Sample records for fall river rural

  1. Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc (Montana) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGerman AerospaceEfficiency Incentives andFVEFall River Rural

  2. Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGerman AerospaceEfficiency Incentives andFVEFall River

  3. RiverFalls,Wisconsin SolarinSmall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), which services approximately 5,800 customers, the largest being UW-RF.ii Together, the utility are solar (most are biogas and wind), the program has helped to raise awareness and interest in renewable energy within the community.v Bringing Solar to River Falls The success of the River Falls Renewable

  4. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Distributed Solar Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU), a member of WPPI Energy, offers a special energy purchase rate to its customers that generate electricity using solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The special...

  5. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU) offers a variety of rebates to business customers for implementing energy efficient equipment upgrades. Rebates are available for commercial lighting, central...

  6. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Energy Star Appliance Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU), in conjuction with the Wisconsin Focus on Energy program, offers a variety of rebates to residential electric customers for upgrading to energy efficient...

  7. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Renewable Energy Finance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU) offers loans of $2,500 - $50,000 to its residential customers for the installation of photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, geothermal, wind electric systems. The...

  8. LSRCP Response to ISRP Snake River Fall Chinook Program Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M & E needs necessary to obtain an ESA section 10 permit to operate Lyons Ferry Hatchery. LSRCP assumes that the Section 10 permit will be consistent with the Snake River Fall Chinook Recovery Plan when Plans (HGMPs) and received ESA Section 10 Permit coverage. 2. Evaluate hatchery/wild salmon interactions

  9. Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Nez Perce Tribe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Jay Hesse Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries salmon abundance and productivity have been and continue to be influenced by construction and operation related to productivity; (1) adult abundance, (2) hatchery programs, (3) management actions, and (4

  10. Fall Chinook Salmon Survival and Supplementation Studies in the Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, William D.; Connor, William P.; Arnsberg, Billy D.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, the National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Nez Perce Tribe completed the third year of research to investigate migrational characteristics of subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin.

  11. Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway, Kansas: Energy Resources

  12. Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F. [U.S. Geological Survey; Connor, William P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was initiated to provide empirical data and analyses on the dam passage timing, travel rate, survival, and life history variation of fall Chinook salmon that are produced in the Clearwater River. The area of interest for this study focuses on the lower four miles of the Clearwater River and its confluence with the Snake River because this is an area where many fish delay their seaward migration. The goal of the project is to increase our understanding of the environmental and biological factors that affect juvenile life history of fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River. The following summaries are provided for each of the individual chapters in this report.

  13. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Non-Profit Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU) provides matching rebates to non-profit customers who participate and receive rebates through the Focus On Energy program. Incentives are available on a range...

  14. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  15. OkanoganRiver Summer/FallChinookSalmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN (HGMP) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency/Operator: Watershed B.5 Tribal Incidental Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 98 Upper Columbia River Steelhead Table B.6

  16. Raft River Rural Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:b <RGSRadium Hot SpringsOpenRaft River

  17. Migration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Migration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener A thesis: Aquatic and Fishery Sciences #12;#12;University of Washington Abstract Migration and Bioenergetics are still poorly understood. This thesis describes a complex of individually-based bioenergetic

  18. White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume I..

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developed to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost ratio of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. 28 figs., 23 tabs.

  19. Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River, Annual Report 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Connor, William P.; Burge, Howard L.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted primarily in 1997 and 1998. This report communicates significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin.

  20. Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River During Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Richmond, Marshall C.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Fu, Tao

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10°C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir’s epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four lower Snake reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water’s surface, and during periods of low river discharge, often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The depth of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may also be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004 plus a brief one-week period in 2005 of Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite Reservoirs. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are sufficiently capable of matching diurnal and long term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the 3-D model Flow3-D. This model was used to better understand mixing processing and entrainment. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake discharge. Simulation results were also linked with the particle tracking model FINS to better understand alterations of integrated metrics due to alternative operation schemes. These findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir and may have a significant impact on the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

  1. Tracking Non-point Fecal Pollution in the Guadalupe River: Distinguishing Urban and Rural Influences upon Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Assistant Professor University of Houston - Victoria Non-point fecal pollution is a problem in water bodiesTracking Non-point Fecal Pollution in the Guadalupe River: Distinguishing Urban and Rural Influences upon Water Quality Matthew Boyett University of Houston - Victoria boyettmr@uhv.edu Dmitri Sobolev

  2. Redd Site Selection and Spawning Habitat Use by Fall Chinook Salmon, Hanford Reach, Columbia River : Final Report 1995 - 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1995 through 1998 on identifying the spawning habitat requirements of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The project investigated whether traditional spawning habitat models could be improved in order to make better predictions of available habitat for fall chinook salmon in the Snake River. Results suggest models could be improved if they used spawning area-specific, rather than river-specific, spawning characteristics; incorporated hyporheic discharge measurements; and gave further consideration to the geomorphic features that are present in the unconstrained segments of large alluvial rivers. Ultimately the recovery of endangered fall chinook salmon will depend on how well we are able to recreate the characteristics once common in alluvial floodplains of large rivers. The results from this research can be used to better define the relationship between these physical habitat characteristics and fall chinook salmon spawning site selection, and provide more efficient use of limited recovery resources. This report is divided into four chapters which were presented in the author's doctoral dissertation which he completed through the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. Each of the chapters has been published in peer reviewed journals or is currently under review. Chapter one is a conceptual spawning habitat model that describes how geomorphic features of river channels create hydraulic processes, including hyporheic flows, that influence where salmon spawn in unconstrained reaches of large mainstem alluvial rivers. Chapter two describes the comparison of the physical factors associated with fall chinook salmon redd clusters located at two sites within the Reach. Spatial point pattern analysis of redds showed that redd clusters averaged approximately 10 hectares in area and their locations were consistent from year to year. The tendency to spawn in clusters suggests fall chinook salmon's use of spawning habitat is highly selective. Hydraulic characteristics of the redd clusters were significantly different than the habitat surrounding them. Velocity and lateral slope of the river bottom were the most important habitat variables in predicting redd site selection. While these variables explained a large proportion of the variance in redd site selection (86 to 96%), some unmeasured factors still accounted for a small percentage of actual spawning site selection. Chapter three describes the results from an investigation into the hyporheic characteristics of the two spawning areas studied in chapter two. This investigation showed that the magnitude and chemical characteristics of hyporheic discharge were different between and within two spawning areas. Apparently, fall chinook salmon used chemical and physical cues from the discharge to locate spawning areas. Finally, chapter four describes a unique method that was developed to install piezometers into the cobble bed of the Columbia River.

  3. Spawning and abundance of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 1948--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Watson, D.G.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River provides the only major spawning habitat for the upriver bright (URB) race of fall chinook salmon in the mainstem Columbia River. Hanford Site biologists have conducted aerial surveys of spawning salmon in the Hanford Reach since 1948. This report summarizes data on fall chinook salmon spawning in the Hanford Reach and presents a discussion of factors that may affect population trends. Most data are limited to fisheries agency reports and other working documents. Fisheries management practices in the Columbia River system have changed rapidly over the last decade, particularly under requirements of the Pacific Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980. New information has been generated and included in this report. 75 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

    2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Previous Semi-Annual Technical Progress Reports presented the following: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Analyses of data conducted during the period from April 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003 are presented in this Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report. Report Revision No. 1 includes the additions or removals of text presented in the previous version of this report.

  5. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5)DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Analysis of data collected to date show that: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites, and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Data analysis focusing on relating the aerometric measurements to local and regional scale emissions of sources of primary and secondary fine particles using receptor-based air quality models will follow.

  6. Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 1999 and years previous. In an effort to provide this information to a wider audience, the individual chapters in this report have been submitted as manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals. These chapters communicate significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Abundance and timing of seaward migration of Snake River fall chinook salmon was indexed using passage data collected at Lower Granite Dam for five years. We used genetic analyses to determine the lineage of fish recaptured at Lower Granite Dam that had been previously PIT tagged. We then used discriminant analysis to determine run membership of PIT-tagged smolts that were not recaptured to enable us to calculate annual run composition and to compared early life history attributes of wild subyearling fall and spring chinook salmon. Because spring chinook salmon made up from 15.1 to 44.4% of the tagged subyearling smolts that were detected passing Lower Granite Dam, subyearling passage data at Lower Granite Dam can only be used to index fall chinook salmon smolt abundance and passage timing if genetic samples are taken to identify run membership of smolts. Otherwise, fall chinook salmon smolt abundance would be overestimated and timing of fall chinook salmon smolt passage would appear to be earlier and more protracted than is the case.

  7. Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River during Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Migration, 2002-2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, C.; Dibrani, B.; Richmond, M.; Bleich, M.; Titzler, P..; Fu, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10 C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir's epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water's surface and during periods of low river discharge often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The thickness (depth) of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004. Although temperature, and hence density, differences during flow augmentation periods between the Clearwater and Snake rivers were approximately equal (7-12 C) for all four years, the discharge ratio varied which resulted in significant differences in entrainment of cooler Clearwater River water into the Lower Granite Reservoir epilimnion. However, as a direct result of system management, Lower Granite Dam tailrace temperatures were maintained near 20 C during all years. Primary differences in the other three lower Snake River reservoirs were therefore a result of meteorological conditions and dam operations, which produced variations in wind setup and surface heating. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are capable of matching diurnal and long-term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic model Flow3D. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake river discharge. Simulation results were linked with the particle tracking model FINS to develop reservoir-integrated metrics that varied due to these alternative operation schemes. Findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir, which may also impact the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

  8. Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F. [U.S. Geological Survey; Connor, William P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; McMichael, Geoffrey A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, we used radio and acoustic telemetry to evaluate the migratory behavior, survival, mortality, and delay of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River and Lower Granite Reservoir. Monthly releases of radio-tagged fish ({approx}95/month) were made from May through October and releases of 122-149/month acoustic-tagged fish per month were made from August through October. We compared the size at release of our tagged fish to that which could have been obtained at the same time from in-river, beach seine collections made by the Nez Perce Tribe. Had we relied on in-river collections to obtain our fish, we would have obtained very few in June from the free-flowing river but by late July and August over 90% of collected fish in the transition zone were large enough for tagging. Detection probabilities of radio-tagged subyearlings were generally high ranging from 0.60 (SE=0.22) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the different study reaches and months. Lower detection probabilities were observed in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches where fewer fish were detected. Detection probabilities of acoustic-tagged subyearlings were also high and ranged from 0.86 (SE=0.09) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches during August through October. Estimates of the joint probability of migration and survival generally declined in a downstream direction for fish released from June through August. Estimates were lowest in the transition zone (the lower 7 km of the Clearwater River) for the June release and lowest in the confluence area for July and August releases. The joint probability of migration and survival in these reaches was higher for the September and October releases, and were similar to those of fish released in May. Both fish weight and length at tagging were significantly correlated with the joint probability of migrating and surviving for both radio-tagged and acoustic-tagged fish. For both tag types, fish that were heavier at tagging had a higher probability of successfully passing through the confluence (P=0.0050 for radio-tagged fish; P=0.0038 for acoustic-tagged fish). Radio-tagged fish with greater weight at tagging also had a higher probability of migrating and surviving through both the lower free-flowing reach (P=0.0497) and the transition zone (P=0.0007). Downstream movement rates of radio-tagged subyearlings were highest in free-flowing reaches in every month and decreased considerably with impoundment. Movement rates were slowest in the transition zone for the June and August release groups, and in the confluence reach for the July release group. For acoustic-tagged subyearlings, the slowest movement rates through the confluence and upper reservoir reaches were observed for the September release group. Radio-tagged fish released in August showed the greatest delay in the transition zone, while acoustic-tagged fish released in September showed the greatest delay in the transition zone and confluence reaches. Across the monthly release groups from July through September, the probability of delaying in the transition zone and surviving there declined throughout the study. All monthly release groups of radio-tagged subyearlings showed evidence of mortality within the transition zone, with final estimates (across the full 45-d detection period) ranging from 0.12 (SE not available) for the May release group to 0.58 (SE = 0.06) for the June release group. The May and September release groups tended to have lower mortality in the transition zone than the June, July, and August release groups. Live fish were primarily detected away from shore in the channel, whereas all dead fish were located along shorelines with most being located in the vicinity of the Memorial Bridge and immediately upstream. During the May detection period, before the implementation of summer flow augmentation, temperatures in the Clearwater River and Snake River arms of Lower Granite Reservoir and the downstream boundary of the confluence ranged from 8 to 17 C. During the June-August detection periods, however, temperatures in

  9. Effects of Hydroelectric Dam Operations on the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Spawning Habitat Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Arntzen, Evan V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Fish and Wildlife Program directed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The study evaluated the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat within the impounded lower Snake River. The objective of the research was to determine if hydroelectric dam operations could be modified, within existing system constraints (e.g., minimum to normal pool levels; without partial removal of a dam structure), to increase the amount of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the lower Snake River. Empirical and modeled physical habitat data were used to compare potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Snake River, under current and modified dam operations, with the analogous physical characteristics of an existing fall Chinook salmon spawning area in the Columbia River. The two Snake River study areas included the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Highway 12 bridge and the Lower Granite Dam tailrace downstream approximately 12 river kilometers. These areas represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We used a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats was the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat use data, including water depth, velocity, substrate size and channelbed slope, from the Wanapum reference area were used to define spawning habitat suitability based on these variables. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat suitability of the Snake River study areas was estimated by applying the Wanapum reference reach habitat suitability criteria to measured and modeled habitat data from the Snake River study areas. Channel morphology data from the Wanapum reference reach and the Snake River study areas were evaluated to identify geomorphically suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The results of this study indicate that a majority of the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas contain suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat under existing hydrosystem operations. However, a large majority of the currently available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas is of low quality. The potential for increasing, through modifications to hydrosystem operations (i.e., minimum pool elevation of the next downstream dam), the quantity or quality of fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat appears to be limited. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor study area decreased as the McNary Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Lower Granite study area increased as the Little Goose Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation; however, 97% of the available habitat was categorized within the range of lowest quality. In both the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas, water velocity appears to be more of a limiting factor than water depth for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with both study areas dominated by low-magnitude water velocity. The geomorphic suitability of both study areas appears to be compromised for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with the Ice Harbor study area lacking significant bedforms along the longitudinal thalweg profile and the Lower Granite study area lacking cross-sectional topographic diversity. To increase the quantity of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study area, modifications to hydroelectric dam operations beyond those evaluated in this study likely would be necessary. M

  10. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

  11. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

  12. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spawning ground surveys were conducted in 1994 as part of a five year study of Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawyacha begun in 1991. Observations of fall chinook salmon spawning in the Snake River were limited to infrequent aerial red counts in the years prior to 1987. From 1987-1990, red counts were made on a limited basis by an interagency team and reported by the Washington Department of Fisheries. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and other cooperating agencies and organizations, expanded the scope of spawning ground surveys to include: (1) additional aerial surveys to improve red counts and provide data on the timing of spawning; (2) the validation (ground truthing) of red counts from aerial surveys to improve count accuracy; (3) underwater searches to locate reds in water too deep to allow detection from the air; and (4) bathymetric mapping of spawning sites for characterizing spawning habitat. This document is the 1994 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon. The studies were undertaken because of the growing concern about the declining salmon population in the Snake River basin.

  13. EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide federal funding to Flambeau River Biofuels (FRB) to construct and operate a biomass-to-liquid biorefinery in Park Falls, Wisconsin, on property currently used by Flambeau Rivers Paper, LLC (FRP) for a pulp and paper mill and Johnson Timber Corporation's (JTC) Summit Lake Yard for timber storage. This project would design a biorefinery which would produce up to 1,150 barrels per day (bpd) of clean syncrude. The biorefinery would also supply steam to the FRP mill, meeting the majority of the mill's steam demand and reducing or eliminating the need for the existing biomass/coal-fired boiler. The biorefinery would also include a steam turbine generator that will produce "green" electrical power for use by the biorefinery or for sale to the electric utility.

  14. Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas, 2002-2003 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, T.; Geist, D.; Arntzen, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall Chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period (mid- to late-summer) when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River Chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations (e.g., summer flow augmentation) to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile Chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall Chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. This was a pilot-scale study to evaluate these relationships under existing operations of Hells Canyon Dam (i.e., without any prescribed manipulations of river discharge) during the 2002-2003 water year. The project was initiated in the context of examining the potential for improving juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon survival by modifying the discharge operations of Hells Canyon Dam. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project at index sites throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The HCR extends from Hells Canyon Dam (river kilometer [rkm] 399) downstream to the upper end of Lower Granite Reservoir near rkm 240. We randomly selected 14 fall Chinook salmon spawning locations as study sites, which represents 25% of the most used spawning areas throughout the HCR. Interactions between river water and pore water within the riverbed (i.e., hyporheic zone) at each site were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. Surrounding the piezometer cluster at each site were 3 artificial egg pockets. In mid-November 2002, early-eyed stage fall Chinook salmon eggs were placed inside of perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes, along with a temperature data logger, and buried within the egg pockets. Fall Chinook salmon eggs were also incubated in the laboratory for the purpose of developing growth curves that could be used as indicators of emergence timing. The effects of discharge on vertical hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed were inferred from measured temperature gradients between the river and riverbed, and the application of a numerical model. The hydrologic regime during the 2002-2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only 2 of 14 sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude

  15. The transient response of bedrock river networks to sudden base level fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosby, Benjamin T. (Benjamin Thomas)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a change in the factors that determine landscape form, a transient signal of adjustment propagates through the river network, progressively adjusting channels and hillslopes to the new conditions. When conditions ...

  16. Conceptual Spawning Habitat Model to Aid in ESA Recovery Plans for Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop a spawning habitat model that can be used to determine the physical habitat factors that are necessary to define the production potential for fall chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Columbia River's Hanford Reach and Snake River. This project addresses RPA 155 in the NMFS 2000 Biological Opinion: Action 155: BPA, working with BOR, the Corps, EPA, and USGS, shall develop a program to: (1) Identify mainstem habitat sampling reaches, survey conditions, describe cause-and-effect relationships, and identify research needs; (2) Develop improvement plans for all mainstem reaches; and (3) Initiate improvements in three mainstem reaches. During FY 2003 we continued to collect and analyze information on fall chinook salmon spawning habitat characteristics in the Hanford Reach that will be used to address RPA 155, i.e., items 1-3 above. For example, in FY 2003: (1) We continued to survey spawning habitat in the Hanford Reach and develop a 2-dimensional hydraulic and habitat model that will be capable of predicting suitability of fall chinook salmon habitat in the Hanford Reach; (2) Monitor how hydro operations altered the physical and chemical characteristics of the river and the hyporheic zone within fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach; (3) Published a paper on the impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon (Dauble et al. 2003). This paper was made possible with data collected on this project; (4) Continued to analyze data collected in previous years that will ultimately be used to identify cause-and-effect relationships and identify research needs that will assist managers in the improvement of fall chinook habitat quality in main-stem reaches. During FY 2004 we plan to: (1) Complete preliminary reporting and submit papers based on the results of the project through FY 2004. Although we have proposed additional analysis of data be conducted in FY 2005, we anticipate a significant number of key papers being prepared and submitted in FY 2004 which will go toward identifying the data gaps this RPA is intended to address; (2) Make available data from this project for use on Project 2003-038-00 ('Evaluate restoration potential of Snake River fall chinook salmon') which is a BPA-funded project that will start in FY 2004; and (3) Present results of our work at regional and national meetings in order to facilitate technology transfer and information sharing. The objective of this project is to define the production potential of fall chinook salmon that spawn in the Hanford Reach. We will provide fisheries and resource managers with the information they need to determine if the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is indeed healthy, and whether this population will be capable of seeding other satellite populations in the future. We will accomplish this purpose by continuing our on-going research at determining the carrying capacity of the Hanford Reach for producing fall chinook salmon under current operational scenarios, and then begin an assessment of whether the Reach is functioning as a model of a normative river as is widely believed. The product of our research will be a better understanding of the key habitat features for mainstem populations of anadromous salmonids, as well as a better understanding of the measures that must be taken to ensure long-term protection of the Hanford Reach fall chinook population. Although the project was originally funded in FY 1994, it was significantly redefined in FY 2000. At that time five tasks were proposed to accomplish the project objective. The purpose of this progress report is to briefly describe the activities that have been completed on each of the five tasks from FY 2000 through FY 2003.

  17. Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

  18. Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, William P.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

  19. Geochemical characteristics of the Bulgarmarse Granite of the Fall River Pluton in the Avalonian Superterrane of southeastern New England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, C.I.; Puffer, J.H. (Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 600 m.y. Bulgarmarsh Granite of the Fall River Pluton crops out along the SE margin of the Pennsylvanian-age Narragansett Basin in the Dedham terrane of the New England Avalonian Superterrane. The Bulgarmarsh is a coarse-grained, quartz-rich, very leucooratic granite, in which mafic minerals, generally less than 5--8%, occur chiefly as chlorite, biotite and garnet disequilibrium intergrowths. Most of the granite is very slightly deformed, but there are many localized zones of deformation, both brittle and plastic, that vary in degree of intensity. The Bulgarmarsh intrudes Basin margin metavolcanics similar to those of Price Neck Formation that crop out within the Basin in Newport and on Gould Island. The Bulgarmarsh Granite has many of the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of an A-type granite. Its geochemistry places it in the post-orogenic classification of Maniar and Piccoli (1989). New major and minor element geochemical data clearly discriminate between the Bulgarmarsh Granite and the adjacent calc-alkaline Metacom Granite Gneiss. Avalonian Orogeny, occupying a place in geologic history similar to that of the Newport Granite.

  20. Wydzga, M.A., M.A. Hassan, J.G. Venditti, T. Dunne (2005), Can interlocked grains reduce the mobility of gravel bed rivers?, Eos Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract H53B-0462.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the mobility of gravel bed rivers?, Eos Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract H53B-0462. Can interlocked grains reduce the mobility of gravel bed rivers? M.A. Wydzga1 , M.A. Hassan2 , J.G. Venditti3 , T of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Channel stability of gravel

  1. Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River; 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, William P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2000, 2001, and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River basin. The report is divided into sections and self-standing chapters. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2001. The Journal Manuscripts section includes complete copies of papers submitted or published during 2000 and 2001 that were not included in previous annual reports. Publication is a high priority for this project because it provides our results to a wide audience, it ensures that our work meets high scientific standards, and we believe that it is a necessary obligation of a research project. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers co-authored by personnel of project 199102900 that were published from 1998 to 2001.

  2. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day.

  3. Evaluation of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Stranding on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, John

    2002-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has been contracted through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) to perform an evaluation of juvenile fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) stranding on the Hanford Reach. The evaluation, in the third year of a multi-year study, has been developed to assess the impacts of water fluctuations from Priest Rapids Dam on rearing juvenile fall chinook salmon, other fishes, and benthic macroinvertebrates of the Hanford Reach. This document provides the results of the 1999 field season.

  4. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

    2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This semi-annual Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 2003 through March 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

  5. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

    2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This Final Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 1998 through December 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

  6. Small-scale hydroelectric power demonstration project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. , Cherokee Falls Hydroelectric Project: Final technical and construction cost report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to fulfill part of the requirement of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement Number FC07-80ID12125 of the Small Scale Hydropower Program and is submitted on behalf of the Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. of Gaffney, South Carolina. The project was initially studied in 1978 with construction commencing in January, 1984. The primary work elements of the project consisted of the renovation of an existing dam and a new powerhouse. The dam was rehabilitated and flashboards were installed along the top of the structure. The powerhouse was supplied with a single open pit turbine and a new substation was constructed. The project generated power in December of 1985 but has been plagued with numerous problems compounded by a flood in March, 1987 causing extensive damages. The flood of March, 1987 resulted in filing of litigative action by the developers against their project managers and engineers which has yet to reach settlement and will possibly culminate in court sometime during the fall of 1988.

  7. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The report discusses the following conclusions: (1) The TEOM equipment performed as well as the sequential filter samplers in accounting for ambient PM{sub 2.5} levels; however, the FRM-obtained data was consistently lower than the averages from the TEOM/DRI-SFS measurements; (2) The trending in the PM{sub 2.5} levels was similar for Lawrenceville and Holbrook, which represent an urban and a rural site sixty-five miles apart. This implies that the PM{sub 2.5} levels appear to be impacted more by regional than by local effects; (3) The absolute median PM{sub 2.5} levels were slightly higher for Lawrenceville than for Holbrook, implying that local urban environmental contributions had a minor but measurable effect on total PM{sub 2.5} mass concentration; (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels were consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels observed in the spring and fall; (5) Sulfate levels predominated in the speciation data obtained from both the Holbrook and the Lawrenceville sites during winter and summer intensive sampling. Sulfate level measured at Holbrook were higher than those taken at Lawrenceville regardless of the season; (6) Ammonium levels remained relatively constant between seasons and between sites; (7) Nitrate levels measured at Lawrenceville were higher than those measured at Holbrook during winter intensive sampling. Nitrate levels measured during the summer intensive period were found to be very low at both locations; (8) In general, the predominant inorganic fraction of the samples analyzed could be described as being composed of a mixture of ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate with minor amounts of ammonium nitrate; (9) The PM10 fraction had a larger percentage of geological material and a smaller percentage of condensable material (ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate and total carbon species) than the PM{sub 2.5} fraction for samples collected in winter at Lawrenceville; and (10) Most high PM{sub 2.5} episodes occurred when the predominating wind direction was from the South-West. (11) Plots of ozone vs. NO{sub x} suggest chemical reaction between these molecules since a high concentration of one always results in a low concentration of the other. The analysis of the acquired data has so far addressed three of the four scientific questions originally posed. More data analysis is on-going including the correlation between O{sub 3} and PM{sub 2.5} levels and the correlation of mass data with meteorological observations.

  8. Survival of Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Free-flowing Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs in 2003 and from McNary Dam Tailrace to John Day Dam Tailrace in the Columbia River from 1999 to 2002, 1999-2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, William D.; Axel, Gordon A.; Smith, Steven G. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results from an ongoing study of survival and travel time of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Snake River during 2003 and in the Columbia River during 1999-2002. Earlier years of the study included serial releases of PIT-tagged hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon upstream from Lower Granite Dam, but these were discontinued in 2003. Instead, we estimated survival from a large number of PIT-tagged fish released upstream from Lower Granite Dam to evaluate transportation from Snake River Dams. During late May and early June 2003, 68,572 hatchery-reared subyearling fall Chinook salmon were PIT tagged at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, trucked upstream, acclimated, and released at Couse Creek and Pittsburg Landing in the free-flowing Snake River. We estimated survival for these fish from release to Lower Granite Dam tailrace. In comparison to wild subyearling fall Chinook salmon PIT tagged and released in the free-flowing Snake River, the hatchery fish we released traveled faster and had higher survival to Lower Granite Dam, likely because of their larger size at release. For fish left in the river to migrate we estimated survival from Lower Granite Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace. Each year, a small proportion of fish released are not detected until the following spring. However, the number of fish released in 2003 that overwintered in the river and were detected as they migrated seaward as yearlings in 2004 was small (<1.0%) and had minimal effect on survival estimates. We evaluated a prototype floating PIT-tag detector deployed upstream from Lower Granite reservoir to collect data for use in partitioning travel time and survival between free-flowing and reservoir habitats. The floating detector performed poorly, detecting only 27 PIT tags in 340 h of operation from a targeted release of 68,572; far too few to partition travel time and survival between habitats. We collected river-run subyearling Chinook salmon (mostly wild fish from the Hanford Reach) at McNary Dam, PIT tagged them, and released them to the tailrace as part of an evaluation of transportation from McNary Dam in 2002. Estimated survival in 2002 from the tailrace of McNary Dam to the tailrace of John Day Dam was 0.746 (s.e. 0.036). For migration years 1999-2002, we found that in the reach from McNary to John Day Dam reach, travel time was shorter (migration rate was greater) and survival probabilities were greater when flow volume was greater. Survival was also correlated with water temperature: warmer water was associated with decreased survival, and there was an apparent survival threshold at about 19.3 C (above this temperature survival decreased substantially).

  9. Type B Investigation Board Report Worker Fall from Shoring/Scaffolding...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Scaffolding Structure at the Savannah River Site Tritium Extraction Facility - Construction Site April 2, 2002 SAVANNAH RIVER SITE OFFICE MAY 2002 Worker Fall from Shoring...

  10. Characterization of submicron aerosols at a rural site in Pearl River Delta of China using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Jesse

    The Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in South China is one of the most economically developed regions in China, but it is also noted for its severe air pollution due to industrial/metropolitan emissions. In order to continuously ...

  11. Salt River Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salt River Electric serves as the rural electric provider in Kentucky's Bullitt, Nelson, Spencer, and Washington counties. Residential customers are eligible for a variety of cash incentives for...

  12. Comparisons of cat and dog rabies vaccination rates between epizootic to non-epizootic counties and urban to rural counties in the state of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin-Harborth, Michelle Lynn

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between urban and rural areas were also done because the majority of the epizootic counties fall into rural counties. Samples of vaccinated cats and dogs with Zoonotic Incident Records that compared the epizootic to non-epizootic counties and urban...

  13. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS), LLC, related to a Worker Fall from a Scaffold in the K-Area Complex at the Savannah River Site On November 9, 2012, the U.S. Department of...

  14. Evaluation of Delisting Criteria and Rebuilding Schedules for Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook, Fall Chinook and Sockeye Salmon : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 10 of 11.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, Steven P.; Neeley, Doug

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a framework for distinguishing healthy and threatened populations, and we analyze specific criteria by which these terms can be measured for threatened populations of salmon in the Snake River. We review reports and analyze existing data on listed populations of salmon in the Snake River to establish a framework for two stages of the recovery process: (1) defining de-listing criteria, and (2) estimating the percentage increase in survival that will be necessary for recovery of the population within specified time frames, given the de-listing criteria that must be achieved. We develop and apply a simplified population model to estimate the percentage improvement in survival that will be necessary to achieve different rates of recovery. We considered five main concepts identifying de-listing criteria: (1) minimum population size, (2) rates of population change, (3) number of population subunits, (4) survival rates, and (5) driving variables. In considering minimum population size, we conclude that high variation in survival rates poses a substantially greater probability of causing extinction than does loss of genetic variation. Distinct population subunits exist and affect both the genetic variability of the population and the dynamics of population decline and growth. We distinguish between two types of population subunits, (1) genetic and (2) geographic, and we give examples of their effects on population recovery.

  15. Fall Webworm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ree, Bill

    2004-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fall webworm is a common pest of trees and shrubs. This insect produces unsightly webs, and repeated infestations can damage plants. Control methods are most successful when one understands the pest's life cycle. This publication suggests...

  16. Red River Valley REA- Heat Pump Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red River Valley Rural Electric Association (RRVREA) offers a loan program to its members for air-source and geothermal heat pumps. Loans are available for geothermal heat pumps at a 5% fixed...

  17. Microgrids for Rural Electrification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microgrids for Rural Electrification: A critical review of best practices based on seven case Electrification Microgrids for Rural Electrification: A critical review of best practices based on seven case Mellon University University of California, Berkeley #12;Microgrids for Rural Electrification i Dan

  18. Tell President Obama About Coal River Mountain Coal River Mountain and the Heathrow Airport runway remind me how important it is to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Tell President Obama About Coal River Mountain Coal River Mountain and the Heathrow Airport runway remind me how important it is to keep our eye on the ball. Coal River Mountain is the site of an absurdity. I learned about Coal River Mountain from students at Virginia Tech last fall. They were concerned

  19. EIS-0397: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to modify funding to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, WA. The proposed project would help BPA meet its off-site mitigation responsibilities for anadromous fish affected by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System and increase overall fish production in the Columbia Basin.

  20. The river model of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. S. Hamilton; Jason P. Lisle

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an under-appreciated way to conceptualize stationary black holes, which we call the river model. The river model is mathematically sound, yet simple enough that the basic picture can be understood by non-experts. %that can by understood by non-experts. In the river model, space itself flows like a river through a flat background, while objects move through the river according to the rules of special relativity. In a spherical black hole, the river of space falls into the black hole at the Newtonian escape velocity, hitting the speed of light at the horizon. Inside the horizon, the river flows inward faster than light, carrying everything with it. We show that the river model works also for rotating (Kerr-Newman) black holes, though with a surprising twist. As in the spherical case, the river of space can be regarded as moving through a flat background. However, the river does not spiral inward, as one might have anticipated, but rather falls inward with no azimuthal swirl at all. Instead, the river has at each point not only a velocity but also a rotation, or twist. That is, the river has a Lorentz structure, characterized by six numbers (velocity and rotation), not just three (velocity). As an object moves through the river, it changes its velocity and rotation in response to tidal changes in the velocity and twist of the river along its path. An explicit expression is given for the river field, a six-component bivector field that encodes the velocity and twist of the river at each point, and that encapsulates all the properties of a stationary rotating black hole.

  1. Fall 2013 945 277 Fall 2013 190 115 Fall 2012 957 150 Fall 2012 158 41

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    -122010-112009-102008-092007-082006-072005-062004-052003-04 Degrees Awarded Certificate/ Associate Bachelor Graduate 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Fall 2013 Fall 2012

  2. Rural Health Option The Rural Health Option requires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Rural Health Option The Rural Health Option requires: Membership in StORM Club, the Students include up to 3 sites/3physician-mentors Enrollment into BOTH rural health electives for a total of 2.sumner@okstate.edu) o Spring: Perspectives in Rural Health for OMSI or OMSII (or OMSIII with special permission) CLME

  3. AGU Fall Meeting 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Geophysical Union's 47th Annual Fall Meeting will showcase groundbreaking research in the geosciences.

  4. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  5. Alaska Rural Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alaska Rural Energy Conference is a three-day event offering a large variety of technical sessions covering new and ongoing energy projects in Alaska, as well as new technologies and needs for...

  6. Rural Innovation Fund (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fund provides capital to early-stage technology companies located in rural areas of Kentucky. Companies may apply for a $30,000 grant or an investment up to $100,000.

  7. dukenvironmentNICHOLAS SCHOOL OF THE ENVIRONMENT FALL 2009 HUDS NRIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    dukenvironmentNICHOLAS SCHOOL OF THE ENVIRONMENT FALL 2009 HUDS NRIVER THE DREDGING OF THE PG 2 #12;features The Dredging of the Hudson River Two Associated with the Nicholas School Play a Role

  8. THOMASSIN et al.: IDENTIFICATION OF A RIVER REACH BY A BAYESIAN APPROACH 1 Identification of a Managed River Reach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -delay estimation, of a river reach managed to produce hydroelectric power. Difficulties lie in the obligation risks or fall-off in hydroelectric power production, the implementation of experimental protocols, the control stabilization [13]. This is particularly true for cascaded systems like run-of-river hydroelectric

  9. The State and Rural Development in Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nwosu, Nereus I.A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to benefit from rural electrification programme. The BenueInspection Team on rural electrification, Professor Nduka to

  10. Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

  11. Rural Knowledge Clusters: Innovation and Vitality in America's Rural Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Summary 1 I. Context: The Challenge of Rural Community Vitality in a Knowledge-Based Global Economy 5 II challenges to prosperity and vitality in a knowledge-based global economy. Traditional sources of rural Minnesota 65 Appendix C: About the Project, "Globalization and Knowledge Clusters for Rural America" 73

  12. Electronic Out-fall Inspection Application - 12007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weymouth, A Kent III; Pham, Minh; Messick, Chuck [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 2009 an exciting opportunity was presented to the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) team at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS maintenance group was directed to maintain all Out-falls on Site, increasing their workload from 75 to 183 out-falls with no additional resources. The existing out-fall inspection system consisted of inspections performed manually and documented via paper trail. The inspections were closed out upon completion of activities and placed in file cabinets with no central location for tracking/trending maintenance activities. A platform for meeting new improvements required for documentation by the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) out-fall permits was needed to replace this current system that had been in place since the 1980's. This was accomplished by building a geographically aware electronic application that improved reliability of site out-fall maintenance and ensured consistent standards were maintained for environmental excellence and worker efficiency. Inspections are now performed via tablet and uploaded to a central point. Work orders are completed and closed either in the field using tablets (mobile application) or in their offices (via web portal) using PCs. And finally completed work orders are now stored in a central database allowing trending of maintenance activities. (authors)

  13. Sector reform impact on rural drinking water schemes -A case study from Raigad district in Maharashtra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    of India (GoI) policy and its influence on a subject, viz., water, which falls within the state's purview policy in Maharashtra. We observe that compared to what is reflected in the national rural drinking water unchanged in spite of the changes in policy regimes. We find that poor capacity and expertise of state

  14. Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems In a technical session at the 2011 NACE conference, Dennis Foderberg of SEH Inc. discussed intelligent transportation systems (ITS) developed by SEH in collaboration with Network Transportation Technologies, Inc. These systems address the problem of crashes on low-volume roads

  15. Energy requirements for rural development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.W.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study on the role of energy in the development of rural areas was originally conducted in the spring and summer of 1985. It was intended to serve as a background paper for the preparation of a program plan for the Office of Energy of the United States Agency for International Development. As such it begins with a brief overview of how rural development fits into national development, then offers a comprehensive framework for thinking about rural development in particular and the energy implications of the various components of rural development. Agriculture naturally comes to mind when rural areas are mentioned, but industry is an important component of rural activity as well. Consequently, both agricultural and nonagricultural energy use is discussed. Modernization of rural areas will change household, as well as production, energy use. However, household energy use is a veritable subject in its own right, with a large literature. Consequently, that topic is discussed in less detail than the production energy topics.

  16. Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the...

  17. Botswanafeaturing the VICTORIA FALLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    .alumni.jhu.edu AUGUST 6-19, 2015 #12;Victoria Falls N A T U R A L B E A U T Y | B O U N T I F U L W I L D L I F E | R IBotswanafeaturing the OKAVANGO DELTA plus VICTORIA FALLS AHI: 800-323-7373 www'll begin our journey with a visit to powerful Victoria Falls in Zambia, where you will take a sunset cruise

  18. Topical Lunch Robert Howarth "Energy, Agriculture, and Environment in Rural New York."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    , and Marcellus shale gas. - Target areas: Susquehanna River Basin (affecting Chesapeake Bay), Finger Lakes, rural to CAFOs · Marcellus shale gas development (water quality, particularly as it relates to TMDL; greenhouse management practices, in context of meeting TMDL · Marcellus shale gas water quality and relation to TMDL

  19. Rural Viability Index: A Tool for Assessing Rural Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearden, Christi; Cruz, Nelda; Heinsohn, Heidi; Kuzaro, Jami; Norton, Keller; Richardson, Willis; Wood, Meghan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rural Viability Index: A Tool for Assessing Rural Communities Researchers: Christi Bearden Nelda Cruz Heidi Heinsohn Jami Kuzaro Keller Norton Willis Richardson Meghan Wood Deborah L. Kerr, Ph.D., Advisor This project... for the limited resources of government. Especially in this period of difficult budget restrictions, public officials can only fund the projects that will produce the most for their communities. The Rural Viability Index is designed to provide public...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -Elk River Reactor -Texas Falls City,

  1. Fact Sheet - The Snake River Dam Study-Then and Now - November...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 2002, evaluated four alternatives to help Snake River fall chinook get through the dams. The independent peer-reviewed study concluded that dam breaching by itself would not...

  2. Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development Assistance Webinar Rural Development Energy Audit & Renewable Energy Development Assistance Webinar January 21, 2015...

  3. Rural Business Energy Efficiency Improvement Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maryland Agricultural and Resource Based Industry Development Corporation (MARBIDCO) offers low interest loans for energy efficiency improvements to farms and rural businesses through the Rural...

  4. WINDExchange: Rural Communities

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout Printable VersionNewsRural

  5. NWHA Fall Workshop & Tour

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This year’s Fall Regional Workshop on October 30 will focus on extending the longevity of our legacy hydropower projects through upgrades, refurbishment and life extensions, while meeting needs of...

  6. Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

  7. EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, as co-lead Federal agencies, prepared this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to operate Albeni Falls dam during the winter months (approximately December 15th to March 31st) and determine whether the existing Columbia River System Operation Review EIS (DOE/EIS-0170) is adequate or a supplemental or new EIS is required.

  8. EIS-0156: Cowlitz Falls Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of constructing and operating a proposed 70-megawatt hydroelectric dam and electrical infrastructure on the Cowlitz River near Morton and Randle, Washington. The U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration adopted this statement on 12/6/1990 to fulfil its National Environmental Policy Act requirement for its proposed action to acquire the power output from the Cowlitz Falls Hydroelectric Project.

  9. Red River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

  10. Barriers to Electrification for "Under Grid" Households in Rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefits most from rural electrification? Evidence in India.The Effects of Rural Electrification on Employment: NewSpatial Impact of the Rural Electrification Administration

  11. Repensar lo rural ante la globalización: La sociedad civil migrante

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jonathan A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005 migración y desarrollo repensar lo rural ante la2005 migración y desarrollo repensar lo rural ante la2005 migración y desarrollo repensar lo rural ante la

  12. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  13. Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as “outstanding...

  14. Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee River, is considered a protected area, where...

  15. Rural Development Advantage Program (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rural Development Advantage Program provides qualified businesses with refundable tax incentives for projects that create two new jobs and invest $125,000 in counties with less than 15,000...

  16. Rural Schools' Mental Health Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Steven W.; Lohmeier, Jill H.; Niileksela, Christopher Robert; Oeth, Jessica

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rural schools often can not provide the same access to mental health service as schools in larger population areas can.. Understanding the implications of these sometimes limited services is important in overcoming barriers to adequate services...

  17. Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project: Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alldredge, Blake; Kalisek, Danielle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coming soon. Native Grassland Restoration in the Middle Trinity River Basin was published early in August #30;#29;#28;#30; for landowners in the Blackland Prairie and Post Oak Savannah ecoregions. Publications currently available in the Texas A...20 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Blake Alldredge and Danielle Kalisek Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin Fall 2012 tx H2O 21 ] The shores of Lake...

  18. Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, R. A.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

  19. Essays on rural-urban migration in hinterland China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Lei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marriage Rates in Rural China . . . . . . . . . . .Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . . . . . .and Rural-Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . 1.

  20. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

  1. EIS-0114: Fall River/Lower Valley Transmission System Reinforcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration developed this EIS to explore reinforcing the electrical transmission system in southeastern Idaho by adding a 161-kilovolt partly single- and double-circuit line from the Goshen to Drummond Substations in order to maintain reliable electric service in the area.

  2. City of Black River Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCity of Aplington, Iowa

  3. Fall River County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump40279°,

  4. City of Thief River Falls, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCity of Spencer, IowaCitySuperior,Tenakee

  5. City of River Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity of Okolona,Plummer, IdahoCity ofRed Bud,CityCity

  6. BULLETIN OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY / April 2002Zhou, Byrne / RURAL SUSTAINABILITY Renewable Energy for Rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    electrification is now and will remain an essential element for rural development in China and other developingBULLETIN OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY / April 2002Zhou, Byrne / RURAL SUSTAINABILITY Renewable Energy for Rural Sustainability: Lessons From China Aiming Zhou John Byrne University of Delaware Rural

  7. AFBC power systems for rural villages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, N.L. Jr. [Doyon Ltd., Fairbanks, AK (United States); Bonk, D.L. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center; DeLallo, M.R. Jr. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A project definition study was completed for a 500 kWe to 1 MWe FBC power plant for electrical and process heat production in a remote Alaskan application. The plant will utilize advanced atmospheric fluidized bed combustion technology as the primary steam generator co-firing an Alaskan subbituminous coal, local limestone and municipal solid waste. To develop FBC performance characteristics for input to the performance modeling and project definition study, test firing of Little Tonzona coal and McGrath limestone in an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor of a scale suitable for incorporation into a small power plant facility was completed. The test data generated includes primary emissions analyses, bed and fly ash analyses, and test unit operational conditions (pressure, bed height, gas velocity and bed temperature). Combustion efficiency as carbon conversion, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, and limestone utilization were then estimated from the above data. To ensure site conditions would model those found in Alaska, the town of McGrath, Alaska in the region of the upper Kushokwim river valley was selected as a potential plant site. McGrath, like many remote Alaskan villages is dependent upon costly oil-fired diesel power generation and annual subsidy payment from the State of Alaska, through the Power Cost Equalization Program (PCE), to provide village residents with affordable electricity. In the near future rural village utilities will be faced with increased cost of electricity due to transportation, handling, and storage costs of diesel fuel and reduction of funds from the PCE.

  8. Rural Job Tax Credit Program (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rural Job Tax Credit Program is an incentive for businesses located within one of the 36-designated Qualified Rural Areas to create new jobs. The tax credit ranges from $1000 to $1500 per...

  9. Alaska Village Initiatives Rural Business Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Alaska Village Initiative, the 24th Annual Rural Small Business Conference brings together rural businesses and leaders to provide them with networking opportunities, training, and technical information.

  10. Designing sanitation projects in rural Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Jonathan (Jonathan Ho Yin)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Providing sanitation to rural areas in Ghana remains a huge challenge. Government funding is scarce while many international donor projects are ineffective. This thesis explores the difficulties with rural sanitation ...

  11. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, Bruce

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, were located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, was located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2003, a total of 2,138,391 fish weighing 66,201 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 437,633 yearling fish weighing 44,330 pounds and 1,700,758 sub-yearling fish weighing 21,871 pounds.

  12. USDA Rural Business Enterprise Grant (RBEG) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Request for Proposals for funding to support the development of small and emerging private business enterprises in rural Alaska

  13. Migratory Behavior of Adult Spring Chinook Salmon in the Willamette River and its Tributaries: Completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreck, Carl B.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Migration patterns of adult spring chinook salmon above Willamette Falls differed depending on when the fish passed the Falls, with considerable among-fish variability. Early-run fish often terminated their migration for extended periods of time, in association with increased flows and decreased temperatures. Mid-run fish tended to migrate steadily upstream at a rate of 30-40 km/day. Late-run fish frequently ceased migrating or fell back downstream after migrating 10-200 km up the Willamette River or its tributaries; this appeared to be associated with warming water during summer and resulted in considerable mortality. Up to 40% of the adult salmon entering the Willamette River System above Willamette Falls (i.e. counted at the ladder) may die before reaching upriver spawning areas. Up to 10% of the fish passing up over Willamette Falls may fall-back below the Falls; some migrate to the Columbia River or lower Willamette River tributaries. If rearing conditions at hatcheries affect timing of adult returns because of different juvenile development rates and improper timing of smolt releases, then differential mortality in the freshwater segment of the adult migrations may confound interpretation of studies evaluating rearing practices.

  14. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jacqueline

    four years to graduate. www.cm.lsu.edu (3) IEA Course Industry Emphasis Area (IEA) (see reverse Course offered in the Fall semester only IEA Courses (3) IEA Course (3) IEA Course (3) IEA Course Course is a Prerequisite to an IEA Course(s) Must make a "C" or better in the courseC C CC C C C C C CC C C C C CCC C CC

  15. The Sky is Falling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Amanda

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    artificial ice crystals. Seeding takes place either below or above a cloud. In the first method, an aircraft's wings are mounted with flares burning silver iodide, which is then released beneath the cloud. The cloud's updraft carries the particles... enough to fall on their own. Silver iodide is a favored seeding agent because its crystalline composition is almost equal to the structure of ice crystals contained in convective clouds. Seeding with silver iodide can supply up to ten trillion...

  16. 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the RCBRA Fall 2005 Data Compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Queen

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a brief description of the sampling approaches, a description of the samples collected, and the results for the Fall 2005 sampling event. This report presents the methods and results of the work to support the 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment.

  17. State of the State's Rural Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    of health status, health behavior, or health- care access and Oklahomans do not compare favorablyState of the State's Rural Health 2007 Edition Produced by OSU Center for Rural Health ASnapshotof-4391 January 1, 2007 Dear Reader: Welcome to the Oklahoma State University Center for Rural Health's inaugural

  18. Enabling poor rural people to overcome poverty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enabling poor rural people to overcome poverty New realities, new challenges: new opportunities for tomorrow's generation #12;"The Rural Poverty Report 2011 is a valuable contribution to the effort that it supports investment, innovation and risk-taking. I have high hopes that the Rural Poverty Report will help

  19. Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ganadería Desarrollo Rural Pesca y Alimentación (SAGARPA). (Ganadería Desarrollo Rural Pesca y Alimentación (SAGARPA), Desarrollo Rural, Pesca y Alimentación (SAGARPA).

  20. alamos science fall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fall Term School and Major Department Fall 2007 Fall 2008 Fall 2009 Fall 2010 Fall 2011 Science 134 142 158 144 130 Electrical Engineering 110 118 131 127 126 Engineering...

  1. Rural recycling in southeast Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lariviere, R. (Prowers County Development, Inc., Lamar, CO (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a recycling effort developed for rural southeast Colorado. The program was inspired and manned by local volunteers and based on a drop-off method used in Europe. The topics of the article include getting started, funding, problems encountered, level of participation, and estimated savings in waste collection and landfilling fees.

  2. Pecos River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

  3. Canadian River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently...

  4. SAMPLE QUIZ 2 (Fall 2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiz 2. MA/STAT 416 003. Fall 2011. Show detailed explanations. 1. Purdue plays against ... Compute the probability that the second marble taken is white. b.

  5. Fall Run | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOMFailure Modes and Causes5Fall Run

  6. Platte River Cooperative Agreement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agreement Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Platte River Cooperative Agreement PEIS, NE, WY, CO, DOE...

  7. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The annual report contains three individual subproject papers detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1989. Subproject 1 contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject 2 contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. This report has been sub-divided into two parts: Part 1; stream evaluation and Part 2; pond series evaluation. Subproject 3 concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. This report summarizes the evaluation of the project to date including the 1989 pre-construction evaluation conducted within the East Fork drainage. Dredge mining has degraded spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River and in Bear Valley Creek. Mining, agricultural, and grazing practices degraded habitat in the East Fork of the Salmon River. Biological monitoring of the success of habitat enhancement for Bear Valley Creek and Yankee Fork are presented in this report. Physical and biological inventories prior to habitat enhancement in East Fork were also conducted. Four series of off-channel ponds of the Yankee Fork are shown to provide effective rearing habitat for chinook salmon. 45 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

  8. Pollution of the River Niger and its main tributaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nwokedi, G.I.C.; Obodo, G.A. (Univ. of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The River Niger system, with a length of about 4200 kilometers, and a discharge volume of 190 cubic kilometers, per year is the third largest river in Africa, and the largest in West Africa. It serves as an important waterway for the transportation of goods and provides rich agricultural flood basins for the cultivation of food and vegetables. Also it is a major source of animal proteins in form of fishes, snails and other aquatics. Above all the River and its tributaries represent the main source of domestic water supply for the rural communities, and water for irrigation. Therefore there is a need to establish the nature and present levels of pollutants in the river, and the contribution made by the tributaries to the gross pollution level. A number of studies have been reported. Martins reported on the geochemistry of the River Niger while Nriagu; Livingstone; and Imevbore provided some chemical data on the upper reaches around and above its confluence with River Benue at Lokoja. Ajayi and Osibanjo reported on the chemical properties of some tributaries above the confluence of the Niger and the Benue. So far no work has been reported on the lower reaches of the Niger where contributions of the Benue and other major tributaries are significant, and where there are large settlements on its banks and the banks of the tributaries. This work aims at establishing base-line levels of the various pollutants and their sources. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. The western river steamboat: structure and machinery, 1811 to 1860

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Adam Isaac

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    127 128 135 136 . 138 140 142 143 149 152 157 GLOSSARY APPENDIX I . APPENDIX 11 167 174 178 VITA 193 LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1. Navigable river lengths as calculated in 1848 Table 2. Steamboat tonnage and cargo capacity... the Sense of the Citizens on the Subject of Improving the Navigation Around the Falls of the Ohio River, p. 12. by hogging chains. A consequent lack of space in the hull necessitated multiple decks I' or passenger and cargo accommodation. The development...

  10. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the Albeni Falls Hydroelectric Project #12;Biological Objective 1 Protect 900 acres of wetland hydroelectric project. · 1988 publication of the Final Report Albeni Falls Wildlife Protection, Mitigation effects on wildlife resulting from hydroelectric development. 2. Select target wildlife species

  11. 2006 Fall Meeting Search Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    2006 Fall Meeting Search Results Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2006), Title, Eos Trans. AGU, 87 browsers. The iCronus project intends to create a publicly accessible website that contains published and weathering DE: 5475 Tectonics (8149) SC: Tectonophysics [T] MN: 2006 Fall Meeting #12;

  12. Employment Patterns among Women: A Comparative Study of Rural Malawi and Rural Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan, Amira; Hyder, Asma

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shahnaz, L. (2002). How do women decide to work in Pakistan?The Pakistan Development Review,41(4), Part II:495-513.is 8 and 14 in rural Pakistan and rural Malawi respectively

  13. Rural Girls’ Perceptions of Success and the Effect of Living in a Rural Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Katherine S

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study was to better understand how young women in a rural community define successful adulthood and how life in a rural area benefited or challenged their transition into successful adulthood. Non-probability, purposive sampling...

  14. New synchronous compensators for the Nelson River HVDC system; Planning requirements and specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thio, C.V.; Davies, J.B. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first units of Limestone Generating Station, the third plant on the Lower Nelson River in northern Manitoba, will come into service in the fall of 1990. Additional var compensation equipment is required at the inverter end of the Nelson River HVdc system to accommodate power from Limestone. This paper describes the system requirements of and the overall specification for the synchronous compensators selected to supply the reactive power and voltage support.

  15. Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

  16. Postsecondary Completion in Rural Texas: A Statewide Overview 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shuyu; Hall, Taylor R.; Jackson, Candace A.; Liu, Xiaodan; Morin, Zach; Sargent, Orsi T.; Steere, Vladislav S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    statewide rural definition that captures the different levels of “rural.” Doing so may also allow a more precise look at the education pipeline from K-12 to postsecondary to identify students who are missing the completion opportunity. Rural Student Barriers...

  17. ICTs and Rural Development in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Sustainable Fiscal Policy for India: An Internationalareas for policy attention. ICTs and India’s Development –policy aspects of providing rural ICTs in India –

  18. Building Energy Efficiency in Rural China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Yu, Sha; Song, Bo; Deng, Qinqin; Liu, Jing; Delgado, Alison

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rural buildings in China now account for more than half of China’s total building energy use. Forty percent of the floorspace in China is in rural villages and towns. Most of these buildings are very energy inefficient, and may struggle to meet basic needs. They are cold in the winter, and often experience indoor air pollution from fuel use. The Chinese government plans to adopt a voluntary building energy code, or design standard, for rural homes. The goal is to build on China’s success with codes in urban areas to improve efficiency and comfort in rural homes. The Chinese government recognizes rural buildings represent a major opportunity for improving national building energy efficiency. The challenges of rural China are also greater than those of urban areas in many ways because of the limited local capacity and low income levels. The Chinese government wants to expand on new programs to subsidize energy efficiency improvements in rural homes to build capacity for larger-scale improvement. This article summarizes the trends and status of rural building energy use in China. It then provides an overview of the new rural building design standard, and describes options and issues to move forward with implementation.

  19. USDA Rural Development Washington State Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is hosting a Washington Rural Development Workshop. Speakers will cover local and regional broadband initiatives program and broadband success stories,...

  20. Renewable Energy Technologies for Rural Electrification - The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Role of the Private Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Technologies for Rural Electrification - The Role of the Private Sector...

  1. Rural Enterprise Assistance Project's Loan Program (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP) offers four services: financing (micro loans), business training, technical assistance, and networking. REAP's Loan Program focuses on providing...

  2. Missouri Rural Economic Stimulus Act (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Missouri Rural Economic Stimulus Act (MORESA) provides financial incentives for public infrastructure for the development of a renewable fuel production facility or eligible new generation...

  3. ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh--Merging Technology with Sustainable Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addy, Susan E.A.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Kostecki, Robert

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, 35-77 million Bangladeshis drink arsenic-contaminated groundwater from shallow tube wells. Arsenic remediation efforts have focused on the development and dissemination of household filters that frequently fall into disuse due to the amount of attention and maintenance that they require. A community scale clean water center has many advantages over household filters and allows for both chemical and electricity-based technologies to be beneficial to rural areas. Full cost recovery would enable the treatment center to be sustainable over time. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) is compatible with community scale water treatment for rural Bangladesh. We demonstrate the ability of ECAR to reduce arsenic levels> 500 ppb to less than 10 ppb in synthetic and real Bangladesh groundwater samples and examine the influence of several operating parameters on arsenic removal effectiveness. Operating cost and waste estimates are provided. Policy implication recommendations that encourage sustainable community treatment centers are discussed.

  4. The Welfare Impact of Rural Electrification: A Reassessment of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Welfare Impact of Rural Electrification: A Reassessment of the Costs and Benefits Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Welfare Impact of Rural...

  5. agroindustria rural del: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rural areas, has been difficult to achieve. It is essential to convince everyone in rural India that educating himself, children, parents, and even neighborhoods must be. One...

  6. algunas comunidades rurales: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rural areas, has been difficult to achieve. It is essential to convince everyone in rural India that educating himself, children, parents, and even neighborhoods must be. One...

  7. 2014 HAC Rural Housing Conference: Retool, Rebuild, Renew

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The biennial HAC Rural Housing Conference brings together stakeholders in the field of rural affordable housing from local nonprofits, federal agencies, Congress, state and local governments, and...

  8. Equitable Access: Remote and Rural Communities 'Transport Needs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Equitable Access: Remote and Rural Communities 'Transport Needs' Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Equitable Access: Remote and Rural Communities...

  9. Iowa: Geothermal System Creates Jobs, Reduces Emissions in Rural...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Geothermal System Creates Jobs, Reduces Emissions in Rural Community Iowa: Geothermal System Creates Jobs, Reduces Emissions in Rural Community November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis...

  10. Senegal-GTZ Programme to Promote Rural Electrification and a...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Promote Rural Electrification and a Sustainable Supply of Domestic Fuel Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Senegal-GTZ Programme to promote rural electrification and a sustainable...

  11. Saving a Dwindling River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information on this research is available by downloading TWRI Technical Report 291, ?Reconnaissance Survey of Salt Sources and Loading into the Pecos River,? at http://twri.tamu.edu/reports.php. The research team has also compared flow and salinity data from... Water Act, Section 319 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. ?The river?s importance?historically, biologically, hydrologically and economically?to the future of the entire Pecos River Basin and the Rio Grande is huge,? said Will Hatler, project...

  12. September 17, 2010 SLIPS, TRIPS, FALLS PREVENTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    September 17, 2010 SLIPS, TRIPS, FALLS PREVENTION Slips, trips and falls at UCDHS account for 18 and in an effort to reduce slips, trips and falls we offer the following "best practices" to consider: Be aware on floors Use slip resistant shoes in icy conditions (Home Health visits) SLIP and FALL PREVENTION TEAM

  13. MA 15400 ONLINE Fall 2014 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delworth, Timothy J

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15400 ONLINE Fall 2014 Syllabus. TEXTBOOK. COURSE WEBSITE. RECORDED LESSONS. HOMEWORK. QUIZZES. EXAMS. CALCULATORS. OFFICE ...

  14. UAA Leadership Honors Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    UAA Leadership Honors Fall 2014 Purpose UAA Leadership Honors are awarded to individuals upon graduation to recognize and honor their leadership. Leadership activities and involvement must promote individual and collective growth

  15. UAA Leadership Honors Fall 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    1 UAA Leadership Honors Fall 2013 Purpose UAA Leadership their leadership contributions to the University of Alaska Anchorage while maintaining academic excellence. Leadership activities and involvement must promote individual

  16. Sabine River Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Sabine River and its tributaries as apportioned...

  17. Better rural churches through architectural planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, K. Frank

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reoreation snd fun servicesc but also foX Washday Set'Witise related to the rural ~ty and farm ]ising, is a prelinLinaxy investigation of tbe problems concerning rural ehuroh arehitsoturec a surcey wae ~ during the Spring of 19H? The general ~ of tbe...

  18. Rural Knowledge Clusters: Implications for Minnesota State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    communities face tremendous challenges in adapting to a knowledge-based global economy. The "knowledge economy to innovate. Traditional rural economic staples are under growing pressure due to globalization of markets, and diseconomies of scale and outmigration hinder adjustment in the rural economy. Consequently a growing gap

  19. Ciencias de la Salud Fundacin Caja Rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    Ciencias de la Salud Fundación Caja Rural de Granada VIIIOrganizan Colaboran Para mas información Fundación Caja Rural de Granada decidió otorgar el premio al trabajo "Identificación de un nuevo Gen, CD247 en el desarrollo de la enfermedad, lo que permitirá encontrar nuevos tratamientos capaces de mejorar

  20. River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

  1. Phosphorus Retention in Duke's SWAMP Mark River, Neal Flanagan, Curtis Richardson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (1), 83. Richardson, C. J., N. E. Flanagan, M. Ho, and J. W. Pahl. 2011. Integrated stream and wetland Drinking Water Reservoir: Falls Lake, Neuse River, North Carolina, USA." Journal of Soils and Sediments 13. Conclusions Duke's Stream and Wetland Assessment and Management Park (SWAMP) is a restored wetland complex

  2. On the last mile : the effects of telecommunications regulation and deregulation in the rural western United States and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Nadine Irène

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was to mirror rural electrification and rural telephony itcommittee, the rural electrification was important in thethat there were the rural electrification programs in the ‘

  3. Migrant Organization and Hometown Impacts in Rural Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jonathan A; Bada, Xochitl

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rural roads Feeder roads Health centre Regional development planning Irrigation works Electrification

  4. Global Climate Change: Opinions and Perceptions of Rural Nebraskans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Global Climate Change: Opinions and Perceptions of Rural Nebraskans 2008 Nebraska Rural Poll that they understand the issue of global climate change either fairly or very well. #12;Most rural Nebraskans believe climate change is already happening. #12;Most rural Nebraskans believe that our actions contribute

  5. Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014 | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Calls Fall 2014 Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014 Better Buildings Residential Network, Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Fall 2014. Lessons Learned: Peer...

  6. Entre el estado y el mercado: Perspectivas para un desarrollo rural autonomo en el campo mexicano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jonathan A; Gordillo, Gustavo

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CÊlìfù tudios clel Desarrollo Rural/Centro de Ðnseñanza,el proceso dc desarrollo rural cambiando sus términos deiniciativas ¡tropias cle desarrollo rural. ¿Qué significan

  7. Factors associated with compliance among users of solar water disinfection in rural Bolivia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water disinfection in rural Bolivia. BMC Public Health 2011childhood diarrhoea in rural Bolivia: a cluster-randomized,disinfection in rural Bolivia Andri Christen 1,2 , Gonzalo

  8. Rural electric cooperatives IRP survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrick, C. [Garrick and Associates, Morrison, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the integrated resource planning (IRP) practices of US rural electric cooperatives and the IRP policies which influence these practices. It was prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its subcontractor Garrick and Associates to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in satisfying the reporting requirements of Title 1, Subtitle B, Section 111(e)(3) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), which states: (e) Report--Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary (of the US Department of Energy) shall transmit a report to the President and to the Congress containing--(the findings from several surveys and evaluations, including:); (3) a survey of practices and policies under which electric cooperatives prepare IRPs, submit such plans to REA, and the extent to which such integrated resource planning is reflected in rates charged to customers.

  9. Rural Jobs Tax Credit (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This credit can be applied to taxes due on (state) gross receipts, corporate income, or personal income tax.  Rural New Mexico is defined as any part of the state other than Los Alamos County;...

  10. Better rural churches through architectural planning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, K. Frank

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to show that Protestant rural churches can be batter churches by combining religious and sociological planning with proper architectural planning. Architectural planning as presented in this ...

  11. CSR AND THE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION CHALLENGE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joss, Kristina

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    renewable energy for rural electrification in the least developed countries. Using first hand interviews with industry experts to support academic literature and policy report analysis, this dissertation argues that corporations are a necessary tool...

  12. Local Option- Rural Renewable Energy Development Zones

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cities, counties, or several contiguous counties in Oregon can set up Rural Renewable Energy Development Zones. The zone can only cover territory outside of the urban growth boundary of any large...

  13. USDA Rural Small Business Connection Event

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will host Rural Small Business Connections, providing small businesses with networking sessions and opportunities to build capacity and do business with USDA and other Federal agencies.

  14. Assessment of rural energy resources; Methodological guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rijal, K.; Bansal, N.K.; Grover, P.D. (Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Inst. of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 11016 (IN))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents the methodological guidelines used to assess rural energy resources with an example of its application in three villages each from different physiographic zones of Nepal. Existing energy demand patterns of villages are compared with estimated resource availability, and rural energy planning issues are discussed. Economics and financial supply price of primary energy resources are compared, which provides insight into defective energy planning and policy formulation and implication in the context of rural areas of Nepal. Though aware of the formidable consequences, the rural populace continues to exhaust the forest as they are unable to find financially cheaper alternatives. Appropriate policy measures need to be devised by the government to promote the use of economically cost-effective renewable energy resources so as to change the present energy usage pattern to diminish the environmental impact caused by over exploitation of forest resources beyond their regenerative capacity.

  15. On tropospheric rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yuanlong, 1964-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we investigate atmospheric water vapor transport through a distinct synoptic phenomenon, namely, the Tropospheric River (TR), which is a local filamentary structure on a daily map of vertically integrated ...

  16. CMPE 185 Fall 1999 Syllabus 1 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Fall 1999 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and timeKresge 327, MWF 2;2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Fall 1999 4 Special guest lecturers I may arrange

  17. CMPE 185 Fall 2000 Syllabus 1 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Fall 2000 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and timeKresge 327, MWF 2 Info 1 #12;2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Fall 2000 4

  18. Final Report for Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Innis; Randy Udall; Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report for ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America'': This project, ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop'', helped stimulate wind development by rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities in Colorado. To date most of the wind power development in the United States has been driven by large investor-owned utilities serving major metropolitan areas. To meet the 5% by 2020 goal of the Wind Powering America program the 2,000 municipal and 900 rural electric cooperatives in the country must get involved in wind power development. Public power typically serves rural and suburban areas and can play a role in revitalizing communities by tapping into the economic development potential of wind power. One barrier to the involvement of public power in wind development has been the perception that wind power is more expensive than other generation sources. This project focused on two ways to reduce the costs of wind power to make it more attractive to public power entities. The first way was to develop a revenue stream from the sale of green tags. By selling green tags to entities that voluntarily support wind power, rural coops and munis can effectively reduce their cost of wind power. Western Resource Advocates (WRA) and the Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) worked with Lamar Light and Power and Arkansas River Power Authority to develop a strategy to use green tags to help finance their wind project. These utilities are now selling their green tags to Community Energy, Inc., an independent for-profit marketer who in turn sells the tags to consumers around Colorado. The Lamar tags allow the University of Colorado-Boulder, the City of Boulder, NREL and other businesses to support wind power development and make the claim that they are ''wind-powered''. This urban-rural partnership is an important development for the state of Colorado's rural communities get the economic benefits of wind power and urban businesses are able to claim the environmental benefits. The second method to reduce the cost of wind power we investigated involved access to cheap capital. Municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives have access to low-interest loan programs and frequently finance projects through the sale of revenue bonds, but we were interested in the possibility for small businesses and community banks to provide equity and debt for wind projects. We worked with Boulder Community Hospital to explore their interest in partnering with other businesses and individuals to help catalyze the first community-owned wind project in Colorado. We also met with and gained interest from the independent community banks for the idea of wind power. These small banks may be restricted by lending limits, but are an integral part of rural communities and are very interested in the economic development opportunities wind power presents for small towns. This project was successful in getting six rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities to purchase more than 25 MW of wind power in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska. These utilities also announced plans to explore an additional 100 MW or more of wind power development over the next few years. Finally, munis and coops in New Mexico began exploring wind power by offering small green power programs to their customers. WRA believes the lessons learned from this project will assist other municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives as they develop wind projects.

  19. almahata sitta fall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory of Systems of First Order Linear Equations. 37 MGMT 585 2013 Fall1 2013 Fall Syllabus Mathematics Websites Summary: MGMT 585 2013 Fall1 2013 Fall Syllabus MGMT 585:...

  20. Fall 2013 Composite Data Products - Backup Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes 28 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Fall 2013 for fuel cell backup power systems.

  1. Invite Paper Fall Technical Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Alessandro

    within which it is sensible to make predictions, combustion is here to stay. In addition to oil1 Invite Paper Fall Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute: A Laboratory-Scale Benchmark for Turbulent Combustion Studies Alessandro Gomez Department of Mechanical

  2. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, Bruce

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2002, a total of 2,877,437 fish weighing 47,347 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 479,358 yearling fish weighing 33,930 pounds and 2,398,079 sub-yearling fish weighing 19,115 pounds. This is the largest number of fish ever released in one year from the acclimation facilities.

  3. Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the source rock slope (Figure 1), the falling mass strikes the talus slope and breaks up and/or bounces1 Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps J. Deparis, D reviews seismograms from 10 rock-fall events recorded between 1992 and 2001 by the permanent seismological

  4. SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595 of the Water Resources

  5. SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595

  6. EIS-0300: Minnesota Agri-Power Project: Biomass for Rural Development, Granite Falls, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Boards' [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] decision to support a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75–103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri-Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities.

  7. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  8. Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as...

  9. P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and Stream Restoration Pierre Y. Julien Hong Kong - December 2004 River Engineering and Stream Restoration I - Stream Restoration Objectives Brief overview of River Engineering and Stream Restoration with focus on : 1. River Equilibrium; 2. River Dynamics; 3. River

  10. Resources and Opportunities: 2015 Rural Utilities Study Under...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Rural Utilities Study Under Way June 2, 2015 - 1:49pm Addthis The Shugnak power plant is one of nearly 30 rural utilities the RUS team is visiting in 2015. Photo from...

  11. Rural Electrification in India: Economic and Industrial Aspects of Renewables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cust, J; Singh, Anoop; Neuhoff, Karsten

    The paper assesses the demand for rural electricity services and contrasts it with the technology options available for rural electrification. Decentralised Distributed Generation can be economically viable as reflected by case studies reported...

  12. Rural Community-Based Energy Development Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act aims to create new rural economic development opportunities through rural community-based energy development. The act supports C-BED wind development projects, which are defined as...

  13. USDA- Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) Loan Guarantees

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Development issues periodic Notices of Solicitation of Applications for the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP). The deadline to apply for...

  14. Postsecondary Completion in Rural Texas: A Statewide Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shuyu; Hall, Taylor R.; Jackson, Candace A.; Liu, Xiaodan; Morin, Zach; Sargent, Orsi T.; Steere, Vladislav S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    completion in Rural Texas. Using a mixed methods approach, the capstone studied institutional, attitudinal, and academic barriers that impede rural students from pursuing and obtaining a postsecondary credential. Why should policymakers and stakeholders focus...

  15. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  16. Rio Grande River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Photo Shop

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    FORKS BIRDBEAR-NISKU JEFFERSON GROUP DUPEROW O (IJ o BEAVER HILL LAKE GR UP ELK POINT GROUP SOURIS RIVER Ist. RED BED DAWSON BAY 2ll(IRED BED PRAIRIE EVAP WI NI ASHERN INTERLAKE STONY MOUNTAIN RED RIVER WINN IP EG Figure 3... and is bounded by the Sioux Arch, the Black Hills Uplift, the Miles City Arch, and the Bowdoin Dome. The structural trends within the basin parallel the major structural trends of the Rocky Mountain Belt. The Williston Basin is characterized by gently...

  17. Rural Communities Benefit from Wind Energy's Continued Success

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    John Stulp, Colorado Interbasin Compact Committee chairman, discusses how wind energy benefits rural communities, farms, and ranches.

  18. Muddy River Restoration Project Begins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Muddy River Restoration Project Begins Page 5 #12;2 YANKEE ENGINEER February 2013 Yankee Voices of the Muddy River Restoration project. Inset photo: Flooding at the Muddy River. Materials provided by Mike Project Manager, on the passing of his father in law, Francis James (Jim) Murray, Jan. 9. ... to Laura

  19. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM JOHNSTONE RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Warning Centre in Brisbane. The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river risesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the JOHNSTONE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins Flood

  20. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM NERANG RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ALERT System The Nerang River ALERT flood warning system was completed in the early 1990's as a coFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the NERANG RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated Nerang ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins

  1. Women, Work and Household Electrification in Rural India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    v Women, Work and Household Electrification in Rural India We must not believe, certainly electrification in rural India, the answer, it seems, would clearly point in a particular direction. On the one, that in the event of full electrification at the household level, rural women stand to be most affected in terms

  2. Peer effects in employment: Results from Mexico's poor rural communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    1 Peer effects in employment: Results from Mexico's poor rural communities Caridad Araujo , Alain-farm non-agricultural (OFNA) employment offers a major pathway from poverty for rural populations. However and informal OFNA employment using village census data for rural Mexico. We test and reject the possibility

  3. FUZZY COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF RURAL INFORMATION POVERTY IN CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    FUZZY COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF RURAL INFORMATION POVERTY IN CHINA CASE STUDY OF HEBEI PROVINCE@yahoo.com.cn Abstract: Information poverty is a new form of poverty in information society. With the growing information-gap between urban and rural areas, information poverty is prevailing in the vast rural areas in China

  4. Migration, rural development, poverty and food security: a comparative perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Migration, rural development, poverty and food security: a comparative perspective Thomas Lacroix rural underdevelopment, poverty and food insecurity in rural areas? The case studies provide mixed poverty, even for non-migrant households. In the countries benefiting from temporary migration schemes

  5. WORKING PAPER N 2008 -73 Educational programs in rural Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    WORKING PAPER N° 2008 - 73 Educational programs in rural Nepal: Peer communication and information ­ ÉCOLE NORMALE SUPÉRIEURE halshs-00585981,version1-14Apr2011 #12;Educational Programs in Rural Nepal concentrate on three rural villages in Nepal where an educational radio program about family planning

  6. Incomes of Rural Families in Northeast Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern, John H.; Hendrix, W. E.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary i This study deals on a sample basis with the income levels, income sources and farm and human re- source characteristics of the 88,000 rural open-country families in a 24-county area of Northeast Texas. ) Low levels of living... mainly from small-scale crop to s~all- scale livestock farming. In 1955, 49,000 of the area's rural families were farm families and 39,000 were nonfarm families, or 55 percent and 45 percent, respectively. However, 21 percent of all farmers were full...

  7. Planning Rural Fire Protection for Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Jack L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and shall have full authority to carry out the objects of their creation and to that end are authorized to acquire, purchase, hold, lease, manage, occupy and sell real and personal property or any interest therein; to enter into and to perform any and all... to make fire protection feasible, the citizens of the rural area must organize their own fire department to protect their property and their lives. ORGANIZING A FIRE PROTECTION PROGRAM Before planning can begin, a community must determine whether rural...

  8. Savannah River Site Robotics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  9. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  10. Rainfall-River Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ;2Rainfall-River Forecasting Joint Summit II NOAA Integrated Water Forecasting Program · Minimize losses due management and enhance America's coastal assets · Expand information for managing America's Water Resources, Precipitation and Water Quality Observations · USACE Reservoir Operation Information, Streamflow, Snowpack

  11. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

    2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

  12. IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K. [NDE Lab, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 23187-8795 (United States)

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  13. The State and Rural Development in Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nwosu, Nereus I.A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    57. 15central Bank of Nigeria, Annuol Report ond Sl4tementThe Rise and Fall of Nigeria's Second Republic, 1979-84 (Development Programmes in Nigeria: an evaluation of the

  14. Washington River Protection Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural PublicRates > RateWannier90089Operation

  15. A fully relativistic radial fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro D. A. M. Spallicci; Patxi Ritter

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Radial fall has historically played a momentous role. It is one of the most classical problems, the solutions of which represent the level of understanding of gravitation in a given epoch. A {\\it gedankenexperiment} in a modern frame is given by a small body, like a compact star or a solar mass black hole, captured by a supermassive black hole. The mass of the small body itself and the emission of gravitational radiation cause the departure from the geodesic path due to the back-action, that is the self-force. For radial fall, as any other non-adiabatic motion, the instantaneous identity of the radiated energy and the loss of orbital energy cannot be imposed and provide the perturbed trajectory. In the first part of this letter, we present the effects due to the self-force computed on the geodesic trajectory in the background field. Compared to the latter trajectory, in the Regge-Wheeler, harmonic and all others smoothly related gauges, a far observer concludes that the self-force pushes inward (not outward) the falling body, with a strength proportional to the mass of the small body for a given large mass; further, the same observer notes an higher value of the maximal coordinate velocity, this value being reached earlier on during infall. In the second part of this letter, we implement a self-consistent approach for which the trajectory is iteratively corrected by the self-force, this time computed on osculating geodesics. Finally, we compare the motion driven by the self-force without and with self-consistent orbital evolution. Subtle differences are noticeable, even if self-force effects have hardly the time to accumulate in such a short orbit.

  16. Idaho Falls Power- Residential Weatherization Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential customers with permanently installed electric heat who receive service from the City of Idaho Falls, are eligible for 0% weatherization loans. City Energy Service will conduct an...

  17. STAT 490 Fall 2012 Test 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owner

    2014-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    STAT 490. Fall 2012. Test 2. October 30, 2012. 1. Datsenka Dog Insurance Company has developed the following mortality table for dogs: Age xl. Age xl. 0.

  18. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483- Fall Tuesdays organic materials. The discussion will include aspects of synthesis General introduction to the electronic structure of organic materials with connection

  19. Course Announcement MATH 450 -Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Course Announcement MATH 450 - Fall 2005 Mathematical Modeling of the Physical World Time: TR 9://www.math.psu.edu/belmonte/math450 05.html #12;

  20. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | April 15, 2013 | Ho * This project employs modeling, design, testing, and optimization to further develop and improve key areas of falling particle receiver technology...

  1. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | June 15, 2013 | Ho * This project employs modeling, design, testing, and optimization to further develop and improve key areas of falling particle receiver technology...

  2. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    temperatures, nitrate salt fluids become chemically unstable. In contrast, direct absorption receivers using solid particles that fall through a beam of concentrated solar...

  3. falls-city2.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj:'I,\ W CTheuse of biotaFalls

  4. Rural migration in the western states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Poster, B.R.; Olinger, C.; Aragon, P.C.; Buslee, P.L.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid rural growth rate since 1970 in 14 western states (Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming) was stimulated by recreation, resource development, manufacturing, commuting, institutional employment, and retirement. The eight Rocky Mountain States had significantly greater rural growth than the six Great Plains States. Other factors correlated with in-migration are population growth during the 1960's, presence of an interstate highway, adjacency to a metropolitan area, high per capita income, high population density, and absence of rural farm population. The presence of a central city with a population of over 20,000 or of a military base does not appear to be significantly related to net in-migration. An overview of regional growth patterns and of the factors related to rural in-migration is included, followed by an examination of these factors for each of the counties that experienced high in-migration in the 14 states.

  5. Policy support activities Brazil Rural Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Policy support activities Brazil Rural Energy Enterprise Development (B-REED) Juan Zak UNEP Risoe Centre Annual Management Meeting Fortaleza, July ­ 2004 #12;2 B-REED policy support · B-REED should perform three policy support activities for local/state/federal governments. · Although small in nature

  6. Preparing for the Challenges The Rural South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    (excluding Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands) Environmental Agencies and Agriculture and Waste-Related Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Texas A&M University 21st Century No. 15, December 2000 & 2000 agriculture in the rural South has gradually shifted from small animal feeding operations (A.Os) to highly

  7. Turkish Trailblazer: Boosting Rural Areas through Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Çokgezen Reviewed by · Aline Kraemer Sector · Consumer Products Enterprise Class · Large Domestic Company her company and the economic and social welfare of rural areas of Turkey. To achieve success, Ms production units in impoverished parts of Turkey in six years. Hey Textile's investment has improved

  8. Broadband, Higher Education and Rural New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    Broadband, Higher Education and Rural New Mexico Gil Gonzales, Ph.D., Chief Information Officer University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 E mail: gonzgil@unm.edu Background UNM students enjoy the country do. New Mexico is also home to two national laboratories in Los Alamos (Los Alamos National

  9. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  10. Rural electrification, climate change, and local economies: Facilitating communication in development policy and practice on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casillas, Christian E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    household in India’s rural  electrification policy.  Oxford equitable access to rural electrification: current thinking Welfare Impact of Rural Electrification: A Reassessment of 

  11. To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Elizabeth N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    de Agricultura, Desarrollo Rural, Pesca y Alimentación.TLCAN) sobre el desarrollo rural: Red Colombiana de AcciónGanadería, Desarrollo Rural, Pesca y Alimentación (SAGARPA –

  12. Fall 2013 Edition Editor-in-Chief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Musings of Brescia Fall 2013 Edition Editor-in-Chief Alicia Moore Editor Shelly Harder #12, rousing him from a nap. I held him up by one gangly, black arm. His marble brown eyes were shiny always occurred to me that TJ could fall apart at any moment. His arms were already feeling a bit loose

  13. Population Analysis, Fall 2005 1 Population Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, William R.

    Population Analysis, Fall 2005 1 Population Analyses EEOB/AEcl 611 Fall Semester 2005 Scheduled Phone: 294-5176 email: wrclark@iastate.edu AEcl 611 is evolving in response to very rapid changes. The emphasis in AEcl 611 is on understanding the statistical basis of various analytical techniques, applying

  14. CURRICULUM VITAE Andrs Fall, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    -0140 Cell: (512) 810-2335 Updated: May 20, 2014 Academic Background 2005-2008 Ph.D. Virginia Tech-poor to 4-excellent. #12;Dr. András Fall - Vitae 3 Selected Publications Peer reviewed journal articles in shale: a review. Accepted pending revisions, AAPG Bulletin. 7. Fall, A., Eichhubl, P., Bodnar, R

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls City Mill Site - TX 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -Elk River Reactor -Texas Falls

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls City Uranium Ore Stockpile - TX

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -Elk River Reactor -Texas Falls04A

  17. Fall Lectures Feature Life of Einstein; Exploring Our World With...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fall Lectures Feature Life of Einstein; Exploring Our World With Particle Accelerators NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Sept. 22, 2010 - Jefferson Lab's first 2010 Fall Science Series lecture,...

  18. City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperatur...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility City of Klamath Falls...

  19. FUPWG Fall 2009 Washington Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FUPWG Fall 2009 Washington Update FUPWG Fall 2009 Washington Update Presentation covers the 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Washington update to the Lighting...

  20. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  1. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  3. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  4. Office of River Protection

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en Y earEnergy T H E DofitemsFallFederalOffice

  5. South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the Scenic Rivers Act is to protect selected rivers or river segments of the State with outstanding scenic, recreational, geologic, botanical, fish, wildlife, historic, or cultural...

  6. Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio River Greenway Development Commission administers the Ohio River Greenway Project, which is a park along a 7-mile stretch of the Ohio River. The Commission developed a master plan for the...

  7. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology Support of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)...

  8. Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - October 2011 October 2011 Industrial Hygiene Surveillance of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene...

  9. Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - November...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savannah River Site On November 14, 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a nuclear safety Enforcement Letter to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to...

  10. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activity Report, Savannah River Site - February 2014 February 2014 Operational Awareness Visit of the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2014-02-25 This Independent Activity...

  11. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2010 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014...

  12. Great River (1973)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC)Graphite Reactor 'In the- EnergyGreat-River

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - america rural economic Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services for Rural Families." Prior to the recent economic crisis in the U... , health care reform and rural America, mental health and emotional well-being, the role of rural...

  14. From Resource Management to Political Activism: Civil Society Participation in Nicaragua's Rural Water Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Sarah T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Desarrollo Económico y Social para el Área Urbana y Rural (Desarrollo Económico y Social para el Área Urbana y Rural (Rural Aqueducts) DNRM Decentralized natural resource management DP Design principle ECODES Fundación Ecología y Desarrollo (

  15. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Todd D. [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

  16. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM HAUGHTON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment and enables moreFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the HAUGHTON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Flooding Flood Forecasting Local Information Haughton ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins

  17. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BURDEKIN RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment below the DamFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BURDEKIN RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Local Information Burdekin ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings

  18. Potential of CDMA450 for Rural Network Connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nedevschi, Sergiu; Surana, Sonesh; Du, Bowei; Patra, Rabin; Brewer, Eric; Stan, Victor

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capital expen- diture (CapEx), ideal for rural areas whereadditional savings in CapEx. E STABLISHED T ECHNOLOGY CDMA

  19. Best Practices of the Alliance for Rural Electrification: what...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    areas in developing nations. The report is a comprehensive collection of best practice case-studies in the use of renewable energy for rural electrification across the globe....

  20. Alternative Energy Projects by Rural Electric Membership Corporations (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation encourages the development of alternative energy projects using clean or renewable resources by rural electric membership corporations. The section establishes the Office of...

  1. Tri-National Agricultural Accord Rural Development Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Tri-National Agricultural Accord Rural Development Workshop Overview of Canadian Provinces April 14. Structure Structures: Federal and provincial government organization Municipal / County Community / Regional

  2. Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries AgencyCompany...

  3. Columbia Rural Electric Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Rural Electric Association offers its residential customers a variety of rebates for the purchase of energy efficient equipment and measures. Eligible equipment includes efficient clothes...

  4. Grayson Rural Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grayson Rural Electric Cooperative provides rebates to its customers for increasing their energy efficiency. Members who make improvements based on recommendations by the utility's energy advisor...

  5. Missouri Rural Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Missouri Rural Electric Cooperative (MREC) offers a number of rebates to residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient equipment. Eligible equipment includes clothes...

  6. Carbon Cycling, Environmental & Rural Economic Impacts from Collecting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Area Review Steve Kelley, NCSU Rick Gustafson, U of WA Elaine Oneil, CORRIM Carbon Cycling, Environmental & Rural Economic Impacts from Collecting & Processing Specific...

  7. al hospital rural: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    health Hartman, Chris 2 Critical access hospitals (CAHs) are essential to rural health care and play an important role in its Engineering Websites Summary: - 1 -...

  8. Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative- Solar Water Heater Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative Association (Linn County RECA) is a member-owned cooperative. To encourage energy efficiency, Linn County offers a number of rebates to commercial,...

  9. Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P.; Loffink, Ken; Duke, Bill

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from June 7, 2007 to August 11, 2008. A total of 3,133 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,487 adult, 1,067 jack, and 999 subjack fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha); 5,140 adult and 150 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,009 adult, 517 jack, and 128 subjack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 1,442 summer steelhead and 88 adult and 84 jack spring Chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 1,497 summer steelhead; 609 adult, 1,018 jack and 979 subjack fall Chinook; 5,036 adult and 144 jack coho; and 1,117 adult, 386 jack and 125 subjack spring Chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 110 summer steelhead; 878 adult and 43 jack fall Chinook; and 560 adult and 28 jack spring Chinook were collected as broodstock for the Umatilla River hatchery program. In addition, there were 241 adult and 15 jack spring Chinook collected at Threemile Dam for outplanting in the South Fork Walla Walla River and Mill Cr, a tributary of the mainstem Walla Walla River. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at river mile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for out-migrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 158 days between February 11, 2008 and July 18, 2008. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 150 days and were trapped 6 days. There were also 2 days when fish were directed into and held in the canal forebay between the time the bypass was closed and the trap opened. An estimated 64 pounds of fish were transported from the Westland trapping facility. Approximately 25.8% of the fish transported were salmonids. In addition, one adult Pacific lamprey was trapped and released above the Westland ladder this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on March 11, 2008 in conjunction with water deliveries and continued through the summer. West Extension Irrigation District (WEID) discontinued diverting live flow on June 24, 2008 but the bypass remained open throughout the project year. The juvenile trap was not operated this project year.

  10. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  11. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

    2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  12. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  13. CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Fall, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Fall, 2001 Received 79 completed surveys out of 126 students who graduated in Dec, 2001 21 (27%) Have fulltime positions (9 temporary and 12 permanent) 3 (4

  14. DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Fall Semester 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Fall Semester 2010 Brown, Bryant P. Brown, Dustin H. Campbell Laughlin, Amanda Diane Lemieux, Sydnie Lynn Lesnewski, Michael Phillip Lester, David Ernest Li, Crystal Gan

  15. Fall 2012 FUPWG Meeting Welcome: Southern Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the Southern Company's retail service territory, financials, customers and sales, power generation, U.S. military projects, and more.

  16. Cedar Falls Utilities- Residential New Construction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cedar Falls Utilities offers incentives to residential customers who construct new energy efficient homes. A rate discount of 25% is available to customers who meet the 5 Star Home Program criteria...

  17. Fall Back Daylight Savings time is November

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Braddock K.

    Fall Back ­ Daylight Savings time is November 2nd.The Energy Policy Act of 2005 changed both the starting and ending dates. Beginning in 2007, daylight time starts on the second Sunday in March and ends

  18. STAT 416 Fall 2014 Homework 6 Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 3, 2014 ... STAT 416 Fall 2014. Homework 6 Solutions ... 4.35 Let X denote the winnings. P (X = 1.1) = P (both marbles red) + P (both marbles blue) = 2. (5.

  19. AMST Courses --Fall 2014 Tulsa Based Classes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    AMST Courses -- Fall 2014 Tulsa Based Classes: Globalization & Am Culture AMST 3253 Gray M 4 in trips to the Philbrook, Philbrook Downtown, and Gilcrease Museums and attend events of the Tulsa

  20. Utility Variable Generation Integration Group Fall Technical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    15, 2014 9:00AM CDT to October 17, 2014 3:00PM CDT The Utility Variable Generation Integration Group (UVIG) Fall Technical Workshop in San Antonio, Texas will provide attendees...

  1. Math 373 Fall 2012 Test 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owner

    2014-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Copyright Jeffrey A Beckley. Math 373. Fall 2012. Test 2. October 18, 2012. 1. Jordan has the option to purchase either of the two bonds below. Both bonds will

  2. Environmental Research Group 2014 Fall Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Research Group 2014 Fall Seminar Series October 24, 2014 Gregg 320, 12:00 ­ 1 of five hours, the city of Boston would have sustained even more damage from Hurricane Sandy than New York

  3. Does Agricultural Liberalization Reduce Rural Welfare in Less Developed Countries? The Case of CAFTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, J. Edward; Yunez Naude, Antonio; Jesurun-Clements, Nancy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    affect welfare in rural LDC households by depressing worldin high-income countries with LDC tariff reform, from thisinflicts damage on the LDC rural economy. More than two

  4. Prevention of postpartum hemorrhage: Options for home births in rural Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prata, Ndola; Holston, Martine; Potts, Malcolm

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Home Births in Rural Ethiopia N. Prata 1 *, A. Gessessewinterventions. In rural Tigray, Ethiopia, traditional birthCentral Statistical Agency [Ethiopia] and ORC Macro. 2006.

  5. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  6. Retrofit Savings Determination for Wichita Falls Independent School District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, X.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Claridge, D. E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory Wichita Falls ISD Texas A&M University Carrigan Center Energy Systems Laboratory Texas Engineering Experiment station Wichita Falls ISD Texas A&M University College Station. TX Carrigan Center Energy Systems Laboratory Wichita Falls ISO Texas A...&M University Denver Center Energy Systems Laboratory Texas Engineering Experiment Station Wichita Falls ISD Texas A&M University College station. TX Denver Center Energy Systems Laboratory Wichita Falls ISO Texas A&M University Fannin Elementary Energy Systems...

  7. CENTER FOR TECHNOLOGY ALTERNATIVES FOR RURAL AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    , Maharashtra, suffer from severe water shortage in the months preceding the monsoons. A few check dams have of the villages north of the river Pej face severe water shortage after February. There are two main options Water Supply System for North Karjat Techno-Economic Feasibility Study By Abhishek Kumar Sinha (07D04025

  8. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY NATIONAL of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program Publication number: SRO-NERP-2S Printed OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BY CHARLES E. DAVIS AND LAURA L. JANECEK A PUBLICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

  9. The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, C.

    planting saltcedar for stream bank erosion control along such rivers as the Pecos River in New Mexico. The plant has spread down the Pecos River into Texas and is now known to occur along the river south of Interstate 10. More recently the plant has become...

  10. Measuring availability of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustillos, Brenda Diane

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive in-store survey may capture the availability of healthful food alternatives in different store types in two rural counties. The purpose of this study was to: (1) compare the availability of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties...

  11. Tegola tiered mesh network testbed in rural Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardi, Giacomo; Buneman, Peter; Marina, Mahesh

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many rural and remote communities around the world see themselves on the wrong side of the digital divide. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that there is a growing digital divide between urban and rural areas in terms of broadband...

  12. Economic changes and afforestation incentives in rural China Sylvie Dmurger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Economic changes and afforestation incentives in rural China Sylvie Démurger HIEBS of this paper is to examine the forces that shape the afforestation incentives of rural economic agents and Economics (Beijing) Corresponding author: Sylvie Démurger HK Institute of Economics & Business Strategy

  13. Introduction Approximately 40% of rural Ethiopia (WaterAid, 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Introduction Approximately 40% of rural Ethiopia (WaterAid, 2010) lacks access to clean water for water pumping is one alternative in the rural areas of Ethiopia since most of the population has technologies for water pumping in Ethiopia and especially in Amhara Region is limited. The promotion

  14. Wireless Networks in Rural Areas: Challenges and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Wireless Networks in Rural Areas: Challenges and Solutions Shen Wan April 25, 2009 Abstract In this thesis proposal, we discuss the current limitations and chal- lenges in wireless networks, especially in rural, remote or areas with rough terrains. Although traditional wireless networking technologies have

  15. Scaling Up Primary Education Services in Rural India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scaling Up Primary Education Services in Rural India Nirupam Bajpai, Ravindra H. Dholakia and Sustainable Development The Earth Institute at Columbia University www.earth.columbia.edu #12;Scaling up attempt to address two key questions in this paper: 1) In terms of state-wide scaling up of rural services

  16. TERRITORIALIZACIN E IDENTIDADES EN EL ESPACIO RURAL Hernn SALAS QUINTANAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    TERRITORIALIZACIÓN E IDENTIDADES EN EL ESPACIO RURAL Hernán SALAS QUINTANAL Doctor en Antropología en la concepción del espacio y el manejo del territorio rural, en los cuales se articulan identidades acuerdo a intereses particulares y metodologías contrapuestas unas a otras; de modo que su desarrollo fue

  17. biogas for rural communities TD390 Supervised learning: Study report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    0 biogas for rural communities TD390 Supervised learning: Study report Vaibhav Nasery Roll No. 08D highly successful rural biogas models wherein biogas is produced and utilized as a cooking fuel by the villagers. The two models studied are the Community Biogas plant established by SUMUL Dairy at Bhintbudrak

  18. Measuring the poverty reduction potential of land in rural Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Measuring the poverty reduction potential of land in rural Mexico Frederico Finan, Elisabeth debate on the role of land as an instrument for poverty reduction, we analyze the conditions under which access to land reduces poverty in Mexican rural communities. Semi-parametric regression results show

  19. Incubating Innovation for Rural Electrification. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June, the team held a workshop on ''Low Carbon Sustainable Rural Electrification'' in Salima, Malawi. Co-organized with the Government of Malawi's Department of Energy, this event gathered participants from the energy, telecom, non-profit, banking sectors as well as from governmental and international agencies to discuss the potential development of private led off-grid electrification in Malawi where only 9% of the population has currently access to electricity. A very active participation provided us with insightful feedback and valuable recommendations.

  20. Alliance for Rural Electrification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,AlleghanyAlliance forRural

  1. Rural Cooperative Geothermal Development Electric & Agriculture

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofittingFundA l iRural Cooperative Geothermal

  2. WINDExchange: Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAboutDeployment Activities PrintableRural

  3. Lyon Rural Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation,LushuiLyme, NewLyon Rural Electric

  4. Wells Rural Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWaranaWaterEnergyWeeklyWelivitWells Rural

  5. Whitewater Valley Rural EMC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's picture Submitted byWhitewater Valley Rural EMC

  6. Club for Rural Electrification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York: Energy Resources JumpClover SolarClub for Rural

  7. Benton Rural Electric Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources of Funding: CaseBenton Rural

  8. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  9. Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River was small (n=6). In spite of this project's shortcomings, bull trout continue to be observed in low numbers at Snake River dam fish facilities. It is highly possible that bull trout observed at the Snake River dam fish facilities are originating from sources other than the Tucannon River. We suggest that these fish might come from upstream sources like the Clearwater or Salmon rivers in Idaho, and are simply following the outmigration of juvenile anadromous fish (a food supply) as they emigrate toward the Pacific Ocean. Based on our study results, we recommend abandoning radio telemetry as a tool to monitor bull trout movements in the mainstem Snake River. We do recommend continuing PIT tagging and tag interrogation activities to help determine the origin of bull trout using the Snake River hydropower facilities. As a complementary approach, we also suggest the use of genetic assignment tests to help determine the origin of these fish. Lastly, several recommendations are included in the report to help manage and recover bull trout in the Tucannon subbasin.

  10. Impacts of the Snake River drawdown experiment on fisheries resources in Little Goose and Lower Granite Reservoirs, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D D; Geist, D R

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1992, the US Army Corps of Engineers initiated a test to help evaluate physical and environmental impacts resulting from the proposed future drawdown of Snake River reservoirs. Drawdown would reduce water levels in Snake River reservoirs and is being proposed as a solution to decrease the time it takes for salmon and steelhead smolts to migrate to the ocean. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated impacts to specific fisheries resources during the drawdown experiment by surveying Lower Granite Reservoir to determine if fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas and steelhead (0. mykiss) access to tributary creeks were affected. In addition, shoreline areas of Little Goose Reservoir were monitored to evaluate the suitability of these areas for spawning by fall chinook salmon. Relative abundance of fish species in nearshore areas was also determined during the drawdown, and stranded resident fish and other aquatic organisms were observed.

  11. China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

  12. Classes Entering Fall 2009 and Fall 2010 Last Name: First Name: Middle Ini2al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afshari, Ehsan

    Classes Entering Fall 2009 and Fall 2010 Last Name: First Name: Middle Ini2 ini2als for agreement: Date: From the courses listed in the tables above, iden2fy Wri2ng Advisor Approved Ini2als: Date: Probability & Sta2s2cs Final ECE Approval: Advanced

  13. Interior cavern conditions and salt fall potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Myers, R.E. [Strategic Petroleum Reserve, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A relatively large number of salt caverns are used for fluid hydrocarbon storage, including an extensive set of facilities in the Gulf Coast salt domes for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Attention is focused on the SPR caverns because of available histories that detail events involving loss and damage of the hanging string casing. The total number of events is limited, making the database statistically sparse. The occurrence of the events is not evenly distributed, with some facilities, and some caverns, more susceptible than others. While not all of these events could be attributed to impacts from salt falls, many did show the evidence of such impacts. As a result, a study has been completed to analyze the potential for salt falls in the SPR storage caverns. In this process, it was also possible to deduce some of the cavern interior conditions. Storage caverns are very large systems in which many factors could possibly play a part in casing damage. In this study, all of the potentially important factors such as salt dome geology, operational details, and material characteristics were considered, with all being logically evaluated and most being determined as secondary in nature. As a result of the study, it appears that a principal factor in determining a propensity for casing damage from salt falls is the creep and fracture characteristics of salt in individual caverns. In addition the fracture depends strongly upon the concentration of impurity particles in the salt. Although direct observation of cavern conditions is not possible, the average impurity concentration and the accumulation of salt fall material can be determined. When this is done, there is a reasonable correlation between the propensity for a cavern to show casing damage events and accumulation of salt fall material. The accumulation volumes of salt fall material can be extremely large, indicating that only a few of the salt falls are large enough to cause impact damage.

  14. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, Fisheries Resource Management, Yakima Indian Nation1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasserman, Larry

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose was to evaluate enhancement methodologies that can be used to rebuild runs of spring chinook to the Yakima River system. In January, 1983, 100,000 fish raised at Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery were transported to Nile Springs Rearing Ponds on the Naches River. These fish were allowed a volitional release as smolts in April. An additional 100,000 smolts were transported from Leavenworth Hatchery in April and immediately released to the Upper Yakima River. Relative survival of smolts from their points of release to a trap at Prosser (RM48) was 1.69:1 for fish from Nile Springs, versus the trucked smolts. The fish from Nile Springs arrived at Prosser and McNary Dam approximately 1 week earlier than the transported fish. To better determine the magnitude and location of releases, distribution and abundance studies were undertaken. There is a decrease in abundance from upstream areas over time, indicating a general downstream movement. In the Naches System, the lower Naches River is heavily utilized by juvenile spring chinook during the early summer. A preliminary study evaluated physical limitations of production. On a single evening 67 fish were killed on diversion screens at Chandler Canal. This constituted 5.7% of the wild spring chinook entering the canal and 8.2% of the fall chinook. The larger hatchery spring chinook sustained a 2.3% loss. Adult returns resulted in 443 redds in the Yakima System, with 360 in the Yakima River and 83 in the Naches System.

  15. Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Oregon and Washington stream temperature data Figure 4 and 5. Herman Creek (Oxbow Hatchery): 7-Day Moving.7 (10 cfs) 50 powerhouse discharge river mile 4.51 (20 cfs) Upper Lenz or Odell cr no info Davis water

  16. Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The law creates a 200-foot riverfront area that extends on both sides of rivers and streams. The riverfront area is 25 feet in the following municipalities: Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Chelsea,...

  17. Case Studies in River Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Site Description and Background --History of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Aggradation of Abandoned Channels Cheongmi Stream and Mangyeong River Cheongmi Stream South Korea In Collaboration

  18. Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act establishes the Niobrara Council, to assist in all aspects of the management of the Niobrara scenic river corridor and promulgate rules and regulations related to the preservation of the...

  19. Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro electricity Development Co Ltd in Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao...

  20. Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after their release, representing a residualization rate of 12.8% (21 of 164). Snorkeling revealed considerable overlap of habitat use (in space and time) by residual hatchery steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss in the South Santiam River. Results from our study (and others) also indicated that hatchery steelhead juveniles typically dominate interactions with naturally produced O. mykiss juveniles. The overlap in space and time, combined with the competitive advantage that residual hatchery steelhead appear to have over naturally produced O. mykiss, increases the potential for negative ecological interactions that could have population-level effects on the wild winter steelhead population of the South Santiam River.

  1. EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

  2. October 1, 1989 tornado at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, M.J.; Kurzeja, R.J.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tornado with wind speeds in the 113 to 157 mph range struck the southern portion of the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC at around 7:30 pm on October 1, 1989. The tornado was spawned from a severe thunderstorm with a height of 57,000 ft in a warm and humid air mass. Two million dollars in timber damage occurred over 2,500 acres along a ten-mile swath, but no onsite structural damage or personal injury occurred. Tree-fall patterns indicated that some of this damage was the result of thunderstorm downbursts which accompanied the tornado. Ground-based and aerial photography showed both snapped and mowed over trees which indicate that the tornado was elevated at times. 4 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. You have remarkable ideas. share them at the Falling Walls lab!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    of the falling wallS lab + conference berlin 8/9 nov 2012 aPPlYnoW!www.falling-walls.com/lab THE FALLING WALLS

  4. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems  and  rock  fall  source  and  impact  areas,  it  meters  from  a  rock  fall  source  area.   The   success  possible  to  the  rock  fall  source  areas,   spacing  

  5. SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595 to, NEPA and Section 401 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1341). #12;

  6. SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321-4347; hereinafter "NEPA") and Section 401 of the Federal Water Pollution

  7. La servidumbre por deuda en el mbito rural del sur de la India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , programas de desarrollo Debt-bondage in Rural South India The article explores how migrant rural workers4 83 La servidumbre por deuda en el ámbito rural del sur de la India David Picherit David Picherit trabajadores rurales migrantes en el sur de la India negocian y conciben el endeudamiento en un contexto de

  8. Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well...

  9. Sediment transport and topographic evolution of a coupled river and river plume system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment transport and topographic evolution of a coupled river and river plume system inundation from storms, hurricanes, and tsunamis [Tornqvist et al., 2007; Blum and Roberts, 2009; Jerolmack

  10. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2003-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Tara

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Juvenile Outmigration and Survival M&E project in the Umatilla River subbasin between 2004-2006. Information is used to make informed decisions on hatchery effectiveness, natural production success, passage improvement and flow enhancement strategies. Data collected includes annual estimates of smolt abundance, migration timing, and survival, life history characteristics and productivity status and trends for spring and fall Chinook salmon, coho salmon and summer steelhead. Productivity data provided is the key subbasin scale measure of the effectiveness of salmon and steelhead restoration actions in the Umatilla River. Information is also used for regional planning and recovery efforts of Mid-Columbia River (MCR) ESA-listed summer steelhead. Monitoring is conducted via smolt trapping and PIT-tag interrogation at Three Mile Falls Dam. The Umatilla Juvenile Outmigration and Survival Project was established in 1994 to evaluate the success of management actions and fisheries restoration efforts in the Umatilla River Basin. Project objectives for the 2004-2006 period were to: (1) operate the PIT tag detection system at Three Mile Falls Dam (TMFD), (2) enhance provisional PIT-tag interrogation equipment at the east bank adult fish ladder, (3) monitor the migration timing, abundance and survival of naturally-produced juvenile salmonids and trends in natural production, (4) determine migration parameters and survival of hatchery-produced fish representing various rearing, acclimation and release strategies, (5) evaluate the relative survival between transported and non-transported fish, (6) monitor juvenile life history characteristics and evaluate trends over time, (7) investigate the effects of river, canal, fishway operations and environmental conditions on smolt migration and survival, (8) document the temporal distribution and diversity of resident fish species, and (9) participate in planning and coordination activities within the basin and dissemination of results.

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 2002 SCM IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5govCampaignsFall 1997 Cloud IOPgovCampaignsFall

  12. IN THIS ISSUE... Noted writers highlight River City Writers Series for fall 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memphis, University of

    to power a TV for three hours. One recycled glass bottle would save enough energy to power a computer for 25 minutes while one recycled plastic bottle would save enough energy to power a 60-watt light bulb

  13. Investigation of the July 1, 2011, Fall Injury at the Savannah River Site |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002 InvestigationFuel

  14. Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

  15. Long-term, One-dimensional Simulation of Lower Snake River Temperatures for Current and Unimpounded Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the study was to compare water temperatures in the Lower Snake River for current (impounded) and unimpounded conditions using a mathematical model of the river system. A long-term analysis was performed using the MASS1 one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and water quality model. The analysis used historical flows and meteorological conditions for a 35-year period spanning between 1960 and 1995. Frequency analysis was performed on the model results to calculate river temperatures at various percent of time exceeded levels. Results were are also analyzed to compute the time when, during the year, water temperatures rose above or fell below various temperature levels. The long-term analysis showed that the primary difference between the current and unimpounded river scenarios is that the reservoirs decrease the water temperature variability. The reservoirs also create a thermal inertia effect which tends to keep water cooler later into the spring and warmer later into the fall compared to the unimpounded river condition. Given the uncertainties in the simulation model, inflow temperatures, and meteorological conditions the results show only relatively small differences between current and unimpounded absolute river temperatures.

  16. Clocking the Rise and Fall of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Rise and Fall of Core-Collapse Supernovae The Rise and Fall of Core-Collapse Supernovae 2D and 3D Models Shed New Light on What Fuels an Exploding Star July 2, 2015 | Tags:...

  17. advanced falling film: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grade Lathrop, Daniel P. 29 Advanced Virology MCBI 7460 Fall 2013 Tuesdays from 2 to 5 pm Engineering Websites Summary: Advanced Virology MCBI 7460 Fall 2013 Tuesdays from 2 to 5...

  18. ME 119 a Prof. A. Minnich Fall 2011 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ME 119 a Prof. A. Minnich Fall 2011 Syllabus ME 119a - Heat Transfer: Conduction and Radiation community and perpetuating the Honor System." #12;ME 119 a Prof. A. Minnich Fall 2011 Syllabus Schedule

  19. CMPE 185 Fall 1999 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Fall 1999 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Kresge 327, MWF 2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Fall 1999 4 Special guest lecturers I may arrange to have some guest lectures

  20. CMPE 185 Fall 2000 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Fall 2000 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Kresge 327, MWF 2, and need to do the grading mostly on Dec 2. Karplus Info 1 #12; 2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Fall 2000 4 Special

  1. Global Studies Course List Fall 2010 (2111) COURSE LIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    2111-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ...........................................................................5 2. Global Economy and Global Governance .................................................9 3 from one of six Global Concentrations (Sustainable Development; Global Economy and Global GovernanceGlobal Studies Course List ­ Fall 2010 (2111) Page 1 COURSE LIST Fall 2010 (2111) Global Studies

  2. arts fall training: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 BA: Art History Fall--First Year Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: BA: Art History Fall--First Year ART...

  3. Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference November 18, 2014 10:00AM CST to November 20, 2014 4:00PM CST Richland Community College...

  4. Highlights of the Fall 2013 Implementation Guidelines for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Highlights of the Fall 2013 Implementation Guidelines for Presidential Directive 2009-05 Maureen not permit financial aid for classes not required for the degree.) #12;THANKYOU!!! Fall 2013 Implementation

  5. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat

  6. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation ope

  7. http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation >>> Transportation operat > Freight traffic > Commodities > Travel time > Travel demand > http

  8. Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December...

  9. Elm Fork of the Trinity River Floodplain Management Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tickle, Greg; Clary, Melinda

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ELM FORK OF THE TRINITY RIVER FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT STUDYof the Elm Fork of the Trinity River, Dallas County, Dallas,

  10. HKUST Programming Contest 2006 Fall Page 1 of 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dekai

    Programming Contest 2006 Fall Page 4 of 7 Problem C ­ Marble Arrangement Given the number of marbles of threeHKUST Programming Contest 2006 Fall Page 1 of 7 HKUST Programming Contest 2006 Fall Sponsored Programming Contest 2006 Fall Page 2 of 7 Problem A ­ Infinite Path (0,0) (0,1) (0,2) (0,3) (0,4) (0,5) (1

  11. FINANCE DEPARTMENT Office Hours Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    FINANCE DEPARTMENT Office Hours Fall 2014 NAME OFFICE HOURS COURSE # COURSE TITLE DAY TIME ROOM-1515 and by appointment FIN 323.8 FIN 323.9 FIN 323.11 FIN 326.1 Fundamentals of Finance Fundamentals of Finance Fundamentals of Finance Financial Institution Mgt TTH TTH TH TTH 0930-1045 1100-1215 1600-1840 1230-1345 GMCS

  12. 2014 Fall Seminar Series September 19, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014 Fall Seminar Series September 19, 2014 Gregg 320, 12:00 ­ 1:00 Kathleen D. White, PhD, PE U and associated water resources infrastructure represent a tremendous Federal investment (~$400B over the past 50 years) that supports public safety and local and national economic growth. Hence, we have a compelling

  13. ECONOMIC EMERGENCY PROGRAM International Falls Plant Shutdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Falls. An additional 35 jobs within the corporate structure will also be affected. As the community The manufacturing industry employs 1,100 of those workers, or approximately 17 percent of all jobs, thus making is classified as a manufacturing business. Of the 1,100 manufacturing jobs in Koochiching County, 900

  14. Dynamics of Clouds Fall Semester 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS712 Dynamics of Clouds Fall Semester 2012 Meeting Times: T/Th: 9-10:15am Room: ATS 101-2pm Course Description: This class focuses on the general dynamics of cloud systems. Models of fog and other Tools / Skills Cotton, W.R., G.H. Bryan, and S.C. van den Heever, 2010: Storm and Cloud Dynamics

  15. Landscape Ecology + Planning NRE 687 Fall 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    Landscape Ecology + Planning NRE 687 ­ Fall 2013 Course Syllabus NRE 687: Landscape Planning in the field of landscape ecology. Hierarchy theory and methods for working across spatial scales. The social mining, collection, and validation Scientific research and application Digital tools, including Arc

  16. Fall 2012 President's Welcome Back Dear Colleagues,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering, Chemistry, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, and Physics departments. I'd like to thank of the formation of the College of Engineering and Computational Sciences, and Dean Kevin Moore has experiencedFall 2012 President's Welcome Back Dear Colleagues, The excitement of new and returning students

  17. Syllabus Fall 2011 Instructor: Dr. Ginny Catania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catania, Ginny

    Glaciology Syllabus Fall 2011 Instructor: Dr. Ginny Catania Office Location: EPS 3.128, gcatania@ig.utexas.edu Office Hours: Tuesdays 1-2pm, or by appointment Class Times/Location: T & Th: 11-12:30pm EPS 1

  18. Fall 2013 BOSTONIA ancient Greece is alive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Fall 2013 BOSTONIA ancient Greece is alive and well and living conspicuously, for those who pay. And while the University has a sizable community of scholars who focus on ancient Greece from several Professor is David Roochnik, a CAS professor and chair of philosophy. "Ancient Greece is a living world

  19. Enrollment Analysis Final for Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    ) November 6, 2014 Project Request: Enrollment Analysis ­ Final for Fall 2014. Requested by: Dr. Brooks Keel, President; Dr. Teresa Thompson, Vice President, Student Affairs and Enrollment Management Project Abstract, progression, and graduation. Methodology: The following items and their sources are included in this report

  20. High Noon Lecture Series 2012 Fall Schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    signed the Affordable Care Act into law. Some health insurance reforms have already taken place at how important arenas of constitutional law, from health care reform to abortion to affirmative actionHigh Noon Lecture Series 2012 Fall Schedule September 19 "Deciphering the Affordable Care Act" Glen

  1. CALIFORNIA DREAMIN' IGHSPA 2013 FALL CONFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the country's population, represents only 2.3 percent of ground source heat pump activity ....." SourceCALIFORNIA DREAMIN' IGHSPA 2013 FALL CONFERENCE Bill Martin built an air-sourced heat pump home's potential to lower greenhouse gases been recognized by regulators? Have electric IOUs financed ground loops

  2. Math 110 Fall 2007 Basic Calculus I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckmire, Ron

    will have at some point t years in the future, if we know the rate M (t) at which money increases in the space below: 1 #12;Math 110 Class 31 Fall 2007 Newton's Law of Cooling Newton's Law of Cooling states that the rate of cooling is proportional to the difference between the object's temperature and the ambient

  3. CenterPiece | Fall 2012 15 REBUILDINGTHELOSTARCHIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    to be sectioned, and processing them for regular histopathology, high throughput X-ray fluorescence elementalCenterPiece | Fall 2012 15 REBUILDINGTHELOSTARCHIVE From the 1950s until the end of the Cold War and stockpiled food, scientists around the world worked to understand the biological consequences of nuclear

  4. FALL LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE OCTOBER 29, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusu, Adrian

    FALL LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE OCTOBER 29, 2004 OVERVIEW This conference is a unique opportunity for your chapter officers and members to learn about HOSA leadership, and the responsibilities for their office. This conference will combine the leadership skills training and officer responsibilities

  5. Fall Rubber Colloquium CHARACTERIZATION OF DISPERSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    9th Fall Rubber Colloquium CHARACTERIZATION OF DISPERSION MECHANISMS OF AGGLOMERATED FILLERS (styrene-butadiene rubber). The objective was to determine the role of the intrinsic parameters Carbon black and silica are widely used as reinforcing fillers for rubber compounds in the tire industry

  6. Experimental Foods 709:489 Fall 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    #11 Emulsions & fat replacers F 11/30 Food Colors T 12/4 Flavors & seasonings F 12/7 Genetically modified foods Reserve reading Research paper due 12/7 T 12/11 EXAM #12;Experimental Foods 709:489 Fall 2012 Lecture: Tuesday & Friday 9:30- 10:25 AM 106 HSB Lab sections

  7. FALL 2012 OU/SPC CAREER EXPERIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FALL 2012 OU/SPC CAREER EXPERIENCE PROGRAM The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) and the OU School will spend between 8-10 hrs per week at the SPC working on a research project related to U.S. severe weather through this program. The student will also will have the opportunity to spend several days in the SPC

  8. Chemistry 106X -Fall 2010 General Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Chemistry 106X - Fall 2010 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 9 bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. by Kotz, Treichel, and Townsend-0-495-38703-9 Electronic Book - ISBN 978-0-495-68043-7 · OWL pin number for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1

  9. CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Fall, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (38% are employed or attending grad school) #12;Natural Resource Management (17 completed surveys) 4CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Fall, 2002 Received 73 completed surveys out of 79 students or are planning to attend graduate school after graduation $21,710 Average salary of the students who indicated

  10. Inside this issue: New this fall 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Braddock K.

    .albany.edu/gogreen. Interesting in trying vanpooling? Want to car- pool but don't know how to find someone to share the ride of Environmental Sustainability Sustainability Bulletin New this fall Car sharing Rent cars on an hourly basis the week following the program for any group interested in trying it out. The car- pooling service features

  11. Internship -Fall 2011 Search Solutions Digital Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Internship - Fall 2011 Search Solutions Digital Media SSdigitalmedia.com About us: Search Solutions Search Solutions Digital Media 1500 N. Stephenson HWY Royal Oak, MI 48067 Amanda are a full service digital advertising agency. We build custom web packages to meet our clients' exact needs

  12. Purdue College of Science|Fall 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Purdue College of Science|Fall 2012 :: Geosciences in the Cinema :: Field Notes Colombia in Roberts Frederick L. Hovde Dean of Science Joseph S. Francisco Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Biological Sciences Paul B. Shepson Chemistry Sunil Prabhakar Computer Science Jon Harbor Earth, Atmospheric

  13. California Environmental Law & Policy Issues (Fall 2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Law 273.71 California Environmental Law & Policy Issues (Fall 2008) Units: 2 CCN (2Ls/3Ls): 49696 for Environmental Law & Policy and a Lecturer in Residence at Boalt Hall School of Law. He received his law degree of key California environmental law and policy issues. Guest speakers include a distinguished group

  14. USDA Rural Community Development Initiative | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Community Development Initiative November 12, 2014 9:00PM EST U.S. Department of Agriculture The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Housing Service is seeking...

  15. Traits Affecting Household Livestock Marketing Decisions in Rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traits Affecting Household Livestock Marketing Decisions in Rural Kenya Katherine L. Baldwin community of Central Kenya, we regressed household offtake rate of both cattle and smallstock against in Kenya. Because pastoralist economies depend almost exclusively upon livestock production, most recent

  16. Butler Rural Electric Cooperative- Residential Rebate Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Butler Rural Electric Cooperative provides rebates for geothermal heat pumps, dual fuel heating systems, and water heaters. A $1,200 rebate is available to residential members that install a new...

  17. Butler Rural Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency Improvement Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Butler Rural Electric Cooperative, Inc. provides low interest loans (3.5%) for members to make energy efficiency improvements in eligible homes. There is a $15 application fee for all loans plus...

  18. The Rural Opportunity Initiative Enhanced Job Tax Credit (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rural Opportunity Initiative Enhanced Job Tax Credit program provides enhanced job tax credits to businesses locating or expanding in certain Tennessee counties considered Tier 2 or Tier 3...

  19. Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative Association (Linn County RECA) is a member-owned cooperative. To encourage energy efficiency, Linn County offers a number of rebates to residential customers....

  20. Effect of Government Policies on Urban and Rural Income Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    al. (2001), although the impact of the recent welfare reform does not appear to differ greatly that the impact of welfare reform on employment and earnings in the rural areas is smaller than in the urban areas

  1. QER- Comment of National Rural Electric Cooperative Association 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please find attached additional comments from the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA). Thank you for the opportunity to participate. If you have questions or need additional information, please do not hesitate to contact me.

  2. Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative- Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative Association (Linn County RECA) is a member-owned cooperative. To encourage energy efficiency, Linn County offers a number of equipment rebates to agricultural...

  3. Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative Association (Linn County RECA) is a member-owned cooperative. To encourage energy efficiency, Linn County offers a number of rebates to residential customers....

  4. Designing Robotic Artifacts: Rural School-Community Collaboration for Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Designing Robotic Artifacts: Rural School-Community Collaboration for Learning Claudia Urrea MIT of robotic artifacts and the use of other digital technologies can enhance student learning, while also artifact-be it a robot,

  5. Fuelwood Use by Rural Households in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox-Moore, Kellie J.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuelwood is an important source of domestic energy in rural regions of Brazil. In the Zona da Mata of Minas Gerais, native species from the Atlantic Forest are an important source of fuelwood, supplemented by wood from eucalyptus and coffee...

  6. Investigating Childhood Overweight and Obesity in Rural Settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serrano, Katrina 1983-

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Children’s risk for overweight and obesity is particularly high in rural areas of the United States. Many health, psychosocial, and economic consequences are associated with childhood overweight and obesity, which concerns health researchers...

  7. ESMAP-Rural Electrification Strategies/Africa Electrification...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy products. The goal of this initiative is to enhance quality of life and reduce poverty in rural areas of that region by offering an alternative to current fossil fuel based...

  8. NEJC: "Rural Development: Access to Justice and Access to Opportunities"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Description: This workshop will focus on understanding the programs of Rural Development (RD) and how a new generation of committed leaders and experts is needed to continue the contribution these...

  9. adult rural african: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Center 25 CAN SOLAR-BIOGAS HYBRID SYSTEMS BE THE SOLUTION TO SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SUPPLY IN RURAL AREAS? CiteSeer Summary: Access to modern energy services is a...

  10. The 2009 Outlook for Texas Rural Land Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klinefelter, Danny A.

    2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Farm income in 2009 will likely decline from previous years, and the value of rural land is likely to flatten out also. Producers need to increase their emphasis on financial and risk management....

  11. adult rural population: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Comparisons of Access to, Cost of, and Quality of Health Care Between Rural and Urban Populations Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: or...

  12. analysis eletrificacao rural: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: the current spectrum of state and local media in its coverage of health care reform help the implementation of reform in rural health policy?; 4. Better able to...

  13. fall convocation THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    fall convocation THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING fall convocation #12;Message from the Dean To the Fall 2012 University of New Mexico School of Engineering Graduates I am delighted and honored to welcome you to the University of New Mexico School of Engineering Convocation

  14. 30 BOSTONIA Fall 2014 PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATTIA BALSAMINI Lessons from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    30 BOSTONIA Fall 2014 PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATTIA BALSAMINI Lessons from #12;Fall 2014 BOSTONIA 31 Venice LASKOWSKI #12;32 BOSTONIA Fall 2014 On a warm June night, tourists sip cocktails on the banks of the Grand into the ground, effectively petrifying and preserving them. They put planks on top of these pillars, and marble

  15. Prof. A. Suciu Name: MTH 1733 QUIZ 4 Fall 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prof. A. Suciu Name: MTH 1733 QUIZ 4 Fall 1997 1. 6 points Solve the following initial value of differential equations: x 0 = 2x + y y 0 = \\Gammax + 4y #12; MTH 1733 Quiz 4 Fall 1997 3. 6 points A tank present? #12; MTH 1733 Quiz 4 Fall 1997 5. 6 points Consider the following autonomous differential

  16. Automatic Fall Detection Based on Doppler Radar Motion Signature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhihai "Henry"

    than one third of adults 65 and older fall each year in the United States. To address the problem, we above age 65 [2]. The death rate caused by falls among elders is increasing quickly over the past decade classification; SVM; kNN I. INTRODUCTION Falls are the leading causes of accidental death in the US population

  17. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    March 19, 2002 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Safety Basis and Radiation Protection Violations at the Savannah River Site, On March 19, 2002, the U.S....

  18. Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details...

  19. An Inside Look at River Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the seventh chapter of The Handford Story, the Energy Department takes a look at the River Corridor -- a 50-mile stretch of the Columbia River that flows through the Hanford site in southeast...

  20. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    December 5, 1997 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to an Unplanned Radioactive Material Intake at the Savannah River Site, (EA-97-12) On December 5, 1997, the...

  1. Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

  2. Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

  3. River System Hydrology in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,700 86,700 Proctor Leon River USACE 1963 59,400 54,702 310,100 Belton Leon River USACE 1954 457,600 432,978 640,000 Stillhouse Hollow Lampasas River USACE 1968 235,700 224,279 390,660 Georgetown San Gabriel R USACE 1980 37,100 36,980 87,600 Granger... San Gabriel R USACE 1980 65,500 50,540 162,200 Somerville Yequa Creek USACE 1967 160,110 154,254 337,700 Hubbard Creek Hubbard Creek WCTMWD 1962 317,750 317,750 í Post NF Double Mt WRMWD proposed 57,420 í í Alan Henry SF Double Mt Lubbock 1993 115...

  4. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  5. South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River J. Michael Jess Platte, and Arkansas rivers, for example, have been resolved through litigation brought before the U and Kansas are examples. In the Platte River watershed the State of Nebraska has experience allocating water

  6. Prepared in cooperation with the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program River Channel Topographic Surveys Collected Prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prepared in cooperation with the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program River Channel Topographic Surveys Collected Prior to and Following Elevated Flows in the Central Platte River, Spring 2008 Flows in the Central Platte River, Nebraska, Spring 2008 By Paul J. Kinzel Prepared in cooperation

  7. Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams W. Nicholas dams in the Columbia/Snake River hydrosystem may delay the upstream passage of the adults. To evaluate-to-day variations of spill and upstream fish passage at the eight dams of the Columbia/Snake river hydrosystem

  8. Historical Ecology of the lower santa clara river, Ventura river, and oxnard Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical Ecology of the lower santa clara river, Ventura river, and oxnard Plain: an analysis. Historical ecology of the lower Santa Clara River,Ventura River, and Oxnard Plain: an analysis of terrestrial layers are available on SFEI's website, at www.sfei.org/projects/VenturaHE. Permissions rights for images

  9. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Happy  Isles  and  the  1999  Glacier  Point  rock  falls,  there   was   an   attempt   to   monitor   rock   fall   in   Yosemite   Valley  

  10. Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

  11. EIS-0116-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Blue River-Gore Pass Portion of the Hayden-Blue River Transmission Line Project, Grand and Summit Counties, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This supplemental environmental impact statement by the Western Area Power Administration assesses the environmental effects of constructing, operating, and maintaining about 30 miles of 230/345-kV transmission line between the existing Gore Pass Substation northwest of Kremmling, Colorado, and a proposed new substation (not part of this action) near the Ute Pass Road. Alternatives assessed included routing and design alternatives plus the alternatives addressed in the Hayden-Blue River Final EIS, issued by the Rural Electrification Administration in July 1982 and adopted by DOE in June 1985 (see DOE/EIS-0116).

  12. Land Reallocation Reform in Rural China: A Behavioral Economics Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Lei; Bao, Helen X. H.; Jiang, Yan

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    in 9 The 2008 and 2010 surveys were conducted jointly by the Rural Development Institute, Renmin University of China, and Michigan State University. 10 The survey sampling consisted of two stages. In the first stage, 17 provinces were selected... Based on five surveys conducted by Renmin University of China (RUC) and Rural Development Institute (RDI) in the US. 5 The remainder of the paper is organized as follows. The development of the theoretical framework and testable hypotheses...

  13. Predictors of Psychological Health among Rural-Residing African Americans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Helene

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    in the West had higher rates of alcohol abuse and suicide, rural residents who lived in the Northeast had higher rates of total tooth loss. Rural health care continues to face numerous challenges in the areas of access, diversity, and a constantly growing... strong after controlling for age, education, marital status, physician’s health rating, dieting for medical reasons, use of psychiatric medicines, cigarette smoking, and use of alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine. They did not provide specific data...

  14. Licking Rural Electric Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin ZhongdiantouLichuan City Yujiang River Valley Hydro Co Ltd

  15. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  16. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: IMPACTS OF FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V.

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These “123 agreements” are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

  17. The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River estuary was a high-energy environment dominated by physical forces, with extensive sand Riddell November 28, 2000 ISAB 2000-5 #12;ISAB 2000-5 Estuary Report i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Northwest to an informed response to the Council. Consequently, this report has been prepared as a preliminary reply

  18. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfalls and river rises throughout the catchment and enablesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning system of Meteorology operates a flood warning system for the Logan and Albert River catchments based on a rainfall

  19. SRO -NERP-1 THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    AND TREATMENT by Whit Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Aiken , South Carolina A PUBLICATION OF EROA 'S SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK -SEPTEMBER 1977 COPIES MAY BE OBTAINEO FROM SAVANNAHSRO -NERP-1 SNAKES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT WITH INFORMATION ABOUT SNAKEBITE PREVENTION

  20. Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

  1. Geological Sciences 330 Fall 2007 Sedimentary Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Principles of sedimentology and stratigraphy. 4th edition. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. 662 pp: Principles of Stratigraphy and Sedimentology (1) Week 2 10 Sept Sedimentary Particles: Weathering (13, 15 & 16) 28 Nov Integrated Stratigraphy and Sedimentology Lab 10: Well-log Interpretation Week 14

  2. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We sampled and released 313 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from the Tucannon River in 2004. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 231 of these individuals, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 44 bull trout. Twenty-five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Ten bull trout that were radio-tagged in 2003 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring of 2004. One of these fish outmigrated into the Snake River in the fall, and remained undetected until February, when it's tag was located near the confluence of Alkali Flat Creek and the Snake River. The remaining 9 fish spent the winter between Tucannon River miles 2.1 (Powers Road) and 36.0 (Tucannon Fish Hatchery). Seven of these fish retained their tags through the summer, and migrated to known spawning habitat prior to September 2004. During June and July, radio-tagged bull trout again exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. As in past years, we observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October, suggesting post spawning outmigrations. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from river mile 42 at Camp Wooten downstream to river mile 17, near the Highway 12 bridge. As in previous years, we did not collect data associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the vicinity of the hydropower dams on the main stem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged Lotek model NTC-6-2 nano-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20, 30, and 40 ft. We were able to maintain tag detection and code separation at all depths from both a boat and 200 ft. above water surface in a helicopter. However, we lost detection capability from 40 ft. water depth when we passed 700 ft. above the water surface in a helicopter. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we reduced the size of the radio tags that we implanted, and delayed most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

  3. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  4. CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 1998 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    Name: -1- CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 1998 Professor Walba Third Hour Exam November 19, 1998 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) PLEASE read the questions carefully! This is a closed-book "open model" exam. You may use for scratch. H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

  5. CHEM 3311, Fall 2010 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    CHEM 3311, Fall 2010 Professor Walba First Hour Exam September 23, 2010 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) CU-book exam. The use of notes, calculators, scratch paper, or cell phones will not be allowed during the exam the backs of the pages for scratch. ! H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

  6. CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    Name: -1- CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba Third Hour Exam November 16, 2000 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) PLEASE read the questions carefully! This is a closed-book "open model" exam. You may use for scratch. H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

  7. CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    Name: -1- CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba Second Hour Exam October 26, 2000 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) PLEASE read the questions carefully! This is a closed-book "open model" exam. You may use for scratch. H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

  8. CHEM 3311, Fall 2010 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    CHEM 3311, Fall 2010 Professor Walba Second Hour Exam October 21, 2010 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) CU-book exam. The use of notes, calculators, scratch paper, or cell phones will not be allowed during the exam the backs of the pages for scratch. ! H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

  9. Journal of Undergraduate Research, Fall 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , electrospray is not a universal ionizer. Some of the ingredients may not have been ionized and therefore would not be detected by the mass spectrometer. Qualitative analysis was performed on each of the samples’ NMR spectra. The body wash samples...The Journal of Undergraduate Research at the University of Kansas Second Edition | Fall 2009 ON THE COVER Jayhawk Boulevard winds between Fraser Hall (left) and Lippincott and Dyche halls on the Lawrence campus. Courtesy University Relations...

  10. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation : Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terra-Berns, Mary

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group continued to actively engage in implementing wildlife mitigation actions in 2002. Regular Work Group meetings were held to discuss budget concerns affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, to present potential acquisition projects, and to discuss and evaluate other issues affecting the Work Group and Project. Work Group members protected 1,386.29 acres of wildlife habitat in 2002. To date, the Albeni Falls project has protected approximately 5,914.31 acres of wildlife habitat. About 21% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities have increased as more properties are purchased and continue to center on restoration, operation and maintenance, and monitoring. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development of a monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. This year the Work Group began implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program performing population and plant surveys, data evaluation and storage, and map development as well as developing management plans. Assuming that the current BPA budget restrictions will be lifted in the near future, the Work Group expects to increase mitigation properties this coming year with several potential projects.

  11. Falling through the black hole horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brustein, Ram

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the fate of a small classical object, a "stick", as it falls through the horizon of a large black hole (BH). Classically, the equivalence principle dictates that the stick is affected by small tidal forces, and Hawking's quantum-mechanical model of BH evaporation makes essentially the same prediction. If, on the other hand, the BH horizon is surrounded by a "firewall", the stick will be consumed as it falls through. We have recently extended Hawking's model by taking into account the quantum fluctuations of the geometry and the classical back-reaction of the emitted particles. Here, we calculate the strain exerted on the falling stick for our model. The strain depends on the near-horizon state of the Hawking pairs. We find that, after the Page time when the state of the pairs deviates significantly from maximal entanglement (as required by unitarity), the induced strain in our semiclassical model is still parametrically small. This is because the number of the disentangled pairs is parametrically ...

  12. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Erik

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded the development of two master plans which outline the rationale, and general approach, for implementing a defined group of projects that are an integral part of a comprehensive watershed goal to 'Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of anadromous and resident fish within the Hood River Subbasin'. The Hood River Production Master Plan and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1992. Action items identified in the two master plans, as well as in a later document entitled 'Hood River/Pelton Ladder Master Agreement' (ODFW and CTWSRO Undated), are designed to achieve two biological fish objectives: (1) to increase production of wild summer and winter steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to levels commensurate with the subbasins current carrying capacity and (2) re-establishing a self-sustaining population of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Numerical fish objectives for subbasin escapement, spawner escapement, and subbasin harvest are defined for each of these species in Coccoli (2000). Several projects are presently funded by the BPA to achieve the Hood River subbasin's numerical fish objectives for summer and winter steelhead and spring chinook salmon. They include BPA project numbers 1998-021-00 (Hood River Fish Habitat), 1998-053-03 (Hood River Production Program - CTWSRO: M&E), 1998-053-07 (Parkdale Fish Facility), 1998-053-08 (Powerdale/Oak Springs O&M), and 1998-053-12 (Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study). Collectively, they are implemented under the umbrella of what has come to be defined as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP is jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO). Strategies for achieving the HRPP's biological fish objectives for the Hood River subbasin were initially devised based on various assumptions about (1) subbasin carrying capacity, (2) survival rates for selected life history stages, and (3) historic and current escapements of wild, natural, and hatchery stocks of anadromous salmonids to the Hood River subbasin. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife began funding a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) project in December 1991 to collect the quantitative biological information needed to (1) more accurately assess the validity of these assumptions and (2) evaluate the proposed hatchery supplementation component of the HRPP. Bonneville Power Administration assumed funding of the M&E project in August 1992. The M&E project was initially confined to sampling anadromous salmonids escaping to an adult trapping facility operated at Powerdale Dam; which is located at River Mile (RM) 4.5 on the mainstem of the Hood River. Stock specific life history and biological data was collected to (1) monitor subbasin spawner escapements and (2) collect pre-implementation data critical to evaluating the newly proposed HRPP's potential biological impact on indigenous populations of resident fish. The scope of the M&E project was expanded in 1994 to collect the data needed to quantify (1) subbasin smolt production and carrying capacity, (2) smolt to adult survival rates, and (3) the spatial distribution of indigenous populations of summer and winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon. A creel was incorporated into the M&E project in December 1996 to evaluate the HRPP with respect to its defined subbasin and spawner escapement objectives for Hood River stocks of wild and hatchery summer and winter steelhead and for natural and Deschutes stock hatchery spring chinook salmon. In 1996, the M&E project also began monitoring streamflow at various locations in the Hood River subbasin. Streamflow data will be used to correlate subbasin smolt production with summer streamflows. Data collected from 1991-1999 is reported in the following annual progress reports: Olsen et al. (1994), Olsen et al

  13. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices.

  14. A cross-sectional study of the prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in rural Nepali women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and risk factors for hypertension in rural Nepali women. BMCHe J: Global burden of hypertension: analysis of worldwideNeupane RP: Prevalence of hypertension in a rural community

  15. Does Natural Resource Extraction Mitigate Poverty and Inequality? Evidence from Rural Mexico and a Lacandona Rainforest Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Feldman, Alejandro; Mora, Jorge; Taylor, J. Edward

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitigate Poverty and Inequality? Evidence from Rural MexicoMitigate Poverty and Inequality? Evidence from Rural MexicoBootstrap Inference for Inequality and Poverty Measures’,

  16. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  17. DOE WINDExchange Webinar: Rural Energy for America Program 2014 Farm Bill

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February, Congress passed a new Farm Bill that includes an Energy Title. The Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) provides grants and loan guarantees to farmers, ranchers, and rural small...

  18. A Resource Kit for Participatory Socio-technical Design in Rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    A Resource Kit for Participatory Socio-technical Design in Rural Kenya Abstract We describe our, initially in two rural villages in Kenya. Mobile technologies are employed to bridge remote sensor networks

  19. "Table HC8.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Space Heating...

  20. Trucking country : food politics and the transformation of rural life in Postwar America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Shane, 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trucking replaced railroads as the primary link between rural producers and urban consumers in the mid-twentieth century. With this technological change came a fundamental transformation of the defining features of rural ...

  1. Sandstone-carbonate cycles in Tensleep Formation, eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittersbacher, D.J.; Wheeler, D.M.; Horne, J.C.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outcrop and core study of the Tensleep Formation in the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin has revealed cyclic deposits of eolian sandstone and marine carbonate. These cycles, several meters to tens of meters thick, represent the rise and fall of sea level on the Wyoming shelf during Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time. Falling sea level was marked by development of a sharp scour surface at the base of each cycle and progradation of eolian dunes over an exposed, shallow carbonate shelf. Subsequent sea level rise resulted in the reworking of eolian sand through wave activity and burrowing organisms. Subtidal carbonates overlies the reworked eolian sands and are sandy at the base, grading upward into fossiliferous dolomite mudstones to wackestones. The sharp scour surface, normally present directly on the subtidal carbonates, indicates that erosion eliminated any regressive marine deposits by deflation to the ground-water table during shoreline progradation or by deflation related to abrupt drop in sea level. Relative sea level changes on the low-relief Wyoming shelf affected large areas during Tensleep deposition. This resulted in widespread sandstone-carbonate cycles that provide the basis for regional correlations of the Tensleep Formation throughout the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin.

  2. RURAL HEALTH OUTREACH PROGRAM (RHOP) "Helping Nurses 2011-2012 ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    of Rural Health Clinics (TARHC) and East and West Texas Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Assisted cities, throughout rural Texas, to host RHOP regional CNE programs Collaborations continued with Texas Organization of Rural and Community Hospitals (TORCH), Texas Hospital Association (THA), Texas Association

  3. SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1341). Compliance with all applicable environmental laws and regulations

  4. Potential of distributed wood-based biopower systems serving basic electricity needs in rural Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    October 2009 Revised 8 January 2010 Accepted 9 January 2010 Keywords: Rural electrification Gasification supply. Although virtually non-existent, rural electrification is receiving very little attentionPotential of distributed wood-based biopower systems serving basic electricity needs in rural

  5. Freight logistics services for rural economies: User needs and future challenges Angela Cristina Marqui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Pete

    Freight logistics services for rural economies: User needs and future challenges Angela Cristina requirements for logistics and transport services of small and micro rural businesses. This paper explores for the logistics requirements of rural businesses calls for intelligent software platforms that provide solutions

  6. Removal of Barriers to the Use of Renewable Energy Sources for Rural Electrification in Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    in Latin America, a series of interviews with different agents involved in the rural electrificationRemoval of Barriers to the Use of Renewable Energy Sources for Rural Electrification in Chile Forcano 2 Removal of Barriers to the Use of Renewable Energy Sources for Rural Electrification in Chile

  7. Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from August 19, 2003 to July 8, 2004. A total of 3,388 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,482 adult, 638 jack, and 2,150 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawytscha); 8,319 adult and 667 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,965 adult and 270 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 34 summer steelhead and 31 adult and 9 jack spring chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 3,166 summer steelhead; 1,076 adult, 554 jack and 2,026 subjack fall chinook; 8,213 adult and 647 jack coho; and 2,152 adult and 174 jack spring chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 121 summer steelhead; 388 adult and 19 jack fall chinook; and 561 adult and 29 jack spring chinook were collected for brood. In addition, 239 spring chinook were collected for the outplanting efforts in the Walla Walla Basin. There were also 25 pair hatchery steelhead adults collected for the progeny maker study. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at rivermile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 184 days between January 12 and July 6, 2004. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 173 days and were trapped 10 days. An estimated 44 pounds of juvenile fish were transported from Westland to the Umatilla River boat ramp (RM 0.5). Approximately 84% of the juveniles transported were salmonids. No steelhead kelts were hauled from Westland this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on February 10, 2004 for outmigration sampling and continued until July 7, 2004 when sampling was discontinued. The juvenile bypass ran at the 5 cfs level until the initiation of Phase I on August 15, 2004. The juvenile trap was operated by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) under the Evaluation of Umatilla Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration Project.

  8. Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en Y earEnergy T H E DofitemsFallFederalOfficeLLC (WRPS)

  9. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the river’s basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

  10. Digital Mapping and Environmental Characterization of National Wild and Scenic River Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Bosnall, Peter [National Park Service; Hetrick, Shelaine L [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatially accurate geospatial information is required to support decision-making regarding sustainable future hydropower development. Under a memorandum of understanding among several federal agencies, a pilot study was conducted to map a subset of National Wild and Scenic Rivers (WSRs) at a higher resolution and provide a consistent methodology for mapping WSRs across the United States and across agency jurisdictions. A subset of rivers (segments falling under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service) were mapped at a high resolution using the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). The spatial extent and representation of river segments mapped at NHD scale were compared with the prevailing geospatial coverage mapped at a coarser scale. Accurately digitized river segments were linked to environmental attribution datasets housed within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory s National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program database to characterize the environmental context of WSR segments. The results suggest that both the spatial scale of hydrography datasets and the adherence to written policy descriptions are critical to accurately mapping WSRs. The environmental characterization provided information to deduce generalized trends in either the uniqueness or the commonness of environmental variables associated with WSRs. Although WSRs occur in a wide range of human-modified landscapes, environmental data layers suggest that they provide habitats important to terrestrial and aquatic organisms and recreation important to humans. Ultimately, the research findings herein suggest that there is a need for accurate, consistent, mapping of the National WSRs across the agencies responsible for administering each river. Geospatial applications examining potential landscape and energy development require accurate sources of information, such as data layers that portray realistic spatial representations.

  11. Loan/deposit links at rural Texas banks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podolecki, Vera Burton

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Agricultural Economics LOAN/DEPOSIT LINKS AT RURAL TEXAS RANKS A Thesis by VERA SURTON PODOLECKI Approved as to style and content by: fCha' an of Comm' ee) . '/ (Head' of Dep rtment) (Member ) (Membe May 1977 441'726 ABSTRACT Loan/Deposit Links... in agri- cultural lending on deposit level which in turn influences bank pro- fitability. This paper is directed towards providing the rural banker with tangible evidence of the effect of lending on deposit levels over time, and providing a...

  12. Fall 2001 Vol. 2, No. 4 ii Colorado Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Climate Fall 2001 Vol. 2, No. 4 #12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents On Being a Small . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 July 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 August 2001

  13. Idaho Falls Power- Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Falls Power is offering a zero interest loan program to qualifying commercial customers to install efficient lighting and other energy conservation measures. The building must receive its...

  14. Idaho Falls Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Falls Power offers rebates to eligible customers on energy efficient HVAC measures and weatherization upgrades. Rebates are available on heat pumps, new manufactured homes and insulation....

  15. Idaho Falls Power- Commercial Energy Conservation Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to loan programs, Idaho Falls Power offers rebates for customers meeting certain criteria. An energy audit will inspect the following measures and recommend upgrades as needed:...

  16. Math 13800 Mathematics for Elementary Education II Fall 2014 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Math Dept.

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematics for Elementary Education II. Fall 2014. Coordinator: Renee Figueroa (formerly Renee Roames) MATH 808 ph: 494-1929 email: rroames@

  17. Math 13700 Mathematics for Elementary Education I Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematics for Elementary Education I. Fall 2014. Coordinator: Renee Figueroa (formerly Renee Roames) MATH 808 ph: 494-1929 email: rroames@purdue.

  18. albeni falls wildlife: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JAMES A. MARTIN, Department of Wildlife, Fisheries 5 Wildlife Landscape Ecology -Syllabus FS599 Fall Term 2010 Geosciences Websites Summary: 1 Wildlife Landscape Ecology -...

  19. #tipsEnergy: Weatherizing Your Home for Fall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the start of colder weather, we are sharing fall energy-saving tips that will help you save money and stay comfortable.

  20. Cathode fall measurement in a dielectric barrier discharge in helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Yanpeng; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Yaoge [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)] [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method based on the “zero-length voltage” extrapolation is proposed to measure cathode fall in a dielectric barrier discharge. Starting, stable, and discharge-maintaining voltages were measured to obtain the extrapolation zero-length voltage. Under our experimental conditions, the “zero-length voltage” gave a cathode fall of about 185 V. Based on the known thickness of the cathode fall region, the spatial distribution of the electric field strength in dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric helium is determined. The strong cathode fall with a maximum field value of approximately 9.25 kV/cm was typical for the glow mode of the discharge.

  1. ,"International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

  2. ,"Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Niagara Falls,...

  3. Safety and Occupational Health Specialist (Fall Protection Specialist)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position serves as a Fall Protection Specialist in the Safety Office. Safety is responsible for administering BPA's safety program and providing advice, counsel, direction,...

  4. Seating Final Exam, Fall 2011, Bailey classes, Lambert Fieldhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Charlotte M

    2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Seating Final Exam, Fall 2011, KLOSTER classes, Lambert. Fieldhouse. NAME. ROW. SEAT NUMBER. Arrington, Brook L. 1. 1. Blevins, Sash M. 2. 1. Brown ...

  5. Cedar Falls Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cedar Falls Utilities (CFU) Energy Efficiency Rebate Program provides rebates for energy efficient heating and cooling equipment, thermal envelope improvements and appliance recycling. The...

  6. Accident Investigation of the September 20, 2012 Fatal Fall from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 20, 2012 Fatal Fall from the Dworshak-Taft 1 Transmission Tower, at the Bonneville Power Marketing Administration Accident Investigation of the September 20, 2012 Fatal...

  7. Accident Investigation of the June 1, 2013, Stairway Fall Resulting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Accident Investigation of the June 1, 2013, Stairway Fall Resulting in a Federal Employee Fatality at DOE Headquarters Germantown, Maryland Accident Investigation of the June 1,...

  8. The NRS Transect 4:1 (fall 1985)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UC Natural Reserve System

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transect, Fall Publications Carpinteria Salt Marsh: Wayne R.natural history of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh, complete withencompasses the 120-acre Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, a

  9. Hawking radiation on a falling lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ted Jacobson; David Mattingly

    2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Scalar field theory on a lattice falling freely into a 1+1 dimensional black hole is studied using both WKB and numerical approaches. The outgoing modes are shown to arise from incoming modes by a process analogous to a Bloch oscillation, with an admixture of negative frequency modes corresponding to the Hawking radiation. Numerical calculations show that the Hawking effect is reproduced to within 0.5% on a lattice whose proper spacing where the wavepacket turns around at the horizon is $\\sim0.08$ in units where the surface gravity is 1.

  10. Bioenergy Deployment Consortium (BDC) 2014 Fall Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2014 BDC Fall Symposium will be held on October 21–22, 2014 in Fort Myers, Florida. The event will include a tour of the Algenol facility on Wednesday morning. The symposium will have panels for progress reports from current cellulosic bio-product companies, updates on government policy from several agencies, scale-up strategies,and lessons learned. POET-DSM will provide the after dinner success story. Neil Rossmeissl, Program Manager, Algal Program, Bioenergy Technologies Office, will be delivering the keynote address on expanding the bioeconomy.

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5govCampaignsFall 1997 Cloud IOP ARM Data

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 SCM IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5govCampaignsFall 1997 Cloud IOP ARM

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Shortwave IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5govCampaignsFall 1997 Cloud IOP ARMShortwave IOP

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 UAV IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5govCampaignsFall 1997 Cloud IOP ARMShortwave

  15. Klamath Falls Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home KizildereKlamath Falls

  16. Granite Falls Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County,Texas: EnergyOhio:Geothermal ProjectFalls

  17. Twin Falls District | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas2022Wind Farm JumpTwin Falls

  18. MIT Fall Career Fair | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, In this3,OfficeWITHMISR-DerivedFall

  19. New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

  20. Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    employee Matthew Gay uses critical electronic rounds to take a reading at the Savannah River National Laboratory. In one Continuous Improvement initiative, SRNS switched to...

  1. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  2. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  3. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) More Documents & Publications PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite...

  4. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services. Rebates are available for water heaters, refrigerator...

  5. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  6. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  7. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  8. South River EMC- Energy Efficient Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South River EMC offers a variety of rebates encouragings its members to invest in energy efficient appliances, equipment, and home upgrades. Incentives are available for clothes washers,...

  9. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is state policy to protect the outstanding scenic, geologic, ecologic, historic, recreational, agricultural, fish, wildlife, cultural, and other similar values of certain rivers and adjacent...

  10. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  11. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  12. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA-2000-08 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the...

  13. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA-2000-08 More Documents & Publications Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: river current energy converters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team includes a partnership between...

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

  16. Imaginaire et dveloppement des rseaux techniques. Les apports de l'histoire de l'lectrification rurale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for rural electrification did not stand to reason. Rather it rested on the "modernizing imaginaire electrification and electrical agriculture, and that electrification could check rural emigration. Mots-clés Electrification rurale. Modernisation. Imaginaire. Histoire. Etats-Unis d'Amérique. France. Keywords Rural

  17. Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

  18. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We collected 279 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Tucannon River during the Spring and Fall of 2003. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 191 of them, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 31bull trout. Thirty five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Fourteen radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 21 remained in the river through December 31, 2003. Four bull trout that were radio-tagged in spring 2002 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring and/or summer of 2003. One of these fish spent the winter near river mile (RM) 13.0; the other 3 over-wintered in the vicinity of the Tucannon Hatchery between RM 34 and 36. Twenty-one radio tags from bull trout tagged in 2002 were recovered during the spring and summer, 2003. These tags became stationary the winter of 2002/2003, and were recovered between RM 11 and 55. We were unable to recover the remaining 15 tags from 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. We observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 6.4, near Lower Monumental Pool. As in 2002, we did not conduct work associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the Federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged ATS model F1830 radio-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20 and 30 ft. Tests were conducted using an ATS R-4000 Receiver equipped with an ''H'' antenna at 200 and 700 feet above water surface from a helicopter. Audible detection and frequency separation were possible at both elevations. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we are planning to reduce the size of the radio tags that we implant, and delay most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

  19. I-Slate, Ethnomathematics and Rural Education Krishna Palem#1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mooney, Vincent

    I-Slate, Ethnomathematics and Rural Education Krishna Palem#1 , Al Barr%2 , Avinash Lingamneni^3 as the first test focussing on grades 1-5. Driving the I-Slate design are the pioneering principles trading off. To respond to this challenge, we propose an interactive and intelligent I-Slate that on one hand is very

  20. I-Slate, Ethnomathematics and Rural Education Krishna Palem#1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I-Slate, Ethnomathematics and Rural Education Krishna Palem#1 , Al Barr%2 , Avinash Lingamneni^3 of electronics for energy is at the heart of probabilistic hardware design and drives the design of I-Slate books! To respond to this challenge, we propose an interactive and intelligent I-Slate that on one hand