events. In this study we exposed juvenile Chinook salmon to varied acclimation pressures and subsequent exposure pressures (nadir) to mimic the hydraulic pressures of large Kaplan turbines (ratio of pressure change). Additionally, we varied abiotic (total dissolved gas, rate of pressure change) and biotic (condition factor, fish length, fish weight) factors that may contribute to the incidence of mortal injury associated with fish passing through hydro-turbines. We determined that the main factor associated with mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon during simulated turbine passage was the ratio between acclimation and nadir pressures. Condition factor, total dissolved gas, and the rate of pressure change were found to only slightly increase the predictive power of equations relating probability of mortal injury to conditions of exposure or characteristics of test fish during simulated turbine passage. This research will assist engineers and fisheries managers in operating and improving hydroelectric facility efficiency while minimizing mortality and injury of turbine-passed juvenile Chinook salmon. The results are discussed in the context of turbine development and the necessity of understanding how different species of fish will respond to the hydraulic pressures of turbine passage.

Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Welch, Abigail E.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for tagged yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during spring 2011. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a paired-release survival model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Batten, G.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Elder, T.; Etherington, D. J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Miracle, Ann L.; Mitchell, T. D.; Prather, K.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Royer, Ida; Seaburg, Adam; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

119

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts and juvenile steelhead tagged with JSATS acoustic micro-transmitters as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during 2010. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a single-release survival estimate model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Wagner, Katie A.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Royer, Ida M.; Khan, Fenton; Cushing, Aaron W.; Etherington, D. J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Elder, T.; Batton, George; Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

EIS-0397: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project To Improve Fish Passage to Habitat in the Upper Part of the Watershed,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Synthesis of Juvenile Salmonid Passage Studies at The Dalles Dam, Volume II, 2001-05  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of juvenile salmonid research at The Dalles Dam is to provide data to inform decisions on strategies to improve smolt survival rates at the project. Survival improvement strategies address the three primary passage routes at The Dalles Dam -- spillway, sluiceway, and turbines – with the general intent to increase spill and sluice passage and decrease turbine passage. Since the review by Ploskey et al. (2001a) of research during 1982-2000 at The Dalles Dam, the Corps funded over $20M of research in at least 39 studies during 2001-2006. The purpose of the current review is to synthesize juvenile salmonid passage data at The Dalles Dam (TDA) collected from 2001 through 2006. The data we synthesize comes from numerous research techniques employed to address particular study objectives at The Dalles Dam. The suite of techniques includes acoustic and radio telemetry, acoustic cameras, acoustic Doppler current profilers, balloon tags, computational fluid dynamics models, drogues, fixed and mobile hydroacoustics, fyke nets, physical scale models, PIT-tags, sensor fish, sonar trackers, and underwater video. Hydraulic data involves flow patterns and water velocities. Biological data involve forebay approach paths and residence times, horizontal and diel distributions, passage efficiencies and effectiveness, fish behaviors, tailrace egress and predation rates, and route-specific and total project survival rates. Data for 2001-2006 are synthesized in this report to provide, in conjunction with Ploskey et al. (2001a), resources for engineers, biologists, and dam operators to use when making decisions about fish protection measures for juvenile salmonids at The Dalles Dam. This review covers the major fish passage research efforts during 2001-2006 and includes sections on the Environmental Setting, Forebay and Project Passage Studies, Spill Studies, Sluiceway Studies, Turbine Studies, Smolt Survival Studies, and a Discussion.

Johnson, Gary E.; Beeman, John W.; Duran, Ian; Puls, Andrew

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Improved return passages for multistage centrifugal compressors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a design concept for return passages in multistage centrifugal compressors. Flow in a baseline return passage is analyzed to identify loss sources that have substantial potential for reduction. For the ...

Glass, Benjamin W., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Turbine Blade Shape Favorable for Fish Survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various mechanisms associated with turbine design and operation injure fish passing through hydro turbines. Pilot-scale tests with various fish species and sizes showed that most turbine passage injury and mortality are caused by blade strike. Leading edge blade strike is particularly important for turbines with numerous blades. Very little information and data are available on the mechanics of fish struck by turbine blades and the resulting injury and mortality rates. Determining what leading edge blade...

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

Inventory and Typology of Fauna Passages on French Transport Infrastructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

passages à faune en Picardie (Inventory of fauna passages inis to carry out a database to inventory the structures oforganisation). Methods The inventory of fauna passages uses

Bielsa, Sabine; Pineau, Christophe

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Culvert test bed: fish-passage research facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory (PNNL). The partnership has under- takenscientists and engineers from PNNL to address the hydraulic

Pearson, Dr. Walter H.; May, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Flying fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flying fish Name: Prairie View Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: How does the flying fish get speed to fly? Replies: The "flying fish", like most fishes, gets its...

127

Efficacy of Single-Suture Incision Closures in Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Turbine Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reductions in the size of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the use of a shorter incision-one that may warrant only a single suture for closure. However, it is not known whether a single suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed when fish are decompressed and when outward pressure is placed on the surgical site during turbine passage through hydroelectric dams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of single-suture incision closures on five response variables in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were subjected to simulated turbine passage. An acoustic transmitter (0.43 g in air) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g in air) were implanted in each fish; the 6-mm incisions were closed with either one suture or two sutures. After exposure to simulated turbine passage, none of the fish exhibited expulsion of transmitters. In addition, the percentage of fish with suture tearing, incision tearing, or mortal injury did not differ between treatments. Expulsion of viscera through the incision was higher among fish that received one suture (12%) than among fish that received two sutures (1%). The higher incidence of visceral expulsion through single-suture incisions warrants concern. Consequently, for cases in which tagged juvenile salmonidsmay be exposed to turbine passage, we do not recommend the use of one suture to close 6-mm incisions associated with acoustic transmitter implantation.

Boyd, James W.; Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fish-Friendly Hydropower Turbine Development & Deployment: Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing  

SciTech Connect

The Alden turbine was developed through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) former Advanced Hydro Turbine Systems Program (1994-2006) and, more recently, through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the DOE's Wind & Water Power Program. The primary goal of the engineering study described here was to provide a commercially competitive turbine design that would yield fish passage survival rates comparable to or better than the survival rates of bypassing or spilling flow. Although the turbine design was performed for site conditions corresponding to 92 ft (28 m) net head and a discharge of 1500 cfs (42.5 cms), the design can be modified for additional sites with differing operating conditions. During the turbine development, design modifications were identified for the spiral case, distributor (stay vanes and wicket gates), runner, and draft tube to improve turbine performance while maintaining features for high fish passage survival. Computational results for pressure change rates and shear within the runner passage were similar in the original and final turbine geometries, while predicted minimum pressures were higher for the final turbine. The final turbine geometry and resulting flow environments are expected to further enhance the fish passage characteristics of the turbine. Computational results for the final design were shown to improve turbine efficiencies by over 6% at the selected operating condition when compared to the original concept. Prior to the release of the hydraulic components for model fabrication, finite element analysis calculations were conducted for the stay vanes, wicket gates, and runner to verify that structural design criteria for stress and deflections were met. A physical model of the turbine was manufactured and tested with data collected for power and efficiency, cavitation limits, runaway speed, axial and radial thrust, pressure pulsations, and wicket gate torque. All parameters were observed to fall within ranges expected for conventional radial flow machines. Based on these measurements, the expected efficiency peak for prototype application is 93.64%. These data were used in the final sizing of the supporting mechanical and balance of plant equipment. The preliminary equipment cost for the design specification is $1450/kW with a total supply schedule of 28 months. This equipment supply includes turbine, generator, unit controls, limited balance of plant equipment, field installation, and commissioning. Based on the selected head and flow design conditions, fish passage survival through the final turbine is estimated to be approximately 98% for 7.9-inch (200-mm) fish, and the predicted survival reaches 100% for fish 3.9 inches (100 mm) and less in length. Note that fish up to 7.9- inches (200 mm) in length make up more than 90% of fish entrained at hydro projects in the United States. Completion of these efforts provides a mechanical and electrical design that can be readily adapted to site-specific conditions with additional engineering development comparable to costs associated with conventional turbine designs.

None

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival Proportions at John Day Dam, 2009  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the acoustic telemetry study at JDA during 2009 was to determine the best configuration and operation for JDA prior to conducting BiOp performance standard tests. The primary objective was to determine the best operation between 30% and 40% spill treatments. Route-specific and JDA to TDA forebay survival estimates, passage distribution, and timing/behavior metrics were used for comparison of 30% to a 40% spill treatments. A secondary objective was to evaluate the performance of TSWs installed in spill bays 15 and 16 and to estimate fish survival rates and passage efficiencies under 30% and 40% spill-discharge treatments each season.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Kim, Jin A.; Johnson, Gary E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Khan, Fenton; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, J. R.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Meyer, Matthew M.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

132

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Effect of an Externally Attached Neutrally Buoyant Transmitter on Mortal Injury during Simulated Hydroturbine Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On their seaward migration, juvenile salmonids commonly pass hydroelectric dams. Fish passing through hydroturbines experience a rapid decrease in pressure as they pass by the turbine blade and the severity of this decompression can be highly variable. This rapid decrease in pressure can result in injuries such as swim bladder rupture, exophthalmia, and emboli and hemorrhaging in the fins and tissues. However, recent research indicates that the presence of a telemetry tag (acoustic, radio, inductive) implanted inside the coelom of a juvenile salmon increases the likelihood that the fish will be injured or die during turbine passage. Thus, previous research conducted using telemetry tags implanted into the coelom of fish may have been inaccurate. Thus, a new technique is needed to provide unbiased estimates of survival through turbines. This research provides an evaluation of the effectiveness of a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter. Both nontagged fish and fish tagged with a neutrally buoyant external transmitter were exposed to a range of rapid decompressions simulating turbine passage. Juvenile Chinook salmon tagged with a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter did not receive a higher degree of barotrauma than their nontagged counterparts. We suggest that future research include field-based comparisons of survival and behavior among fish tagged with a neutrally buoyant external transmitter and those internally implanted with transmitters.

Brown, Richard S.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

134

Fish breathing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish breathing Name: Bob W Whitbeck Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What factors make it harder for fish to breathe? Replies: Fish "breathe" with gills and...

135

Glowing fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glowing fish Name: Nicholas L Walker Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do certain fish glow??? Replies: Some fish are able to produce light by a chemical...

136

Applications of the Sensor Fish Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sensor Fish is an autonomous device developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Army Corps of Engineers (COE) to better understand the physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro-turbines and other dam bypass alternatives. Since its initial development in 1997, the Sensor Fish has undergone several design changes to improve its function and extend the range of its use. The most recent Sensor Fish design, the six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) device, has been deployed successfully to characterize the environment fish experience when they pass through several hydroelectric projects along main stem Columbia and Snake Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Just as information gathered from crash test dummies can affect automobile design with the installation of protective designs to lessen or prevent human injury, having sensor fish data to quantify accelerations, rotations, and pressure changes, helps identify fish injury mechanisms such as strike, turbulent shear, pressure, and inertial effects, including non-lethal ones such as stunning or signs of vestibular disruption that expose fish to a higher risk of predation by birds and piscivorous fish downstream following passage.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

137

FDST 8010 (Fall 2003)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FDST 8010 (Fall Semester 2007) FOOD LIPIDS Instructor: C. C. Akoh Objective: After completion of this course, students will know: 1. How the chemical composition and structure can influence the analysis, processing, deterioration, nutrit

138

Turbulence and Diapycnal Mixing in Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct measurements of turbulence levels in the Drake Passage region of the Southern Ocean show a marked enhancement over the Phoenix Ridge. At this site, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) is constricted in its flow between the southern tip ...

L. St. Laurent; A. C. Naveira Garabato; J. R. Ledwell; A. M. Thurnherr; J. M. Toole; A. J. Watson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Deep-Flow Variability at Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rotary empirical orthogonal function analysis of the currents measured in central Drake Passage during DRAKE 79 shows that the deep (2500 m) flow has the same spatial and temporal structure as the flow at 500 m, suggesting that current ...

John M. Klinck; Eileen E. Hofmann

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study estimated dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and provided additional performance measures as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. This summary report focuses on spring run stocks, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dales Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect

The study estimated dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and provided additional performance measures as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. This summary report focuses on spring run stocks, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Evaluation of Behavioral Guidance Structure on Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam in 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an acoustic-telemetry study at Bonneville Dam in 2009 to evaluate the effects of a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) in the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse forebay on fish passage and survival through the second powerhouse (B2), the dam as a whole, and through the first powerhouse and spillway combined. The BGS was deployed to increase the survival of fish passing through B2 by increasing the percentage of outmigrating smolts entering the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC)—a surface flow outlet known to be a relatively benign route for downstream passage at this dam. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. Study results indicated that having turbine 11 in service is important for providing flow conditions that are comparable to those observed in pre-BGS years (2004 and 2005) and in 2008. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to compare dam passage survival, at two spill treatment levels, of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during spring 2010. The two treatments were 30% and 40% spill out of total project discharge. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. However, by agreement among the stakeholders, this study was not an official BiOp compliance test because the long-term passage measures at John Day Dam have yet to be finalized and another year of spill-treatment testing was desired.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

How to Add Your Own Reading Comprehension Passage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adding Your Own Reading Comprehension Passage Adding Your Own Reading Comprehension Passage Please follow these instructions for submitting a reading comprehension passage: Use a text editor or word processor to create your reading comprehension passage. Since Jefferson Lab is a basic physics research facility, passages that incorporate some aspect of science are preferred over passages that do not. Make certain that your passage is accessible to a general audience. While you are creating this passage primarily for your classes' benefit, realize that anyone on the internet will be able to view it. The passage should make sense to anyone, not just to those in your class. Check your passage for: Factual accuracy Correct spelling Correct punctuation Proper grammar Once you have your passage, place brackets ([]) around the words you

145

Color of fall leaves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Color of fall leaves Color of fall leaves Name: macmillan Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Why do leaves change color in the fall? Is the cold a contributing factor? What determines the ultimate color of a leaf? Is the change due to an absence of chlorophyll or the presence of something else? Replies: This will be a partial answer. The colors are due to chemicals called carotenes, the same chemicals that give rise to color of carrots. There are several and they have different colors. They are present in the leaves all of the time. We see them in the fall because the chlorophyll production in the leaves stops. I think it is due to the cooling, not directly the presence of freezing temperatures, it seems to depend on the plant. It would be a good experiment to see what events contribute to the changes. Clearly the amount of water in the plant contributes to the quality of the color.

146

Spawning fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spawning fish Name: Jeffrey M Ulmer Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What signals some fish to travel up a waterfall? Replies: Good question, Jeff Much is...

147

Gulping fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulping fish Name: Jason S Kay Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Dear Mr. or Ms. Scientist, why do fish come to the surface and gulp like they're...

148

Fish breathing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish breathing Name: lennartz Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: How do fish get their oxygen under water? Replies: Not so differently from the way we get it from air....

149

Fish Scales  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Scales Name: Kaylee Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Do all fish have scales? Replies: No, some like catfish and bullheads, have smooth skins. J. Elliott No,...

150

Little Fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Nature Bulletin No. 258-A February 25, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B, Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation LITTLE FISH It is...

151

Fish eating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish eating Name: Rex P Frost Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: From the students in my grade 7 science class who are doing a an assignment on marine fish: What stops...

152

Internet Fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I have invented "Internet Fish," a novel class of resource-discovery tools designed to help users extract useful information from the Internet. Internet Fish (IFish) are semi-autonomous, persistent information brokers; ...

LaMacchia, Brian A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s per meter); Make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Falling film evaporator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A falling film evaporator including a vertically oriented pipe heated exteriorly by a steam jacket and interiorly by a finned steam tube, all heating surfaces of the pipe and steam tube being formed of a material wet by water such as stainless steel, and packing within the pipe consisting of Raschig rings formed of a material that is not wet by water such as polyvinylidene fluoride.

Bruns, Lester E. (Kennewick, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Bubble Universe Dynamics After Free Passage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider bubble collisions in single scalar field theories with multiple vacua. Recent work has argued that at sufficiently high impact velocities, collisions between such bubble vacua are governed by 'free passage' dynamics in which field interactions can be ignored during the collision, providing a systematic process for populating local minima without quantum nucleation. We focus on the time period that follows the bubble collision and provide evidence that, for certain potentials, interactions can drive significant deviations from the free-passage bubble profile, thwarting the production of bubbles with different field values.

Pontus Ahlqvist; Kate Eckerle; Brian Greene

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

157

Edible Fall Fruits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fall Fruits Fall Fruits Nature Bulletin No 161-A September 19, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor EDIBLE FALL FRUITS Autumn is the favorite season for many people, and especially those who have the hobby of harvesting wild fruits for home use. In the forest preserves they, and you too, can have the fun of hunting, finding and gathering them. You can have the added satisfaction of making -- for enjoyment by your family and friends -- jellies, jam, preserves, pickles, and beverages that are "different". One of the most abundant, but least used of all wild fruits in the Chicago region are those of the hawthorns, We have perhaps 200 species, hybrids and varieties, most of them along woodland borders and in thickets that have taken over many old fields and clearings. Their fruits, called haws, vary widely in size and color when ripe. Most of them are small and many are dull red; some are yellow and some are spotted. Only a few bear the mealy, bright scarlet fruits, from 3/4 inch to more than an inch in diameter, which are most desirable and known as "red haws". Some folks, mostly boys, eat them raw. Others use them to make a unique jelly.

158

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

Carter, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to examine the relative importance of pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality. Specific tests were designed to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes typical of turbine passage, with and without the complication of the fish being acclimated to gas supersaturated water. We investigated the responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, both singly and in combination.

Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G.; Cada, G F.

2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

Building structures from classifiers for passage reranking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper shows that learning to rank models can be applied to automatically learn complex patterns, such as relational semantic structures occurring in questions and their answer passages. This is achieved by providing the learning algorithm with a ... Keywords: kernel methods, learning to rank, question answering, structural kernels

Aliaksei Severyn, Massimo Nicosia, Alessandro Moschitti

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations; Nursery Bridge Fishway and Garden City/Lowden II Sites, 2005-2006 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated two fish screen facilities in the Walla Walla River basin in 2005 and early 2006. The Garden City/Lowden screen site was evaluated in April and June 2005 to determine whether the fish screens met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to provide safe passage for juvenile salmonids. Louvers behind the screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway were modified in fall 2005 in an attempt to minimize high approach velocities. PNNL evaluated the effects of those modifications in March 2006. Results of the Garden City/Lowden evaluations indicate the site performs well at varying river levels and canal flows. Approach velocities did not exceed 0.4 feet per second (fps) at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder in March but not in June. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. At Nursery Bridge, results indicate all the approach velocities were below 0.4 fps under the moderate river levels and operational conditions encountered on March 7, 2006. Sweep did not consistently increase toward the fish ladder, but the site generally met the criteria for safe passage of juvenile salmonids. Modifications to the louvers seem to allow more control over the amount of water moving through the screens. We will measure approach velocities when river levels are higher to determine whether the louver modifications can help correct excessive approach velocities under a range of river levels and auxiliary water supply flows.

Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at The Dalles Dam during spring 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay boat-restricted zone (BRZ) to the tailrace BRZ at The Dalles Dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam. The approach included releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of The Dalles Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below The Dalles Dam. A total of 4,298 yearling Chinook salmon and 4,309 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation. The dam passage survival results are summarized as follows: Yearling Chinook Salmon 0.9641 (SE = 0.0096) and Steelhead 0.9535 (SE = 0.0097).

Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

EIS-0397: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Statement EIS-0397: Final Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project BPA proposes to fund modifications to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway...

164

Primitive Fishes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fishes Fishes Nature Bulletin No. 322-A November 23, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRIMITIVE FISHES The history of fish covers such a vast stretch of time that the mind simply cannot grasp its immensity. The beginnings of fish -- or at least the earliest known forms -- and of the fish-like animals that existed before them, are found as fossils in rocks that geologists say were formed 400 million years ago. Sea scorpions, worms, mollusks and all of the other main types of lower animals had already lived in the sea for ages before that. It is a question which of them, if any, gave rise to fish. These older animals had a digestive tube and beneath it, on the side next to the ground, was the brain and nerve cord. The forerunners of fish, however, had the brain and nerve cord above the digestive tube, with a slender rod of gristle in between -- something that no other animal ever had had before. The theory is that this rod later developed into the backbone that is found in all of their modern descendants: fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.

165

Granite Falls Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Granite Falls Energy Place Granite Falls, Minnesota Zip 56241 Product Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock References Granite Falls Energy1 LinkedIn...

166

Effect of Multiple Turbine Passage on Juvenile Snake River Salmonid Survival  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to identify populations of migrating juvenile salmonids with a potential to be impacted by repeated exposure to turbine passage conditions. This study is part of a research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind/Hydropower Program. The program's goal is to increase hydropower generation and capacity while enhancing environmental performance. Our study objective is to determine whether the incremental effects of turbine passage during downstream migration impact populations of salmonids. When such a potential is found to exist, a secondary objective is to determine what level of effect of passing multiple turbines is required to decrease the number of successful migrants by 10%. This information will help identify whether future laboratory or field studies are feasible and design those studies to address conditions that present the greatest potential to improve dam survival and thus benefit fish and power generation.

Ham, Kenneth D.; Anderson, James J.; Vucelick, Jessica A.

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

167

Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; CH0) at John Day Dam (JDA) during summer 2010. This study was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) and the University of Washington (UW). The study was designed to estimate the effects of 30% and 40% spill treatment levels on single release survival rates of CH0 passing through two reaches: (1) the dam, and 40 km of tailwater, (2) the forebay, dam, and 40 km of tailwater. The study also estimated additional passage performance measures which are stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Effect of Multiple Turbine Passage on Juvenile Snake River Salmonid Survival  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to identify populations of migrating juvenile salmonids with a potential to be impacted by repeated exposure to turbine passage conditions. This study is part of a research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind/Hydropower Program. The program's goal is to increase hydropower generation and capacity while enhancing environmental performance. Our study objective is to determine whether the incremental effects of turbine passage during downstream migration impact populations of salmonids. When such a potential is found to exist, a secondary objective is to determine what level of effect of passing multiple turbines is required to decrease the number of successful migrants by 10%. This information will help identify whether future laboratory or field studies are feasible and design those studies to address conditions that present the greatest potential to improve dam survival and thus benefit fish and power generation.

Ham, Kenneth D.; Anderson, James J.; Vucelick, Jessica A.

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman's Statement on Senate Passage...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Senate Passage of the Energy Bill Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman's Statement on Senate Passage of the Energy Bill June 28, 2005 - 1:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of...

172

Evaluation of Passage Performance of a Deepened (Model A40) Alaska Steeppass Fishway for American Shad (Alosa sapidissima) and White Sucker (Catostomus commersoni)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional upstream fish passes (baffle fishways, pool and weir fishways, and lifts) can be cost-prohibitive for construction and operation, potentially hindering anadromous fish restoration efforts throughout the eastern United States. At sites where fishways are the only passage alternative (i.e., high-head dams), new lower-cost technologies and designs are needed to support restoration programs. In the Northeast, more information is particularly needed on the effectiveness of structures for passing a...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

173

W:WPGRAPHSCCTCCTODAY_fall  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PSDF and Vision 21 PSDF and Vision 21 ..................... 1 Project News Bytes ..................... 1 Barge-Mounted PFBC ................. 4 PM 2.5 Monitoring Efforts ............. 6 NETL's PM 2.5 Research .............. 8 Upcoming Events ......................... 8 Advanced Turbine Program ......... 9 International Initiatives .............. 10 R&D Milestones ........................ 12 Specialty NO x Conferences ....... 13 Status of CCT Projects .............. 14 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION PROJECT NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOE/FE-0215P-41 ISSUE NO. 41, FALL 2000 See "News Bytes" on page 7... See "PSDF" on page 2... SGI International, owner of the Liquids-From-Coal ® technology used in the ENCOAL Mild Coal

174

2009, Webbers Falls Open  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwestern and its Southwestern and its customers, the May 27, 2009, Webbers Falls Open House hosted by the Tulsa District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) was just one more example of what can be accomplished when partners in Federal hydropower work together. The event, which was designed to publicize the upcoming rehabilitation of the project, drew staff members from several congressional offices as well as a healthy contingent of Corps, Southwestern, and customer representatives. Colonel Anthony Funkhouser, Commander of the Tulsa District, welcomed the attendees and emphasized the importance of working together to accomplish common goals. Southwestern's Administrator, Jon Worthington, spoke of the importance of hydropower, both regionally and nationally, and quantified its benefits by citing the average 5,570

175

2003 Fall TOPICS 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SUMMARY of the SUMMARY of the Fall Meeting of the American Statistical Association (ASA) Committee on Energy Statistics with the Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, D.C. 20585 October 16 and 17, 2003 Thursday, October 09, 2003 Background: EIA's Strategic Plan and Performance Goals for 2003-2008 (Plenary Session): Session emphasis was on the action plan for Goal 1, the first of the three EIA Goals: Goal 1: EIA's information program is relevant, reliable and consistent with changing industry structures, and EIA's information products are high quality and timely. Goal 2: EIA's resource base is sufficient to accomplish its mission Goal 3: EIA employees rate EIA high in the areas of leadership management, and meaningful work; and they rate themselves high in motivation and

176

NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

:i" :i" _,, ' _~" ORISE 95/C-70 :E : i:; :' l,J : i.: RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY Op BUILDINGS 401, ' 403, AND ' m HITTMAN BUILDING $ <,' 2:. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE I .~~ ; " LEWISTON, ' NEW YORK : f? j:,:i I ,.J- ;b f" /: Li _e.*. ~,, I ,,~, ,:,,;:, Prepared by T. .I. Vitkus i,c Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division ;>::; Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education .,:, "Oak Ridge, Temressee 37831-0117 .F P ., ? :_ &,d ,,,, ;<:x,, Prepared for the 3 I. Office of Environmental Restoration I, U.S. Department of Energy i gy i. ~: ,,, "! ? ' :' : "' ,//, FINAL REPORT ".$ :,a ,,, MARCH 1995 ; m L ,, ,, ,,,. ., ,,. ' 1 jq ,Ij:,., .,~ _,I_ 1 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the

177

Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

Connor, William P.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during the spring and summer outmigrations in 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 for spring migrants and greater than or equal to 0.93 for summer migrants, estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 3 km downstream of the dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Fish Accords). A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam. The approach included releases of smolts, tagged with acoustic micro-transmitters, above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of John Day Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below John Day Dam. A total of 3376 yearling Chinook salmon, 5726 subyearling Chinook salmon, and 3239 steelhead smolts were used in the virtual releases. Sample sizes for the below-dam paired releases (R2 and R3, respectively) were 997 and 995 for yearling Chinook salmon smolts, 986 and 983 for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts, and 1000 and 1000 for steelhead smolts. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tags were manufactured by Advanced Telemetry Systems. Model SS300 tags, weighing 0.304 g in air, were surgically implanted in yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon, and Model SS130 tag, weighing 0.438 g in air, were surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead for this investigation. The intent of the spring study was to estimate dam passage survival during both 30% and 40% spill conditions. The two spill conditions were to be systematically performed in alternating 2-day test intervals over the course of the spring outmigration. High flow conditions in 2012 interrupted the spill study. Dam passage survival was therefore estimated season-wide regardless of spill conditions.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The acoustic telemetry study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The purpose of the study was to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fischer, Eric S.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jin A.; Townsend, Richard L.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Ice Fishing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Fishing Ice Fishing Nature Bulletin No. 327-A January 11, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ICE FISHING We have a peculiar class of people known as the "Frosty-toed Tribe". As soon as winter comes and the ice permits, they put on all the clothes they own and what they can borrow, pack their automobiles with equipment, and start early in the morning for some inland body of water or a bay along one of the Great Lakes. Usually, two or three go together and they may drive 50 or 100 miles. For hours, even in below zero weather, they huddle around holes cut in the ice, fishing patiently, sustained by hope, hot coffee, and a lot of conversation. Some days a man may catch nothing. Other days he may bring home all the law allows. Sometimes he fishes vainly until almost sundown and then begins to haul them in, all of the same kind and size, as fast as he can re-bait his hook. In the meantime, other anglers have rushed over, cut holes, and are fishing all around him -- usually in vain, because one of the strange things about ice fishing is that, although you may catch fish out of one hole, you may get nothing out of another only a few feet from it, using the same kind of bait at the same depth. There are a lot of hotly contested theories but nobody knows why. After watching and questioning scores of ice fishermen, some of them noted for their prowess, we find that although each has his own secret techniques and favorite spots, good catches seem more a matter of luck than skill. Although they are sluggish and don't fight, fish caught in winter have the firmest flesh and finest flavor. The biggest thrill comes from the skillet.

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181

Evolution of the Sensor Fish Device for Measuring Physical Conditions in Severe Hydraulic Environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assist in deriving biological specifications for design of turbine rehabilitation measures, new ''fish-friendly'' turbines, and spillway designs and operations, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed and tested an autonomous multi-sensor device called a Sensor Fish that can acquire pressure and tri-axial linear acceleration data during passage through severe hydraulic conditions. The purpose of the Sensor Fish is to characterize physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro turbines, spill stilling basins, high-discharge outfalls, and other dam passage routes. The Sensor Fish was developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine System program. Field tests of the Sensor Fish at Rock Island, McNary, The Dalles, Bonneville, and Wanapum dams on the Columbia River and the Prosser Irrigation District on the Yakima River have shown that the device can withstand the severe environments of turbine, spill, and fish bypass passage and provide useful environmental data that can ultimately aid in the design and operation of new and existing turbines, spill, and dam fish bypass facilities.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

PNNL: Breakthroughs Magazine - Fall 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 issue Sensor fish make a splash Breakthroughs Magazine Breakthroughs Archive In this issue... Cover Editor's Screen Contents At A Glance Solutions Update Science of Doing...

183

Fish Bait  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Bait Fish Bait Nature Bulletin No. 70 June 15, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation FISH BAIT The bass season opens June 15 in the northern zone. Then the number of fishermen doubles because it will no longer be necessary to throw back a bass caught while fishing for crappies, bluegills, bullheads or carp. That breaks a fellow's heart. Fancy tackle is very hard to get this year. But black bass do take worms and minnows, as well as frogs, hellgramites, grasshoppers, crickets and other live baits. The fly-casters and bait-casters, who carry around a tackle box filled with gadgets made of wood, feathers, fur, paint and assorted hardware, have no better luck -- on the average -- than the live bait fishermen at whom they turn up their noses.

184

Richard Fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Electrochemical Technologies Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 62R0203 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 62-0339J (510) 486-4850 RHFish@lbl.gov...

185

Richard Fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richard Fish Electrochemical Technologies Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 62R0203 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 62-0339J (510) 486-4850...

186

Turbine engine component with cooling passages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A component for use in a turbine engine including a first member and a second member associated with the first member. The second member includes a plurality of connecting elements extending therefrom. The connecting elements include securing portions at ends thereof that are received in corresponding cavities formed in the first member to attach the second member to the first member. The connecting elements are constructed to space apart a first surface of the second member from a first surface of the first member such that at least one cooling passage is formed between adjacent connecting elements and the first surface of the second member and the first surface of the first member.

Arrell, Douglas J. (Oviedo, FL); James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s/m), (3) make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A FISH called WANDA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 A FISH called WANDA, 2013 A FISH called WANDA WANDA: A Measurement Tool for ... Stefan Giesler, Freiburg, Germany FISH-new: ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

190

Laboratory Studies on the Effects of Shear on Fish  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of our studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish's tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system, in other words, determining or assuming that those conditions known to injure fish will provide the descriptions of conditions that engineers must consider in the design of a turbine system. These biological specifications must be carefully and thoroughly documented throughout the design of a fish friendly turbine. To address the development of biological specifications, we designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Guensch, Greg R.

2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Partially turbulated trailing edge cooling passages for gas turbine nozzles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of passages are spaced one from the other along the length of a trailing edge of a nozzle vane in a gas turbine. The passages lie in communication with a cavity in the vane for flowing cooling air from the cavity through the passages through the tip of the trailing edge into the hot gas path. Each passage is partially turbulated and includes ribs in an aft portion thereof to provide enhanced cooling effects adjacent the tip of the trailing edge. The major portions of the passages are smooth bore. By this arrangement, reduced temperature gradients across the trailing edge metal are provided. Additionally, the inlets to each of the passages have a restriction whereby a reduced magnitude of compressor bleed discharge air is utilized for trailing edge cooling purposes.

Thatcher, Jonathan Carl (Schenectady, NY); Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Analysis of environmental issues related to small scale hydroelectric development. II. Design considerations for passing fish upstream around dams. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 1567  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The possible requirement of facilities to move migrating fish upstream around dams may be a factor in determining the feasibility of retrofitting small dams for hydroelectric generation. Basic design considerations are reported that should be evaluated on a site-specific basis if upstream fish passage facilities are being considered for a small scale hydroelectric project (defined as an existing dam that can be retrofitted to generate 25 MW or less). Information on general life history and geographic distribution of fish species that may require passage is presented. Biological factors important in the design of upstream passage facilities are discussed: gas bubble disease, fish swimming speed, oxygen consumption by fish, and diel and photo behavior. Three general types of facilities (fishways, fish locks, and fish lifts) appropriate for upstream fish passage at small scale hydroelectric projects are described, and size dimensions are presented. General design criteria for these facilities (including fish swimming ability and behavior) and general location of facilities at a site are discussed. Basic cost considerations for each type of passage facility, including unit cost, operation and maintenance costs, and costs for supplying attraction water, are indicated.

Hildebrand, S.G. (ed.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor fall velocity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fall velocity fall velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Hydrometeor fall velocity Fall velocity of hydrometeors (e.g. rain, snow, graupel, hail). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer LDIS : Laser Disdrometer WSACR : Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, tuned to W-Band (95GHz) Field Campaign Instruments DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

194

LBNL/ Adopt Fall Protection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the Company Letter Certification Template to address if your company has decided to work under LBNL fall protection program. See attached Chapter 30 of our program of PUB...

195

Twin Falls District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Falls District Jump to: navigation, search Name BML Twin Falls District Office Address 2536 Kimberly Road Place Twin Falls, ID Zip 83301 Phone number 208-736-2350 Website http:...

196

Fall 2005 Meeting of the ASA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of EIA's fall 2005 meeting with the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. Beginning with the fall 2003 meeting, EIA no longer edits these...

197

Kettle Falls Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Kettle Falls Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kettle Falls Biomass Facility Facility...

198

Cooperative fish-rearing programs in Hanford Site excess facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In, 1993, two successful fish-rearing pilot projects were conducted in Hanford Site 100 K Area water treatment pools (K Pools) that are excess to the US Department of Energy needs. Beginning this spring, two larger cooperative fish programs will be undertaken in the K Pools. One program will involve the Yakama Indian Nation, which will rear, acclimate, and release 500,000 fall chinook salmon. The other program involves the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, which will rear warm-water specie (walleye and channel catfish) for planting in state lakes. Renewed economic vitality is the goal expected from these and follow-on fish programs.

Herborn, D.I.; Anderson, B.N.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

falls-city2.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Falls City Disposal Site Falls City Disposal Site Uranium ore was processed near Falls City, Texas, between 1961 and 1982. The milling operations created process-related waste and tailings, a sandlike waste containing radioactive material and other contaminants. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) encapsulated the tailings in an engineered disposal cell in 1994. DOE established the LTSM Program in 1988 to provide stewardship of disposal cells that contain low-level radioactive material after completion of environmental restoration activities. The mission of the LTSM Program is to ensure that the disposal cells continue to prevent release of contaminated materials to the environment. These materials will remain potentially hazardous for thousands of years. As long as the cells function as

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fall 2007 ASA Meeting Disclaimer  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Meeting of the 7 Meeting of the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics and the Energy Information Administration In two adjacent files you will find unedited transcripts of EIA's fall 2007 meeting with the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. Beginning with the fall 2003 meeting, EIA no longer edits these transcripts. Summaries of previous meetings can be found to the right of the Thursday and Friday transcripts. The public meeting took place October 18 and 19, 2007 in the Forrestal Building at 1000 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20585. All of the plenary and three of the break-out sessions were in 8E-089. The three remaining break-out sessions were in 5E-069. The fall meeting agenda, papers, presentation slides and other materials

202

Reduced Spill at Hydropower Dams: Opportunities for More Generation and Increased Fish Population  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report indicates that reduction of managed spill at hydropower dams can speed implementation of technologies for fish protection and achieve economic goals. Spill of water over spillways is managed in the Columbia River basin to assist downstream-migrating juvenile salmon, and is generally believed to be the most similar to natural migration, benign and effective passage route; other routes include turbines, intake screens with bypasses, and surface bypasses. However, this belief may be misguided, because spill is becoming recognized as less than natural, with deep intakes below normal migration depths, and likely causing physical damages from severe shear on spillways, high turbulence in tail waters, and collisions with baffle blocks that lead to disorientation and predation. Some spillways induce mortalities comparable to turbines. Spill is expensive in lost generation, and controversial. Fish-passage research is leading to more fish-friendly turbines, screens and bypasses that are more effective and less damaging, and surface bypasses that offer passage of more fish per unit water volume than does spill (leaving more water for generation). Analyses by independent economists demonstrated that goals of increased fish survival over the long term and net gain to the economy can be obtained by selectively reducing spill and diverting some of the income from added power generation to research, development, and installation of fish-passage technologies. Such a plan would selectively reduce spill when and where least damaging to fish, increase electricity generation using the water not spilled and use innovative financing to direct monetary gains to improving fish passage.

Coutant, Charles C [ORNL; Mann, Roger [RMecon, Davis, California; Sale, Michael J [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Augmented Fish Health Monitoring; Volume II of II, Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Participating agencies included: Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). This is the final data report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project. Data collected and sampling results for 1990 and 1991 are presented within this report. An evaluation of this project can be found in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Volume 1, Completion Report.'' May, 1991. Pathogen detection methods remained the same from methods described in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Annual Report 1989,'' May, 1990. From January 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991 fish health monitoring sampling was conducted. In 1990 21 returning adult stocks were sampled. Juvenile pre-release exams were completed on 20 yearling releases, and 13 sub-yearling releases in 1990. In 1991 17 yearling releases and 11 sub-yearling releases were examined. Midterm sampling was completed on 19 stocks in 1990. Organosomatic analysis was performed at release on index station stocks; Cowlitz spring and fall chinook, Lewis river early coho and Lyons Ferry fall chinook.

Michak, Patty

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Survival and Passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011 - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The study reported herein was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The PNNL and UW project managers were Drs. Thomas J. Carlson and John R. Skalski, respectively. The USACE technical lead was Mr. Brad Eppard. The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion (BiOp) and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study is being documented in two types of reports: compliance and technical. A compliance report is delivered within 6 months of the completion of the field season and focuses on results of the performance metrics outlined in the 2008 BiOp and Fish Accords. A technical report is produced within the 18 months after field work, providing comprehensive documentation of a given study and results on route-specific survival estimates and fish passage distributions, which are not included in compliance reports. This technical report concerns the 2011 acoustic telemetry study at The Dalles Dam.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Batten, G.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Hughes, James S.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Royer, Ida M.; Townsend, Richard L.; Woodley, Christa M.; Kim, Jeongkwon; Etherington, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Fisher, Erik J.; Greiner, Michael J.; Khan, Fenton; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Pathways of Barotrauma in Juvenile Salmonids Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Boyle’s Law vs. Henry’s Law  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On their seaward migration, juvenile salmonids commonly pass hydroelectric dams. Fish passing by the turbine blade may experience rapid decompression, the severity of which can be highly variable and may result in a number of barotraumas. The mechanisms of these injuries can be due to expansion of existing bubbles or gases coming out of solution; governed by Boyle’s Law and Henry’s Law, respectively. This paper combines re-analysis of published data with new experiments to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of injury and mortality for fish experiencing rapid decompression associated with hydroturbine passage. From these data it appears that the majority of decompression related injuries are due to the expansion of existing bubbles in the fish, particularly the expansion and rupture of the swim bladder. This information is particularly useful for fisheries managers and turbine manufacturers, demonstrating that reducing the rate of swim bladder ruptures by reducing the frequency of occurrence and severity of rapid decompression during hydroturbine passage could reduce the rates of injury and mortality for hydroturbine passed juvenile salmonids.

Brown, Richard S.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Brauner, Colin J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Seaburg, Adam

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Diesel prices continue to fall  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to fall The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 4.09 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly...

207

Fall Orientation Schedule Kresge College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2011 Fall Orientation Schedule Kresge College University of California Santa Cruz September 16 - 26 60 05 1 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 Kresge College our time is now #12;#12;3 1 Orientation Week Planner your first several days on campus. This Orientation Schedule is designed to help guide you. Use

California at Santa Cruz, University of

208

The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, millions of fish have telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, inductive) surgically implanted to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One route of passage of particular concern is through hydro turbines, in which fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries, including barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from acclimation to exposure (nadir) has been found to be an important factor in predicting the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon undergoing rapid decompression associated with simulated turbine passage. The presence of telemetry tags has also been shown to influence the likelihood of injury and mortality for juvenile Chinook salmon. This research investigated the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon carrying telemetry tags and exposed to a range of simulated turbine passage. Several factors were examined as predictors of mortal injury for fish undergoing rapid decompression, and the ratio of pressure change and tag burden were determined to be the most predictive factors. As the ratio of pressure change and tag burden increase, the likelihood of mortal injury also increases. The results of this study suggest that previous survival estimates of juvenile Chinook salmon passing through hydro turbines may have been biased due to the presence of telemetry tags, and this has direct implications to the management of hydroelectric facilities. Realistic examples indicate how the bias in turbine passage survival estimates could be 20% or higher, depending on the mass of the implanted tags and the ratio of acclimation to exposure pressures. Bias would increase as the tag burden and pressure ratio increase, and have direct implications on survival estimates. It is recommended that future survival studies use the smallest telemetry tags possible to minimize the potential bias that may be associated with carrying the tag.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Piper L.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Fish Tales  

SciTech Connect

This talk is about fishing and the friendships that have resulted in its pursuit. It is also about theoretical physics, and the relationship of imagination and fantasy to the establishment of ideas about nature. Fishermen, like theoretical physicists, are well known for their inventive imaginations. Perhaps neither are as clever as sailors, who conceived of the mermaid. If one doubts the power of this fantasy, one should remember the ghosts of the many sailors who drowned pursuing these young nymphs. An extraordinary painting by J. Waterhouse is shown as Fig. 1. The enchantment of a mermaid must reflect an extraordinary excess of imagination on the part of the sailor, perhaps together with an impractical turn of mind. A consummated relationship with a mermaid is after all, by its very nature a fantasy incapable of realization. To a theoretical physicist, she is symbolic of many ideas we develop. There are many truths known to fisherman in which one might also find parallels to the goals of scientists: (1) A fish is the only animal that keeps growing after its death; (2) Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught; (3) ''...of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.'' (William Sherwood Fox, in Silken Lines and Silver Hooks); and (4) Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths. These quotes may be interpreted as reflecting skepticism regarding the honesty of fisherman, and probably do not reflect adequate admiration for a creative imagination. Is it fair to criticize a person for believing a falsehood that he or she sincerely believes to be true? The fisherman simultaneously invents the lie, and believes in it himself. The parallel with theoretical physics is perhaps only approximate, although we physicists may invent stories that we come to believe, on some rare occasions our ideas actually correspond to a more or less true descriptions of nature. These minor philosophical differences are not really the central issue, however. It is more to the point that both fishermen and scientists enjoy creating a good story, and we also enjoy a story well told. The correct mixture of truth, lie, fantasy and excitement is a witches brew.

McLerran, L.

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

Do fish sleep?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do fish sleep? Name: Tom M Dechand Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Is it true that fish do not sleep? Replies: Most all fish spend time in an...

211

Fish scales and growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish scales and growth Name: Belinda Clark Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: In my daughter's book about fish, it states that fish continue to get bigger as they age...

212

Inside Passage Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inside Passage Elec Coop, Inc Inside Passage Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Inside Passage Elec Coop, Inc Place Alaska Utility Id 18963 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Power Commercial Large Power Interruptible Commercial Residential Residential Small Commercial Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.5720/kWh Commercial: $0.4600/kWh Industrial: $0.5640/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Inside_Passage_Elec_Coop,_Inc&oldid=410873"

213

Measuring Surface Currents in Drake Passage from Altimetry and Hydrography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new method for combining altimetry data with hydrography in order to produce absolute surface geostrophic currents from altimetry. This method is then applied to data from the Drake Passage allowing surface currents to be ...

P. G. Challenor; J. F. Read; R. T. Pollard; R. T. Tokmakian

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Secretary of Energy's Statement on the Senate Passage of the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on the Senate Passage of the Energy Bill July 29, 2005 - 2:31pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released the following statement regarding...

215

EOF Analysis of Central Drake Passage Currents from DRAKE 79  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rotary Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis was performed on the current meter observations made dining DRAKE 79 to quantify current variability in central Drake Passage in the vicinity of the Polar Front. Two forms of variability are ...

John M. Klinck

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Spatial Variation in Turbulent Heat Fluxes in Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution underway shipboard atmospheric and oceanic observations collected in Drake Passage from 2000 to 2009 are used to examine the spatial scales of turbulent heat fluxes and flux-related state variables. The magnitude of the seasonal ...

ChuanLi Jiang; Sarah T. Gille; Janet Sprintall; Kei Yoshimura; Masao Kanamitsu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

First-passage-time problems in time-aware networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First passage time or the first time that a stochastic process crosses a boundary is a random variable whose probability distribution is sought in engineering, statistics, finance, and other disciplines. The probability ...

Suwansantisuk, Watcharapan, 1978-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Effect of the Drake Passage Throughflow on Global Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the Southern Ocean in global climate is examined using three simulations with a coupled model employing geometries different only at the location of Drake Passage (DP). The results of three main experiments are examined: 1) a ...

Willem P. Sijp; Matthew H. England

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Statement by Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on House Passage...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on House Passage of H.R. 6 - Creating Long-Term Energy Alternatives for The Nation Act Statement by Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on House...

220

Safe Fall: Humanoid robot fall direction change through intelligent stepping and inertia shaping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although fall is a rare event in the life of a humanoid robot, we must be prepared for it because its consequences are serious. In this paper we present a fall strategy which rapidly modifies the robot's fall direction in ...

Yun, Seung-kook

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluation of the Fish Passage Effectiveness of the Bonneville I Prototype Surface Collector using Three-Dimensional Ultrasonic Fish Tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes tests conducted at Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River in the spring of 2000 using three-dimensional acoustic telemetry and computational fluid dynamics hydraulic modeling to observe the response of outmigrating juvenile steelhead and yearling chinook to a prototype surface collector installed at the Powerhouse. The study described in this report was one of several conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to prepare a decision document on which of two bypass methods: surface flow bypass or extended-length submersible bar screens to use to help smolts pass around Bonneville dams without going through the turbines.

Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Moursund, Robert; Carlson, Thomas J.; Adams, Noah; Rhondorf, D.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement Project Annual Report 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this project (Phase I, baseline data collection- 1990-91) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation-1992-96). At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the project is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife initiated the project fieldwork in 1990. Phase II included only the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and the Spokane Tribe of Indians. Phase III is being completed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation.

Jones, Charles D.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Natural fish passage structures in urban streams (part 1: hydrologic and resource issues)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fisheries and Oceans, Manitoba, Canada, 1992. KCI. 1996.Freshwater Institute, Manitoba, Canada, produced a fishway

Hegberg, Charles H.; Schlindwein, P. Alan; Cohen, Stephen J.; Jacobs, Susan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Natural fish passage structures in urban streams (Part 1: Hydrologic and resource issues)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fisheries and Oceans, Manitoba, Canada, 1992. KCI. 1996.Freshwater Institute, Manitoba, Canada, produced a fishway

Hegberg, Charles H.; Schlindwein, P. Alan; Cohen, Stephen J.; Jacobs, Susan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial...

226

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

below Libby Dam. The reservoir operation in spring largely works toward project refill while otherwise operations in the mid-Columbia River to support fall Chinook spawning and rearing in the Hanford Reach to fish. Action item F&W-2 (see the Action Plan) calls for the Council to work with fish and wildlife

227

Meredith Rainey BIO515 Fall 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meredith Rainey BIO515 Fall 2009 Using graph theory to compare least cost path and circuit theory;Meredith Rainey BIO515 Fall 2009 Fahrig 2000; With et al. 1997). Many of the metrics developed with the FunConn v1 (Theobald et al. 2006) network #12;Meredith Rainey BIO515 Fall 2009 analysis package

Hansen, Andrew J.

228

Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

229

Free-fall core sampler  

SciTech Connect

The described free-fall corer apparatus consists of an expendable, elongated casing having an annular-shaped ballast member secured to it. A cylindrical housing surmounts this ballast member and accommodates a float which is tied to the core liner. During descent of the apparatus, the float is latched to the ballast element, but when the apparatus strikes bottom, a pilot weight suspended from the float latching means moves upward and allows the float to freely ascend within the ocean. This ascent unlatches the core liner from the expendable casing and the liner is thereafter raised to the surface. (13 claims)

Raymond, S.O.; Sachs, P.L.

1968-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Bonneville Hatchery - Tule Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Bonneville Hatchery (Tule Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located on the Columbia River just west of Cascade Locks, Oregon. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall Chinook and URB Fall Chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Bonneville Hatchery - Urb Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Bonneville Hatchery (Upriver bright [URB] Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located on the Columbia River just west of Cascade Locks, Oregon. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall Chinook and URB Fall Chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of at two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project This Mitigation Action Plan identifies measures that are intended to avoid, reduce, or...

233

EIS-0397: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Availability of the Record of Decision Bonneville Power Administration Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project This notice announces the availability of the Record of Decision to...

234

Semi-supervised fall detection algorithm using fall indicators in smartphone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fall injury is a health-threatening incident that may cause instant death. There are many research interests aimed to detect fall incidents as early as possible. Fall detection is envisioned critical on ICT-assisted healthcare future. In this paper, ... Keywords: accelerometer, algorithm, decision tree, fall detection, indicators, orientation sensor, smartphone, thresholds

P. N. Ali Fahmi; Vo Viet; Choi Deok-Jai

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, were located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, was located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2003, a total of 2,138,391 fish weighing 66,201 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 437,633 yearling fish weighing 44,330 pounds and 1,700,758 sub-yearling fish weighing 21,871 pounds.

McLeod, Bruce

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fall Chinook Aclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, and will ultimately work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Complete returns for all three acclimation facilities will not occur until the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish protected under the Endangered Species Act) from those returns will be returning for the next five years. In 2001, a total of 2,051,099 fish weighing 59,647 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 318,932 yearling fish weighing 31,128 pounds and 1,732,167 sub-yearling fish weighing 28,519 pounds. Yearling fish numbers were reduced by Bacterial Kidney Disease (BKD) and sub-yearling acclimation time was limited by record low river water flows.

McLeod, Bruce

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

JGI - Why Sequence Cichlid Fish?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cichlid Fish? photo of chichlid fish The sequencing of several Lake Malawi cichlid fish will contribute to major advances in our understanding of evolution in Lake Malawi cichlids....

238

FUPWG Fall 2009 Washington Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilit P Utilit P Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov Federal Energy Management Program FUPWG Fall 2009 David McAndrew November 18 & 19, 2009 Utility Program Sailing into Energy Efficiency President Obama Signing E.O. 13514 Signing of Executive Order 13514 - Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy & Economic Performance Federal Energy Management Program femp.energy.gov 4 E.O. 13514 SUMMARY  Transf formative shif ft in the way the government operates  Establishes GHGs as the integrating metric for tracking progress in federal sustainability  Requires a deliberative planning process  Links goal achievement to budget allocations Links goal achievement to budget allocations and OMB scorecards.  Establishes numerous additional goals for  Establishes numerous additional goals for

239

Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Surveys of Velocity Downstream of Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, is studying the potential to locate fish bypass systems at Albeni Falls Dam. The USACE requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to survey velocity magnitude and direction in the dam tailrace. The empirical data collected will be used to support future numerical modeling, physical modeling, and evaluation of fish bypass system alternatives. In May 2010, PNNL conducted velocity surveys of the Albeni Falls Dam using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler. The surveys were conducted over three days (May 25 through 27). During the survey period, total river discharge at the dam varied between 30.2 and 31.0 kcfs. A small amount of spill discharge, 2 kcfs, was present on two days (May 26 and 27). This report presents data plots showing measured velocity direction and magnitude averaged over the entire depth and over 5-ft depth increments from 5 to 30 ft.

Perkins, William A.; Titzler, P. Scott; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Kallio, Sara E.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council (U.S.); Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper oceanic temporal response to tropical cyclone (TC) passage is investigated using a 6-yr daily record of data-driven analyses of two measures of upper ocean energy content based on the U.S. Navy’s Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation System ...

John A. Knaff; Mark DeMaria; Charles R. Sampson; James E. Peak; James Cummings; Wayne H. Schubert

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Information extraction from concise passages of natural language sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper will present a semi-automated approach for information extraction for ontology construction. The sources used are short news extracts syndicated online. These are used because they contain short passages which provide information in a concise ... Keywords: POS tagging, knowledge engineering, knowledge extraction, knowledge formalization, named entity recognition, natural language processing, ontology construction, ontology population

Sandi Pohorec; Mateja Verli?; Milan Zorman

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. 2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting: Registration Information. 2000 TMS FALL EXTRACTION AND PROCESS METALLURGY ...

245

A summary of 22 Years of Fish Screen Evaluation in the Yakima River Basin, Summary Report 1985-2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sixty fish screen facilities were constructed in the Yakima River basin between 1985 and 2006 as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council plan to mitigate the effects of federal hydroelectric projects on fish and wildlife populations. This report summarizes evaluations of some of those and other fish screen facilities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from 1985 through 2006. The objective of these studies was to determine if the newly designed and constructed fish screens were effective at providing juvenile salmonids safe passage past irrigation diversions. To answer that question, PNNL conducted release-and-catch studies at eight Phase I sites in the Yakima River basin. Increasing concerns about the impacts of hatchery fish releases on the wild fish population, as well as the cost and time necessary to perform these kinds of biological studies at more than 60 planned Phase II sites, required development of techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of the sites without releasing fish. The new techniques involved collecting information on screen design, operation, and effectiveness at guiding fish safely through the fish screen facility. Performance measures including water velocities and passage conditions provide a good alternative to biological studies at significantly lower cost and time. Physical techniques were used at all 10 Phase I and 28 Phase II sites evaluated by PNNL over the following 19 years. Results of these studies indicate the Phase I and II fish screen facilities are designed and capable of providing safe passage for juvenile salmonids so long as construction, maintenance, and operations meet the criteria used in the design of each site and the National Marine Fisheries Service criteria for juvenile fish screen design.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Center for Emergent Superconductivity 2013 Fall Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Emergent Superconductivity (CES) 2013 Fall Workshop Homepage Registration pulldown Talks pulldown CES Workshop Talks CES Jr. Research Talks Programs pulldown Contact Us...

247

Center for Emergent Superconductivity 2013 Fall Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

main gate, please inform the guard you are attending the Center for Emergent Superconductivity 2013 Fall Workshop workshop. You may be requested to check in at the security...

248

About the TMS Fall Meeting '98  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

David Bourell, MPMD, University of Texas, Austin, Texas ; Dr. Richard Wright, MPMD, INEEL, Idaho Falls, Idaho; Dr. Walter Milligan, ASM/MSCTS, Michigan ...

249

2001 TMS Fall Meeting: Student Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2001 TMS Fall Meeting: Student Information ... graduate students. For more information, contact Tara Oprosky, Membership Coordinator at toprosky@tms.org

250

2006 TMS Fall Extraction and Processing Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2006 TMS Fall Extraction & Processing Meeting: Sohn Int'l Symposium ... Sold out. Hyatt Regency Islandia Hotel In the heart of Mission Bay Park, the Hyatt has  ...

251

Idaho Falls Power- Residential Weatherization Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Residential customers with permanently installed electric heat who receive service from the City of Idaho Falls, are eligible for 0% weatherization loans. City Energy Service will conduct an...

252

Energy Specialist Info Sheet- Fall Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPECIALIST TRAINING PROGRAM ORENTATION FOR THE FALL SESSION BEGINS OCTOBER 27th This program is sponsored by the Central Florida Energy Efficiency Alliance (CFEEA) to provide...

253

Ice Fall Doctors 5, Changing Route  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Base Camp. The recordings span a wide variety of topics from making and drinking chang to the work of Mount Everest's 'ice fall doctors'....

Loomis, Molly

254

Summary of the Fall Meeting of the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data, extraction loss, liquefied natural gas operations, and consumption volumes and prices. Some of these efforts were part of the Fall 2002 forms clearance project, while...

255

Smolt Passage Behavior and Flow-Net Relationships in the Forebay of John Day Dam, 1983 [Amended] Annual Report of Research.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1983, the research program had three separate but complementary phases--monitoring current patterns in the forebay, defining fish distribution with purse seine sampling, and describing the migration routes of salmonid smolts using radio tracking techniques. Preliminary results from the radio-tracking and purse seining operations in FY83 suggest that the discharge from the John Day River and the turbid plume it forms in the forebay may have a pronounced effect on the distribution of smolts, especially chinook and sockeye salmon, as they approach the dam. The implication of these data is that the plume may be shunting salmon toward the Washington (spill) side of the river where they would be more susceptible to spill passage. This resulted in higher spill passage of tagged chinook salmon than the proportion of water being spilled. In contrast, spillway passage of steelhead not influenced by the plume is approximately the same as the proportion of water being spilled. These findings are based on limited data and must be considered preliminary at this time. Data describing the current patterns have just recently been reduced to a usable format and have not yet been correlated with findings from radio tracking and purse seining. Such data will be incorporated into an overall analysis of the relations of current patterns and John Day River discharge to fish migration patterns. Representative examples of prevailing current patterns during the spring migration have been completed and are included in this document.

Giorgi, Albert E.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE CAUTION! FISH LAKE SCAVANGER HUNT RED HEADED in large dead trees. Males and females both have the majestic red head the mound. Damselflies sit with their wings folded down, which differs them

Minnesota, University of

257

Reviving Frozen Fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reviving Frozen Fish Name: Frank Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Is there a way that a fish can be frozen and then revived? Replies: I have not specifically heard of...

258

Pen Rearing and Imprinting of Fall Chinook Salmon, 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to compare net-pen rearing methods to traditional hatchery methods of rearing upriver bright fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawvtscha). Fish were reared at several densities in net pens at three Columbia River backwater sites during 1984-1987, and in a barrier net at one site during 1984-1986; methods included both fed and unfed treatments. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results obtained from the unfed treatments and the current return of adults from all fed treatments and the barrier net. Zooplankton were the primary food item of unfed fish. Fish reared in net pens utilized insects colonizing the nets as an additional food source, whereas those reared in the barrier net did not. Growth and production of fish reared in the unfed treatments were low. Instantaneous growth rates of unfed fish were much lower than those of the fed treatments and hatchery controls except when zooplankton densities were high and chironomid larvae were important in the diet of unfed fish reared in pens. Only fish in the barrier net treatment resulted in consistent net gains in growth and production over the rearing periods. Adult returns of fish from all fed and unfed treatments are lower than those of control fish reared at the hatchery. Returns appear to be inversely related to rearing density. Even though adult returns are lower than those of traditional hatchery methods, a cost-benefit analysis, as return data becomes more complete, may prove these methods to be an economical means of expanding current hatchery production, particularly if thinning releases were used.

Beeman, John W.; Novotny, Jerry F.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fish and Tetrapods Geology 331  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and ostracoderms (armored jawless fish) Gnathostomes: jawed fish (an evolutionary grade, not a taxon) Class Placoderms: armored fish Class Chondrichthyes: cartilaginous fish Class Osteichthyes: bony fish Subclass the armored fish of the Paleozoic. Grew up to 10 m in length. #12;Placoderm, Dunkleosteus, Devonian of Ohio

Kammer, Thomas

262

Development of a more fish-tolerant turbine runner, advanced hydropower turbine project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. (ARL) and Northern Research and Engineering Corporation (NREC) conducted a research program to develop a turbine runner which will minimize fish injury and mortality at hydroelectric projects. ARL?NREC have developed a runner shape which minimizes the number of blade leading edges, reduces the pressure versus time and the velocity versus distance gradients within the runner, minimizes or eliminates the clearance between the runner and runner housing, and maximizes the size of the flow passages, all with minimal penalty on turbine efficiency. An existing pump impeller provided the starting point for developing the fish tolerant turbine runner. The Hidrostal pump is a single bladed combined screw/centrifugal pump which has been proven to transport fish with minimal injury. The focus of the ARL/NREC research project was to develop a new runner geometry which is effective in downstream fish passage and hydroelectric power generation. A flow of 1,000 cfs and a head in the range of 75 ft to 100 ft were selected for conceptual design of the new runner. Conceptual design of the new runner began with a re-evaluation of studies which have been previously conducted to identify probable sources of injury to fish passing through hydraulic turbines. Criteria relative to hydraulic characteristics which are favorable for fish passage were prepared based on a reassessment of the available information. Important criteria used to develop the new runner design included low pressure change rates, minimum absolute pressures, and minimum shear. Other criteria which are reflected in the runner design are a minimum number of blades (only two), minimum total length of leading edges, and large flow passages. 86 figs., 5 tabs.

Cook, T.C.; Hecker, G.E. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Holden, MA (United States). Alden Research Lab.; Faulkner, H.B.; Jansen, W. [Northern Research and Engineering Corp., Woburn, MA (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

Soults, Scott [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

264

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall Term Spring Term  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM FALL 2010 Fall Term Spring Term EGGG 101 Introduction to Chemical Engineering 3 MATH 242 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B 4 MATH 243 Analytic Geometry & Calculus C 4 Critical Reading and Writing 3 Breadth Requirement Elective 1 3 15 17 CHEG 231 Chemical Engineering

Lee, Kelvin H.

265

Population Viability Analysis of Riverine Fishes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many utilities face conflkts between two goals: cost-efficient hydropower generation and protecting riverine fishes. Research to develop ecological simulation tools that can evaluate alternative mitigation strategies in terms of their benefits to fish populations is vital to informed decision-making. In this paper, we describe our approach to population viability analysis of riverine fishes in general and Snake River white sturgeon in particular. We are finding that the individual-based modeling approach used in previous in-stream flow applications is well suited to addressing questions about the viability of species of concern for several reasons. Chief among these are: (1) the abiIity to represent the effects of individual variation in life history characteristics on predicted population viabili~, (2) the flexibili~ needed to quanti~ the ecological benefits of alternative flow management options by representing spatial and temporal variation in flow and temperaturty and (3) the flexibility needed to quantifi the ecological benefits of non-flow related manipulations (i.e., passage, screening and hatchery supplementation).

Bates, P.; Chandler, J.; Jager, H.I.; Lepla, K.; Van Winkle, W.

1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Learning to fall: Designing low damage fall sequences for humanoid soccer robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology for the analysis and design of fall sequences of robots that minimize joint/articulation injuries, and the damage of valuable body parts is proposed. These fall sequences can be activated/triggered by the robot in case of a detected unintentional ... Keywords: Complex humanoid robots simulation, Fall management, Full-body motion control, Humanoid soccer robots, Nao humanoid robots

J. Ruiz-del-Solar; R. Palma-Amestoy; R. Marchant; I. Parra-Tsunekawa; P. Zegers

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

House Passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act May 31, 2006 -...

268

Observations of Internal and Near-Inertial Oscillations at Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetic energy levels Of horizontal oscillations near and above the inertial frequency are described based on 84 current records made during 5 years at Drake Passage. Instrument depths ranged from 280 to 3600 m. Moorings spanned the passage, ...

W. D. Nowlin Jr.; J. S. Bottero; R. D. Pillsbury

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Net Transport of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current through Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of the net transport through Drake Passage are made for three periods during which the year-long DRAKE 79 current meter array spanning the Passage was in operation. Relative geostrophic shears from hydrographic surveys in January 1979, ...

T. Whitworth III; W. D. Nowlin Jr.; S. J. Worley

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Modal Decomposition of the Low-Frequency Currents and Baroclinic Instability at Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently collected hydrographic data show that each of the four water mass zones previously identified in Drake Passage is characterized by a distinctly different vertical profile of Brunt-Väisälä frequency. Stratification in Drake Passage is ...

Masamichi Inoue

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Attribution of Projected Future Changes in Tropical Cyclone Passage Frequency over the Western North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper performs an attribution analysis of future changes in the frequency of tropical cyclone (TC) passages over the western North Pacific basin projected by seven general circulation models. The models project increases in the passage ...

Satoru Yokoi; Yukari N. Takayabu; Hiroyuki Murakami

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Processing and Application of Inverted Echo Sounder Data from Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bottom pressure recorders (BPRs) have been deployed at Drake Passage (DP) to monitor changes in the volume transport of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) through the passage. The use of inverted echo sounders (IESs) in assisting the ...

Michael P. Meredith; John M. Vassie; Robert Spencer; Karen J. Heywood

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Gone Fishing Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gone Fishing Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Gone Fishing Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gone Fishing Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Gone Fishing Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

274

MHK Projects/Western Passage OCGen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Western Passage OCGen Western Passage OCGen < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.6755,"lon":-67.014,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

275

Artificial fishes: Physics, locomotion, perception, behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

physics-based modeling Abstract: This paper proposesa framework for animation that can achieve the intricacy of motion evident in certain natural ecosystems with minimal input from the animator. The realistic appearance, movement, and behavior of individual animals, as well as the patterns of behavior evident in groups of animals fall within the scope of the framework. Our approach to emulating this level of natural complexity is to model each animal holistically as an autonomous agent situated in its physical world. To demonstrate the approach, we develop a physics-based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes that can swim hydrodynamically in simulated water through the motor control of internal muscles that motivate fins. Their repertoire of behaviors relies on their perception of the dynamic environment. As in nature, the detailed motions of artificial fishes in their virtual habitat are not entirely predictable because they are not scripted. 1

Xiaoyuan Tu; Demetri Terzopoulos

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Columbia River Salmonid Outmigration: McNary Dam Passage and Enhanced Smolt Quality, 1984 Second Year Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of the McNary Dam transportation system on emigrating fall and spring chinook smolts were evaluated using physiological indices of stress (e.g., plasma cortisol, hepatic glycogen, leucocrit, interrenal cell nuclear diameter) and performance tests (e.g., saltwater challenge, secondary stress challenge, disease resistance). Controlled experiments were conducted in a hatchery environment to characterize the fishes' physiological responses to stress, and disease resistance to allow a basis for judging the nature of the stress experienced by smolts at McNary Dam. 55 figs., 3 tabs.

Schreck, Carl B.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

SciTech Connect

In December 2008, an ash dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured, releasing over one billion gallons of coal fly ash into the Emory and Clinch Rivers. Coal fly ash may contain several contaminants of concern, but of these selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) have been highlighted because of their toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic food chains. To assess the potential impact of the spilled fly ash on humans and the environment, a comprehensive biological and environmental monitoring program was established, for which resident aquatic organisms (among other sample media) are collected to determine contaminant exposure and evaluate the risk to humans and wildlife. Studies on bioaccumulation and fish health are major components of the TVA Biological Monitoring Program for the Kingston fly ash project. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure (to metals) and effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information regarding other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash, not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report summarizes the bioaccumulation results from the first two years of study after the fly ash spill, including four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation, selenium and arsenic were the only two metals consistently elevated above background levels in fish. E

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Teams (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Fall Chinook). The audit is being conducted as a requirement of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) ``Strategy for Salmon`` and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Under the audit, the hatcheries are evaluated against policies and related performance measures developed by the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT). IHOT is a multi-agency group established by the NPPC to direct the development of new basinwide standards for managing and operating fish hatcheries. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Method of creating a controlled interior surface configuration of passages within a substrate  

SciTech Connect

A method of creating a controlled interior surface configuration of passages within a substrate, particularly cooling passages of nozzles or buckets of a gas turbine, involves the hot isostatic pressing of a leachable passage insert whose surface carries the female image of the desired interior surface configuration inside the substrate followed by leaching of the insert from the substrate.

Dembowski, Peter V. (Richmond Heights, OH); Schilke, Peter W. (Scotia, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002 a total of 364 adult fall chinook and 472 chum were sampled for biological data in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. Vital statistics were developed from 290 fall chinook and 403 chum samples. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 214. The peak redd count for chum was 776. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 15 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 6 December. There were estimated to be a total of 1,881 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2002. The study area's 2002 chum population was estimated to be 4,232 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2002 brood bright stock, fall chinook emergence began on February 3 2003 and ended 7 May 2003, with peak emergence occurring 20 April. 2002 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 27 January and continued through 6 April 2003. Peak chum emergence took place 1 March. A total of 10,925 juvenile chinook and 1,577 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 24 January and 21 July 2003 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place during the month of June 2003 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2002 and 2003 the majority of fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning, bright stock of fall chinook. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI and DNA analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration suggests chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville dam are similar to stocks of chum found in Hamilton and Hardy creek and are part of the Lower Columbia River Chum ESU.

van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Brooks, Robert (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Columbia River Section, John Day, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

HANDLING FRESH FISH REFRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Fishery Leaflet 427) Cold-Storage Design and Refrigeration Equipment Part 3 (Fisher y Leaflet 429) FactorsHANDLING FRESH FISH REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 2 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH 428 Washington 25, D, C. December 1956 REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART TWO HANDLING FRESH FISH By Charles

284

A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes  

SciTech Connect

In Part 1 of this paper [1], we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.06 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.05 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the case study at John Day Dam during 2008, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities.

Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, Matthew B.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

Primitive Fishing Tackle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fishing Tackle Fishing Tackle Nature Bulletin No. 752-A April 19, 1980 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRIMITlVE FISHING TACKLE Fishing is one of man's oldest occupations and the gear used for catching fish has changed but little over the ages. The basic methods in use today -- spearing, trapping, netting and angling -- had their origin among primitive peoples back in prehistoric times. Our modern steel fishhooks have gradually evolved from early crude hooks made from flint, bone, ivory, shell, horn or wood. Thousands of years ago, the Swiss Lake Dwellers and the ancient Egyptians used bronze wire bent into a shape like a youngster's pin hook. Much later some inventive fisherman added a barb to those bronze hooks to hold the fish more securely.

286

New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Volume II of IV, Results of Laboratory and Field Research on New Concepts in Weir and Pool Fishways, 1982-1984 Final Project Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive review of fishway design practice led to new design concepts that had previously been untested. This concept was based on the observation that fish can be stimulated to leap when presented with certain hydraulic conditions. A laboratory test program was conducted to develop this concept into a new fishway configuration. Field testing revealed that components of the new design improved fish passage. Verification of the initial premise that fish can be stimulated to leap needs further study.

Aaserude, Robert G.; Orsborn, John F.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fall 2012 Composite Data Products - Backup Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes 15 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Fall 2012 for fuel cell backup power systems.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will match Focus on Energy incentive to 5,000 Commercial Central AC Tune-Up: 50 LED Exit Signs: Free Installation River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU) offers a variety of...

289

Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential New Construction Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Heater: Natural Gas 0.67 EF or greater; Electric 0.93 EF or greater Windows: 0.35 U-value or less Program Administrator Cedar Falls Utilities Website http:www.cfu.net...

290

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Texas Texas Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site Data Validation Package-April 2013 Groundwater Sampling Ground Water Compliance Action Plan Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Falls City Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Falls City, Texas Please be green. Do not print these documents unless absolutely necessary. Request a paper copy of any document by submitting a Document Request. All Site Documents All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon

291

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline decreased for the second week in a row to 3.71 a gallon on Monday. That's down...

292

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline prices continue to fall (long version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 3.61 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3.7 cents from a week ago, based on...

293

Precipitation Rate and Extinction in Falling Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visible and infrared atmospheric transmittances measured through falling snow have shown a wavelength dependence in which extinction is greater for longer wavelengths. The diffraction component of the energy scattered by the snow crystals causes ...

Mary Ann Seagraves

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall 2013-Winter 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall 2013-Winter 2014 Certificate Program CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATIONCONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION #12;About the Advanced Chemical Engineering Certificate Program The new Advanced Chemical Engineering Certificate Program offers professionals in chemi- cal engineering

California at Davis, University of

295

TMS Fall Meeting '99 Registration Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 4, 1999 ... Focusing on physical metallurgy and materials, the 1999 TMS Fall Meeting will ... Print out this form, complete it, and fax or mail it to the TMS ...

296

TMS Fall Meeting '99: General Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 4, 1999 ... Focusing on physical metallurgy and materials, the TMS Fall ... Don't miss out on this opportunity for a one-year trial membership in TMS and ...

297

Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon  

SciTech Connect

The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fish-Eating Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish-Eating Birds Nature Bulletin No. 307-A May 18, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation...

299

Anglers' fishing problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The considered model will be formulated as related to "the fishing problem" even if the other applications of it are much more obvious. The angler goes fishing. He uses various techniques and he has at most two fishing rods. He buys a fishing ticket for a fixed time. The fishes are caught with the use of different methods according to the renewal processes. The fishes' value and the inter arrival times are given by the sequences of independent, identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables with the known distribution functions. It forms the marked renewal--reward process. The angler's measure of satisfaction is given by the difference between the utility function, depending on the value of the fishes caught, and the cost function connected with the time of fishing. In this way, the angler's relative opinion about the methods of fishing is modelled. The angler's aim is to have as much satisfaction as possible and additionally he has to leave the lake before a fixed moment. Therefore his goal is to find two...

Karpowicz, Anna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Acoustic Method for Fish Counting and Fish Sizing in Tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

basis without harm for the fish. Acknowledgments We areregarding the handling of the fish. We also would like toE. , Lagardère, J.P. , 1995. Fish telemetry in aquaculture :

Roux, Philippe; Conti, Stéphane; Demer, David; Maurer, Benjamin D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fish, fishing, diving and the management of coral reefs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

things? What is the largest fish you ever caught in a trap?Year? What is the largest fish you ever caught with line?Kg? Year? What is the largest fish you ever caught with

Johnson, Ayana Elizabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Acoustic Method for Fish Counting and Fish Sizing in Tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A-123: 3.01.2004–2.28.2005 Acoustic Method for Fish Countingand Fish Sizing in Tanks W.A. Kuperman and Philippe Rouxlower the costs of raising fish to marketable size. Water,

Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Evaluation of the Contribution of Fall Chinook Salmon Reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries, 1989 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979 this study was initiated to determine the distribution, contribution, and value of artificially propagated fall chinook salmon from the Columbia River. Coded wire tagging (CWT) of hatchery fall chinook salmon began in 1979 with the 1978 brood and was completed in 1982 with the 1981 brood of fish at rearing facilities on the Columbia River system. From 18 to 20 rearing facilities were involved in the study each brood year. Nearly 14 million tagged fish, about 4% of the production, were released as part of this study over the four years, 1979 through 1982. Sampling for recoveries of these tagged fish occurred from 1980 through 1986 in the sport and commercial marine fisheries from Alaska through California, Columbia River fisheries, and returns to hatcheries and adjacent streams. The National Marine Fisheries Service coordinated this study among three fishery agencies: US Fish and Wildfire Service, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fisheries. The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution, fishery contribution, survival, and value of the production of fall chinook salmon from each rearing facility on the Columbia River system to Pacific coast salmon fisheries. To achieve these objectives fish from each hatchery were given a distinctive CWT. 81 refs., 20 figs., 68 tabs.

Vreeland, Robert R.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

BLM Twin Falls District Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twin Falls District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name BLM Twin Falls District Office Address 2536 Kimberly Road Place Twin Falls, ID Zip 83301 Phone number 208-735-2060...

305

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2002, a total of 2,877,437 fish weighing 47,347 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 479,358 yearling fish weighing 33,930 pounds and 2,398,079 sub-yearling fish weighing 19,115 pounds. This is the largest number of fish ever released in one year from the acclimation facilities.

McLeod, Bruce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville Dam; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003 a total of 253 adult fall chinook and 113 chum were sampled for biological data in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. Vital statistics were developed from 221 fall chinook and 109 chum samples. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 190. The peak redd count for chum was 262. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 24 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 24 November. There were estimated to be a total of 1,533 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2003. The study area's 2003 chum population was estimated to be 688 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2003 brood bright stock, fall chinook emergence began on January 6, 2004 and ended 28 April 2004, with peak emergence occurring 13 April. 2003 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 22 February and continued through 15 April 2004. Peak chum emergence took place 25 March. A total of 25,433 juvenile chinook and 4,864 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 20 January and 28 June 2004 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place during the month of June 2004 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2003 all of the fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning, bright stock. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI and DNA analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration suggests chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville dam are similar to stocks of chum found in Hamilton and Hardy creek and are part of the Lower Columbia River Chum ESU.

van der Naald, Wayne; Duff, Cameron; Brooks, Robert (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Columbia River Section, John Day, OR)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

One Fish, Two Fish, Small Fish, Huge Fish: Utilizing Zebrafish as a Model for Studying Mitochondrial Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

353-367 Laelle, H. (1977) J Fish Biol 10, 121-174 Koerber,arrow). (I) The heart rates of MitoBloCK-6 treated fish andmorpholino-injected fish were markedly reduced compared with

Johnson, Meghan Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Climate Variability, Fish, and Fisheries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish population variability and fisheries activities are closely linked to weather and climate dynamics. While weather at sea directly affects fishing, environmental variability determines the distribution, migration, and abundance of fish. ...

P. Lehodey; J. Alheit; M. Barange; T. Baumgartner; G. Beaugrand; K. Drinkwater; J.-M. Fromentin; S. R. Hare; G. Ottersen; R. I. Perry; C. Roy; C. D. van der Lingen; F. Werner

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Pages that link to "American Falls, Idaho" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "American Falls, Idaho" American Falls, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search What links here Page: American...

312

Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports...

313

Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline...

314

2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. 2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting: New Technologies for the Next Millennium. 2000 TMS FALL EXTRACTION AND ...

315

2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting: US Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. 2000 TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting: U.S. Airways. 2000 TMS FALL EXTRACTION AND PROCESS METALLURGY MEETING: ...

316

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls City Mill Site - TX...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site Documents Related to Falls City Mill Site Data Validation Package for...

317

2000 TMS Fall Meeting: Technical Events and Sessions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. 2000 TMS Fall Meeting: Technical Events & Sessions. October 8–12, 2000 · TMS FALL MEETING 2000 · St. Louis, Missouri. Focusing on physical ...

318

Fish at Night  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Night at Night Nature Bulletin No. 264-A April 8, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FISH AT NIGHT Most people take it for granted that fish are creatures of perpetual motion and go swimming day and night. On the contrary, it appears that each kind has a rather definite daily routine with certain hours for quiet rest or sleep, and other hours for moving about in search of food. As a rule, fish active in daylight rest at night as if they were asleep. Sometimes they lean against rocks, with their fins folded, or creep into holes and among vegetation. Fish scientists have learned that almost every kind of fish makes regular daily trips between shallow and deep water. Lampreys, suckers, smelt, redhorses, wall-eyed pike and a few other kinds are known to make their spawning migrations and lay their eggs at night.

319

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Performance of the SERI parallel-passage dehumidifer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The key component in improving the performance of solar desiccant cooling systems is the dehumidifier. A parallel-passage geometry for the desiccant dehumidifier has been identified as meeting key criteria of low pressure drop, high mass transfer efficiency, and compact size. An experimental program to build and test a small-scale prototype of this design was undertaken in FY 1982, and the results are presented in this report. Computer models to predict the adsorption/desorption behavior of desiccant dehumidifiers were updated to take into account the geometry of the bed and predict potential system performance using the new component design. The parallel-passage design proved to have high mass transfer effectiveness and low pressure drop over a wide range of test conditions typical of desiccant cooling system operation. The prototype dehumidifier averaged 93% effectiveness at pressure drops of less than 50 Pa at design point conditions. Predictions of system performance using models validated with the experimental data indicate that system thermal coefficients of performance (COPs) of 1.0 to 1.2 and electrical COPs above 8.5 are possible using this design.

Schlepp, D.; Barlow, R.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Movement and Injury Rates for Three Life Stages of Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha : A Comparison of Submerged Orifices and an Overflow Weir for Fish Bypass in a Modular Rotary Drum Fish Screen : Annual Report 1995.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the effectiveness of 6-in. and 2-in. submerged orifices, and an overflow weir for fish bypass at a rotary drum fish screening facility. A modular drum screen built by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) was installed at PNNL`s Aquatic Ecology research laboratory in Richland, Washington. Fry, subyearlings, and smolts of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyacha) were introduced into the test system, and their movement and injury rates were monitored. A total of 33 tests (100 fish per test) that lasted from 24 to 48 hr were completed from 1994 through 1995. Passage rate depended on both fish size and bypass configuration. For fry/fingerling spring chinook salmon, there was no difference in passage rate through the three bypass configurations (2-in. orifice, 6-in. orifice, or overflow weir). Subyearlings moved sooner when the 6-in. orifice was used, with more than 50% exiting through the fish bypass in the first 8 hr. Smolts exited quickly and preferred the 6-in. orifice, with over 90% of the smolts exiting through the bypass in less than 2 hr. Passage was slightly slower when a weir was used, with 90% of the smolts exiting in about 4 hr. When the 2-in. orifice was used in the bypass, 90% of the smolts did not exit until after 8 hr. In addition, about 7% of the smolts failed to migrate from the forebay within 24 hr, indicating that smolts were significantly delayed when the 2-in. orifice was used. Few significant injuries were detected for any of the life stages. However, light descaling occurred on about 15% of chinook salmon smolts passing through the 2-in. orifice. Although a single passage through the orifice did not appear to cause significant scale loss or other damage, passing through several screening facilities with 2-in. orifices could cause cumulative injuries.

Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Mavros, William V.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

SciTech Connect

This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

324

EIS-0397: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0397: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project The underlying need for the project is to improve fish passage to habitat in the upper part of the watershed. Funding from BPA would serve to provide off-site mitigation for the effects of the federal Columbia River hydroelectric facilities on fish populations by improving fish passage at Lyle Falls. While the fish passage issues at Lyle Falls were not caused by the hydroelectric facilities, this project would help BPA meet its mitigation responsibilities and potentially increase overall fish production in the Columbia Basin by enhancing fish passage into the Klickitat subbasin. EIS-0397-DEIS-Summary-2008.pdf EIS-0397-DEIS-2008.pdf More Documents & Publications

325

Fall 2005 Meeting of the ASA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Meeting of the 6 Meeting of the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics and the Energy Information Administration In two adjacent files you may find unedited transcripts of EIA's fall 2006 meeting with the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. Beginning with the fall 2003 meeting, EIA no longer edits these transcripts. Summaries of previous meetings may be found to the right of the Thursday and Friday transcripts. The public meeting took place October 6 and 7, 2006 in the Forrestal Building at 1000 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20585. All of the plenary and two of the break-out sessions were in 8E-089. The two remaining break-out sessions were in 5E-069. The fall meeting agenda, papers, presentation slides and other materials

326

Klamath Falls Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.23333333,"lon":-121.7666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

327

REDUCTION OF THE MOMENTUM OF FALLING BODIES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A means for catching free falling bodies that may be damaged upon impact is given. Several layers of floating gas-filled rubber balls are contained within a partially compartmented tank of liquid. The compartment extends from beneath the surface of the liquid to that height necessary to contain the desired number of layers of the balls. The balls and the liquid itself break the force of the fall by absorbing the kinetic energy of falling body. The body may then be retrieved from the floor of the tank by a rake that extends from outside of the tank through the free surface area and underneath the compartment wall. This arrangement is particularly useful in collecting irradiated atomic fuel rods that are discharged from a reactor at considerable height without damaging the thin aluminum jacket of the rods.

Kendall, J.W.; Morrison, I.H.

1954-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

328

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1993.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recovery efforts for the endangered fall chinook salmon necessitates knowledge of the factors limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which affect spawning of the fish in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing seward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs. The spawning was generally a November event in 1993, with some activity in late Oct. and early Dec. Spawning habitat availability was assessed by applying hydraulic and habitat models to known fall chinook salmon spawning sites. Juveniles were seined and PIT tagged in the free-flowing Snake River, and in the Columbia River in he Hanford Reach and in McNary Reservoir. Subyearling fish were marked at McNary Dam to relate river flow and migration patterns of juveniles to adult returns. Hydroacoustic surveys were conducted on McNary and John Day reservoirs and in net pens.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Study of falling-jet flash evaporators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results of flash evaporation from sheets of water, 3.2 mm and 6.3 mm thick and 27.9 cm wide, falling freely in the presence of their own vapor, are reported. With no flashing the jets fall in coherent sheets, but with flashing the jets were observed to spread and break up into droplets. Flashing was characterized by an effectiveness parameter, which was found to increase with increasing water temperature and jet length. Variations in water flow rate and heat flux did not influence the effectiveness appreciably.

Kreith, F.; Olson, D.A.; Bharathan, D.; Green, H.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Growth of Fishes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Growth of Fishes Growth of Fishes Nature Bulletin No. 272-A June 3, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE GROWTH OF FISHES Baby fish, by the millions, are hatching now every day in our lakes, streams and ponds. Some kinds come from eggs sown broadcast among water plants; others from eggs laid in clusters or nests; some from masses of eggs hidden in underwater holes; while the eggs of many little fish, such as minnows and darters, are attached in neat patches to the underside of rocks or sunken logs. For some time before hatching, the young fish can be seen wriggling inside the eggs. Newly hatched baby fish -- or fry, as they should be called -- look much alike, regardless of the size or appearance of their parents. Each is almost transparent except for the large dark eyes and a bulging stomach which encloses yolk from the egg. Under a magnifying glass, the pumping red heart can be seen and the mouth gulping water. The tiny fins are beginning to form, a few dots of dark pigment may show in the skin, but there is little or no sign of scales. They vary from an eighth to a half inch or more in length, depending upon the species and the size of the egg.

331

Mercury and Fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury and Fish Mercury and Fish Name: donna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: how does mercury get into fish in rivers. what is the ecological process involved which could produce toxic levels of mercury in fish and eventually get into humans? Replies: Hi Donna! Nowadays mercury or its compounds are used at a high scale in many industries as the manufacture of chemicals, paints, household itens, pesticides and fungicides. These products can contaminate humans (and mamals) by direct contact, ingestion or inhalation. Besides the air can become contaminated also, and since mercury compounds produce harmful effects in body tissues and functions, that pollution is very dangerous. Now for your question: Efluent wastes containing mercury in various forms sometimes are dropped in sea water or in rivers or lakes. There the mercury may be converted by bacteria, that are in the muddy sediments, into organic mercurial compounds particularly the highly toxic alkyl mercurials ( methyl and di-methyl mercury), which may in turn be concentrated by the fishes and other aquatic forms of life that are used as food by men. The fishes dont seem to be affected but they are able to concentrate mercury in high poisoning levels, and if human beings, mamals or birds eat these containing mercury fishes, algae, crabs or oysters they will be contaminated and poisoned.

332

Development of a more fish tolerant turbine runner advanced hydropower turbine project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hidrostal pump is a single bladed combined screw/centrifugal pump which has been proven to transport fish with minimal injury. The focus of the ARL/NREC research project was to develop a new runner geometry which is effective in downstream fish passage and hydroelectric power generation. A flow of 1,000 cfs and a head in the range of 75 ft to 100 ft were selected for conceptual design of the new runner. Criteria relative to hydraulic characteristics which are favorable for fish passage were prepared based on a reassessment of the available information. Important criteria used to develop the new runner design included low pressure change rates, minimum absolute pressures, and minimum shear. Other criteria which are reflected in the runner design are a minimum number of blades (only two), minimum total length of leading edges, and large flow passages. Flow characteristics of the new runner were analyzed using two- dimensional and three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models. The basic runner geometry was initially selected using the two-dimensional model. The three-dimensional model was used to investigate the flow characteristics in detail through the entire runner and to refine the design by eliminating potential problem areas at the leading and trailing edges. Results of the analyses indicated that the runner has characteristics which should provide safe fish passage with an overall power efficiency of approximately 90%. The size of the new runner, which is larger than conventional turbine runners with the same design flow and head, will provide engineering, fabrication, and installation.challenges related to the turbine components and the civil works. A small reduction in the overall efficiency would reduce the size of the runner considerably, would simplify the turbine manufacturing operations, and would allow installation of the new turbine at more hydroelectric sites.

Cook, T.C.; Hecker, G.E. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Holden, MA (United States). Alden Research Lab.; Faulkner, H.B.; Jansen, W. [Northern Research and Engineering Corp., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan 2: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan SUMMARY In this final environmental impact statement (FEIS), with the benefit of public comment and participation, BPA has developed and proposes a Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) that substantially combines elements of the Weak Stock and Sustainable Use alternatives and that falls within the established range of potential Policy Direction alternatives. This FEIS evaluates the environmental consequences of BPA's implementation and funding of sample actions that could emerge from any of the Policy Directions. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 26, 2012 EIS-0312: Notice of Availability of the Bonneville Power Administration

334

20 Summer/Fall 2012 Children and Libraries Author is ......  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- garten. Sobering evidence from multiple sources indicates that children who fall behind in reading

335

Fall 2011 Composite Data Products: National FCEV Learning Demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical presentation describes Fall 2011 composite data products: national FCEV learning demonstration.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

California Environmental Law & Policy Issues (Fall 2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Law 273.71 California Environmental Law & Policy Issues (Fall 2008) Units: 2 CCN (2Ls/3Ls): 49696:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Instructor's Profile: Mr. Frank is the Executive Director of the California Center from the University of California at Davis in 1974. Following positions as a staff attorney

Kammen, Daniel M.

337

The rise and fall of surfactants lore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant changes have occurred in the surfacThe rise and fall of surfactants lore tants industry in the past 30 years, both in terms of what we consider to be important and in the paradigms that we operate under. The following discussion highlights my v

338

Better Plants Fall 2013 Progress Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Fall 2013 Progress Update chronicles the Better Buildings Programs efforts to capture these cost-effective, energy-saving opportunities and demonstrate that strong energy management practices are good for business, good for the economy, and good for the environment.

339

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall Term Spring Term  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM Fall Term Spring Term EGGG 101 Introduction to Engineering (FYE) 2 CHEG 112 Introduction to Chemical Engineering 3 CHEM 111 General Chemistry 3 CHEM 112 General Chemistry and Writing 3 Breadth Requirement Elective 1 3 15 17 CHEG 231 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 3 CHEG 325

Lee, Kelvin H.

340

Ice Fall Doctors 6, Long Conversation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ang Nima and Ang Kami discuss different elements of their lives as Ice Fall Doctors: what they like about the job; safety; what their wives think of the work; religion and how it keeps them safe in the ice; spirits in the Icefall and the surrounding...

Loomis, Molly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Book reviews, Fall 2011 Christian P. Robert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book reviews, Fall 2011 Christian P. Robert Universit´e Paris-Dauphine, CEREMADE, IUF, and CREST of three book reviews of Lange (2010), Vasishth and Broe (2011), and Stephenson (2008), respectively is irrelevant." (page iii) I had missed the first edition of this book and thus I started reading

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

342

Fish in electrical storms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish in electrical storms Name: Kelly A Krugeger Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I have always been told to stay out of water during an electrical storm...

343

Continental Shelf Fishing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do most commercial fisherman don't fish beyond the continental shelf? Replies: The deep waters of the ocean offer little food...

344

Fish and Temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish and Temperature Name: Christopher Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Dear Sirs, I am doing a project on a sand tiger shark and i was wondering if temperature...

345

Fish, Weather and People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish, Weather and People Fish, Weather and People Nature Bulletin No. 241-A October 22, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FISH, WEATHER AND PEOPLE. Fishing can be one of the cheapest and most satisfying forms of recreation for people of all ages and both sexes. The proudest moment for many a boy is when he comes home with a big catfish or a string of bluegills caught with a can of worms for bait, and a cane pole or a willow cut from a thicket. Fishing can also be an expensive sport when the fisherman, laden with gadgets and high-priced tackle, journeys long distances to northern waters. The time of year, the sign of the moon, the barometric pressure, the direction and velocity of wind, rainfall, the amount of fishing and other conditions are some of the reasons given by credulous fisherman to bolster up their alibis. None of them can be proved. We do know that, in general, in the streams, ponds and inland lakes of Illinois, the principal fish caught in early spring are bullheads and, after them, the crappies. In summer the catches are mostly bluegills and largemouth black bass. In autumn, often, we again get good strings of crappies. But beyond that, as far as we know, in only one body of water has there been kept sufficient records over a long term of years, and a scientific study of such records, to throw any light upon the theories about why and when fish bite or don't bite.

346

Fish Protection Technology Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an updated review of the state of knowledge on fish protection technologies for use at power plant cooling water intake structures (CWISs) to meet requirements of §316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA). While it is not possible to know with certainty how the §316(b) Final Rule will look (it is scheduled to be issued on or before June 27, 2013), it is anticipated that power generating facilities will have some flexibility in selecting fish protection technologies. The ...

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

347

Fish Scales and Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Scales and Science Fish Scales and Science Name: Amanda Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: In special education class.Science project time.Topic choosen is HOW DO SCALES HELP FISH? Any suggestions or information would be of help. Replies: Wait a minute. Why do you think the scales help the fish? How do you know they do? Have you talked to a fish lately? Maybe they are useless, or even a problem. Maybe the fish wishes it didn't have scales! I say this only to emphasize two things: First of all, when you think scientifically, the MOST IMPORTANT thing is to be very careful not to assume you know something when you really don't. What I mean by that is: don't think you know the answer before you are dead positive absolutely for-sure 100% certain that you do. Why? Why make a big fuss over being so very careful? Well, I hate to tell you this (but you probably already know it), it's just SO EASY for human beings to fool themselves, to think they know the answers when they really don't know AT ALL what they are talking about. If you have a brother or sister, you know EXACTLY what I mean, I expect.

348

MACM 202 Assignment 5, Fall 2005 - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michigan 4.9. 158. Erie. 0.46. 175. Ontario. 1.6. 209. 2. Let x(t) denote a fish population at time t. Consider models of the form x (t) = G(x) ? H(x, t) where G(x) ...

349

Improved techniques for studying the temporal and spatial behavior of fish in a fixed location  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Special Scientific Report--Fisheries Number 179. United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC (Timko et al., 2001), Cowlitz Falls Dam on the Cowlitz River, and Chittendon Locks on the Washington Ship. Each vertical scan in the plot shows the detected arrivals in a time window equal to the programmed

350

Physicochemical Characteristics of the Hyporheic Zone Affect Redd Site Selection of Chum and Fall Chinook Salmon, Columbia River.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) may historically have been the most abundant species of Columbia River salmon, contributing as much as 50% of the total biomass of all salmon in the Pacific Ocean prior to the 1940's (Neave 1961). By the 1950's, however, run sizes to the Columbia River dropped dramatically and in 1999 the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Columbia River chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA; NMFS 1999). Habitat degradation, water diversions, harvest, and artificial propagation are the major human-induced factors that have contributed to the species decline (NMFS 1998). Columbia River chum salmon spawn exclusively in the lower river below Bonneville Dam, including an area near Ives Island. The Ives Island chum salmon are part of the Columbia River evolutionary significant unit (ESU) for this species, and are included in the ESA listing. In addition to chum salmon, fall chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) also spawn at Ives Island. Spawning surveys conducted at Ives Island over the last several years show that chum and fall chinook salmon spawned in clusters in different locations (US Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, unpublished data). The presence of redd clusters suggested that fish were selecting specific habitat features within the study area (Geist and Dauble 1998). Understanding the specific features of these spawning areas is needed to quantify the amount of habitat available to each species so that minimum flows can be set to protect fish and maintain high quality habitat.

Geist, David R.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Developing an Instrument for Counting Fish Eggs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anchovy (Engraulis mordax) eggs. Fish. Oceanogr. In Press.Cummings. 1997. A continuous, underway fish egg sampler.Fish. Oceanogr. 6(2):58–73). Biologist David Checkley

Checkley, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A First-Passage Kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm for complex diffusion-reaction systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop an asynchronous event-driven First-Passage Kinetic Monte Carlo (FPKMC) algorithm for continuous time and space systems involving multiple diffusing and reacting species of spherical particles in two and three dimensions. The FPKMC algorithm ... Keywords: Asynchronous algorithms, Diffusion-reaction, First-passage, Kinetic Monte Carlo

Aleksandar Donev; Vasily V. Bulatov; Tomas Oppelstrup; George H. Gilmer; Babak Sadigh; Malvin H. Kalos

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: Increased distillate fuel production sure seems to explain some of the January 2001 stock increase. This graph shows the distillate yield pattern over the 1990's. Generally yields rise in the fall to build stocks for winter distillate use. On average, the yield during the fourth quarter is about 2% higher than the average of the lowest yield months of June, July and August. (Recognize that a 1% change in yield is about a 150 MB/D change in distillate production, which is about 4% of winter demand.) During the fall of 1996, the winter season began with very low stocks, but refiners pushed yields to very high levels and regained some of the lost ground. As we saw earlier, we entered last winter in a similar situation as 1996 with low stock levels. At last year's SHOPP conference, Joanne Shore

354

Why are gasoline prices falling so rapidly?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Why are gasoline prices falling so rapidly? Why are gasoline prices falling so rapidly? As of October 29, 2001, the national average retail price of regular gasoline was $1.235 per gallon, its lowest level since November 8, 1999 (Figure 1). The average price has fallen 29 cents in 6 weeks since September 17, with further declines perhaps to come. The sharpest decline has been in the Midwest (Petroleum Administration for Defense District 2), where the average has dropped 57 cents in 8 weeks since Labor Day (September 3). Additionally, this decline comes on the heels of a 33-cent drop in the national average in 10 weeks from Memorial Day through August 6, interrupted only by a brief 17-cent rise in August. In total, the national average retail gasoline price has fallen nearly 48 cents from its peak on May 14. This is already the widest one-year range in retail prices

355

cctoday_fall_2005_Final.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

491 * ISSUE NO. 64, FALL 2005 491 * ISSUE NO. 64, FALL 2005 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEW DOE PROGRAM TO ADVANCE FUEL CELL CENTRAL POWER STATIONS Recent advances in technology have precipitated movement of fuel cells into the central power arena in support of FutureGen - coal-based central power plants capable of co-producing electricity and clean fuels (including hydrogen), enabling carbon sequestration, and producing near-zero emis- sions. While the initial focus of the Offi ce of Fossil Energy (FE) stationary fuel cell research and development program has been on distributed genera- tion applications, the strategy has always included eventual integration with central power plants. The central power element of the strategy is now being implemented under the Fuel Cell Coal-Based Systems program.

356

Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act May 31, 2006 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman released the following statement on the House passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act: "I applaud the House's passage of a bill that allows responsible, environmentally safe oil and natural gas drilling in the ANWR region of arctic Alaska. Had President Clinton not vetoed the ANWR drilling bill in 1995, we would have at least an additional one million barrels a day of domestic oil production available to the citizens of this country today." "We need to enhance our nation's energy mix by increasing domestic

357

House Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act House Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act June 8, 2006 - 2:17pm Addthis Statement from Secretary Bodman WASHINGTON, DC - The following is a statement from the Secretary Samuel W. Bodman of the Department of Energy on the passage of House Resolution 5254, The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act: "I commend the House of Representatives for their passage of this important piece of legislation. Expanding our nation's refining capacity is an important part of President Bush's four-point plan to confront high gasoline prices and is a key component to strengthening our nation's energy security. By increasing our nation's domestic refining capacity we can help grow our nation's economy and reduce our reliance on foreign sources

358

Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act May 31, 2006 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman released the following statement on the House passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act: "I applaud the House's passage of a bill that allows responsible, environmentally safe oil and natural gas drilling in the ANWR region of arctic Alaska. Had President Clinton not vetoed the ANWR drilling bill in 1995, we would have at least an additional one million barrels a day of domestic oil production available to the citizens of this country today." "We need to enhance our nation's energy mix by increasing domestic

359

Great Falls lineament, Idaho and Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The name Great Falls lineament is given to a northeast-trending zone of diverse geologic features that can be traced northeastward from the Idaho batholith in the cordilleran miogeocline of the United States, across thrust belt structures and basement rocks of west-central and southwestern Montana, through the cratonic rocks of central Montana, and into southwesternmost Saskatchewan, Canada. The zone is well represented in east-central Idaho and west-central Montana where geologic mapping has outlined northeast-trending, high-angle faults and shear zones that: (1) extend more than 150 km (93 mi) from near Salmon, Idaho, northeastward toward Anaconda, Montana; (2) define a nearly continuous zone of faulting that shows recurrent movement from middle Proterozoic to Holocene time; (3) controlled the intrusion and orientation of some Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary batholithic rocks and early Tertiary dike swarms; and (4) controlled the uplift and orientation of the Anaconda-Pintlar Range. The boundary is also characterized by: high-angle faults, shear zones, and topographic lineaments; pronounced linear gravity and magnetic anomalies; igneous intrusions; and fault controlled depositional patterns and mineralization. That the Great Falls lineament is controlled by a similar Precambrian boundary between the Archean Wyoming province of southwestern Montana and early Proterozoic terrane to the north is speculative; however, the geologic features found along the Great Falls lineament share many common characteristics with features present along the Archean-Proterozoic boundary in Canada.

O'Neil, J.M.; Lopez, D.A.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fishing | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fishing Fishing Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three datasets: electricity energy balance (2005 - 2009), electricity market snapshot (2009), and market competition statistics (2004 - 2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords Agriculture Commercial electricity demand electricity supply Fishing Forestry Industrial Residential Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Energy Balance (2005 - 2009) (xls, 42.5 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Market Snapshot (2009) (xls, 49.7 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Market Competition Statistics (xls, 46.1 KiB)

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361

Six-Degree-of-Freedom Sensor Fish Design: Governing Equations and Motion Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sensor Fish device is being used at Northwest hydropower projects to better understand the conditions fish experience during passage through hydroturbines and other dam bypass alternatives. Since its initial development in 1997, the Sensor Fish has undergone numerous design changes to improve its function and extend the range of its use. The most recent Sensor Fish design, the three degree of freedom (3DOF) device, has been used successfully to characterize the environment fish experience when passing through turbines, in spill, or in engineered fish bypass facilities at dams. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of redesigning the current 3DOF Sensor Fish device package to improve its field performance. Rate gyros will be added to the new six degree of freedom (6DOF) device so that it will be possible to observe the six linear and angular accelerations of the Sensor Fish as it passes the dam. Before the 6DOF Sensor Fish device can be developed and deployed, governing equations of motion must be developed in order to understand the design implications of instrument selection and placement within the body of the device. In this report, we describe a fairly general formulation for the coordinate systems, equations of motion, force and moment relationships necessary to simulate the 6DOF movement of an underwater body. Some simplifications are made by considering the Sensor Fish device to be a rigid, axisymmetric body. The equations of motion are written in the body-fixed frame of reference. Transformations between the body-fixed and interial reference frames are performed using a formulation based on quaternions. Force and moment relationships specific to the Sensor Fish body are currently not available. However, examples of the trajectory simulations using the 6DOF equations are presented using existing low and high-Reynolds number force and moment correlations. Animation files for the test cases are provided in an attached CD. The next phase of the work will focus on the refinement and application of the 6DOF simulator developed in this project. Experimental and computational studies are planned to develop a set of force and moment relationships that are specific to the Sensor Fish body over the range of Reynolds numbers that it experiences. Lab testing of prototype 6DOF Sensor Fish will also allow for refinement of the trajectory simulations through comparison with observations in test flumes. The 6DOF simulator will also be an essential component in tools to analyze field data measured using the next generation Sensor Fish. The 6DOF simulator will be embedded in a moving-machinery computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for hydroturbines to numerically simulate the 6DOF Sensor Fish.

Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Simmons, Carver S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Pilot Study of the Effects of Simulated Turbine Passage Pressure on Juvenile Chinook Salmon Acclimated with Access to Air at Absolute Pressures Greater than Atmospheric  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impacts of pressure on juvenile salmon who pass through the turbines of hydroelectric dams while migrating downstream on the Columbia and Snake rivers has not been well understood, especially as these impacts relate to injury to the fish's swim bladder. The laboratory studies described here were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District at PNNL's fisheries research laboratories in 2004 to investigate the impacts of simulated turbine passage pressure on fish permitted to achieve neutral buoyancy at pressures corresponding to depths at which they are typically observed during downstream migration. Two sizes of juvenile Chinook salmon were tested, 80-100mm and 125-145mm total length. Test fish were acclimated for 22 to 24 hours in hyperbaric chambers at pressures simulating depths of 15, 30, or 60 ft, with access to a large air bubble. High rates of deflated swim bladders and mortality were observed. Our results while in conclusive show that juvenile salmon are capable of drawing additional air into their swimbladder to compensate for the excess mass of implanted telemetry devices. However they may pay a price in terms of increased susceptibility to injury, predation, and death for this additional air.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Abernethy, Cary S.

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

363

BLM Idaho Falls District Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Falls District Office Address 1405 Hollipark Drive Place Idaho Falls, ID Zip 83401 Phone number 208-524-7500 Website http:www.blm.govidstenin References Office Directory1...

364

AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Fall Symposium AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium November 6, 2013 8:00AM EST to November 8, 2013 5:00PM EST Colorado Springs, Colorado To learn about the Symposium, visit...

365

Test 2 PURE MATHEMATICS 2320 Fall 2001 Name MUN Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test 2 PURE MATHEMATICS 2320 Fall 2001 Name MUN Number Marks [9] 1. Let A = f1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 10; 11 that (A; #22;) is a poset. (this question continues...) #12; Pure Mathematics 2320 {2{ Test 2, Fall 2001(s)? iii. minimum element(s)? iv. minimal element(s)? #12; Pure Mathematics 2320 {3{ Test 2, Fall 2001 [4

deYoung, Brad

366

Experiments with computer vision methods for fall detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of a fall detection system is to automatically detect cases where a human falls and may have been injured. A natural application of such a system is in home monitoring of patients and elderly persons, so as to automatically alert relatives and/or ... Keywords: Gaussian model, fall detection, non-parametric model

Zhong Zhang; Eric Becker; Roman Arora; Vassilis Athitsos

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian enclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2000 included: (1) Implementing 2 new projects in the Grande Ronde drainage, and retrofitting one old project that will protect an additional 1.3 miles of stream and 298.3 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Improving fish passage in Bear Creek to restore tributary and mainstem access; (4) Planting and seeding 6.7 stream miles with 7,100 plants and 365 lbs. of seed; (5) Establishing 18 new photopoints and retaking 229 existing photopoint pictures; (6) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (7) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 98.7 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 62 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,910 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.; Stennfeld, Scott P.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Velocity Measurements at Six Fish Screening Facilities in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, Summer 1988 : Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE) are funding the construction and evaluation of fish passage facilities and fish protection facilities at irrigation and hydroelectric diversions in the Yakima River Basin, Washington State. The program provides offsite enhancement to compensate for fish and wildlife losses caused by hydroelectric development throughout the Columbia River Basin, and addresses natural propagation of salmon to help mitigate the impact of irrigation in the Yakima River Basin. This report evaluates the flow characteristics of the screening facilities. Studies consisted of velocity measurements taken in front of the rotary drum screens and within the fish bypass systems during peak flows. Measurements of approach velocity and sweep velocity were emphasized in these studies; however, vertical velocity was also measured. 5 refs., 18 figs., 15 tabs.

Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Lusty, E. William

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

01_fall_rev1.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Meeting on Fossil R&D China Meeting on Fossil R&D ..... 1 News Bytes ................................... 1 DOE CCT Conference ................... 2 Sequestration Conference ............ 3 APFBC Repowering ...................... 4 R&D Milestones ........................... 6 Thermal Barrier Coatings .............. 7 Mined Land a Carbon Sink ........... 8 Upcoming Events .......................... 8 UCR Advances Coal Science ....... 9 NAS Validates FE R&D .............. 10 Lasers to Enhance Gasifiers ....... 11 International Initiatives ............... 12 Status of CCT Projects ................ 14 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOE/FE-0215P-46 ISSUE NO. 46, FALL 2001 See "News Bytes" on page 5 ...

370

04_fall_CCToday_AAs_fixed.pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wabash Coal-Fired Fuel Cell Wabash Coal-Fired Fuel Cell ...... 1 News Bytes .................................... 1 Hydrates Capture CO 2 ................... 3 Controlling Zebra Mussels ............ 4 Upcoming Events ........................... 5 Mercury Speciation Data ............... 6 Advanced Membranes ................... 7 Internship Program ......................... 9 International Initiatives ................ 10 Status Report ............................... 14 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOE/FE-0476* ISSUE NO. 59, FALL 2004 See "News Bytes" on page 9... See "Wabash" on page 2 ... WORLD'S LARGEST CLEAN COAL-POWERED FUEL CELL A FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) 2-megawatt (MW) carbonate fuel cell -

371

Effects of Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Fish Residing in the Snake and Columbia Rivers, 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased spill at dams has commonly brought dissolved gas supersaturation higher than levels established by state and federal water quality criteria in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. These increased spill volumes are intended to provide safe passage for migrating juvenile salmon. However, dissolved gas supersaturation resulting from spill in past decades has led to gas bubble disease (GBD) in fish. Therefore, during the period of high spill in 1996, the authors monitored the prevalence and severity of gas bubble disease by sampling resident fish in Priest Rapids Reservoir and downstream from Bonneville, Priest Rapids, and Ice Harbor Dams.

Schrank, Boyd P.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations; Nursery Bridge Fishway and Garden City/Lowden II Sites, 2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the fish screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway and the newly constructed Garden City/Lowden II site west of Walla Walla, Washington, in the Walla Walla River Basin during spring and summer 2003. Both fish screen facilities were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. At the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the screens were evaluated specifically to determine whether the louvers that aid in controlling water flow from behind the screens could be adjusted so that the screens would meet fish protection criteria. Data were collected to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) (formerly National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage before and after changing the louver settings. Rock weirs downstream of the dam were also evaluated to determine whether they might impede upstream migration of juvenile salmonids during low flow conditions. At the Garden City/Lowden II site, data were collected to establish a baseline for operating conditions and to determine whether any changes in the baffle settings were needed.

Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Idaho Falls Power - Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Falls Power - Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program Idaho Falls Power - Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program Idaho Falls Power - Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate General: $50,000 Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount General: up to $50,000 Provider Idaho Falls Power Idaho Falls Power is offering a zero interest loan program to qualifying commercial customers to install efficient lighting and other energy

374

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Other Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type PACE Financing Provider River Falls Municipal Utilities River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU) offers loans of $2,500 - $50,000 to its residential customers for the installation of photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, geothermal, wind electric systems. The program will also support the installation of energy efficiency measures in connection with a qualifying renewable energy project, provided that the renewable energy

375

New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Part I of IV, Summary Report, 1982-1984 Final Project Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report looks at the most active periods of fishway research since 1938 as background for a project to apply fundamental fluid and bio-mechanics to fishway design, and develop more cost effective fish passage facilities with primary application to small scale hydropower facilities. Also discussed are new concepts in fishway design, an assessment of fishway development and design, and an analysis of barriers to upstream migration. (ACR)

Orsborn, John F.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon through Snake River Dams and Reservoirs, 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A pilot study was conducted to estimate survival of hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon through dams and reservoirs on the Snake River. The goals of the study were to: (1) field test and evaluate the Single-Release, Modified-Single-Release, and Paired-Release Models for the estimation of survival probabilities through sections of a river and hydroelectric projects; (2) identify operational and logistical constraints to the execution of these models; and (3) determine the usefulness of the models in providing estimates of survival probabilities. Field testing indicated that the numbers of hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon needed for accurate survival estimates could be collected at different areas with available gear and methods. For the primary evaluation, seven replicates of 830 to 1,442 hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon were purse-seined from Lower Granite Reservoir, PIT tagged, and released near Nisqually John boat landing (River Kilometer 726). Secondary releases of PIT-tagged smolts were made at Lower Granite Dam to estimate survival of fish passing through turbines and after detection in the bypass system. Similar secondary releases were made at Little Goose Dam, but with additional releases through the spillway. Based on the success of the 1993 pilot study, the authors believe that the Single-Release and Paired-Release Models will provide accurate estimates of juvenile salmonid passage survival for individual river sections, reservoirs, and hydroelectric projects in the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

Iwamoto, Robert N.; Sandford, Benjamin P.; McIntyre, Kenneth W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Umatilla Basin Fish Facilities Operation & Maintenance : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westland Irrigation District, as contractor to Bonneville Power Administration, and West Extension Irrigation District, as subcontractor to Westland, provide labor, equipment, and material necessary for the operation, care, and maintenance of fish facilities on the Umatilla River. Westland Irrigation District is the contractor of record. Job sites that are covered: Three Mile Right, Three Mile Left, Three Mile Adult Spawning, WEID Sampling Facility, Maxwell Screen Site, Westland Screen Site/Ladder/Juvenile Sampling Facility, Feed Canal Ladder/Screen Site, Stanfield Ladder/Screen Site, Minthorn Holding Facility, Thornhollow Acclimation Site, Imeques Acclimation Site, Pendleton Acclimation Site, and South Fork Walla Walla Spawning Facility. O & M personnel coordinate with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) personnel in performing tasks under this contract including scheduling of trap and haul, sampling, acclimation site maintenance, and other related activities as needed. The input from ODFW biologists Bill Duke and Ken Loffink, and CTUIR biologist Preston Bronson is indispensable to the success of the project, and is gratefully acknowledged. All tasks associated with the project were successfully completed during the fiscal year 2008 work period of October, 2007 through September, 2008. The project provides operations and maintenance throughout the year on five fish screen sites with a total of thirty-four rotating drum-screens, and four fish ladders in the Umatilla River Basin; additionally, periodic operations and maintenance is performed at holding, acclimation, and spawning sites in the Basin. Three people are employed full-time to perform these tasks. The FY08 budget for this project was $492,405 and actual expenditures were $490,267.01. Selected work activities and concerns: (1) Feed Dam Passage Improvement Project - A project to improve fish passage over the short term at the Feed Canal Diversion Dam site (Umatilla River mile 28.7) was implemented with local U.S. Bureau of Reclamation field office personnel coordinating project activities. Operation and Maintenance Project personnel assisted with labor, materials, and equipment to ensure the project was completed as planned. Discussions are under way to determine feasible alternatives for longer term solutions to passage issues at the site. (2) Three Mile Right (east bank) Facilities - The pump for supplying water to the fish handling facility holding pond was reconstructed successfully to achieve the desired increase in flow output necessary when increased quantities of fish are present. (3) Fish Screen Rehab at Stanfield Canal Diversion - Working with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife screen shop personnel, three rotating drum screens at the Stanfield Canal diversion site (Umatilla River mile 33.3) were serviced and overhauled with new bearings, seals, paint, and reinforcing bars. Work was completed, and screens reinstalled prior to water diversions beginning in the spring. (4) O & M personnel performed daily, weekly, and monthly operations and maintenance duties at the screen and ladder sites including, but not limited to, desilting of mud and debris, lubrication of mechanical parts, replacement of screen seals and screen motor components, adjustment of ladder gates, removal of large trees and woody debris deposited during high river flow conditions, servicing of pumps and screens for fish handling operations and sampling studies, in addition to general site clean-up, vegetative control, and security. Crew members responded as needed during evenings and after-hours according to weather conditions, river flows, and fish passage facility needs.

Wick, Mike

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Freshwater fish in salt water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freshwater fish in salt water Freshwater fish in salt water Name: Shannon Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What would actually happen if a fresh water fish had to live in salt water? Replies: For most fish, they would die. But some, like eels and salmon, can move freely between the two at certain stages of their lives. To do this they have special mechanisms of excretion and absorption of salt and water. --ProfBill If you put a freshwater fish into saltwater, most fish would lose weight (from losing water from its body) and eventually die. Approximately 2% of all 21000 species of fish actually move from freshwater to saltwater or from salt to fresh at some point in their lives, the move would kill any other fish. But even with these special varieties of fish, the move must be gradual so their bodies can adjust, or they too, will die from the change. If you want to learn more about why the freshwater fish will lose water, (or why a saltwater fish in freshwater would gain water), look up the words "diffusion" and "osmosis"

380

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems  and  rock  fall  source  and  impact  areas,  it  possible  to  a   rock   fall   source   area   in   the  possible  to  a  rock   fall  source  area.    There  are  

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EIS-0397: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Record of Decision 7: Record of Decision EIS-0397: Record of Decision Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund modifications to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, Washington. In addition to improving fish passage to the upper part of the Klickitat River watershed, This decision implements the Proposed Action and Preferred Alternative identified in the Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project (Lyle Falls) EIS (DOE/EIS-0397, November 2008). Record of Decision for the Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0397 (February 2009) More Documents & Publications EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0397: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0397: Final Environmental Impact Statement

382

Bodman Statement on House Passage of Energy Bill | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

House Passage of Energy Bill House Passage of Energy Bill Bodman Statement on House Passage of Energy Bill April 21, 2005 - 10:57am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman released the following statement today regarding House passage of energy legislation: "I congratulate the House of Representatives for passing comprehensive energy legislation. This bill will put us on a path to affordable and reliable supplies of energy in the future by improving energy efficiency; increasing domestic energy supplies; diversifying our energy sources to include more renewable energy sources; and modernizing our energy delivery system. For the good of American families, the American economy and America's national security, I call on the Senate to pass energy legislation and get a bill to the President's desk by this summer."

383

Comment on Mean First Passage Time for Nuclear Fission and the Emission of Light Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical methods, interpretations and conclusions on the fission dynamics in a recent publication of H. Hofmann and F. A. Ivanyuk on the mean first passage time are critically considered.

K. -H. Schmidt; J. Benlliure; D. Boilley; A. Heinz; A. Junghans; B. Jurado; A. Kelic; J. Pereira; C. Schmitt; O. Yordanov

2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

384

Sea-Air Heat and Freshwater Fluxes in the Drake Passage and Western Scotia Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrographic data from the vicinity of the Antarctic Polar Front in the Drake Passage and the western Scotia Sea are used to estimate the heat content and salinity differences for the upper ocean between summer and winter. Assuming that these ...

Alberto R. Piola; Daniel T. Georgi

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Constant Potential Vorticity Hydraulically Controlled Flow—Complexities from Passage Shape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Velocity, surface height profiles, and volume flux are calculated for critically controlled flow of a layer of rotating fluid from a channel to an exit passage. The upstream fluid possesses constant potential vorticity. These are models of an ...

J. A. Whitehead

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Energy Secretary Bodman's Statement on House Passage of the Energy Bill |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bodman's Statement on House Passage of the Energy Bodman's Statement on House Passage of the Energy Bill Energy Secretary Bodman's Statement on House Passage of the Energy Bill July 28, 2005 - 2:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released the following statement regarding House passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005: "Ensuring America's future energy security has been a priority for President Bush since his early days in office, and I commend the House of Representatives, particularly Chairman Barton and Ranking Member Dingell, for their efforts on this broad-based legislation that helps achieve that goal. Because of the hard work and thoughtful approach that went into crafting this bipartisan legislation, the House has passed a bill that will reduce energy demand, increase energy supplies, and update our aging energy

387

Statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on House passage of the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

House passage House passage of the GAS Act Statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on House passage of the GAS Act October 14, 2005 - 11:58am Addthis "I applaud the House passage of the Gasoline for America's Security (GAS) Act. Chairman Barton and his colleagues are to be commended for taking steps to address the high gasoline prices we face by seeking to expand our nation's refining capacity and fuel supply." "The President has identified new refining capacity as a critical need for our growing economy, and this bill includes measures to simplify the refinery permitting process and limit the proliferation of boutique fuels, while maintaining high environmental standards. The bill also takes concrete steps to act on the President's call for new refineries to be

388

Monitoring the Transport of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current at Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from an extensive moored instrument array and three hydrographic cruises are used to calculate a time series of the net transport through the upper 2500 m of the Drake Passage. The baroclinic geostrophic transport was monitored with heavily ...

T. Whitworth III

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Atmospheric Moisture Transport Moderates Climatic Response to the Opening of Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absence of the Drake Passage (DP) gateway in coupled models generally leads to vigorous Antarctic bottom water (AABW) formation, Antarctic warming, and the absence of North Atlantic deep-water (NADW) formation. Here the authors show that this ...

Willem P. Sijp; Matthew H. England

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Restratification of the Upper Ocean after the Passage of a Tropical Cyclone: A Numerical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of baroclinic instability in the restratification of the upper ocean after the passage of a tropical cyclone (TC) is determined by means of numerical simulations. Using a regional ocean model, the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), a ...

Wei Mei; Claudia Pasquero

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Near-Surface Eddy Heat and Momentum Fluxes in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present new estimates of the eddy momentum and heat fluxes from repeated high-resolution upper-ocean velocity and temperature observations in Drake Passage and interpret their role in the regional Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) ...

Yueng-Djern Lenn; Teresa K. Chereskin; Janet Sprintall; Julie L. McClean

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Vertical Structure of Kelvin Waves in the Indonesian Throughflow Exit Passages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface structure of intraseasonal Kelvin waves in two Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) exit passages is observed and characterized using velocity and temperature data from the 2004–06 International Nusantara Stratification and Transport (...

Kyla Drushka; Janet Sprintall; Sarah T. Gille; Irsan Brodjonegoro

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Control of Mode and Intermediate Water Mass Properties in Drake Passage by the Amundsen Sea Low  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of the physical properties of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the Drake Passage region is examined on time scales down to intraseasonal, within the 1969–2009 period. Both SAMW and AAIW ...

Sally E. Close; Alberto C. Naveira Garabato; Elaine L. McDonagh; Brian A. King; Martin Biuw; Lars Boehme

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2007, we used radio and acoustic telemetry to evaluate the migratory behavior, survival, mortality, and delay of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River and Lower Granite Reservoir. Monthly releases of radio-tagged fish ({approx}95/month) were made from May through October and releases of 122-149/month acoustic-tagged fish per month were made from August through October. We compared the size at release of our tagged fish to that which could have been obtained at the same time from in-river, beach seine collections made by the Nez Perce Tribe. Had we relied on in-river collections to obtain our fish, we would have obtained very few in June from the free-flowing river but by late July and August over 90% of collected fish in the transition zone were large enough for tagging. Detection probabilities of radio-tagged subyearlings were generally high ranging from 0.60 (SE=0.22) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the different study reaches and months. Lower detection probabilities were observed in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches where fewer fish were detected. Detection probabilities of acoustic-tagged subyearlings were also high and ranged from 0.86 (SE=0.09) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches during August through October. Estimates of the joint probability of migration and survival generally declined in a downstream direction for fish released from June through August. Estimates were lowest in the transition zone (the lower 7 km of the Clearwater River) for the June release and lowest in the confluence area for July and August releases. The joint probability of migration and survival in these reaches was higher for the September and October releases, and were similar to those of fish released in May. Both fish weight and length at tagging were significantly correlated with the joint probability of migrating and surviving for both radio-tagged and acoustic-tagged fish. For both tag types, fish that were heavier at tagging had a higher probability of successfully passing through the confluence (P=0.0050 for radio-tagged fish; P=0.0038 for acoustic-tagged fish). Radio-tagged fish with greater weight at tagging also had a higher probability of migrating and surviving through both the lower free-flowing reach (P=0.0497) and the transition zone (P=0.0007). Downstream movement rates of radio-tagged subyearlings were highest in free-flowing reaches in every month and decreased considerably with impoundment. Movement rates were slowest in the transition zone for the June and August release groups, and in the confluence reach for the July release group. For acoustic-tagged subyearlings, the slowest movement rates through the confluence and upper reservoir reaches were observed for the September release group. Radio-tagged fish released in August showed the greatest delay in the transition zone, while acoustic-tagged fish released in September showed the greatest delay in the transition zone and confluence reaches. Across the monthly release groups from July through September, the probability of delaying in the transition zone and surviving there declined throughout the study. All monthly release groups of radio-tagged subyearlings showed evidence of mortality within the transition zone, with final estimates (across the full 45-d detection period) ranging from 0.12 (SE not available) for the May release group to 0.58 (SE = 0.06) for the June release group. The May and September release groups tended to have lower mortality in the transition zone than the June, July, and August release groups. Live fish were primarily detected away from shore in the channel, whereas all dead fish were located along shorelines with most being located in the vicinity of the Memorial Bridge and immediately upstream. During the May detection period, before the implementation of summer flow augmentation, temperatures in the Clearwater River and Snake River arms of Lower Granite Reservoir and the downstream boundary of the confluence ranged from 8 to 17 C. During the June-August detection periods, however, temperatures in

Tiffan, Kenneth F. [U.S. Geological Survey; Connor, William P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; McMichael, Geoffrey A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

396

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol IOP Aerosol IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Stephen Schwartz For data sets, see below. Summary The Aerosol IOP was highlighted by the Gulfstream-1 aircraft flying clear-sky aerosol missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on clear sky radiation fields, with weather particularly favorable for these flights during the first and third weeks of the IOP. A secondary but important goal of this IOP was to fly cloudy-sky missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on cloud microphysics, and the effect of the microphysics on cloud optical properties. The Gulfstream obtained aerosol data in support of some of the

397

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1995 UAV IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UAV IOP UAV IOP Campaign Links ARM UAV Program Science Plan Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1995 UAV IOP 1995.09.01 - 1995.09.30 Lead Scientist : John Vitko For data sets, see below. Description ARESE, the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment, concluded a very successful deployment to Oklahoma on November 1, 1995. The purpose of this five week long campaign was to conduct a series of instrumented flights to measure the interaction of solar energy with clear and cloudy skies to provide additional insight into recent observations of enhanced absorption in cloudy atmospheres.As such, ARESE focused on two scientific objectives: (1) the direct measurement of the absorption of solar radiation by clear

398

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Shortwave IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave IOP Shortwave IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Shortwave IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Graeme Stephens For data sets, see below. Summary The Shortwave Radiation IOP, the first in a series of three such IOPs, was devoted to exploring the measurement of broadband and spectral radiation with an array of ground-based ARM and guest instrumentation, including the RCF suite, and with airborne radiometric sensors on all of the IOP aircraft. Whereas much of the debate on solar radiative transfer has centered on the topic of clouds, there are also a significant number of issues related to clear sky transfer that this IOP hoped to address. Two key aspects of the underlying problem relate to the baseline measurement of solar radiation

399

Cedar Falls Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Cedar Falls Utilities Place Iowa Utility Id 3203 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All-Electric Residential Service Residential Demand Space Heating Service Commercial Electric Street Lighting Service Lighting

400

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary Dams; 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) from 1 October 1999 to 30 September 2000. The work is part of studies to evaluate spawning of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) below the four lowermost Columbia River dams under the Bonneville Power Administration's Project 99-003. The purpose of this project is twofold: (1) Document the existence of fall chinook and chum populations spawning below Bonneville Dam (river mile (RM) 145), The Dalles Dam (RM 192), John Day Dam (RM 216), and McNary Dam (RM 292) (Figure 1) and estimate the size of these populations; and (2) Profile stocks for important population characteristics; including spawning time, genetic make-up, emergence timing, migration size and timing, and juvenile to adult survival rates.

van der Naald, Wayne; Spellman, Bryant; Clark, Roy (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "falls fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume VIII; New Model for Estimating Survival Probabilities and Residualization from a Release-Recapture Study of Fall Chinook Salmon Smolts in the Snake River, 1995 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

Standard release-recapture analysis using Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) models to estimate survival probabilities between hydroelectric facilities for Snake River fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) ignore the possibility of individual fish residualizing and completing their migration in the year following tagging.

Lowther, Alan B.; Skalski, John R. (University of Washington, School of Fisheries, Fisheries Research Institute, Seattle, WA)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Category:International Falls, MN | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MN MN Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "International Falls, MN" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 88 KB SVHospital International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVHospital Internation... 84 KB SVLargeHotel International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVLargeHotel Internati... 85 KB SVLargeOffice International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVLargeOffice Internat... 83 KB SVMediumOffice International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png

403

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips October 21, 2013 - 8:44am Addthis Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. This article will help you find strategies to help you save energy during the cool fall and cold winter months. Some of the tips below are free and can be used on a daily basis to increase your savings; others are simple and inexpensive actions you can take to ensure maximum savings through the winter. If you haven't already, conduct an energy assessment to find out where you

404

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips October 21, 2013 - 8:44am Addthis Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. This article will help you find strategies to help you save energy during the cool fall and cold winter months. Some of the tips below are free and can be used on a daily basis to increase your savings; others are simple and inexpensive actions you can take to ensure maximum savings through the winter. If you haven't already, conduct an energy assessment to find out where you

405

How Will You Save Energy This Fall? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will You Save Energy This Fall? Will You Save Energy This Fall? How Will You Save Energy This Fall? September 10, 2009 - 3:00am Addthis While summer is officially in full swing until later this month, Labor Day has come and gone and-for many Americans-the fall season has unofficially started. Fewer hours of sunlight and cooler temperatures mean you may already be thinking about how you'll save energy this fall. How will you save energy this fall? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles How Do You Save Energy in Your Apartment or Rental? How Should Energy Savers Use Facebook? How Do You Light Your Home Efficiently

406

Saving Energy as a Renter this Fall | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Energy as a Renter this Fall Saving Energy as a Renter this Fall Saving Energy as a Renter this Fall September 19, 2013 - 9:38am Addthis If you live in an apartment, you can still take some energy-saving steps this fall. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/buzbuzzer If you live in an apartment, you can still take some energy-saving steps this fall. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/buzbuzzer Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program How can I participate? Take some small actions, like using fans and unplugging electronics, to save energy this fall. A couple of weeks ago, my friend Rutherford told me that this month's electric bill for his three-bedroom apartment was $300. It was August, so I'm sure that was part of it, but, still - $300 for just one month?

407

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla habitat improvement program targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning,and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall Chinook and coho salmon. This report covers work accomplished by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation from April 1991 through May 1992. This program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Measure 704 (d)(1) 34.02) as partial mitigation for construction of hydroelectric dams and the subsequent losses of anadromous fish throughout the Columbia River system.

Scheeler, Carl A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperatur...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

409

American Falls, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon American Falls, Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

410

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Storage Site...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

411

The rise and fall of presidential power in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project explores the power dynamics within the Iranian political system, asking what accounts for the rise and fall of a president's power relative to… (more)

Jacobsen, Donavan.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Big Falls, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigFalls,Wisconsin&oldid227753" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...