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Sample records for fall chinook salmon

  1. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  2. OkanoganRiver Summer/FallChinookSalmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Tribal Harvest Thresholds for Upper Columbia River 99 Summer/Fall Chinook (Early-Arriving Run) Table B.7. Tribal Harvest Thresholds for Upper Columbia River 99 Summer/Fall Chinook (Later-Arriving Run) Table B.8AppendixC OkanoganRiver Summer/FallChinookSalmon HatcheryGeneticManagementPlan #12;HATCHERY

  3. 1.2000-2009 time-series return information for Snake River: a. Fall Chinook Salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Content: 1.2000-2009 time-series return information for Snake River: a. Fall Chinook Salmon b. Sockeye Salmon c. Summer Steelhead d. Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon 2.2010 run-size forecasts for: a. Sockeye Salmon b. Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon #12;#12;Species: Run: Origin: Period: Chinook Salmon Fall

  4. Temporal Trends in Hatchery Releases of Fall-Run Chinook Salmon in California's Central Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric R.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    in Central Valley rivers, many fall-run Chinook salmon nowrun Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, to yearlings at Feather Riverrun Chinook salmon breed and rear in low-elevation mainstem rivers (

  5. Appendices for: Proposed ESA Recovery Plan for Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon

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    predominately in the mainstem of the Snake River and some of its major tributaries. Like other fall-run Chinook initiated a 5-year status review for 32 species of salmon and steelhead, including Snake River Fall-RunAppendices for: Proposed ESA Recovery Plan for Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus

  6. Delta Flow Factors Influencing Stray Rate of Escaping Adult San Joaquin River Fall-Run Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Escaping Adult San Joaquin River Fall-run Chinook Salmon (comparable with Sacramento River fall-run stray rates (i.e.reported a Mokelumne River wild fall-run Chinook stray rate

  7. Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2009-03-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

  8. Migration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Migration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener A thesis: Aquatic and Fishery Sciences #12;#12;University of Washington Abstract Migration and Bioenergetics are still poorly understood. This thesis describes a complex of individually-based bioenergetic

  9. Migration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    was the primary cause of the reversal of modeled migration triggers; for this reason, we then assert that the coolMigration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener A thesis: Aquatic and Fishery Sciences #12;#12;University of Washington Abstract Migration and Bioenergetics

  10. Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River, Annual Report 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Connor, William P.; Burge, Howard L.

    1999-12-01

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted primarily in 1997 and 1998. This report communicates significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin.

  11. Temporal Trends in Hatchery Releases of Fall-Run Chinook Salmon in California's Central Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric R.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    California Press. 161 p. Barnett-Johnson R, Grimes CB, Royerby hatchery production (Barnett–Johnson et al. 2007). Therun Chinook salmon complex (Barnett– Johnson et al. 2007;

  12. Large-scale spatial variability of riverbed temperature gradients in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2007-02-01

    In the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States, hydroelectric dam operations are often based on the predicted emergence timing of salmon fry from the riverbed. The spatial variability and complexity of surface water and riverbed temperature gradients results in emergence timing predictions that are likely to have large errors. The objectives of this study were to quantify the thermal heterogeneity between the river and riverbed in fall Chinook salmon spawning areas and to determine the effects of thermal heterogeneity on fall Chinook salmon emergence timing. This study quantified river and riverbed temperatures at 15 fall Chinook salmon spawning sites distributed in two reaches throughout 160 km of the Snake River in Hells Canyon, Idaho, USA, during three different water years. Temperatures were measured during the fall Chinook salmon incubation period with self-contained data loggers placed in the river and at three different depths below the riverbed surface. At all sites temperature increased with depth into the riverbed, including significant differences (p<0.05) in mean water temperature of up to 3.8°C between the river and the riverbed among all the sites. During each of the three water years studied, river and riverbed temperatures varied significantly among all the study sites, among the study sites within each reach, and between sites located in the two reaches. Considerable variability in riverbed temperatures among the sites resulted in fall Chinook salmon emergence timing estimates that varied by as much as 55 days, depending on the source of temperature data used for the estimate. Monitoring of riverbed temperature gradients at a range of spatial scales throughout the Snake River would provide better information for managing hydroelectric dam operations, and would aid in the design and interpretation of future empirical research into the ecological significance of physical riverine processes.

  13. Spawning and abundance of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 1948--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Watson, D.G.

    1990-03-01

    The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River provides the only major spawning habitat for the upriver bright (URB) race of fall chinook salmon in the mainstem Columbia River. Hanford Site biologists have conducted aerial surveys of spawning salmon in the Hanford Reach since 1948. This report summarizes data on fall chinook salmon spawning in the Hanford Reach and presents a discussion of factors that may affect population trends. Most data are limited to fisheries agency reports and other working documents. Fisheries management practices in the Columbia River system have changed rapidly over the last decade, particularly under requirements of the Pacific Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980. New information has been generated and included in this report. 75 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Use of Aerial Photography to Monitor Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning in the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, Richard H.; Dauble, Dennis D.); Geist, David R.)

    2002-11-01

    This paper compares two methods for enumerating salmon redds and their application to monitoring spawning activity. Aerial photographs of fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River were digitized and mapped using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques in 1994 and 1995 as part of an annual assessment of the population. The number of visible redds from these photographs were compared to counts obtained from visual surveys with fixed wing aircraft. The proportion of the total redds within each of five general survey areas was similar for the two monitoring techniques. However, the total number of redds based on aerial photographs was 2.2 and 3.0 times higher than those observed during visual surveys for 1994 and 1995, respectively. The divergence in redd counts was most evident near peak spawning activity when the number of redds within individual spawning clusters exceeded 500. Aerial photography improved our ability to monitor numbers of visible salmon redds and to quantify habitat use.

  15. Conceptual Spawning Habitat Model to Aid in ESA Recovery Plans for Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a spawning habitat model that can be used to determine the physical habitat factors that are necessary to define the production potential for fall chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Columbia River's Hanford Reach and Snake River. This project addresses RPA 155 in the NMFS 2000 Biological Opinion: Action 155: BPA, working with BOR, the Corps, EPA, and USGS, shall develop a program to: (1) Identify mainstem habitat sampling reaches, survey conditions, describe cause-and-effect relationships, and identify research needs; (2) Develop improvement plans for all mainstem reaches; and (3) Initiate improvements in three mainstem reaches. During FY 2003 we continued to collect and analyze information on fall chinook salmon spawning habitat characteristics in the Hanford Reach that will be used to address RPA 155, i.e., items 1-3 above. For example, in FY 2003: (1) We continued to survey spawning habitat in the Hanford Reach and develop a 2-dimensional hydraulic and habitat model that will be capable of predicting suitability of fall chinook salmon habitat in the Hanford Reach; (2) Monitor how hydro operations altered the physical and chemical characteristics of the river and the hyporheic zone within fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach; (3) Published a paper on the impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon (Dauble et al. 2003). This paper was made possible with data collected on this project; (4) Continued to analyze data collected in previous years that will ultimately be used to identify cause-and-effect relationships and identify research needs that will assist managers in the improvement of fall chinook habitat quality in main-stem reaches. During FY 2004 we plan to: (1) Complete preliminary reporting and submit papers based on the results of the project through FY 2004. Although we have proposed additional analysis of data be conducted in FY 2005, we anticipate a significant number of key papers being prepared and submitted in FY 2004 which will go toward identifying the data gaps this RPA is intended to address; (2) Make available data from this project for use on Project 2003-038-00 ('Evaluate restoration potential of Snake River fall chinook salmon') which is a BPA-funded project that will start in FY 2004; and (3) Present results of our work at regional and national meetings in order to facilitate technology transfer and information sharing. The objective of this project is to define the production potential of fall chinook salmon that spawn in the Hanford Reach. We will provide fisheries and resource managers with the information they need to determine if the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is indeed healthy, and whether this population will be capable of seeding other satellite populations in the future. We will accomplish this purpose by continuing our on-going research at determining the carrying capacity of the Hanford Reach for producing fall chinook salmon under current operational scenarios, and then begin an assessment of whether the Reach is functioning as a model of a normative river as is widely believed. The product of our research will be a better understanding of the key habitat features for mainstem populations of anadromous salmonids, as well as a better understanding of the measures that must be taken to ensure long-term protection of the Hanford Reach fall chinook population. Although the project was originally funded in FY 1994, it was significantly redefined in FY 2000. At that time five tasks were proposed to accomplish the project objective. The purpose of this progress report is to briefly describe the activities that have been completed on each of the five tasks from FY 2000 through FY 2003.

  16. Salmon Lifecycle Considerations to Guide Stream Management: Examples from California’s Central Valley

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    Merz, Joseph E.; Workman, Michelle; Threloff, Doug; Cavallo, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Lower Mokelumne River fall- run Chinook salmon escapementviability of Sacramento River winter-run Chinook salmon (estimation of Mokelumne River fall-run Chinook salmon (

  17. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Aaron P.; Bradbury, S.M.; Arnsberg, Billy D.

    2003-09-01

    Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2001; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992) and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2002 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (Projects 1998-01-003 and 1994-03-400) and the Idaho Power Company.

  18. Temporal Trends in Hatchery Releases of Fall-Run Chinook Salmon in California's Central Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric R.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    throughout the Northeast Pacific Ocean region (Augerot etSan Francisco Bay and Pacific Ocean than ocean-ready, largerocean salmon fisheries: stock assessment and fishery evaluation document for the Pacific

  19. Conservation of Native Fishes of the San Francisco Estuary: Considerations for Artificial Propagation of Chinook Salmon, Delta Smelt, and Green Sturgeon

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    Israel, Joshua A.; Fisch, Kathleen M.; Turner, Thomas F.; Waples, Robin S.

    2011-01-01

    Upper Sacramento River winter–run Chinook salmon carcassSpecies Sacramento River Fall-run Chinook Sacramento RiverStone NFH Sacramento River Winter-run Chinook Sacramento

  20. WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA

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    461 WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA WITH NOTES ON WATER TEMPERATURE REPORT-FISHERIES Na 461 #12;#12;WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA WITH NOTES HAMILTON CITY O Frontispiece.--Upper Sacramento River and Tributaries iv #12;WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON

  1. Migration Patterns of Juvenile Winter-run-sized Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) through the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Habitat; Sacramento River Winter-Run Chinook Salmon. VolumeStatus of Sacramento River Winter-run Chinook Salmon. Volumeplasticity in Sacramento River winter-run chinook salmon (

  2. Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, William P.

    2008-04-01

    In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

  3. Chinook Timing 1 October 11, 2007 Run timing of adult Chinook salmon passing

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    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Chinook Timing 1 October 11, 2007 Run timing of adult Chinook salmon passing Bonneville dam on the Columbia River White Paper Prepared by: W. Nicholas Beer Columbia Basin Research School of Aquatic....................................................................................................................... 8 In-River Conditions

  4. 1Proposed Snake River Fall Chinook Recovery Plan -Executive Summary | NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service October 2015

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    This recovery plan (plan) serves as a blueprint for the protection and recovery of Snake River fall-run Chinook salmon. NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) first listed Snake River fall-run Chinook salmon of Snake River listed species (NMFS 2011a). At one time the run numbered half a million strong

  5. EARLY HISTORY AND SEAWARD MIGRATION OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA AND SACRAMENTO RIVERS

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    EARLY HISTORY AND SEAWARD MIGRATION OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA AND SACRAMENTO RIVERS ,;f. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 History of the investigation. .. ...... .. . .. . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 72 2 #12;EARLY HISTORY AND SEAWARD MIGRATION OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA AND SACRAMENTO RIVERS

  6. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

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    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    and Chinook salmon bioenergetics: temperature, ration andOncorhynchus tshawytscha ) bioenergetics model. CanadianAS, Gross, ML. 1985. Bioenergetics of juvenile salmon during

  7. Framework for Assessing Viability of Threatened and Endangered Chinook Salmon and Steelhead in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    plan for the Sacramento River winter- run chinook. NOAA/NMFSsteel- head. Sacramento River Winter-run Chinook salmon notViability of Sacramento River winter-run chinook salmon.

  8. Evaluation of Delisting Criteria and Rebuilding Schedules for Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook, Fall Chinook and Sockeye Salmon : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 10 of 11.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, Steven P.; Neeley, Doug

    1993-06-01

    We develop a framework for distinguishing healthy and threatened populations, and we analyze specific criteria by which these terms can be measured for threatened populations of salmon in the Snake River. We review reports and analyze existing data on listed populations of salmon in the Snake River to establish a framework for two stages of the recovery process: (1) defining de-listing criteria, and (2) estimating the percentage increase in survival that will be necessary for recovery of the population within specified time frames, given the de-listing criteria that must be achieved. We develop and apply a simplified population model to estimate the percentage improvement in survival that will be necessary to achieve different rates of recovery. We considered five main concepts identifying de-listing criteria: (1) minimum population size, (2) rates of population change, (3) number of population subunits, (4) survival rates, and (5) driving variables. In considering minimum population size, we conclude that high variation in survival rates poses a substantially greater probability of causing extinction than does loss of genetic variation. Distinct population subunits exist and affect both the genetic variability of the population and the dynamics of population decline and growth. We distinguish between two types of population subunits, (1) genetic and (2) geographic, and we give examples of their effects on population recovery.

  9. Yuba River analysis aims to aid spring-run chinook salmon habitat rehabilitation

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    Pasternack, Gregory; Fulton, Aaron A; Morford, Scott L

    2010-01-01

    Spawning habitat rehabilitation-I. Conceptual approach and2004b. Spawning habitat rehabilitation-II. Using hypothesisrun chinook salmon habitat rehabilitation Courtesy of Ralph

  10. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

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    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    of California, Berkeley. Technical Report No. 549. Freedman,Bay/Delta Estuary. Technical Report. Groot, C, Margolis, L.Chinook salmon. Canadian Technical Report of Fisheries and

  11. Release of persistent organic contaminants from carcasses of Lake Ontario Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

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    Gross, Mart

    Release of persistent organic contaminants from carcasses of Lake Ontario Chinook salmon from Lake Ontario contribute persistent contaminants to a river ecosystem. Abstract About 20,000 Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from Lake Ontario enter the Credit River, Ontario, Canada every

  12. EVALUATION OF THE RETURN OF ADULT CHINOOK SALMON TO THE ABERNATHY INCUBATION CHANNEL

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    -, and 4-yr-old adult fish returning to the hatchery holding pond were examined for fin clips and fluoresEVALUATION OF THE RETURN OF ADULT CHINOOK SALMON TO THE ABERNATHY INCUBATION CHANNEL ALLAN E. THOMAS' ABSTRACT Adult returns of progeny of the 1964 year class of chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus

  13. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operation and Maintenance Facilities, Annual Report 2003.

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    McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie

    2004-01-01

    Anadromous salmonid stocks have declined in both the Grande Ronde River Basin (Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Status Review Symposium 1998) and in the entire Snake River Basin (Nehlsen et al. 1991), many to the point of extinction. The Grande Ronde River Basin historically supported large populations of fall and spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho (O. kisutch) salmon and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) (Nehlsen et al. 1991). The decline of chinook salmon and steelhead populations and extirpation of coho and sockeye salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin was, in part, a result of construction and operation of hydroelectric facilities, over fishing, and loss and degradation of critical spawning and rearing habitat in the Columbia and Snake River basins (Nehlsen et al. 1991). Hatcheries were built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to compensate for losses of anadromous salmonids due to the construction and operation of the lower four Snake River dams. Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on Lookingglass Creek, a tributary of the Grande Ronde River, was completed under LSRCP in 1982 and has served as the main incubation and rearing site for chinook salmon programs for Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers in Oregon. Despite these hatchery programs, natural spring chinook populations continued to decline resulting in the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listing Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon as ''threatened'' under the federal Endangered Species Act (1973) on 22 April 1992. Continuing poor escapement levels and declining population trends indicated that Grande Ronde River basin spring chinook salmon were in imminent danger of extinction. These continuing trends led fisheries co-managers in the basin to initiate the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program (GRESCSSP) in order to prevent extinction and preserve options for use of endemic fish stocks in future artificial propagation programs. The GRESCSSP was implemented in three Grande Ronde River basin tributaries; the Lostine and upper Grande Ronde rivers and Catherine Creek. The GRESCSSP employs two broodstock strategies utilizing captive and conventional brood sources. The captive brood program began in 1995, with the collection of parr from the three tributary areas. The conventional broodstock component of the program began in 1997 with the collection of natural adults returning to these tributary areas. Although LGH was available as the primary production facility for spring chinook programs in the Grande Ronde Basin, there were never any adult or juvenile satellite facilities developed in the tributary areas that were to be supplemented. An essential part of the GRESCSSP was the construction of adult traps and juvenile acclimation facilities in these tributary areas. Weirs were installed in 1997 for the collection of adult broodstock for the conventional component of the program. Juvenile facilities were built in 2000 for acclimation of the smolts produced by the captive and conventional broodstock programs and as release sites within the natural production areas of their natal streams. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) operate both the juvenile acclimation and adult trapping facilities located on Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River under this project. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) operate the facilities on the Lostine River under a sister project. Hatcheries were also built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the LSRCP to compensate for losses of summer steelhead due to the construction and operation of the lowest four Snake River dams. Despite these harvest-driven hatchery programs, natural summer steelhead populations continued to decline as evidenced by declining counts at Lower Granite Dam since 1995 (Columbia River Data Access in Real Time, DART) and low steelhead redd counts on index streams in the Grande Ronde Basin. Because of low escapement the Snake River summer steelhead were listed as threat

  14. Status and Monitoring of Natural and Supplemented Chinook Salmon in Johnson Creek, Idaho, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

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    Rabe, Craig D.; Nelson, Douglas D.

    2008-11-17

    The Nez Perce Tribe Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project (JCAPE) has conducted juvenile and adult monitoring and evaluation studies for its 10th consecutive year. Completion of adult and juvenile Chinook salmon studies were conducted for the purpose of evaluating a small-scale production initiative designed to increase the survival of a weak but recoverable spawning aggregate of summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The JCAPE program evaluates the life cycle of natural origin (NOR) and hatchery origin (HOR) supplementation fish to quantify the key performance measures: abundance, survival-productivity, distribution, genetics, life history, habitat, and in-hatchery metrics. Operation of a picket style weir and intensive multiple spawning ground surveys were completed to monitor adult Chinook salmon and a rotary screw trap was used to monitor migrating juvenile Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. In 2007, spawning ground surveys were conducted on all available spawning habitat in Johnson Creek and one of its tributaries. A total of 63 redds were observed in the index reach and 11 redds for all other reaches for a combined count of 74 redds. Utilization of carcass recovery surveys and adult captures at an adult picket weir yielded a total estimated adult escapement to Johnson Creek of 438 Chinook salmon. Upon deducting fish removed for broodstock (n=52), weir mortality/ known strays (n=12), and prespawning mortality (n=15), an estimated 359 summer Chinook salmon were available to spawn. Estimated total migration of brood year 2005 NOR juvenile Chinook salmon at the rotary screw trap was calculated for three seasons (summer, fall, and spring). The total estimated migration was 34,194 fish; 26,671 of the NOR migrants left in the summer (July 1 to August 31, 2005) as fry/parr, 5,852 left in the fall (September 1 to November 21, 2005) as presmolt, and only 1,671 NOR fish left in the spring (March 1 to June 30, 2006) as smolt. In addition, there were 120,415 HOR supplementation smolts released into Johnson Creek during the week of March 12, 2007. Life stage-specific juvenile survival from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was calculated for brood year 2005 NOR and HOR supplementation juvenile Chinook salmon. Survival of NOR parr Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 16.2%. Survival of NOR presmolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 22.3%. Survival of NOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 44.7% and 32.9%. Survival of HOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 31.9% and 26.2%. Multi-year analysis on smolt to adult return rate's (SAR's) and progeny to parent ratio's (P:P's) were calculated for NOR and HOR supplementation Brood Year 2002 Chinook salmon. SAR's were calculated from Johnson Creek to Johnson Creek (JC to JC), Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite (LGD to LGD), and Lower Granite Dam to Johnson Creek (LGD to JC); for NOR fish SAR's were 0.16%, 1.16% and 1.12%, while HOR supplementation SAR's from JC to JC, LGD to LGD and LGD to JC were 0.04%, 0.19% and 0.13%. P:P's for all returning NOR and HOR supplemented adults were under replacement levels at 0.13 and 0.65, respectively. Recruit per spawner estimates (R/S) for Brood Year 2005 adult Chinook salmon were also calculated for NOR and HOR supplemented Chinook salmon at JC and LGD. R/S estimates for NOR and HOR supplemented fish at JC were 231 and 1,745, while R/S estimates at LGD were 67 and 557. Management recommendations address (1) effectiveness of data collection methods, (2) sufficiency of data quality (statistical power) to enable management recommendations, (3) removal of uncertainty and subsequent cessation of M&E activities, and (4) sufficiency of findings for program modifications prior to five-year review.

  15. Juvenile Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in and Around the San Francisco Estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2012-01-01

    vary strongly by run and river of origin; surprisingly fewplan, Feather River Hatchery spring-run Chinook salmonmostly fall-run, rear to Mokelumne River. Coleman National

  16. Migration Patterns of Juvenile Winter-run-sized Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) through the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    tshawytscha) in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta. [salmon in California’s Sacramento Valley. Climatic ChangeCritical Habitat; Sacramento River Winter-Run Chinook

  17. The Effects of Disease-Induced Juvenile Mortality on the Transient and Asymptotic Population Dynamics of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujiwara, Masami; Mohr, Michael S.; Greenberg, Aaron

    2014-01-10

    The effects of an increased disease mortality rate on the transient and asymptotic dynamics of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were investigated. Disease-induced mortality of juvenile salmon has become a serious concern in recent years...

  18. Gastric Evacuation and Daily Ration of Naturally Produced Age-0 Chinook Salmon in Lake Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Gastric Evacuation and Daily Ration of Naturally Produced Age-0 Chinook Salmon in Lake Ontario was discovered in Lake Ontario tributaries, little is known about the feeding dynamics of these fish after the nearshore region of Lake Ontario after emigrating from the Salmon River, New York, a major U.S. tributary

  19. Population Structure of Columbia River Basin Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, Technical Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, E.L.; National Science Foundation (U.S.)

    2002-08-01

    The population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead trout is presented as an assimilation of the life history forms that have evolved in synchrony with diverse and complex environments over their Pacific range. As poikilotherms, temperature is described as the overwhelming environmental influence that determines what life history options occur and where they are distributed. The different populations represent ecological types referred to as spring-, summer-, fall, and winter-run segments, as well as stream- and ocean-type, or stream- and ocean-maturing life history forms. However, they are more correctly described as a continuum of forms that fall along a temporal cline related to incubation and rearing temperatures that determine spawn timing and juvenile residence patterns. Once new habitats are colonized, members of the founding populations spread through adaptive evolution to assume complementary life history strategies. The related population units are collectively referred to as a metapopulation, and members most closely associated within common temporal and geographic boundaries are designated as first-order metapopulations. Population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin, therefore, is the reflection of the genetic composition of the founding source or sources within the respective region, shaped by the environment, principally temperature, that defines life history evolutionary strategy to maximize fitness under the conditions delineated. The complexity of structure rests with the diversity of opportunities over the elevations that exist within the Basin. Consistent with natural selection, rather than simply attempting to preserve populations, the challenge is to provide opportunities to expand their range to new or restored habitat that can accommodate genetic adaptation as directional environmental changes are elaborated. Artificial propagation can have a critical role in this process, and the emphasis must be placed on promoting the ability for anadromous salmonids to respond to change by assuring that the genetic diversity to facilitate such responses is present. The key in developing an effective recovery program for chinook salmon and steelhead is to recognize that multiple life history forms associated with temperature characterize the species in the Columbia Basin, and recovery measures taken must address the biological requirements of the population unit within the environmental template identified. Unless such measures are given first and highest priority, establishment of biologically self-sustaining populations will be restrained.

  20. Historic and Present Distribution of Chinook Salmon and Steelhead in the Calaveras River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Glenda

    2007-01-01

    2001). Presently, fall run Tuolumne River still occurs inof Calaveras River King Salmon run and proposed contingencyJune and Stanislaus Rivers Fall Run 8 June – December Late

  1. Storage of Dressed Chinook Salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in Refrigerated Freshwater, Diluted Seawater, Seawater, and in Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage of Dressed Chinook Salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in Refrigerated Freshwater, Diluted during storage. Iced storage offers several advantages over the water chilling systems, including little by 25 per- cent within four days after transfer to ice, and weight gained during water storage was lost

  2. POPULATION RESPONSES OF COHO AND CHINOOK SALMON TO SEDIMENTATION ASSOCIATED WITH FOREST ROADS IN A COASTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _____________________________________________ Committee Member: Duncan Knowler Associate Dean, Faculty of Environment Associate Professor, School suspended-sediment events caused by forest road construction and use on populations of chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in a medium-sized coastal watershed of the lower Fraser

  3. Quantifying mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to simulated hydro-turbine passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Welch, Abigail E.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-02-01

    A proportion of juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids travel through one or more turbines during seaward migration in the Columbia and Snake River every year. Despite this understanding, limited information exists on how these fish respond to hydraulic pressures found during turbine passage events. In this study we exposed juvenile Chinook salmon to varied acclimation pressures and subsequent exposure pressures (nadir) to mimic the hydraulic pressures of large Kaplan turbines (ratio of pressure change). Additionally, we varied abiotic (total dissolved gas, rate of pressure change) and biotic (condition factor, fish length, fish weight) factors that may contribute to the incidence of mortal injury associated with fish passing through hydro-turbines. We determined that the main factor associated with mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon during simulated turbine passage was the ratio between acclimation and nadir pressures. Condition factor, total dissolved gas, and the rate of pressure change were found to only slightly increase the predictive power of equations relating probability of mortal injury to conditions of exposure or characteristics of test fish during simulated turbine passage. This research will assist engineers and fisheries managers in operating and improving hydroelectric facility efficiency while minimizing mortality and injury of turbine-passed juvenile Chinook salmon. The results are discussed in the context of turbine development and the necessity of understanding how different species of fish will respond to the hydraulic pressures of turbine passage.

  4. AN ESTIMATE OF MORTALITY OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER NEAR BONNEVILLE DAM DURING THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ESTIMATE OF MORTALITY OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER NEAR BONNEVILLE DAM DURING THE SUMMER RUN OF 1955' . . BY THEODORE R. MERRELL, JR.,I. MELVIN D. COLLlNS,2 AND ,JOSEEH W. GREENOUGH8 at the dam, and the river below the dam was· searched systematically to recover tagged and untagged car

  5. Chapter 4, Section 4.2 South Fork Salmon River MPG Spg/Sum Chinook Status and Recovery (Draft describes habitat-related limiting factors, threats, strategies and actions)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a largely genetically cohesive grouping of summer run Chinook returning to the South Fork Salmon RiverChapter 4, Section 4.2 South Fork Salmon River MPG Spg/Sum Chinook Status and Recovery (Draft.2 Status and Recovery of South Fork Salmon River MPG in the Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon ESU

  6. Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 2000 Project Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venditti, David A.

    2002-04-01

    During 2000, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued to develop techniques to rear chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were collected to establish captive cohorts from three study streams and included 503 eyed-eggs from East Fork Salmon River (EFSR), 250 from the Yankee Fork Salmon River, and 304 from the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF). After collection, the eyed-eggs were immediately transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery, where they were incubated and reared by family group. Juveniles collected the previous summer were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease before the majority (approximately 75%) were transferred to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Manchester Marine Experimental Station for saltwater rearing through sexual maturity. Smolt transfers included 158 individuals from the Lemhi River (LEM), 193 from the WFYF, and 372 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from the Manchester facility to the Eagle Fish Hatchery included 77 individuals from the LEM, 45 from the WFYF, and 11 from the EFSR. Two mature females from the WFYF were spawned in captivity with four males in 2000. Only one of the females produced viable eggs (N = 1,266), which were placed in in-stream incubators by personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe. Mature adults (N = 70) from the Lemhi River were released into Big Springs Creek to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Fifteen of the 17 suspected redds spawned by captive-reared parents in Big Springs Creek were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from 13 of these, and survival ranged from 0% to 96%, although there was evidence that some eggs had died after reaching the eyed stage. Six redds were capped in an attempt to document fry emergence, but none were collected. A final hydraulic sampling of the capped redds yielded nothing from five of the six, but 75 dead eggs and one dead fry were found in the sixth. Smothering by fine sediment is the suspected cause of the observed mortality between the eyed stage and fry emergence.

  7. Spatial consistency of Chinook salmon redd distribution within and among years in the Cowlitz River, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klett, Katherine J.; Torgersen, Christian; Henning, Julie; Murray, Christopher J.

    2013-04-28

    We investigated the spawning patterns of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha on the lower Cowlitz River, Washington (USA) using a unique set of fine- and coarse-scale 35 temporal and spatial data collected during bi-weekly aerial surveys conducted in 1991-2009 (500 m to 28 km resolution) and 2008-2009 (100-500 m resolution). Redd locations were mapped from a helicopter during 2008 and 2009 with a hand-held global positioning system (GPS) synchronized with in-flight audio recordings. We examined spatial patterns of Chinook salmon redd reoccupation among and within years in relation to segment-scale geomorphic features. Chinook salmon spawned in the same sections each year with little variation among years. On a coarse scale, five years (1993, 1998, 2000, 2002, and 2009) were compared for reoccupation. Redd locations were highly correlated among years resulting in a minimum correlation coefficient of 0.90 (adjusted P = 0.002). Comparisons on a fine scale (500 m) between 2008 and 2009 also revealed a high degree of consistency among redd locations (P < 0.001). On a finer temporal scale, we observed that salmon spawned in the same sections during the first and last week (2008: P < 0.02; and 2009: P < 0.001). Redds were clustered in both 2008 and 2009 (P < 0.001). Regression analysis with a generalized linear model at the 500-m scale indicated that river kilometer and channel bifurcation were positively associated with redd density, whereas sinuosity was negatively associated with redd density. Collecting data on specific redd locations with a GPS during aerial surveys was logistically feasible and cost effective and greatly enhanced the spatial precision of Chinook salmon spawning surveys.

  8. Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

    2010-12-21

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon smolts at The Dalles Dam during summer 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 2 km below the dam The forebay-to-tailrace survival estimate satisfies the “BRZ-to-BRZ” survival estimate called for in the Fish Accords. , as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The estimate of dam survival for subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles in 2010 was 0.9404 with an associated standard error of 0.0091.

  9. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  10. PHYSIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF THE CHINOOK SALMON. By CHARLES "\\VILSON GREENE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The salmon is an anadromous fish. Its natural spawning beds are in the cold waters of the mountain streams they reenter the mouths of the rivers and make the long journey back to the spawning ,gTounds in the mountain of the mountain streams. It matters not how long the distance nor how great the exertion that is required, all

  11. Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin

    2009-06-10

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams per fish, and Meadow Creek received 53,425 BY 2006 direct stream release parr at an average of 4.7 grams per fish. Natural and hatchery origin spring Chinook salmon pre-smolt emigrants were monitored from September - November 2006 and smolts from March-June 2007. Data on adult returns were collected from May-September. A suite of performance measures were calculated including total adult and spawner escapement, juvenile production, and survival probabilities. These measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation and provide information on the capacity of the natural environment to assimilate and support supplemented salmon populations.

  12. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2002, a total of 2,877,437 fish weighing 47,347 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 479,358 yearling fish weighing 33,930 pounds and 2,398,079 sub-yearling fish weighing 19,115 pounds. This is the largest number of fish ever released in one year from the acclimation facilities.

  13. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

  14. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

  15. John Day Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Escapement and Productivity Monitoring; Fish Research Project Oregon, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Richard W.; Claire, Glenda M.; Seals, Jason

    2002-01-01

    The four objectives of this report are: (1) Estimate annual spawner escapement and number of spring chinook salmon redds in the John Day River basin; (2) Determine sex ratio, age composition, length-at-age of spawners, and proportion of natural spawners that are hatchery origin strays; (3) Determine adequacy of historic index surveys for indexing spawner abundance and for detecting changes in spawner distribution through time; and (4) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival for spring chinook salmon emigrating from the John Day River basin.

  16. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  17. Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fischer, Eric S.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jin A.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2011-12-01

    The acoustic telemetry study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The purpose of the study was to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  18. Survival of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Passing the Bonneville Dam Spillway in 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; McComas, Roy L.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) funds numerous evaluations of fish passage and survival on the Columbia River. In 2007, the CENWP asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct an acoustic telemetry study to estimate the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon passing the spillway at Bonneville Dam. This report documents the study results which are intended to be used to improve the conditions juvenile anadromous fish experience when passing through the dams that the Corps operates on the river.

  19. Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

  20. Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

  1. Performance Assessment of Suture Type in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.

    2009-02-27

    The objective of this study was to determine the best overall suture material to close incisions from the surgical implantation of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The effects of seven suture materials, four surgeons, and two water temperatures on suture retention, incision openness, tag retention, tissue inflammation, and tissue ulceration were quantified. The laboratory study, conducted by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supports a larger effort under way for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, aimed at determining the suitability of acoustic telemetry for estimating short- and longer-term (30-60 days) juvenile-salmonid survival at Columbia and Snake River dams and through the lower Columbia River.

  2. Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-12

    The study estimated dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and provided additional performance measures as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. This summary report focuses on spring run stocks, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead.

  3. Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dales Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-02-01

    The study estimated dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and provided additional performance measures as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. This summary report focuses on spring run stocks, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead.

  4. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during the spring and summer outmigrations in 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 for spring migrants and greater than or equal to 0.93 for summer migrants, estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 3 km downstream of the dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Fish Accords). A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam. The approach included releases of smolts, tagged with acoustic micro-transmitters, above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of John Day Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below John Day Dam. A total of 3376 yearling Chinook salmon, 5726 subyearling Chinook salmon, and 3239 steelhead smolts were used in the virtual releases. Sample sizes for the below-dam paired releases (R2 and R3, respectively) were 997 and 995 for yearling Chinook salmon smolts, 986 and 983 for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts, and 1000 and 1000 for steelhead smolts. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tags were manufactured by Advanced Telemetry Systems. Model SS300 tags, weighing 0.304 g in air, were surgically implanted in yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon, and Model SS130 tag, weighing 0.438 g in air, were surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead for this investigation. The intent of the spring study was to estimate dam passage survival during both 30% and 40% spill conditions. The two spill conditions were to be systematically performed in alternating 2-day test intervals over the course of the spring outmigration. High flow conditions in 2012 interrupted the spill study. Dam passage survival was therefore estimated season-wide regardless of spill conditions.

  5. Evaluation of Juvenile Fall Chinook Stranding on the Hanford Reach, 1997-1999 Interim Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Paul; Nugent, John; Price, William

    1999-02-15

    Pilot work conducted in 1997 to aid the development of the study for the 1998 Evaluation of Juvenile Fall Chinook Stranding on The Hanford Reach. The objectives of the 1997 work were to: (1) identify juvenile chinook production and rearing areas..., (2) identify sampling sites and develop the statistical parameters necessary to complete the study, (3) develop a study plan..., (4) conduct field sampling activities...

  6. Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at The Dalles Dam during spring 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay boat-restricted zone (BRZ) to the tailrace BRZ at The Dalles Dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam. The approach included releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of The Dalles Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below The Dalles Dam. A total of 4,298 yearling Chinook salmon and 4,309 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation. The dam passage survival results are summarized as follows: Yearling Chinook Salmon 0.9641 (SE = 0.0096) and Steelhead 0.9535 (SE = 0.0097).

  7. Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; CH0) at John Day Dam (JDA) during summer 2010. This study was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) and the University of Washington (UW). The study was designed to estimate the effects of 30% and 40% spill treatment levels on single release survival rates of CH0 passing through two reaches: (1) the dam, and 40 km of tailwater, (2) the forebay, dam, and 40 km of tailwater. The study also estimated additional passage performance measures which are stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  8. A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM-8295 Final Draft April 19, 2004 #12;BioAnalysts, Inc Summer/Fall Chinook Research Plan Chief Joseph Dam Page........................................................................ 11 3.6.3 Chief Joseph Dam Powerhouse

  9. Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead at McNary Dam, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, James S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Batton, George; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Deng, Zhiqun; Etherington, D. J.; Fu, Tao; Greiner, Michael J.; Ingraham, John M.; Kim, Jin A.; Li, Xi; Martinez, Jayson J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-12-23

    The study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead at McNary Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a virtual/paired-release model. This study supports the USACE’s continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  10. Acoustic Telemetry Studies of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Survival at the Lower Columbia Projects in 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; McComas, Roy L.

    2008-02-01

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct three studies using acoustic telemetry to estimate detection probabilities and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon at three hydropower projects on the lower Columbia River. The primary goals were to estimate detection and survival probabilities based on sampling with JSATS equipment, assess the feasibility of using JSATS for survival studies, and estimate sample sizes needed to obtain a desired level of precision in future studies. The 2006 JSATS arrays usually performed as well or better than radio telemetry arrays in the JDA and TDA tailwaters, and underperformed radio arrays in the BON tailwater, particularly in spring. Most of the probabilities of detection on at least one of all arrays in a tailwater exceeded 80% for each method, which was sufficient to provide confidence in survival estimates. The probability of detection on one of three arrays includes survival and detection probabilities because fish may die or pass all three arrays undetected but alive.

  11. Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2008 Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Wayne H.; Schricker, Jaym'e; Ruzychi, James R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

    2009-02-13

    The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations remain depressed relative to historic levels and limited information is available for steelhead life history. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects have been implemented in the basin to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival. However, these projects often lack effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed programmatic or watershed (status and trend) information to help evaluate project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts as well as meet some data needs as index stocks. Our continued monitoring efforts to estimate salmonid smolt abundance, age structure, SAR, smolts/redd, freshwater habitat use, and distribution of critical life states will enable managers to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the level of emphasis by the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP), NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds (OWEB). Each of these groups have placed priority on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. The objective is to estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead.

  12. Differences in neurobehavioral responses of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to copper and cobalt: Behavioral avoidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, J.A.; Marr, J.C.A.; Lipton, J.; Cacela, D.; Bergman, H.L.

    1999-09-01

    Behavioral avoidance of copper (Cu), cobalt (Co), and a Cu and Co mixture in soft water differed greatly between rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha). Chinook salmon avoided at least 0.7 {micro}g Cu/L, 24 {micro}g Co/L, and the mixture of 1.0 {micro}g Cu/L and 0.9 {micro}g Co/L, whereas rainbow trout avoided at least 1.6 {micro}g Cu/L, 180 {micro}g Co/L, and the mixture of 2.6 {micro}g Cu/L and 2.4 {micro}g Co/L. Chinook salmon were also more sensitive to the toxic effects of Cu in that they failed to avoid {ge}44 {micro}g Cu/L, whereas rainbow trout failed to avoid {ge}180 {micro}g Cu/L. Furthermore, following acclimation to 2 {micro}g Cu/L, rainbow trout avoided 4 {micro}g Cu/L and preferred clean water, but chinook salmon failed to avoid any Cu concentrations and did not prefer clean water. The failure to avoid high concentrations of metals by both species suggests that the sensory mechanism responsible for avoidance responses was impaired. Exposure to Cu concentrations that were not avoided could result in lethality from prolonged Cu exposure or in impairment of sensory-dependent behaviors that are essential for survival and reproduction.

  13. Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 1998: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 1998-2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John

    2003-05-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon collection and spawning began in 1998. A total of 114 fish were collected from Johnson Creek and 54 fish (20 males and 34 females) were retained for Broodstock. All broodstock were transported to Lower Snake River Compensation Plan's South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility, operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. The remaining 60 fish were released to spawn naturally. An estimated 155,870 eggs from Johnson Creek chinook spawned at the South Fork Salmon River facility were transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for rearing. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,871. Approximately 20,500 eggs from females with high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease were culled. This, combined with green-egg to eyed-egg survival of 62%, resulted in about 84,000 eyed eggs produced in 1998. Resulting juveniles were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery in 1999. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags and 8,043 were also PIT tagged. A total of 78,950 smolts were transported from the McCall Fish Hatchery and released directly into Johnson Creek on March 27, 28, 29, and 30, 2000.

  14. Use of Dual Frequency Identification Sonar to Determine Adult Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Escapement in the Secesh River, Idaho ; Annual Report, January 2008 – December 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucera, Paul A.

    2009-06-26

    Chinook salmon in the Snake River basin were listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1992 (NMFS 1992). The Secesh River represents the only stream in the Snake River basin where natural origin (wild) salmon escapement monitoring occurs at the population level, absent a supplementation program. As such the Secesh River has been identified as a long term salmon escapement and productivity monitoring site by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management. Salmon managers will use this data for effective population management and evaluation of the effect of conservation actions on a natural origin salmon population. The Secesh River also acts as a reference stream for supplementation program comparison. Dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) was used to determine adult spring and summer Chinook salmon escapement in the Secesh River in 2008. DIDSON technology was selected because it provided a non-invasive method for escapement monitoring that avoided listed species trapping and handling incidental mortality, and fish impedance related concerns. The DIDSON monitoring site was operated continuously from June 13 to September 14. The first salmon passage was observed on July 3. DIDSON site total estimated salmon escapement, natural and hatchery fish, was 888 fish {+-} 65 fish (95% confidence interval). Coefficient of variation associated with the escapement estimate was 3.7%. The DIDSON unit was operational 98.1% of the salmon migration period. Adult salmon migration timing in the Secesh River occurred over 74 days from July 3 to September 14, with 5,262 total fish passages observed. The spawning migration had 10%, median, and 90% passage dates of July 8, July 16, and August 12, respectively. The maximum number of net upstream migrating salmon was above the DIDSON monitoring site on August 27. Validation monitoring of DIDSON target counts with underwater optical cameras occurred for species identification. A total of 860 optical camera identified salmon passage observations were identical to DIDSON target counts. However, optical cameras identified eight jack salmon (3 upstream, 5 downstream) less than 55 cm in length that DIDSON did not count as salmon because of the length criteria employed ({ge} 55 cm). Precision of the DIDSON technology was evaluated by comparing estimated net upstream salmon escapement and associated 95% confidence intervals between two DIDSON sonar units operated over a five day period. The DIDSON 1 salmon escapement was 145.7 fish ({+-} 2.3), and the DIDSON 2 escapement estimate was 150.5 fish ({+-} 5). The overlap in the 95% confidence intervals suggested that the two escapement estimates were not significantly different from each other. Known length salmon carcass trials were conducted in 2008 to examine the accuracy of manually measured lengths, obtained using DIDSON software, on high frequency files at a 5 m window length. Linear regression demonstrated a highly significant relationship between known lengths and manually measured salmon carcass lengths (p < 0.0001). A positive bias in manual length measurement of 6.8% to 8% existed among the two observers in the analysis. Total Secesh River salmon escapement (natural origin and hatchery) in 2008 was 912 fish. Natural origin salmon escapement in the entire Secesh River drainage was 847 fish. The estimated natural origin spawner abundance was 836 fish. Salmon spawner abundance in 2008 increased by three fold compared to 2007 abundance levels. The 10 year geometric mean natural origin spawner abundance was 538 salmon and was below the recommended viable population threshold level established by the ICTRT (2007). One additional Snake River basin salmon population was assessed for comparison of natural origin salmon spawner abundance. The Johnson Creek/EFSF Salmon River population had a 10 year geometric mean natural origin spawner abundance of 254 salmon. Salmon spawner abundance levels in both streams were below viable population thresholds. DIDSON technology has been used in the Secesh River to determine salmo

  15. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare dam passage survival, at two spill treatment levels, of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during spring 2010. The two treatments were 30% and 40% spill out of total project discharge. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. However, by agreement among the stakeholders, this study was not an official BiOp compliance test because the long-term passage measures at John Day Dam have yet to be finalized and another year of spill-treatment testing was desired.

  16. Influence of Incision Location on Transmitter Loss, Healing, Incision Lengths, Suture Retention, and Growth of Juvenile Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panther, Jennifer L.; Brown, Richard S.; Gaulke, Greggory L.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2010-05-11

    In this study, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, we measured differences in survival and growth, incision openness, transmitter loss, wound healing, and erythema among abdominal incisions on the linea alba, lateral and parallel to the linea alba (muscle-cutting), and following the underlying muscle fibers (muscle-sparing). A total of 936 juvenile Chinook salmon were implanted with both Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Tracking System transmitters (0.43 g dry) and passive integrated transponder tags. Fish were held at 12°C (n = 468) or 20°C (n = 468) and examined once weekly over 98 days. We found survival and growth did not differ among incision groups or between temperature treatment groups. Incisions on the linea alba had less openness than muscle-cutting and muscle-sparing incisions during the first 14 days when fish were held at 12°C or 20°C. Transmitter loss was not different among incision locations by day 28 when fish were held at 12°C or 20°C. However, incisions on the linea alba had greater transmitter loss than muscle-cutting and muscle-sparing incisions by day 98 at 12°C. Results for wound closure and erythema differed among temperature groups. Results from our study will be used to improve fish-tagging procedures for future studies using acoustic or radio transmitters.

  17. The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Piper L.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-05-01

    Each year, millions of fish have telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, inductive) surgically implanted to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One route of passage of particular concern is through hydro turbines, in which fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries, including barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from acclimation to exposure (nadir) has been found to be an important factor in predicting the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon undergoing rapid decompression associated with simulated turbine passage. The presence of telemetry tags has also been shown to influence the likelihood of injury and mortality for juvenile Chinook salmon. This research investigated the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon carrying telemetry tags and exposed to a range of simulated turbine passage. Several factors were examined as predictors of mortal injury for fish undergoing rapid decompression, and the ratio of pressure change and tag burden were determined to be the most predictive factors. As the ratio of pressure change and tag burden increase, the likelihood of mortal injury also increases. The results of this study suggest that previous survival estimates of juvenile Chinook salmon passing through hydro turbines may have been biased due to the presence of telemetry tags, and this has direct implications to the management of hydroelectric facilities. Realistic examples indicate how the bias in turbine passage survival estimates could be 20% or higher, depending on the mass of the implanted tags and the ratio of acclimation to exposure pressures. Bias would increase as the tag burden and pressure ratio increase, and have direct implications on survival estimates. It is recommended that future survival studies use the smallest telemetry tags possible to minimize the potential bias that may be associated with carrying the tag.

  18. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    such as harvest, hatchery production, and water management.FR, St FR Sport Harvest Funded by Yuba County Water Agency,HARVEST Among the king salmon taken … by trolling in the salt water

  19. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    a salmon population. In: Barnett, V, Turkman, KF, editors.Aquatic Sciences 57:915-927. Barnett-Johnson, RC, Ramos, FC,Santa Cruz, California: Barnett-Johnson, RRFC, Grimes, CB,

  20. Manchester Spring Chinook Broodstock Project, 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAuley, W.Carlin; Wastel, Michael R.; Flagg, Thomas A.

    2000-02-01

    This yearly report concerned facilities upgrade and endangered Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon captive broodstock rearing.

  1. Assessment of Barotrauma Resulting from Rapid Decompression of Depth Acclimated Juvenile Chinook Salmon Bearing Radio Telemetry Transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Welch, Abigail E.; Stephenson, John R.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Theriault, Marie-Helene

    2007-09-06

    A multifactor study was conducted by Battelle for the US Army Corps of Engineers to assess the significance of the presence of a radio telemetry transmitter on the effects of rapid decompression from simulated hydro turbine passage on depth acclimated juvenile run-of-the-river Chinook salmon. Study factors were: (1) juvenile chinook salmon age;, subyearling or yearling, (2) radio transmitter present or absent, (3) three transmitter implantation factors: gastric, surgical, and no transmitter, and (4) four acclimation depth factors: 1, 10, 20, and 40 foot submergence equivalent absolute pressure, for a total of 48 unique treatments. Exposed fish were examined for changes in behavior, presence or absence of barotrauma injuries, and immediate or delayed mortality. Logistic models were used to test hypotheses that addressed study objectives. The presence of a radio transmitter was found to significantly increase the risk of barotrauma injury and mortality at exposure to rapid decompression. Gastric implantation was found to present a higher risk than surgical implantation. Fish were exposed within 48 hours of transmitter implantation so surgical incisions were not completely healed. The difference in results obtained for gastric and surgical implantation methods may be the result of study design and the results may have been different if tested fish had completely healed surgical wounds. However, the test did simulate the typical surgical-release time frame for in-river telemetry studies of fish survival so the results are probably representative for fish passing through a turbine shortly following release into the river. The finding of a significant difference in response to rapid decompression between fish bearing radio transmitters and those not implies a bias may exist in estimates of turbine passage survival obtained using radio telemetry. However, the rapid decompression (simulated turbine passage) conditions used for the study represented near worst case exposure for fish passing through turbines. At this time, insufficient data exist about the distribution of river-run fish entering turbines, and particularly, the distribution of fish passing through turbine runners, to extrapolate study findings to the population of fish passing through FCRPS turbines. This study is the first study examining rapid decompression study to include acclimation depth as an experimental factor for physostomous fish. We found that fish acclimated to deeper depth were significantly more vulnerable to barotrauma injury and death. Insufficient information about the distribution of fish entering turbines and their depth acclimation currently exists to extrapolate these findings to the population of fish passing through turbines. However, the risk of barotrauma for turbine-passed fish could be particularly high for subyearling Chinook salmon that migrate downstream at deeper depths late in the early summer portion of the outmigration. Barotrauma injuries led to immediate mortality delayed mortality and potential mortality due to increased susceptibility to predation resulting from loss of equilibrium or swim bladder rupture.

  2. Surgically Implanted JSATS Micro-Acoustic Transmitters Effects on Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Tag Expulsion and Survival, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Royer, Ida M.; Knox, Kasey M.; Kim, Jin A.; Gay, Marybeth E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Brown, Richard S.

    2011-09-16

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate survival model assumptions associated with a concurrent study - Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Dam Passage Survival and Associated Metrics at John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2010 by Thomas Carlson and others in 2010 - in which the Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The micro-acoustic transmitter used in these studies is the smallest acoustic transmitter model to date (12 mm long x 5 mm wide x 4 mm high, and weighing 0.43 g in air). This study and the 2010 study by Carlson and others were conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet requirements set forth by the 2008 FCRPS Biological Opinion. In 2010, we compared survival, tag burden, and tag expulsion in five spring groups of yearling Chinook salmon (YCH) and steelhead (STH) and five summer groups of subyearling Chinook salmon (SYC) to evaluate survival model assumptions described in the concurrent study. Each tagging group consisted of approximately 120 fish/species, which were collected and implanted on a weekly basis, yielding approximately 600 fish total/species. YCH and STH were collected and implanted from late April to late May (5 weeks) and SYC were collected and implanted from mid-June to mid-July (5 weeks) at the John Day Dam Smolt Monitoring Facility. The fish were collected once a week, separated by species, and assigned to one of three treatment groups: (1) Control (no surgical treatment), (2) Sham (surgical implantation of only a passive integrated transponder [PIT] tag), and (3) Tagged (surgical implantation of JSATS micro-acoustic transmitter [AT] and PIT tags). The test fish were held for 30 days in indoor circular tanks at the Bonneville Dam Juvenile Monitoring Facility. Overall mortality ranged weekly from 45 to 72% for YCH, 55 to 83% for STH, and 56 to 84% for SYC. The high background mortality in all groups and species made it difficult to discern tag effects. However, for YCH, STH, and SYC, the Tagged treatment groups had the highest overall mean mortality - 62%, 79%, and 76%, respectively. Fungal infections were found on 35% of all fish. Mean tag burden for the Tagged treatment group was relatively low for YCH (1.7%) and moderate for SYC (4.2%), while STH had a very low mean tag burden (0.7%). Tag burden was significantly higher in the Tagged treatment group for all species when compared to the Sham treatment group because of the presence of two tags. Surgeon performance did not contribute to the difference in mortality between the Sham and Tagged treatment groups. Tag expulsion from fish that survived to the end of the 30-day experiment was low but occurred in all species, with only two PIT tags and one AT lost, one tag per species. The high background mortality in this experiment was not limited to a treatment, temperature, or month. The decreased number of surviving fish influenced our experimental results and thus analyses. For future research, we recommend that a more natural exposure to monitor tag effects and other factors, such as swimming ability and predator avoidance, be considered to determine the effects of AT- and PIT- implantation on fishes.

  3. Efficacy of Single-Suture Incision Closures in Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, James W.; Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.

    2011-09-01

    Reductions in the size of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the use of a shorter incision-one that may warrant only a single suture for closure. However, it is not known whether a single suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed when fish are decompressed and when outward pressure is placed on the surgical site during turbine passage through hydroelectric dams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of single-suture incision closures on five response variables in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were subjected to simulated turbine passage. An acoustic transmitter (0.43 g in air) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g in air) were implanted in each fish; the 6-mm incisions were closed with either one suture or two sutures. After exposure to simulated turbine passage, none of the fish exhibited expulsion of transmitters. In addition, the percentage of fish with suture tearing, incision tearing, or mortal injury did not differ between treatments. Expulsion of viscera through the incision was higher among fish that received one suture (12%) than among fish that received two sutures (1%). The higher incidence of visceral expulsion through single-suture incisions warrants concern. Consequently, for cases in which tagged juvenile salmonidsmay be exposed to turbine passage, we do not recommend the use of one suture to close 6-mm incisions associated with acoustic transmitter implantation.

  4. Performance Assessment of Suture Type, Water Temperature, and Surgeon Skill in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

    2010-08-01

    Size reductions of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the use of a shorter incision - one that may warrant only one suture for closure. However, it is not known if a single suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed when fish are decompressed and outward pressure is placed on the surgical site during passage of hydroelectric dams. The objectives of this study were to evaluate five response variables in juvenile Chinook salmon subjected to simulated turbine passage. Fish were implanted with an acoustic transmitter (0.43 g in air) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g in air); incisions (6 mm) were closed with either one or two sutures. Following exposure, no transmitters were expelled. In addition, suture and incision tearing and mortal injury did not differ between treatment and control fish. Viscera expulsion was higher in treatment (12%) than control (1%) fish. The higher incidence of viscera expulsion through single-suture incisions warrants concern. Consequently, the authors do not recommend using one suture to close 6-mm incisions associated with acoustic transmitter implantation when juvenile salmonids may be exposed to turbine passage.

  5. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2005-2006 Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Terra Lang; Wilson, Wayne H.; Ruzycki, James R.

    2009-04-10

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations, however, remain depressed relative to historic levels. Between the completion of the life history and natural escapement study in 1984 and the start of this project in 1998, spring Chinook spawning surveys did not provide adequate information to assess age structure, progeny-to-parent production values, smolt-to-adult survival (SAR), or natural spawning escapement. Further, only very limited information is available for steelhead life history, escapement, and productivity measures in the John Day subbasin. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival have also been implemented in the basin and are in need of effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed background information for developing context for project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts. To meet the data needs as index stocks, to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects, and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival, sufficient annual estimates of spawner escapement, age structure, SAR, egg-to-smolt survival, smolt-per-redd ratio, and freshwater habitat use are essential. We have begun to meet this need through spawning ground surveys initiated for spring Chinook salmon in 1998 and smolt PIT-tagging efforts initiated in 1999. Additional sampling and analyses to meet these goals include an estimate of smolt abundance and SAR rates, and an updated measure of the freshwater distribution of critical life stages. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the high level of emphasis the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Subbasin Summaries, NMFS, and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds have placed on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. By implementing the proposed program we have been able to address many of the goals for population status monitoring, such as defining areas currently used by spring Chinook for holding and spawning habitats and determining range expansion or contraction of summer rearing and spawning populations. The BiOp describes these goals as defining population growth rates (adult monitoring), detecting changes in those growth rates or relative abundance in a reasonable time (adult/juvenile monitoring), estimating juvenile abundance and survival rates (juvenile/smolt monitoring), and identifying stage-specific survival (adult-to-smolt, smolt-to-adult).

  6. Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Batten, G.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Kim, Jin A.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Etherington, D. J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Greiner, Michael J.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-02-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2011. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a virtual/paired-release model. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon using a virtual release, paired reference release survival model. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  7. Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Tyler; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  8. Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing Through Bonneville Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2012-09-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  9. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    in the fall and winter, and neither term seems quite apt forand most populations are neither completely isolated nor1992). The fish sampled are neither a random nor a uniform

  10. Atmospheric Mercury near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in Southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2007-12-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured over two-week seasonal field campaigns near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south-central Idaho from the summer of 2005 through the fall of 2006 and over the entire summer of 2006 using automated Tekran mercury analyzers. GEM, RGM, and particulate mercury (HgP) were also measured at a secondary site 90 km to the west in southwestern Idaho during the summer of 2006. The study was performed to characterize mercury air concentrations in the southern Idaho area for the first time, estimate mercury dry deposition rates, and investigate the source of observed elevated concentrations. High seasonal variability was observed with the highest GEM (1.91 ± 0.9 ng m-3) and RGM (8.1 ± 5.6 pg m-3) concentrations occurring in the summer and lower values in the winter (1.32 ± 0.3 ng m-3, 3.2 ± 2.9 pg m-3 for GEM, RGM respectively). The summer-average HgP concentrations were generally below detection limit (0.6 ± 1 pg m-3). Seasonally-averaged deposition velocities calculated using a resistance model were 0.034 ± 0.032, 0.043 ± 0.040, 0.00084 ± 0.0017 and 0.00036 ± 0.0011 cm s-1 for GEM (spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively) and 0.50 ± 0.39, 0.40 ± 0.31, 0.51 ± 0.43 and 0.76 ± 0.57 cm s-1 for RGM. The total annual RGM + GEM dry deposition estimate was calculated to be 11.9 ± 3.3 µg m-2, or about 2/3 of the total (wet + dry) deposition estimate for the area. Periodic elevated short-term GEM (2.2 – 12 ng m-3) and RGM (50 - 150 pg m-3) events were observed primarily during the warm seasons. Back-trajectory modeling and PSCF analysis indicated predominant source directions from the southeast (western Utah, northeastern Nevada) through the southwest (north-central Nevada) with fewer inputs from the northwest (southeastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho).

  11. Atmospheric mercury near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2008-03-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured over 2-week seasonal field campaigns near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south-central Idaho from the summer of 2005 through the fall of 2006 and over the entire summer of 2006 using automated Tekran Hg analyzers. GEM, RGM, and particulate Hg (HgP) were also measured at a secondary site 90 km to the west in southwestern Idaho during the summer of 2006. The study was performed to characterize Hg air concentrations in the southern Idaho area for the first time, estimate Hg dry deposition rates, and investigate the source of observed elevated concentrations. High seasonal variability was observed with the highest GEM (1.91 ± 0.9 ng m-3) and RGM (8.1 ± 5.6 pg m-3) concentrations occurring in the summer and lower values in the winter (1.32 ± 0.3 ng m-3, 3.2 ± 2.9 pg m-3 for GEM, RGM, respectively). The summer-average HgP concentrations were generally below detection limit (0.6 ± 1 pg m-3). Seasonally averaged deposition velocities calculated using a resistance model were 0.034 ± 0.032, 0.043 ± 0.040, 0.00084 ± 0.0017 and 0.00036 ± 0.0011 cm s-1 for GEM (spring, summer, fall and winter, respectively) and 0.50 ± 0.39, 0.40 ± 0.31, 0.51 ± 0.43 and 0.76 ± 0.57 cm s-1 for RGM. The total annual RGM + GEM dry deposition estimate was calculated to be 11.9 ± 3.3 µg m-2, or about 2/3 of the total (wet + dry) deposition estimate for the area. Periodic elevated short-term GEM (2.2–12 ng m-3) and RGM (50–150 pg m-3) events were observed primarily during the warm seasons. Back-trajectory modeling and PSCF analysis indicate predominant source directions to the SE (western Utah, northeastern Nevada) and SW (north-central Nevada) with fewer inputs from the NW (southeastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho).

  12. Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Returns 1999 -2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Returns 1999 - 2008 Peter Hassemer Idaho Department of Fish Upper Columbia Summer Chinook Salmon Coho Salmon Shad Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Returns 1999

  13. Framework for Assessing Viability of Threatened and Endangered Chinook Salmon and Steelhead in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Branch, 830 S Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Steelhead data660 J Street, Suite 260, Sacramento, CA McElhany P, Backmanrecovery plan for the Sacramento River winter- run chinook.

  14. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. (National Marine Fisheries Service)

    2005-11-01

    The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Accomplishments detailed in this report and those since the last project review period (FY 2003) are listed below by major objective. Objective 1: (i) Developed tools for monitoring the spawning success of captively reared Chinook salmon that can now be used for evaluating the reintroduction success of ESA-listed captive broodstocks in their natal habitats. (ii) Developed an automated temperature controlled rearing system to test the effects of seawater rearing temperature on reproductive success of Chinook salmon. Objective 2: (i) Determined that Columbia River sockeye salmon imprint at multiple developmental stages and the length of exposure to home water is important for successful imprinting. These results can be utilized for developing successful reintroduction strategies to minimize straying by ESA-listed sockeye salmon. (ii) Developed behavioral and physiological assays for imprinting in sockeye salmon. Objective 3: (i) Developed growth regime to reduce age-two male maturation in spring Chinook salmon, (ii) described reproductive cycle of returning hatchery Snake River spring Chinook salmon relative to captive broodstock, and (iii) found delays in egg development in captive broodstock prior to entry to fresh water. (iv) Determined that loss of Redfish Lake sockeye embryos prior to hatch is largely due to lack of egg fertilization rather than embryonic mortality. Objective 4 : (i) Demonstrated safety and efficacy limits against bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in fall Chinook of attenuated R. salmoninarum vaccine and commercial vaccine Renogen, (ii) improved prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of compound vaccine against BKD in fall Chinook and (iii) testing of broodstock antibiotic treatment in combination with compound vaccine against BKD. Objective 5: (i) Determined that close inbreeding in Chinook salmon led to substantial reductions in marine survival; progeny of half siblings survived at 90% the rate of noninbred fish and progeny of full siblings survived at only 15% the rate of noninbred fish. (ii) For two broods, 2002 and 2003, we established a breeding design involving 30 half- and 120 full-sib families of Chinook salmon to test the generality of these results.

  15. Performance Assessment of Bi-Directional Knotless Tissue-Closure Device in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters, 2010 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Knox, Kasey M.; Gay, Marybeth E.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2012-09-10

    In 2010, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) conducted a compliance monitoring study—the Lower Columbia River Acoustic Transmitter Investigations of Dam Passage Survival and Associated Metrics 2010 (Carlson et al. in preparation)—for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District. The purpose of the compliance study was to evaluate juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) passage routes and survival through the lower three Columbia River hydroelectric facilities as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp; NOAA Fisheries 2008) and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Fish Accords; 3 Treaty Tribes and Action Agencies 2008).

  16. Monitoring the Reproductive Success of Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Natural Spring Chinook Salmon in the Wenatchee River, 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Michael J.; Williamson, Kevin S.

    2009-05-28

    We investigated differences in the statistical power to assign parentage between an artificially propagated and wild salmon population. The propagated fish were derived from the wild population, and are used to supplement its abundance. Levels of genetic variation were similar between the propagated and wild groups at 11 microsatellite loci, and exclusion probabilities were >0.999999 for both groups. The ability to unambiguously identify a pair of parents for each sampled progeny was much lower than expected, however. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of cases the most likely pair of parents were the true parents was lower for propagated parents than for wild parents. There was a clear relationship between parentage assignment ability and the degree of linkage disequilibrium, the estimated effective number of breeders that produced the parents, and the size of the largest family within the potential parents. If a stringent threshold for parentage assignment was used, estimates of relative fitness were biased downward for the propagated fish. The bias appeared to be largely eliminated by either fractionally assigning progeny among parents in proportion to their likelihood of parentage, or by assigning progeny to the most likely set of parents without using a statistical threshold. We used a DNA-based parentage analysis to measure the relative reproductive success of hatchery- and natural-origin spring Chinook salmon in the natural environment. Both male and female hatchery-origin fish produced far fewer juvenile progeny per parent when spawning naturally than did natural origin fish. Differences in age structure, spawning location, weight and run timing were responsible for some of the difference in fitness. Male size and age had a large influence on fitness, with larger and older males producing more offspring than smaller or younger individuals. Female size had a significant effect on fitness, but the effect was much smaller than the effect of size on male fitness. For both sexes, run time had a smaller but still significant effect on fitness, with earlier returning fish favored. Spawning location within the river had a significant effect on fitness for both males and females, and for females explained most of the reduced fitness observed for hatchery fish in this population. While differences have been reported in the relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced salmonids Oncorhynchus spp., factors explaining the differences are often confounded. We examined the spawning site habitat and redd structure variables of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha of known size that spawned in two tributaries of the Wenatchee River. We controlled for variability in spawning habitat by limiting our analysis to redds found within four selected reaches. No difference in the instantaneous spawner density or location of the redd in the stream channel was detected between reaches. Within each reach, no difference in the fork length or weight of hatchery and naturally produced fish was detected. While most variables differed between reaches, we found no difference in redd characteristics within a reach between hatchery and naturally produced females. Correlation analysis of fish size and redd characteristics found several weak but significant relationships suggesting larger fish contract larger redds in deeper water. Spawner density was inversely related to several redd structure variables suggesting redd size may decrease as spawner density increases. Results should be considered preliminary until samples size and statistical power goals are reached in future years. Trends in relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Wenatchee Basins suggest females that spawn in the upper reaches of the tributaries produced a great number of offspring compared to females that spawn in the lower reaches of the tributaries. To better understand this trend, redd microhabitat data was collected from spring Chinook sa

  17. Relating spatial and temporal scales of climate and ocean variability to survival of Pacific Northwest Chinook salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relating spatial and temporal scales of climate and ocean variability to survival of Pacific Oregon St, Suite 200, Portland, OR 97232, U.S.A. 2 Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-5020, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Pacific Northwest Chinook, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, have

  18. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1989-04-01

    This project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The annual report contains three individual subproject papers detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1989. Subproject 1 contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject 2 contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. This report has been sub-divided into two parts: Part 1; stream evaluation and Part 2; pond series evaluation. Subproject 3 concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. This report summarizes the evaluation of the project to date including the 1989 pre-construction evaluation conducted within the East Fork drainage. Dredge mining has degraded spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River and in Bear Valley Creek. Mining, agricultural, and grazing practices degraded habitat in the East Fork of the Salmon River. Biological monitoring of the success of habitat enhancement for Bear Valley Creek and Yankee Fork are presented in this report. Physical and biological inventories prior to habitat enhancement in East Fork were also conducted. Four series of off-channel ponds of the Yankee Fork are shown to provide effective rearing habitat for chinook salmon. 45 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

  19. UNIT= STATES DEPARTMWT PF COMMERCE National Ooaanic and Atmoepherlo Adrnlnl-ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valley springrunChinook salmon, Lower ColumbiaRiver Chinook salmon, Upper ColumbiaRiver spring-run Chinook salmon, Puget Sound Chinook salmon, SacramentoRiver winter-nmChinook salmon, Snake #12;River fall-run Chinook salmon, Snake River spring/summer-run Chinook salmon, Upper Willamette River Chinook salmon, Columbia

  20. Temporal Trends in Hatchery Releases of Fall-Run Chinook Salmon in California's Central Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric R.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    management attention because local adaptations (Utter 2004) and the ability to adapt to future environmental changes (management. Through future research, we aim to better understand the consequences of these changes

  1. Temporal Trends in Hatchery Releases of Fall-Run Chinook Salmon in California's Central Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric R.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    California Department of Water Resources. Augerot, X. 2005.California Department of Water Resources. Bond N, Lake P.on steelhead. Prepared for the Water Forum. Available from:

  2. Temporal Trends in Hatchery Releases of Fall-Run Chinook Salmon in California's Central Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric R.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    salmonid production from Pacific Rim hatcheries. North Pacacross much of their Pacific Rim distribution (Mahnken et

  3. Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (Steelhead; Oncorhynchus mykiss) Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon from 5 October 2006 to 21 June 2007, Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaels, Brian; Espinosa, Neal

    2009-02-18

    This report summarizes the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) Department of Fisheries Resources Management (DFRM) results for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Hatchery Evaluation studies and the Imnaha River Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP) for the 2007 smolt migration from the Imnaha River, Oregon. These studies are closely coordinated and provide information about juvenile natural and hatchery spring/summer Naco x (Chinook Salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (steelhead; O. mykiss) biological characteristics, emigrant timing, survival, arrival timing and travel time to the Snake River dams and McNary Dam (MCD) on the Columbia River. These studies provide information on listed Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000). The Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program's goal is to maintain a hatchery production program of 490,000 Naco x (Chinook salmon) and 330,000 Heeyey (steelhead) for annual release in the Imnaha River (Carmichael et al. 1998, Whitesel et al. 1998). These hatchery releases occur to compensate for fish losses due to the construction and operation of the four lower Snake River hydroelectric facilities. One of the aspects of the LSRCP hatchery evaluation studies in the Imnaha River is to determine natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolt performance, emigration characteristics and survival (Kucera and Blenden 1998). A long term monitoring effort was established to document smolt emigrant timing and post release survival within the Imnaha River, estimate smolt survival downstream to McNary Dam, compare natural and hatchery smolt performance, and collect smolt-to-adult return information. This project collects information for, and is part of, a larger effort entitled Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Agencies (BPA Project No. 198712700). This larger project provides data on movement of smolts out of major drainages and past dams on the Snake River and Columbia River. In season indices of migration strength and migration timing are provided for the run-at large at key monitoring sites. Marked smolts are utilized to measure travel time and estimate survival through key index reaches. Fish quality and descaling measures are recorded at each monitoring site and provide indicators of the health of the run. Co-managers in the Imnaha River subbasin (Ecovista 2004) have identified the need to collect information on life history, migration patterns, juvenile emigrant abundance, reach specific smolt survivals, and Smolt-to-Adult Return rates (SAR's) for both Heeyey (steelhead) and Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts. The current study provides information related to the majority of the high priority data needs. Current funding does not allow for determination of a total (annual) juvenile emigrant abundance and lack of adult passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag detectors at the mouth of the Imnaha River results in the inability to calculate tributary specific SAR's. Information is shared with the Fish Passage Center (FPC) on a real time basis during the spring emigration period. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted the NPT to monitor emigration timing and tag up to 19,000 emigrating natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolts from the Imnaha River with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. The completion of trapping in the spring of 2007 marked the 16th year of emigration studies on the Imnaha River, and the 14th year of participating in the FPC smolt monitoring program. Monitoring and evaluation objectives were to: (1) Evaluate effects of flow, temperature and other environmental factors on juvenile migration timing. (2) Determine emigration timing, travel time, and in-river survival of PIT tagged hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts released at the Imnaha River acclimation facility to the Imnaha River juvenile migration trap. (3) Monitor the daily catch and biological cha

  4. Stock Assessment of Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids : Final Report, Volume I, Chinook, Coho, Chum and Sockeye Salmon Summaries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Philip J.

    1986-07-01

    The purpose was to identify and characterize the wild and hatchery stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River Basin on the basis of currently available information. This report provides a comprehensive compilation of data on the status and life histories of Columbia Basin salmonid stocks.

  5. Interannual variation of reach specific migratory success for Sacramento River hatchery yearling late-fall run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimley, A. Peter

    a multitude of habitats ­ the more natural run-riffle-pool structure of the upper river, a channelized lowerInterannual variation of reach specific migratory success for Sacramento River hatchery yearling late-fall run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

  6. MIGRATION OF JUVENILE SALMON AND TROUT INTO BROWNLEE RESERVOIR, 1962-65

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIGRATION OF JUVENILE SALMON AND TROUT INTO BROWNLEE RESERVOIR, 1962-65 BY RICHARD F. KRCMA. 98102 ABSTRACT Migrations of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coho salmon (0. kisutch of the reservoir system (Ebel and Koski, 1968), (2) upstream migration of adult chinook salmon (O

  7. Coded-Wire Tag Expansion Factors for Chinook Salmon Carcass Surveys in California: Estimating the Numbers and Proportions of Hatchery-Origin Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Michael S.; Satterthwaite, William H.

    2013-01-01

    late fall run, winter run, and Feather River Hatchery springDeer Creek fall run, and American River late fall run. TheDeer Creek fall run, and American River late fall run), no

  8. A comparison of single-suture and double-suture incision closures in seaward-migrating juvenile Chinook salmon implanted with acoustic transmitters: implications for research in river basins containing hydropower structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.; Cook, Katrina V.; Eppard, M. B.

    2013-07-15

    Reductions in the size of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the ability to make shorter incisions that may warrant using only a single suture for closure. However, it is not known if one suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed, particularly when outward pressure is placed on the surgical site such as when migrating fish experience pressure changes associated with passage at hydroelectric dams. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of single-suture incision closures on juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Juvenile Chinook salmon were surgically implanted with a 2012 Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitter (0.30 g) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g) and incisions were closed with either one suture or two sutures. Mortality and tag retention were monitored and fish were examined after 7 and 14 days to evaluate tissue responses. In a separate experiment, surgically implanted fish were exposed to simulated turbine passage and then examined for expulsion of transmitters, expulsion of viscera through the incision, and mortal injury. With incisions closed using a single suture, there was no mortality or tag loss and similar or reduced tissue reaction compared to incisions closed with two sutures. Further, surgery time was significantly reduced when one suture was used, which leads to less handling and reduced stress. No tags were expelled during pressure scenarios and expulsion of viscera only occurred in two non-mortally injured fish (5%) with single sutures that were also exposed to very high pressure changes. No viscera expulsion was present in fish exposed to pressure scenarios likely representative of hydroturbine passage at many Columbia River dams (e.g. <2.7 ratio of pressure change; an acclimation pressure of 146.2 absolute kpa and a lowest exposure pressure of ~ 53.3 absolute kpa). Based on these results, we recommend the use of a single suture for surgical implantation of transmitters with incisions that are approximately 5 1/2 mm long after tag insertion.

  9. Delta Flow Factors Influencing Stray Rate of Escaping Adult San Joaquin River Fall-Run Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    due to insufficient instream flow releases. Report preparedhead of Old River barrier on flow and water quality in theeffects of San Joaquin River flows and Delta export rates

  10. Delta Flow Factors Influencing Stray Rate of Escaping Adult San Joaquin River Fall-Run Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    to the State Water Resources Control Board. Stockton (CA):Central Valley Water Resources Control Board. San Anselmo (the California Water Resources Control Board in compliance

  11. Delta Flow Factors Influencing Stray Rate of Escaping Adult San Joaquin River Fall-Run Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    was indirectly corroborated by Barnett– Johnson and others (Ca ratios. Collectively Barnett–Johnson Ca and others (2008)Aquatic Science 57:915–927. Barnett–Johnson R, Pearson T,

  12. Delta Flow Factors Influencing Stray Rate of Escaping Adult San Joaquin River Fall-Run Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    pulse flow of 6,000 (in cfs; U.S. ) for a group of salmoncubic feet per second (cfs; U.S. ) units, simply substitutefor cubic feet per second (cfs; U.S. ) unit calculations.

  13. EIS-0346: Salmon Creek Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's proposal to fund activities that would restore sufficient water flows to Salmon Creek and rehabilitate its streambed as necessary to provide adequate passage for summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and possibly spring chinook (O. tshawytscha).

  14. EA-1998: Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and Steelhead Acclimation Project, Chelan County, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA is preparing an EA that will analyze the potential impacts of a proposal to fund the Yakama Nation to improve, develop, and use fish rearing acclimation ponds for hatchery raised steelhead and Chinook salmon in the Methow and Wenatchee watersheds. Additional information is available at http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/ChinookSteelh....

  15. Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Redd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowď‚—34October 201422T Office36Z

  16. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Todd D.

    2009-06-12

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

  17. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume I of III; Narrative, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatick, Emil; Gilbreath, Lyle G.; Harmon, Jerrel R. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-01

    The National Marine Fisheries Service began conducting homing research on Pacific salmon and steelhead. Over 4 million juvenile salmon and steelhead were marked and released, and 23 individual experiments were conducted. The research had the following objectives: (1) develop the techniques for imprinting homing cues while increasing survival of hatchery reared salmonids and (2) provide fishery managers with the information necessary to increase the returns of salmon and steelhead to the Columbia River system and to effectively distribute these fish to the various user groups. Our imprint methods were grouped into three general categories: (1) natural migration imprint from a hatchery of origin or an alternate homing site (by allowing fish to volitionally travel downstream through the river on their seaward journey), (2) single exposure imprinting (cueing fish to a single unique water supply with or without mechanical stimuli prior to transport and release), and (3) sequential exposure imprinting (cueing fish to two or more water sources in a step-by-step process to establish a series of signposts for the route ''home''). With variations, all three techniques were used with all salmonid groups tested: coho salmon, spring and fall chinook salmon, and steelhead. For the single and sequential imprint, fish were transported around a portion of their normal migration route before releasing them into the Columbia River.

  18. OkanoganRiver SpringChinookSalmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Water Source 48 Section 5. Facilities 51 Section 6. Broodstock Origin and Identity 57 Section 7 at Rock Island and Wells Dams 33 Table 2. Future Tribal & Recreational Selective Harvest of Spring 44

  19. Route-Specific Survival of Juvenile Salmon Migrating through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Russell W

    2010-01-01

    B” series, along the Sacramento River; “C” the Delta CrossChinook salmon in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta.Migrating through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Russell

  20. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. (National Marine Fisheries Service)

    2004-01-01

    The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Current velocity in rearing vessels had little if any effect on reproductive behavior of captively reared steelhead. However, males and females reared in high velocity vessels participated a greater number of spawning events than siblings reared in low velocity tanks. Observations of nesting females and associated males in a natural stream (Hamma Hamma River) were consistent with those observed in a controlled spawning channel. DNA pedigree analyses did not reveal significant differences in the numbers of fry produced by steelhead reared in high and low velocity vessels. To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon are being exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Subsequently they will be tested for development of long-term memories of these odorants. In 2002-2003, the efficacy of EOG analysis for assessing imprinting was demonstrated and will be applied in these and other behavioral and molecular tools in the current work plan. Results of these experiments will be important to determine the critical periods for imprinting for the offspring of captively-reared fish destined for release into natal rivers or lakes. By early August, the oocytes of all of Rapid River Hatchery chinook salmon females returning from the ocean had advanced to the tertiary yolk globule stage; whereas, only some of the captively reared Lemhi River females sampled had advanced to this stage, and the degree of advancement was not dependent on rearing temperature. The mean spawning time of captive Lemhi River females was 3-4 weeks after that of the Rapid River fish. Captive Lemhi River females produced smaller and fewer eggs than the Rapid River females; however, relative fecundity was higher than that of the Rapid River fish. Female coho salmon that ceased or slowed oocyte development in the spring had lower body growth from the previous August onward compared with females that continued oocyte growth. This indicates that growth during the late summer and fall, one year prior to spawning, can determine the decision to mature the following spring. Therefore it is important to maintain the growth of broodstock during the summer/fall period to ensure the continuation of ovary development in the subsequent spring. A combined whole cell vaccine of Renogen with killed R. salmoninarum strain MT239 may be effective in reducing the occurrence of BKD during the period immediately after seawater transfer, but not in yearling seawater-adapted chinook salmon. Control of BKD is likely to require an integrated disease management plan, utilizing three components, namely broodstock segregation, antibiotics, and vaccination. Vaccine results incorporated with antibiotic treatment will be used to work toward an integrated disease management plan to help to reduce the cycle of BKD transmission in the captive stocks to increase survival safely. Patterns of estimated survival in one chinook salmon stock (Grovers Creek)were generally consistent with inbreeding depression: progeny of fish that were full siblings (approximate increment in F of 0.25) survived to return at much lower rates than did progeny of fish that were half siblings (F {approx} 0.125) or unrelated individuals (F {approx} 0). Growth at sea of Grovers Creek Hatchery stock study fish was lower than that of UWH stock fish. Among the inbreeding groups alone, no clear differences in growth were detectable. However, preliminary results suggest the general pattern of growth was opposite that expected if inbreeding depression reduced growth: the highest growth was in progeny of related parents.

  1. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A.; Athos, Jaime I.; Dittman, Andrew H. (National Marine Fisheries Service)

    2004-07-01

    The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. We were able to develop an analytical method for optimizing the detection of spawning events in Chinook salmon using EMG signals. The method developed essentially captured the consistently greater frequency of higher EMG values associated with females cover digging immediately following spawning. However, females implanted with EMG tags retained the majority of their eggs, which significantly reduced their reproductive success compared to non-tagged females. Future work will include increased sample sizes, and modified tagging methods to reduce negative effects on reproductive success. Upper Columbia River sockeye salmon exposed to the odorants PEA, L-threonine, Larginine and L-glutamate were able to learn and remember these odorants as maturing adults up to 2.5 years after exposure. These results suggest that the alevin and smolt stages are both important developmental periods for successful olfactory imprinting. Furthermore, the period of time that fish are exposed to imprinting odors may be important for successful imprinting. Experimental fish exposed to imprinting odors as smolts for six or one weeks successfully imprinted to these odors but imprinting could not be demonstrated in smolts exposed to odors for only one day. A 2-3 C reduction in seawater rearing temperature during the fall and winter prior to final maturation had little effect on reproductive development of spring Chinook salmon. Body size at spawning and total ovary mass were similar between temperature treatments. The percentage of fertilized eggs was significantly higher for females exposed to the ambient temperature compared to those exposed to the chilled temperature. However, the percentage of embryos surviving to the eye-stage, total fecundity, and mean egg mass did not differ between treatments. This work is being continued with larger samples sizes and increased duration of temperature exposure. Exercise during the months prior to final maturation had no detectable effects on fertilization success or embryo viability in Redfish Lake Sockeye. Problems with highly variable or low eyed-embryo survival are most likely due to problems with fertilization. Synchronizing spawn timing between males and females may improve gamete fertility, perhaps by making oocyte maturation and ovulation more readily detectable and synchronous within the individual. Improvements in milt production (using GnRHa) and fertilization protocols have apparently increased fertilization success in Redfish Lake sockeye over previous years. Broodstock treatment with azithromycin immediately prior to spawning can protect against acute challenge with R. salmoninarum. Among fish challenged with 10,000 virulent R. salmoninarum cells per fish, progeny of broodstock treated with azithromycin exhibited significantly greater survival than progeny of sham-treated broodstock. Work on the efficacy of antibiotic treatment and vaccination against BKD before and after smoltification in offspring chinook salmon captive broodstocks is ongoing. To date, the long-term study of inbreeding indicates that the potential for anadromous Chinook salmon to respond rapidly to close inbreeding, with adverse consequences for marine survival and, possibly, growth. The effects of inbreeding expressed during early life history do not reveal significant effects. Overall, the results would support recommendations for initiating artificially propagated populations with sufficient, outbred broodstock and implementing carefully monitored breeding practices to minimize rates of inbreeding during a program's duration.

  2. Groundwater Surface Water Interactions in a Gold-mined Floodplain of the Merced River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lynn Sager

    2013-01-01

    1998). Chinook tend to run up larger river systems and occurEstimated Fall Run Chinook Merced River Year Figure 12of Merced River adult fall-run Chinook salmon ..

  3. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon; Assessment of Captive Broodstock Technologies, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry

    2004-01-01

    The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Current velocity in rearing vessels had little if any effect on reproductive behavior of captively reared steelhead. However, males and females reared in high velocity vessels participated a greater number of spawning events than siblings reared in low velocity tanks. Observations of nesting females and associated males in a natural stream (Hamma Hamma River) were consistent with those observed in a controlled spawning channel. DNA pedigree analyses did not reveal significant differences in the numbers of fry produced by steelhead reared in high and low velocity vessels. To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon are being exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Subsequently they will be tested for development of long-term memories of these odorants. In 2002-2003, the efficacy of EOG analysis for assessing imprinting was demonstrated and will be applied in these and other behavioral and molecular tools in the current work plan. Results of these experiments will be important to determine the critical periods for imprinting for the offspring of captively-reared fish destined for release into natal rivers or lakes. By early August, the oocytes of all of Rapid River Hatchery chinook salmon females returning from the ocean had advanced to the tertiary yolk globule stage; whereas, only some of the captively reared Lemhi River females sampled had advanced to this stage, and the degree of advancement was not dependent on rearing temperature. The mean spawning time of captive Lemhi River females was 3-4 weeks after that of the Rapid River fish. Captive Lemhi River females produced smaller and fewer eggs than the Rapid River females; however, relative fecundity was higher than that of the Rapid River fish. Female coho salmon that ceased or slowed oocyte development in the spring had lower body growth from the previous August onward compared with females that continued oocyte growth. This indicates that growth during the late summer and fall, one year prior to spawning, can determine the decision to mature the following spring. Therefore it is important to maintain the growth of broodstock during the summer/fall period to ensure the continuation of ovary development in the subsequent spring. A combined whole cell vaccine of Renogen with killed R. salmoninarum strain MT239 may be effective in reducing the occurrence of BKD during the period immediately after seawater transfer, but not in yearling seawater-adapted chinook salmon. Control of BKD is likely to require an integrated disease management plan, utilizing three components, namely broodstock segregation, antibiotics, and vaccination. Vaccine results incorporated with antibiotic treatment will be used to work toward an integrated disease management plan to help to reduce the cycle of BKD transmission in the captive stocks to increase survival safely. Patterns of estimated survival in one chinook salmon stock (Grovers Creek) were generally consistent with inbreeding depression: progeny of fish that were full siblings (approximate increment in F of 0.25) survived to return at much lower rates than did progeny of fish that were half siblings (F {approx} 0.125) or unrelated individuals (F {approx} 0). Growth at sea of Grovers Creek Hatchery stock study fish was lower than that of UWH stock fish. Among the inbreeding groups alone, no clear differences in growth were detectable. However, preliminary results suggest the general pattern of growth was opposite that expected if inbreeding depression reduced growth: the highest growth was in progeny of related parents.

  4. Status of ESA Listings & Critical Habitat Designations for West Coast Salmon & Steelhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CITED · 6/16/93 (58 FR 33212) Final CHD for Sacramento River Winter-run Chinook · 12/28/93 (58 FR 68543 COLUMBIA DOMAIN · Snake River Sockeye (E) [FCH 12/28/93] · Snake River Fall Chinook (T) [FCH 12/28/93] · Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook (T) [FCH 12/28/93; 10/25/99] · Snake River Steelhead (T) [FCH 9

  5. Fall

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtransScientific User FacilityInnovation15! ! Fall Meeting

  6. NMFS responses to RME Group and ISRP comments on the proposal: Evaluate Delayed (Extra) Mortality Associated with passage of Yearling Chinook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the other group will pass through seven dams (the same aforementioned four dams plus three additional damsNMFS responses to RME Group and ISRP comments on the proposal: Evaluate Delayed (Extra) Mortality Associated with passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon Smolts through Snake River Dams ProjectID: 35047 RME Group

  7. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  8. An Examination of Harvest Rates and Brood-Take Rates as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;iv Abstract The Cowichan River fall-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) population has been of Cowichan River Chinook Salmon by Athena Dawn Ogden Ph.D., University of British Columbia, 2002 B.A. (Hons-Take Rates as Management Strategies to Assist Recovery of Cowichan River Chinook Salmon Examining Committee

  9. Steelhead and Chinook Salmon Bioenergetics: Temperature, Ration, and Genetic Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cech, Joseph J Jr.; Myrick, Christopher A

    1999-01-01

    Oncorhynchus mykiss) bioenergetics. Ph.D. Dissertation,L . Johnson. 1992. Fish Bioenergetics Model 2: An UpgradeUniversity of Generalized Bioenergetics Model of Fish Growth

  10. FOOD AND GROWTH PARAMETERS OF JUVENILE CHINOOK SALMON, ONCORHYNCHUS TSHAWYTSCHA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dam, where it forms the northern and northeastern boundaries of the Atomic Energy Commission's Hanford and 1 This study was supported by Contract AT(45-1)- 1830 with the United States Atomic Energy Commission. p 2.Ecosystems Department, Battelle Memorial Institute, aClfic Northwest Laboratories, Richland

  11. Independent Scientific Advisory Board Review of NOAA Fisheries' Life-Cycle Models of Salmonid Populations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................................31 3.1: Snake River basin fall Chinook salmon run reconstruction as a basis for multistage stock Populations in the Interior Columbia River Basin (June 28, 2013 draft) Appendix - Answers to Questions ............................................................................7 2.2: ISEMP Watershed Model for spring/summer Chinook salmon and steelhead in the Salmon River

  12. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

    2000-04-01

    Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in conjunct ion with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. Each alternative was evaluated based on criteria developed for rearing fish for a conservation program. After this review, the Nez Perce Tribe determined the only alternative that meets the needs of the program is the alternative to use new facilities in conjunction with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. This is the Proposed Alternative. The Proposed Alternative would require: Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Imnaha River and modifications of the existing Gumboot facility to accommodate the Imnaha component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Lostine River to accommodate the Lostine component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; and Modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery to accommodate the Upper Grande Ronde and Catherine Creek components of the Lookingglass Hatchery production. After an extensive screening process of potential sites, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes the Marks Ranch site on the Imnaha River and the Lundquist site on the Lostine River for new facilities. Conceptual design and cost estimates of the proposed facilities are contained in this master plan. The proposed facilities on the Imnaha and Lostine rivers would be managed in conjunction with the existing adult collection and juvenile acclimation/release facilities. Because this master plan has evolved into an endeavor undertaken primarily by the Nez Perce Tribe, the focus of the document is on actions within the Imnaha and Lostine watersheds where the Nez Perce Tribe have specific co-management responsibilities. Nevertheless, modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery could make it possible to provide a quality rearing environment for the remainder of the CPP. The Nez Perce Tribe will assist co-managers in further evaluating facility needs and providing other components of the NPPC master planning process to develop a solution for the entire CPP. Although the fish production for the conservation programs is already authorized and not at issue in this master pla

  13. Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish Passage Center

    1986-02-01

    Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

  14. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Wayne

    2007-04-01

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

  15. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  16. Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division Northwest Fisheries Science Center. National Marine Fisheries Service. NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Indigenous chinook salmon from the Klamath River and spring- and summer-run chinook salmon from the Snake populations from the Snake River and two fall- and one spring-run population from the Klamath River. Utter et al. (1989) also sampled fall-run fish from the Snake River, but this population is genetically quite

  17. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Project - ODFW, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Scott

    2009-04-10

    Core activities of the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Supplementation Program (GRESCSP) are funded through the authority of the Lower Snake River Fish and Wildlife Compensation Plan (LSRCP). The LSRCP program was approved by the Water Resources Development Act of 1976, PL 94-587, Section 102, 94th Congress substantially in accordance with the Special Report, LSRCP, June 1975 on file with the Chief of Engineers. The LSRCP was prepared and submitted in compliance with the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act of 1958, PL 85-624, 85th Congress, August 12, 1958 to mitigate for the losses of fish and wildlife caused by the construction of dams on lower Snake River. The GRESCSP is an artificial propagation program that was initiated by Bonneville Power Administrations Fish and Wildlife program in the mid 1990's. The intent of this program was to change the mitigation aspect of the LSRCP program (harvest mitigation) to an integrated supplementation program; inasmuch as, hatchery produced fish could be experimentally used as a recovery tool and fish surplus to mitigation would be available for in-place and in-kind harvest. Fish production is still authorized by the LSRCP with the original mitigation return goal of 5,860 adult spring Chinook to the project area. The GRESCSP was developed with two primary components: (1) conventional broodstock (projects 199800702; 199800703; 199800704) and (2) captive brood (projects 199801001; 199801006). The GRESCSP relies on cooperative M&E efforts from the LSRCP including setting aside the Wenaha and Minam tributaries as natural production reserves components used for reference streams. The GRESCSP, coordinated with federal and tribal partners, identifies production levels for both propagation components and weir management strategies for each of the three supplemented tributary areas within the Grande Ronde Sub-basin. The three supplemented areas are Catherine Creek, Lostine River, and upper Grande Ronde River. Lookingglass Creek, an extirpated area, will be stocked (smolts and adults) with Catherine Creek origin salmon to initiate natural production in unseeded habitat, and to initiate future harvest opportunities. The current production levels have been incorporated into the U.S. v. Oregon Interim Management Agreement. The purpose of this contract is to integrate Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) efforts with the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) program utilizing Lookingglass Hatchery as the primary rearing facility. BPA constructed an adult holding and spawning structure on the hatchery grounds; however, maintenance of this infrastructure was discontinued due to funding limitation and transferred to the LSRCP program in 2007. These integrated efforts focus on holding and spawning adults, rearing juveniles, fish health, and monitoring natural production (Redd counts) for Catherine Creek, Lostine River, and Upper Grande Ronde stocks.

  18. Canada-USA Salmon Shelf Survival Study, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudel, Marc; Tucker, Strahan; Morris, John

    2009-03-09

    Historically, salmon stocks from the Columbia River and Snake River formed one of the most valuable fisheries on the west coast of North America. However, salmon and steelhead returns sharply declined during the 1980s and 1990s to reach nearly 1 million fish. Although several factors may be responsible for the decline of Columbia River salmon and steelhead, there is increasing evidence that these drastic declines were primarily attributable to persistently unfavorable ocean conditions. Hence, an understanding of the effects of ocean conditions on salmon production is required to forecast the return of salmon to the Columbia River basin and to assess the efficacy of mitigation measures such as flow regulation on salmon resources in this system. The Canadian Program on High Seas Salmon has been collecting juvenile salmon and oceanographic data off the west coast of British Columbia and Southeast Alaska since 1998 to assess the effects of ocean conditions on the distribution, migration, growth, and survival of Pacific salmon. Here, we present a summary of the work conducted as part of the Canada-USA Salmon Shelf Survival Study during the 2008 fiscal year and compare these results with those obtained from previous years. The working hypothesis of this research is that fast growth enhances the marine survival of salmon, either because fast growing fish quickly reach a size that is sufficient to successfully avoid predators, or because they accumulate enough energy reserves to better survive their first winter at sea, a period generally considered critical in the life cycle of salmon. Sea surface temperature decreased from FY05 to FY08, whereas, the summer biomass of phytoplankton increased steadily off the west coast of Vancouver Island from FY05 to FY08. As in FY07, zooplankton biomass was generally above average off the west coast of Vancouver Island in FY08. Interestingly, phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass were higher in FY08 than was expected from the observed nutrient concentration that year. This suggests nutrients were more effectively by phytoplankton in FY08. In addition, the abundance of lipid-rich northern copepods increased from FY05 to FY08, whereas lipid-poor southern copepods showed the opposite pattern, suggesting that growth conditions were more favorable to juvenile salmon in FY08 than in previous years. However, growth indices for juvenile coho salmon were near the 1998-2008 average, both off the west coast of Vancouver Island and Southeast Alaska, indicating that additional factors beside prey quality affect juvenile salmon growth in the marine environment. Catches of juvenile Chinook, sockeye and chum salmon off the west coast of Vancouver Island in June-July 2008 were the highest on record during summer since 1998, suggesting that early marine survival for the 2008 smolt year was high. Interestingly, the proportion of hatchery fish was high (80-100%) among the juvenile Columbia River Chinook salmon caught off the British Columbia coast during summer, suggest that relatively few wild Chinook salmon are produced in the Columbia River Chinook. In addition, we also recovered two coded-wire tagged juvenile Redfish Lake sockeye salmon in June 2008 off the west coast of British Columbia. As relatively few Redfish Lake sockeye smolts are tagged each year, this also suggests that early marine survival was high for these fish, and may result in a high return in 2009 if they mature at age three, or in 2010 if they mature at age four. To date, our research shows that different populations of Columbia River salmon move to different locations along the coastal zone where they establish their ocean feeding grounds and overwinter. We further show that ocean conditions experienced by juvenile Columbia River salmon vary among regions of the coast, with higher plankton productivity and temperatures off the west coast of Vancouver Island than in Southeast Alaska. Hence, different stocks of juvenile salmon originating from the Columbia River and Snake River are exposed to different ocean conditions and may respond differ

  19. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  20. FALL WINTER FALL WINTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smy, Tom

    FALL WINTER FIRST YEAR FALL WINTER SECOND YEAR FALL WINTER THIRD YEAR FALL WINTER FOURTH YEAR MATH Elective ELEC 1908 First Year Project SYSC 2002 Data Structures and Algorithms PHYS 2604 Modern Physics I, PHYS 4508, PHYS 4807. PHYS 4007 4th year Physics Lab ECOR 4995 Professional Practice 4th 1.0 credit

  1. VOLUNTEER-BASED SALMON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute Environment Canada VOLUNTEER-BASED MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE SALMON RIVER BASIN: USING BENTHICVOLUNTEER-BASED MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE SALMON RIVER BASIN: USING BENTHIC INDICATORS TO ASSESS INDICATORS TO ASSESS STREAM ECOSYSTEM HEALTH #12;Volunteer-Based Monitoring Program for the Salmon River

  2. Cooking with Canned Salmon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2001-09-10

    , 1914, as amended, and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. Chester P. Fehlis, Deputy Director, Texas Cooperative Extension, The Texas A&M University System. New E-85 9/01 Salmon Loaf (makes 4 servings) What you...

  3. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of PIT-Tagged Spring/Summer Chinook and Summer Steelhead : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comparative Survival Study Oversight Committee and Fish Passage Center

    2008-12-02

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS; BPA Project 199602000) began in 1996 with the objective of establishing a long term dataset of the survival rate of annual generations of salmon from their outmigration as smolts to their return to freshwater as adults to spawn (smolt-to-adult return rate; SAR). The study was implemented with the express need to address the question whether collecting juvenile fish at dams and transporting them downstream in barges and trucks and releasing them downstream of Bonneville Dam was compensating for the effect of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on survival of Snake Basin spring/summer Chinook salmon migrating through the hydrosystem. The Completion of this annual report for the CSS signifies the 12th outmigration year of hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon marked with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags as part of the CSS and the 9th complete brood year return as adults of those PIT-tagged fish (report covers adult returns from 1997-2006 hatchery Chinook juvenile migrations). In addition, the CSS has provided PIT-tags to on-going tagging operations for wild Chinook since 2002 (report covers adult returns from 1994-2006 wild Chinook juvenile migrations). The CSS tags wild steelhead on the lower Clearwater River and utilized wild and hatchery steelhead from other tagging operations in evaluations of transportation (report covers adult returns from 1997-2005 wild and hatchery steelhead migrations). The primary purpose of this report is to update the time series of smolt-to-adult survival rate data and related parameters with additional years of data since the completion of the CSS 10-yr retrospective analysis report (Schaller et al 2007). The 10-yr report provided a synthesis of the results from this ongoing study, the analytical approaches employed, and the evolving improvements incorporated into the study as reported in CSS annual progress reports. This current report specifically addresses the constructive comments of the most recent regional technical review conducted by the Independent Scientific Advisory Board and Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISAB and ISRP 2007). This report completes the 3-salt returns from migration years 2004 for wild and hatchery Chinook and steelhead (all returns are to Lower Granite Dam). For wild and hatchery Chinook, this report also provides 3-salt returns from migration year 2005 and 2-salt returns from migration year 2006 through a cutoff date of August 13, 2008. For wild and hatchery steelhead, it provides completed 2-salt returns for wild and hatchery steelhead that outmigrated in 2005 (any 3-salt returns of PIT-tagged steelhead are few, but will occur after July 1, 2008). All of the Chinook salmon evaluated in the CSS study exhibit a stream-type life history. All study fish used in this report were uniquely identifiable based on a PIT-tag implanted in the body cavity during (or before) the smolt life stage and retained through their return as adults. These tagged fish can then be detected as juveniles and adults at several locations of the Snake and Columbia rivers. Reductions in the number of individuals detected as the tagged fish grow older provide estimates of survival. This allows comparisons of survival over different life stages between fish with different experiences in the hydrosystem (e.g. transportation vs. in-river migrants and migration through various numbers of dams) as illustrated in Figure 1.1. The CSS is a long term study within the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC FWP) and is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Study design and analyses are conducted through a CSS Oversight Committee with representation from Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC), Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The Fish Passage Center (FPC) coordinates the PIT-tagging efforts, data management and preparation

  4. Monitoring salmon habitat in small streams using streambed profiling and the importance of large woody debris for juvenile chinook salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) determine the importance of large woody debris (LWD) in providing fish habitat in small, boreal forest of fish habitat in placer-mined streams. LWD was abundant and formed 28% of the pools in these streams correlated with LWD abundance. My findings suggest that LWD performs a similar function in creating fish

  5. Snake River Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus Nerka) Habitat/Limnologic Research : Annual Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spaulding, Scott

    1993-05-01

    This report outlines long-term planning and monitoring activities that occurred in 1991 and 1992 in the Stanley Basin Lakes of the upper Salmon River, Idaho for the purpose of sockeye salmon nerka) recovery. Limnological monitoring and experimental sampling protocol, designed to establish a limnological baseline and to evaluate sockeye salmon production capability of the lakes, are presented. Also presented are recommended passage improvements for current fish passage barriers/impediments on migratory routes to the lakes. We initiated O. nerka population evaluations for Redfish and Alturas lakes; this included population estimates of emerging kokanee fry entering each lake in the spring and adult kokanee spawning surveys in tributary streams during the fall. Gill net evaluations of Alturas, Pettit, and Stanley lakes were done in September, 1992 to assess the relative abundance of fish species among the Stanley Basin lakes. Fish population data will be used to predict sockeye salmon production potential within a lake, as well as a baseline to monitor long-term fish community changes as a result of sockeye salmon recovery activities. Also included is a paper that reviews sockeye salmon enhancement activities in British Columbia and Alaska and recommends strategies for the release of age-0 sockeye salmon that will be produced from the current captive broodstock.

  6. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    River and Fresno Slough to Tulare Lake and beyond (Figure 3-wet years, overflow from Tulare Lake passed down FresnoFresno Slough, connecting Tulare Lake and the San Joaquin

  7. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    serve for both flood control and water storage, and arefor both flood control and water storage. The reservoirs areSan Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board, Oakland,

  8. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    effects of environmental heat stress on heat-shock mRNA andor other stresses induces synthesis of small "heat shock "

  9. Idaho MU Recovery Plan Draft Harvest Discussions Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon and Steelhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been well documented (Ricker 1981). Body size is related to redd digging success (Beacham and Murray

  10. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    rates for the upstream and downstream release groups, whichmonitoring of upstream and downstream migrants. Mostof fish released upstream or downstream of the Delta, most

  11. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    Management 24:198-210. Marr, DHA. 1965. The influence ofSociety 3(XVII):33. Marr, DHA. 1963. The influence ofBB, Scarnecchia, DL, La Marr, TJ. 1994. Summer distribution

  12. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    Oregon: Bonneville Power Administration. Annual ReportProposal to Bonneville Power Administration. NMFS. Bottom,migration. Bonneville Power Administration. Annual Report

  13. Idaho MU Recovery Plan Draft Hatchery Discussions Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon and Steelhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (LSRCP), funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and operated by the states and tribes, the Bonneville Power Administration funds the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery as mitigation for the Federal Columbia: (1) Hells Canyon Complex, funded by the Idaho Power Company as mitigation for fish losses caused

  14. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    through June of around 4,000 cfs are required to produceadults and of around 7,500 cfs are required for runs ofRiver was above about 20,000 cfs, high when flow was less

  15. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    presumably two years old, or as “adults. ” The rationale forof returning adults, as 2-year old and small 3-year old fishSamples from adult returns % 6 yr-old Other early data are

  16. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    releases into the river from a hydropower project. Data fromSymposium on small hydropower and fisheries; Bethesda,instream flow needs in hydropower licensing. Palo Alto, CA:

  17. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    the bottom of migrating dredge ponds and were subsequentlypractice and rearing pond, there was great variation in thedepressions that become isolated ponds; even if the ponds do

  18. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    Kondolf, M, Grimaldo, L, Sommer, T, Killam, D, Brown, M,htm Feyrer, F, Sommer, T, Harrell, W. 2006. Importance ofFish Bulletin No. 34. Sommer, TR, Nobroga, ML, Harrell, WC,

  19. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    hsp assays for monitoring temperature stress was confirmedB) water temperatures at the Pool 4 monitoring site in themean temperature greater than 21°C at a monitoring site (

  20. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    and steelhead through the hydroelectric system in the mid-flows for non-federal hydroelectric projects, 107 andflows for non-federal hydroelectric projects but California

  1. Spawning Areas and Abundance of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tsha>vytscha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the main river. Over the past 60 years, the construction of dams has inundated, impeded, or blocked access. Important spawning areas are listed and charted in this report according to their past use (before 1965 of the main stem are also given. Former and present levels of abundance are listed according to three major

  2. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    to capture drifting insects, their main food. For example,insects, especially waterboatmen, and crustaceans were the main foodinsects in stomachs provide evidence of the importance of riparian vegetation as a source of food.

  3. A Study to Evaluate Sampling and Tagging Methods for Estimating Survival of Adult Chinook Salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    predictions of run size #12;What makes us think that lower river mortality may be significant u h th stu nd l C lumbi Rithrough the estuary and lower Columbia River Michelle Rub (CB), Lynn Mc of the Columbia River upstream 234 km to Bonneville Dam have never been developed. Contemporary smolt

  4. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    or for transport to Southern California, and to parts of thetransport and resulting deposition in spawning gravels, North Coastal California.Ekman transport, inducing upwelling. The California Current

  5. EA-1173: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental Program (Preliminary), Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund a program designed to prevent the extinction and begin the recovery...

  6. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    Data from Hill and Webber (1999) and Ward et al. (2004a,b).Data from Hill and Webber (1999) and Ward et al. (2004a,b).Hill and Webber 1999; Sommer et al. 2001; 2004; Ward et al.

  7. Central Valley Salmon: A Perspective on Chinook and Steelhead in the Central Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John G.

    2006-01-01

    heavily modified by hydraulic mining, dams and diversions,modified by hydraulic mining, irrigation dams andOR. 1940. Hydraulic mining and debris dams in relation to

  8. ESA LISTED SPECIES appendix 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    salmon (Upper Columbia River spring-run ESU; Sacramento winter-run ESU) Coho salmon (Central California Chinook salmon (California coastal ESU; Central Valley spring-run ESU; Lower Columbia River ESU; Puget Sound ESU; Snake River fall-run ESU; Snake River spring/summer-run ESU; Upper Willamette River ESU) Chum

  9. Fall 2014 968 293 Fall 2014 164 100 Fall 2013 945 277 Fall 2013 190 115

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Fall 2013 945 277 Fall 2013 190 115 Fall 2012 957 150 1,107 Fall 2012 158 41 Fall 2011 1,133 183 Fall 2011 231 53 Fall 2010 1,065 144 Fall 2010 232 28 Fall 2009 1,066 178 Fall 2009 226 65 Fall 2008 1,078 146 Fall 2008 200 32 Fall 2007 1,296 154 Fall 2007 215 38 Fall 2006 1,325 141 Fall 2006 184 28 Fall

  10. UTILIZATION OF ALASKAN SALMON CANNERY WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UTILIZATION OF ALASKAN SALMON CANNERY WASTE Marine Biological Laboratory iM0V3Ul953 WOODS HOLE and Wildlife Service, John L. Farley, Director UTILIZATION OP ALASKM SALMON CANlTEaT WASH PAHTS I AHD II, September 1953 #12;#12;UTILIZATION OF AUSKAN SALMON CANNERY WASTE y PART I 1. Possibility of Development

  11. Foreign Fishery Developments World Salmon Farming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    economic and environmental conditions will permit such expansion of salmon farming industries. Norway besides Norway with a large and suc- cessful Atlantic salmon farming in- dustry. Production of pen-farmed salmon in other countries is not substantial, but continues to expand. Norway Norway is the world's most

  12. Anglers needed - Save young salmon and reel in cash

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Administration funds the program. Pikeminnow represent about 80 percent of all fish that kill young salmon. So these young salmon need your help. Each angler counts. The...

  13. Ocean Salmon Ranching in the North Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fucile, Mark J.

    1982-01-01

    chum salmon returning to Sakhalin. . . show that an averagegained complete control of Sakhalin. A. NETBOY, supra notethe south- ern portion of Sakhalin to Japan. Id. 143. Areas

  14. New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

  15. n June the governors of Idaho, Montana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by May 28, 2004. Strong Columbia River 2 Salmon Runs Predicted Applying Conservation and 4 Renewable- dations Regarding Fish, Wildlife and BPA (continued on page 3) #12;2 Strong Columbia River Salmon Runs Predicted for Summer and Fall T he summer chinook run in the Columbia River continued the trend

  16. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Mainstem Passage and River Operations SUBJECT: Briefing on Columbia River Basin fish run forecasts for 2014 will cover the 2014 Columbia River salmon run forecasts. It will also include a retrospective review to the Snake River Basin, focusing on the species/run groupings of spring, summer, fall Chinook salmon; summer

  17. Fall Webworm 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ree, Bill

    2004-10-08

    The fall webworm is a common pest of trees and shrubs. This insect produces unsightly webs, and repeated infestations can damage plants. Control methods are most successful when one understands the pest's life cycle. This publication suggests...

  18. WATER SOLUBLE VITAMIN REQUIREMENTS OF SILVER SALMON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER SOLUBLE VITAMIN REQUIREMENTS OF SILVER SALMON Marine Biological Laboratory FEB !) ~iy;)9, Commissioner WATER-SOLUBLE VITAMIN REQUIREMENTS OF SILVER SALMON By John A. Coates* and John E. Halver Western, John A Wiiti'i-sohilile vitamin ivcjuireineiits of silver sahnon, by John A. CoiUes and John E. Ilalver

  19. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R.

    2005-04-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

  20. Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Redd Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey, Cole T.; Nugent, John J.

    2014-02-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and other entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA.

  1. Snake River Fall Chinook Draft, Chapter 5, September 30, 2013, Predecisional, not for Citation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at times have unintended negative consequences on fish populations. These activities have the potential noted the substantial selective pressure imposed by current hydropower operations and cumulative harvest

  2. Snake River Fall Chinook Draft, Chapters 1 and 2, September 30, 2013, Predecisional, not for Citation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    indicates are necessary for the conservation and survival of listed species. Plans are developedpublished whether an action would jeopardize the continued existence of a listed species or adversely modify Page 2-1 Mainstem Snake River dams operated by Idaho Power Company 2-2 Types of sites and essential

  3. Research Article Effects of spawning salmon on dissolved nutrients and epilithon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Gary A.

    and freshwater ecosystems. Through- out the northern Pacific Rim, millions of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp migrations of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) represent a significant nutrient pulse to freshwater. Pacific salmon; salmon-derived nutrients; estuaries; streams; water chemistry; epilithon. Introduction

  4. C.6. Electronic Appendix -Food Demands, Bioenergetics and Fish Mainstem reservoirs as feeding habitats for yearling Chinook salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 C.6. Electronic Appendix - Food Demands, Bioenergetics and Fish Growth Mainstem reservoirs-May (days 127-140). Table C.6.A. Bioenergetics simulation of population-level growth and consumption

  5. Nearshore Areas Used by Fry Chinook Salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in the Northwestern Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLain, Jeff; Castillo, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    and survival in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary. In:179. Volume 2. Sacramento (CA): California Department ofFoundation, Davis, CA. Sacramento, (CA): Jones & Stokes,

  6. Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus Transmission and Disease among Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed in Culture Compared to Environmentally Relevant Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foott, J. Scott; Free, Dan; McDowell, Terry; Arkush, Kristen D.; Hedrick, Ronald P.

    2006-01-01

    tissues by infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and viralhemorrhagic septicemia virus. Journal of Aquatic Animalhematopoietic necrosis virus and other fish viruses by

  7. Migration Patterns of Juvenile Winter-run-sized Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) through the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Region. 844 p + appendices. Sommer TR, Nobriga ML, HarrellAquatic Sciences 58:325-333. Sommer T, Harrell W, Nobriga M.Management 26:685-701. Sommer T, Armor C, Baxter R, Breuer

  8. Framework for Assessing Viability of Threatened and Endangered Chinook Salmon and Steelhead in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Administration Robert S. Schick, National Oceanic andFishery Bulletin Lindley ST, Schick RS, Agrawal A, Goslin M,1, Article 2. Lindley ST, Schick RS, May B, Anderson JJ,

  9. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead through Snake River Dams and Reservoirs, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, William D.

    1996-03-01

    Documentation is provided for the third of a multiyear study to estimate the survival of juvenile salmonids passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake River.

  10. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-07

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  11. Survival and Passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011 - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Batten, G.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Hughes, James S.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Royer, Ida M.; Townsend, Richard L.; Woodley, Christa M.; Kim, Jeongkwon; Etherington, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Fisher, Erik J.; Greiner, Michael J.; Khan, Fenton; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.

    2012-10-01

    The study reported herein was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The PNNL and UW project managers were Drs. Thomas J. Carlson and John R. Skalski, respectively. The USACE technical lead was Mr. Brad Eppard. The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion (BiOp) and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study is being documented in two types of reports: compliance and technical. A compliance report is delivered within 6 months of the completion of the field season and focuses on results of the performance metrics outlined in the 2008 BiOp and Fish Accords. A technical report is produced within the 18 months after field work, providing comprehensive documentation of a given study and results on route-specific survival estimates and fish passage distributions, which are not included in compliance reports. This technical report concerns the 2011 acoustic telemetry study at The Dalles Dam.

  12. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-02-01

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  13. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-01

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  14. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-03-01

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  15. Migration Patterns of Juvenile Winter-run-sized Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) through the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    above normal water year brought rain events and winter-runFor example, early rain events in 2006, a wet water year,late-arriving rain events of 2001, a dry water year, showed

  16. Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 1,470-acre Salmon, Mississippi, Site is located in Lamar County, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, in southwestern Mississippi. It is roughly square in shape, and each side is...

  17. Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change John Ferguson1 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries're finding - adult forecasts and climate change) #12;1. Past (for context) · The coastal pelagic ecosystem

  18. Fall 2014 1,067 473 Fall 2014 354 285 Fall 2013 1,144 516 Fall 2013 339 229

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Term WV Resident Non- Resident Term WV Resident Non- Resident Fall 2014 1,067 473 Fall 2014 354 285 Fall 2013 1,144 516 Fall 2013 339 229 Fall 2012 1,279 502 Fall 2012 433 296 Fall 2011 1,333 467 Fall 2011 435 285 Fall 2010 1,385 451 Fall 2010 462 248 Fall 2009 1,379 431 Fall 2009 460 263 Fall 2008 1

  19. Quantifying the Behavioral Response of Spawning Chum Salmon to Elevated Discharges from Bonneville Dam, Columbia River : Annual Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Haskell, Craig A.; Kock, Tobias J.

    2008-12-01

    In unimpounded rivers, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) typically spawn under relatively stable stream flows, with exceptions occurring during periodic precipitation events. In contrast, hydroelectric development has often resulted in an artificial hydrograph characterized by rapid changes in discharge and tailwater elevation that occur on a daily, or even an hourly basis, due to power generation (Cushman 1985; Moog 1993). Consequently, populations of Pacific salmon that are known to spawn in main-stem habitats below hydroelectric dams face the risks of changing habitat suitability, potential redd dewatering, and uncertain spawning success (Hamilton and Buell 1976; Chapman et al. 1986; Dauble et al. 1999; Garland et al. 2003; Connor and Pflug 2004; McMichael et al. 2005). Although the direct effects of a variable hydrograph, such as redd dewatering are apparent, specific effects on spawning behavior remain largely unexplored. Chum salmon (O. keta) that spawn below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are particularly vulnerable to the effects of water level fluctuations. Although chum salmon generally spawn in smaller tributaries (Johnson et al. 1997), many fish spawn in main-stem habitats below Bonneville Dam near Ives Island (Tomaro et al. 2007; Figure 1). The primary spawning area near Ives Island is shallow and sensitive to changes in water level caused by hydroelectric power generation at Bonneville Dam. In the past, fluctuating water levels have dewatered redds and changed the amount of available spawning habitat (Garland et al. 2003). To minimize these effects, fishery managers attempt to maintain a stable tailwater elevation at Bonneville Dam of 3.5 m (above mean sea level) during spawning, which ensures adequate water is provided to the primary chum salmon spawning area below the mouth of Hamilton Creek (Figure 1). Given the uncertainty of winter precipitation and water supply, this strategy has been effective at restricting spawning to a specific riverbed elevation and providing minimum spawning flows that have the greatest chance of being maintained through egg incubation and fry emergence. However, managing the lower Columbia River for a stable tailwater elevation does not provide much operational flexibility at Bonneville Dam, which has little storage capacity. When river discharges increase due to rain events, the traditional approach has been to pass excess water at night to maintain stable tailwater elevations during the daytime. The underlying assumption of this strategy, referred to as reverse load following, is that fish do not spawn at night. However, Tiffan et al. (2005) showed that this assumption is false by documenting nighttime spawning by chum salmon in the Ives Island area. Similarly, McMichael et al. (2005) reported nighttime spawning by Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in the Columbia River, indicating that diel spawning may be a common occurrence in Pacific salmon. During the latter portion of the chum spawning period in December 2003 and 2004, discharges from Bonneville Dam increased from an average of 3,398 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 3.5 m above mean sea level) during the day to over 5,664 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 5.1 m) at night, with peak discharges of 7,080 m{sup 3}/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 6.1 m). This caused concern among fishery managers regarding the potential effects of these high discharges on this population of spawning chum salmon, which is listed under the Endangered Species Act (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 1999). We hypothesized that increased water velocities associated with elevated tailwaters might alter chum salmon spawning behavior if water velocities at redd locations increased beyond the range of suitability (>0.8 m/s; Salo 1991). In 2005, we investigated the movement and behavioral responses of spawning chum salmon at Ives Island to increased tailwater elevations at Bonneville Dam. We used acoustic telemetry to determine if the higher velocities associated with increased tailwater elevations caused fish to leave their re

  20. The Chinook Hardware/Software Co-Synthesis System Pai H. Chou Ross B. Ortega Gaetano Borriello

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    The Chinook Hardware/Software Co-Synthesis System Pai H. Chou Ross B. Ortega Gaetano Borriello Department of Computer Science & Engineering University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195-2350 Abstract tools for embedded systems have not kept pace with these trends. The Chinook co-synthesis system

  1. HOLDING PONDS FOR ADULT SALMON Marine Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    357; HOLDING PONDS FOR ADULT SALMON Marine Biological Laboratory LIBKABY 50 WOODS HOLE, MASS, Daniel H. Janzen, Director HOLDING PONDS FOR ADULT SALMON By Roger E. Burrows Fishery Research Biologist Retention of adult salmon 2 Holding pond design 2 Prevention of self-inflicted injury 2 Factors influencing

  2. RESPONSES OF STREAM BIOFILM TO PACIFIC SALMON (ONCORHYNCHUS SPP.) SPAWNERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Gary A.

    Pacific Rim. The dynam- ics of salmon runs and environmental conditions of streams in which they spawn canRESPONSES OF STREAM BIOFILM TO PACIFIC SALMON (ONCORHYNCHUS SPP.) SPAWNERS: THE ROLE by Janine R¨uegg 2011 All Rights Reserved #12;RESPONSES OF STREAM BIOFILM TO PACIFIC SALMON (ONCORHYNCHUS

  3. Climate and Sockeye Salmon Climate effects on growth, phenology, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    Climate and Sockeye Salmon Climate effects on growth, phenology, and survival of sockeye salmon in peer-reviewed studies that link sockeye salmon growth, phenology, and survival to climate variables 2. State the known knowledge in regards to effects of climate variables on growth, phenology, and survival

  4. A CONTAGIOUS DISEASE OF SALMON POSSIBLY OF VIRUS ORIGIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A CONTAGIOUS DISEASE OF SALMON POSSIBLY OF VIRUS ORIGIN BY R. R. RUCKER, W. J. WHIPPLE, J. R A CONTAGIOUS DISEASE OF SALMON POSSIBLY OF VIRUS ORIGIN By R. R. Rucker, W. J. Whipple, J. R. Parvin and C. A #12;A CONTAGIOUS DISEASE OF SALMON, POSSIBLY OF VIRUS ORIGIN By R. R. Rucker,! Fishery Research

  5. STATUS OF COLUMBIA RIVER BLUEBACK SALMON RUNS, 1951

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATUS OF COLUMBIA RIVER BLUEBACK SALMON RUNS, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory J'JN13 1952 WOODS AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;STATUS OF COLUMBIA RIVER BLUEBACK SALMON RUNS, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory J blueback salmon counts over Bonneville and Rock Island Dams and total run data 1938-51 8 5. Columbia River

  6. SALMON RUNS -UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER, 1956-57

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    364; SALMON RUNS - UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER, 1956-57 Marine Biological Laboratory WOODS HOLE, MAt L. McKernan, Director SALMON RUNS - UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER. 1956-57 by R. R. French and R. J. Wahle Dams. IV #12;SALMON RUNS - UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER, 1956-57 by R. R. French and R. J. Wahle ABSTRACT

  7. Coho Salmon Master Plan, Clearwater River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nez Perce Tribe; FishPro

    2004-10-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe has a desire and a goal to reintroduce and restore coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin at levels of abundance and productivity sufficient to support sustainable runs and annual harvest. Consistent with the Clearwater Subbasin Plan (EcoVista 2003), the Nez Perce Tribe envisions developing an annual escapement of 14,000 coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1994, the Nez Perce Tribe began coho reintroduction by securing eggs through U.S. v. Oregon; by 1998 this agreement provided an annual transfer of 550,000 coho salmon smolts from lower Columbia River hatchery facilities for release in the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1998, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council authorized the Bonneville Power Administration to fund the development of a Master Plan to guide this reintroduction effort. This Master Plan describes the results of experimental releases of coho salmon in the Clearwater River Subbasin, which have been ongoing since 1995. These data are combined with results of recent coho reintroduction efforts by the Yakama Nation, general coho life history information, and historical information regarding the distribution and life history of Snake River coho salmon. This information is used to assess a number of alternative strategies aimed at restoring coho salmon to historical habitats in the Clearwater River subbasin. These data suggest that there is a high probability that coho salmon can be restored to the Clearwater River subbasin. In addition, the data also suggest that the re-establishment of coho salmon could be substantially aided by: (1) the construction of low-tech acclimation facilities; (2) the establishment of a 'localized' stock of coho salmon; and (3) the construction of hatchery facilities to provide a source of juvenile coho salmon for future supplementation activities. The Nez Perce Tribe recognizes that there are factors which may limit the success of coho reintroduction. As a result of these uncertainties, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize a phased approach for coho reintroductions. This Master Plan seeks authorization and funding to move forward to Step 2 in the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 3-Step review process to further evaluate Phase I of the coho reintroduction program, which would focus on the establishment of a localized coho salmon stock capable of enduring the migration to the Clearwater River subbasin. To achieve this goal, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize space at existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities in concert with the construction of two low-tech acclimation facilities, to capitalize on the higher survival observed for acclimated versus direct stream released coho. In addition, Phase I would document the natural productivity of localized coho salmon released in two targeted tributaries within the Clearwater River subbasin. If Phase I is successful at establishing a localized coho salmon stock in an abundance capable of filling existing hatchery space, the rates of natural productivity are promising, and the interspecific interactions between coho and sympatric resident and anadromous salmonids are deemed acceptable, then Phase II would be triggered. Phase II of the coho reintroduction plan would focus on establishing natural production in a number of Clearwater River subbasin tributaries. To accomplish this goal, Phase II would utilize existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities, and expand facilities at the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Site 1705 facility to rear approximately 687,700 smolts annually for use in a rotating supplementation schedule. In short, this document identifies a proposed alternative (Phase I), complete with estimates of capital, operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and permitting that is anticipated to raise average smolt replacement rates from 0.73 (current) to 1.14 using primarily existing facilities, with a limited capital investment for low-tech acclimation facilities. This increase in survival is expected to provide the opportunity for the establishm

  8. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-07-06

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

  9. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Li, Huidong; Xiao, Jie; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Lu, Jun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2015-01-29

    Salmon recovery, and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish, has been attracting national attention in due to great environmental and economic implications. Acoustic Telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter offers improved performance and 30% weight reduction. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use, substantially reduces adverse effects of implantation,more »and provides additional biological benefits for tagged fish, it will become the enabling technology for studying migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. This will lead to critical information for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.« less

  10. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2004 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2004 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.1 times greater in 2004 than in 2003. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.2 times greater than in 2003. Wild steelhead trout catch was 1.6 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 978 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2004, the Snake River trap captured 23 hatchery and 18 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 60 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on June 4. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 10.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 19.0% less than in 2003. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2004 was 20.0% less and wild steelhead trout collection was 22.3% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on May 28 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because wild Chinook catch was very low, hatchery Chinook catch was very high, and the weekly quota of PIT tagged hatchery Chinook had been met. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2004 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook salmon was caused by age-0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age-0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age-1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. When several groups, which consisted of significant numbers of age-0 Chinook salmon, were removed from the analysis a relation was detected. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 2.8-fold and a 2.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.3-fold and a 2.0-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2004 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 7.0-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 4.7-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 3.8-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monume

  11. AGU Fall Meeting 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Geophysical Union's 47th Annual Fall Meeting will showcase groundbreaking research in the geosciences.

  12. Feasibility for Reintroducing Sockeye and Coho Salmon in the Grande Ronde Basin, 1998 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, Steven P.; Witty, Kenneth L.

    1998-07-01

    A report concerning the feasibility of reintroducing Sockeye Salmon into Wallowa Lake and Coho Salmon into the Grande Ronde River Basin.

  13. Fish Bulletin No. 17. Sacramento-San Joaquin Salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) Fishery of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, G H

    1929-01-01

    of Salmon by Stations on Sacramento River Fig. 31 Fig. 32Commissioners' Reports. Sacramento, California. Publishedon the Egg Yield of Sacramento River King Salmon. California

  14. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Research Elements : 2007 Annual Project Progess Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Mike; Plaster, Kurtis; Redfield, Laura; Heindel, Jeff; Kline, Paul

    2008-12-17

    On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focused on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced adults occurred in 1993. The first release of juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. In 1999, the first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded when six jacks and one jill were captured at the IDFG Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2007, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: (1) eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit Lake in November; (2) age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in October; (3) age-1 smolts were released into Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River in May; and (4) hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2007. Population abundances were estimated at 73,702 fish for Redfish Lake, 124,073 fish for Alturas Lake, and 14,746 fish for Pettit Lake. Angler surveys were conducted from May 26 through August 7, 2007 on Redfish Lake to estimate kokanee harvest. On Redfish Lake, we interviewed 102 anglers and estimated that 56 kokanee were harvested. The calculated kokanee catch rate was 0.03 fish/hour for each kokanee kept. The juvenile out-migrant trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 14 to June 13, 2007. We estimated that 5,280 natural origin and 14,256 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Redfish Lake in 2007. The hatchery origin component originated from a 2006 fall presmolt direct-release. The juvenile out-migrant traps on Alturas Lake Creek and Pettit Lake Creek were operated by the SBT from April 19 to May 23, 2007 and April 18 to May 29, 2007, respectively. The SBT estimated 1,749 natural origin and 4,695 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Pettit Lake and estimated 8,994 natural origin and 6,897 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Alturas Lake in 2007. The hatchery origin component of sockeye salmon out-migrants originated from fall presmolt direct-releases made to Pettit and Alturas lakes in 2006. In 2007, the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC) chose to have all Snake River sockeye salmon juveniles (tagged and untagged) transported due to potential enhanced survival. Therefore, mainstem survival evaluations were only conducted to Lower Granite Dam. Unique PIT tag interrogations from Sawtooth Valley juvenile out-migrant traps to Lower Granite Dam were utilized to estimate survival rates for out-migrating sockeye salmon smolts. Survival rate comparisons were made between smolts originating from Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes and the various release strategies. Alturas Lake hatchery origin smolts tagged at the out-migrant trap recorded the highest survival rate of 78.0%. In 2007, 494 hatchery origin adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. We observed 195 areas of excavation in the lake from spawning events. This was the highest number of redds observed in Redfish Lake since the program was initiated. Suspected redds were approximately 3 m x 3 m in size and were constructed by multiple pairs of adults. To monitor the predator population found within the lakes, we monitored bull trout spawning in Fishhook Creek, a tributary to Redfish Lake; and in Alpine Creek, a tributary to Alturas Lake. This represented the tenth consecutive year that the index reaches have been surveyed on these two streams. Adult counts (41 adults) and redd counts (22 redds

  15. Total Dissolved Gas Monitoring in Chum Salmon Spawning Gravels Below Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Panther, Jennifer L.; Dawley, Earl

    2007-01-30

    At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted research to determine whether total dissolved gas concentrations are elevated in chum salmon redds during spring spill operations at Bonneville Dam. The study involved monitoring the total dissolved gas levels at egg pocket depth and in the river at two chum salmon spawning locations downstream from Bonneville Dam. Dissolved atmospheric gas supersaturation generated by spill from Bonneville Dam may diminish survival of chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon when sac fry are still present in the gravel downstream from Bonneville Dam. However, no previous work has been conducted to determine whether total dissolved gas (TDG) levels are elevated during spring spill operations within incubation habitats. The guidance used by hydropower system managers to provide protection for pre-emergent chum salmon fry has been to limit TDG to 105% after allowing for depth compensation. A previous literature review completed in early 2006 shows that TDG levels as low as 103% have been documented to cause mortality in sac fry. Our study measured TDG in the incubation environment to evaluate whether these levels were exceeded during spring spill operations. Total dissolved gas levels were measured within chum salmon spawning areas near Ives Island and Multnomah Falls on the Columbia River. Water quality sensors screened at egg pocket depth and to the river were installed at both sites. At each location, we also measured dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, and water depth to assist with the interpretation of TDG results. Total dissolved gas was depth-compensated to determine when levels were high enough to potentially affect sac fry. This report provides detailed descriptions of the two study sites downstream of Bonneville Dam, as well as the equipment and procedures employed to monitor the TDG levels at the study sites. Results of the monitoring at both sites are then presented in both text and graphics. The findings and recommendations for further research are discussed, followed by a listing of the references cited in the report.

  16. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Main Body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    US DOE /NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

  17. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    USDOE /NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

  18. EIS-0384: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's approach and associated impacts of a comprehensive management program for summer/fall Chinook salmon in the Okanogan subbasin and the Columbia River between the confluence of the Okanogan River and Chief Joseph Dam including construction, operation, and maintenance of a hatchery and acclimation ponds.

  19. . . ,851 S W Sixth Avenue Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 ,Portland Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2005) Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) Upper Columbia River Spring-run Endangered (70 Fed. Reg. 37160, June 28, 2005) Snake River Spring/Summer-run Threatened (70 Fed. Reg. 37160, June 28, 2005) Snake River Fall-run Threatened (70 Fed. Reg. 37160, June 28, 2005) Lower Columbia River Threatened (70 Fed. Reg

  20. Independent Scientific Advisory Board Review of NOAA Fisheries'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................14 3.1: SNAKE RIVER BASIN FALL CHINOOK SALMON RUN RECONSTRUCTION AS A BASIS FOR MULTISTAGE STOCK Populations in the Interior Columbia River Basin (June 28, 2013 draft) ISAB 2013-5 October 18, 2013 #12;Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council, Columbia River Basin

  1. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adult salmon and steelhead runs to the Columbia River. In addition, he will also present an overview of 2010 run forecasts to the Columbia River with a brief summary of expectations for the 2010 Columbia to the lower Snake River in Washington, focusing on the species/run groupings of spring, summer, fall Chinook

  2. 2009 Salmon ICA Report To NPFMC 1 January 27, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and salmon in the directed pollock fishery by season and for full years, 2000 ­ 2009. * For the years 1993-1999 Council on the 2010 Bering Sea Pollock Intercooperative Salmon Avoidance Agreement Karl Haflinger, Sea is to the North Pacific Fishery Management Council and covers the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area

  3. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF SOCKEYE SALMON AND RELATED LIMNOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Juvenile sockeye salmon seaward migration 17 Age and length of seaward migrants 18 Length-weight relationship 21 Daily and seasonal migration patterns 21 Migration of juvenile salmon upstream 24 Migratory Hydrogen ion concentration (pH) 56 Alkalinity and total hardness 56 Primary productivity 59 Summary

  4. Landscape characteristics, land use, and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) abundance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    . The proportion of total adult coho salmon abundance supported by a specific stream reach was consistent among these habitat variables explained al- most half of the variation in the annual distribution of adult coho salmon versant de la Snohomish. La proportion du nombre total de saumons adultes maintenue par chaque section de

  5. Nutrient export from freshwater ecosystems by anadromous sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient export from freshwater ecosystems by anadromous sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka that sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) imported and exported from four major systems in Bristol Bay, Alaska into fresh waters. The percentage of parental nutrients that smolts exported varied through time and among

  6. DIVERSION OF ADULT SALMON BY AN ELECTRICAL FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVERSION OF ADULT SALMON BY AN ELECTRICAL FIELD Marine Biological Laboratory : -1958 WOODS HOLE OF ADULT SALMON BY AN ELECTRICAL FIELD By Roger E. Burrows Fishery Research Biologist Entiat, Wash. Bureau 1957 #12;ABSTRACT An electrical weir consisting of a line of hanging electrodes and a submerged ground

  7. Uptake of salmon-derived nitrogen by mosses and liverworts in coastal British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reimchen, Thomas E.

    Uptake of salmon-derived nitrogen by mosses and liverworts in coastal British Columbia C. E of salmon-derived nitrogen by mosses and liverworts in coastal British Columbia. Á/ Oikos 108: 85Á/98 to the salmon stream. These data suggest an important contribution of salmon-derived nutrients to the non

  8. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high flows. There were zero days when the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery Chinook catch in 2003 was partially due to differences in flow between years because there was a 5.9% increase in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. The decrease in hatchery steelhead catch may be partially due to a 13% decrease in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2003 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook was probably caused by age 0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age 0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age 1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. For wild Chinook salmon there was a 1.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.7-fold and a 1.9-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2003 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 14-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 8.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.4-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and

  9. Total Dissolved Gas Effects on Incubating Chum Salmon Below Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Hand, Kristine D.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Geist, David R.; Murray, Katherine J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Elston, Ralph A.; Vavrinec, John

    2009-01-29

    At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE; Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook a project in 2006 to look further into issues of total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in the lower Columbia River downstream of Bonneville Dam. In FY 2008, the third year of the project, PNNL conducted field monitoring and laboratory toxicity testing to both verify results from 2007 and answer some additional questions about how salmonid sac fry respond to elevated TDG in the field and the laboratory. For FY 2008, three objectives were 1) to repeat the 2006-2007 field effort to collect empirical data on TDG from the Ives Island and Multnomah Falls study sites; 2) to repeat the static laboratory toxicity tests on hatchery chum salmon fry to verify 2007 results and to expose wild chum salmon fry to incremental increases in TDG, above those of the static test, until external symptoms of gas bubble disease were clearly present; and 3) to assess physiological responses to TDG levels in wild chum salmon sac fry incubating below Bonneville Dam during spill operations. This report summarizes the tasks conducted and results obtained in pursuit of the three objectives. Chapter 1 discusses the field monitoring, Chapter 2 reports the findings of the laboratory toxicity tests, and Chapter 3 describes the field-sampling task. Each chapter contains an objective-specific introduction, description of the study site and methods, results of research, and discussion of findings. Literature cited throughout this report is listed in Chapter 4. Additional details on the monitoring methodology and results are provided in Appendices A and B included on the compact disc bound inside the back cover of the printed version of this report.

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Salmon2

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co - OH 51 FUSRAPMississippi Salmon,

  11. Math PUrview -- Fall 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fall 1995. Department of Mathematics Purdue University 1395 Mathematical Sciences Bldg. West Lafayette, IN 47907-1395. Editor: Sally Goeke. Contributors.

  12. Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-06-12

    This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

  13. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopacky, Richard C.

    1986-04-01

    This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

  14. Agricultural Sciences Fall 2005 Fall 2006 Fall 2007 Fall 2008 Fall 2009 Fall 2010 Fall 2011 Fall 2012 Fall 2013 Fall 2014 Agricultural Mgmt & Rangeland Resource 13 24 26 20 12 6 2 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Paul

    ,975 2,110 2,070 2,187 2,300 2,308 2,329 2,389 2,716 3,031 CA&ES Collegewide Fall 2005 Fall 2006 Fall 745 742 661 561 496 432 Individual 5 3 1 Limited Status 1 2 Visitors 1 CA&ES Collegewide Total 772 521 to College of Letters & Scienes - Fine Arts in AY 2005-06 but existing students may elect to finish in CAES

  15. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

  16. Major habitat purchase in Columbia estuary benefits salmon ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to restore hundreds of acres of historic wetlands in the next few years to provide food and shelter for salmon migrating to and from the ocean. The acquisition protects more...

  17. Request for an exempted fishing permit (EFP) to conduct research on Chinook salmon bycatch reduction device for the Central Gulf of Alaska pollock fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from 1994 to 2011. These tables were taken directly from the North Pacific Fishery Management Council,450 0.40 1997 8,800 57,862 0.15 1998 10,464 88,136 0.12 1999 23,758 68,275 0.35 2000 15,907 47,691 0,448 29,301 0.12 1999 2,307 23,384 0.10 2000 2,472 22,074 0.11 2001 1,237 30,471 0.04 2002 2,548 17,455 0

  18. A Two-Stage Information-Theoretic Approach to Modeling Landscape-Level Attributes and Maximum Recruitment of Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Environment, Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box 3621 Portland

  19. Losses of Sacramento River Chinook Salmon and Delta Smelt to Entrainment in Water Diversions in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmerer, Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    through the lower Sacramento River system. Journal of theand survival in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary. In:transport and fate in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using

  20. Juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) growth in off-channel and main-channel habitats on the Sacramento River, CA using otolith increment widths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limm, Michael P.; Marchetti, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    in both off- channel ponds and non- natal seasonalet al. 2001), off-channel ponds (e.g. Peterson 1982), natalriverine areas, off-channel ponds, and non-natal seasonal

  1. Coded-Wire Tag Expansion Factors for Chinook Salmon Carcass Surveys in California: Estimating the Numbers and Proportions of Hatchery-Origin Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Michael S.; Satterthwaite, William H.

    2013-01-01

    of estimators of the proportion of hatchery-origin spawners.Estimating the Numbers and Proportions of Hatchery-Originas the total number and proportion of hatchery-origin fish

  2. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume III of III; Disease and Physiology Supplements, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatick, Emil; Gilbreath, Lyle G.; Harmon, Jerrel R. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Centr, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-03

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Aquaculture Task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status of the stocks was quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains five previously published papers.

  3. Davis Water Consumption Efficiency Link, Phung, Purewal, Purewal, Salmon ESM 121 Water Science and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Davis Water Consumption Efficiency Link, Phung, Purewal, Purewal, Salmon ESM 121 Water Science and Management Water Consumption Efficiency of Toilets & Shower Heads in Davis: Old Davis Purewal, Kiernan Salmon Abstract The efficiency of household water consumption varies with the age

  4. ESTIMATION OF JUVENILE SALMON HABITAT IN PACIFIC RIM RIVERS USING MULTISCALAR REMOTE SENSING AND GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    ESTIMATION OF JUVENILE SALMON HABITAT IN PACIFIC RIM RIVERS USING MULTISCALAR REMOTE SENSING) encompassing over 3 400 000 km2 and most North Pacific Rim (NPR) salmon rivers. Similar classifications were

  5. Reliably Diagnosing Fraser River Sockeye Salmon Declines in a Variable World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reliably Diagnosing Fraser River Sockeye Salmon Declines in a Variable World by Faye d diagnosing Fraser River sockeye salmon declines in a variable world Report No.: 564 Examining Committee

  6. TYPE, QUANTITY, AND SIZE OF FOOD OF PACIFIC SALMON (ONCORHYNCHUS) IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    increasing for the larger invertebrate species as predator size increased. Rate of increase in mean length species, with fry of pink salmon, Oncor1tyn- elms gorbuscha, and churn salmon, O. keta, migrating to sea

  7. Welcome Fall 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz Moore, Keith

    2007-08-15

    Keith Diaz Moore, Chair of the University of Kansas School of Architecture, introduces the new KU Archcast, welcomes students for the fall 2007 semester and announces some accomplishments of faculty and students as well as important dates...

  8. Building to Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spain, Mitchell Ross

    2015-05-31

    Abstract Building to Fall is an exploration of our experiences that establish ideas of balance, risk, and failure, testing theories about the physical and social world in which we exist. Throughout history we have encountered many failures...

  9. NWHA Fall Workshop & Tour

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This year’s Fall Regional Workshop on October 30 will focus on extending the longevity of our legacy hydropower projects through upgrades, refurbishment and life extensions, while meeting needs of...

  10. DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN: DEVELOPMENT ..........................................................................25 Division Barriers Upstream of the Powerhouse

  11. Nitrogen uptake by plants subsidized by Pacific salmon carcasses: a hierarchical experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, John D.

    the Pacific Rim. Salmon are born in freshwater, with most popu- lations migrating as juveniles to the oceanNitrogen uptake by plants subsidized by Pacific salmon carcasses: a hierarchical experiment Morgan and transport large numbers of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) to riparian areas beside small coastal streams

  12. THE HUDSON RIVER AS A SALMON STREAM. By A. NELSON CHENEY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dam in 1825. In some of the Canadian rivers there is a late run of'salmon, the fish running as lateTHE HUDSON RIVER AS A SALMON STREAM. By A. NELSON CHENEY, State pi:,!{-Culturist, Nnv York describing the Hudson River as an original salmon stream. Some have merely made the broad statement

  13. PACIFIC COASTAL SALMON RECOVERY FUND FY2000 PROGRAM REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    levels due to the combined effects of hydropower operations, habitat destruction, ocean harvest, hatchery the development of federal- state-tribal-local partnerships in salmon recovery and conservation which will promote funds to States would be subject to a 25 percent non-federal match, and that administrative costs

  14. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopacky, Richard C.

    1985-06-01

    This volume contains reports on subprojects involving the determining of alternatives to enhance salmonid habitat on patented land in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, coordination activities for habitat projects occurring on streams within fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribes, and habitat and fish inventories in the Salmon River. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports. (ACR)

  15. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White Salmon Subbasin II.L. Columbia Gorge Framework Potential costs and economic considerations for recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. E Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Serv

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Effects of Salmon-Derived Nutrients and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, John D.

    is the connection between productive marine ecosystems and freshwaters driven by annual spawning migra- tions subsidies can have far-reaching influences on the structure and function of recipient eco- systems and Accelerator Grants to JDR, and the Tom Buell Research Chair partnership between the Pacific Salmon Foundation

  17. Salmon and Steelhead related large scale Monitoring and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Columbia River Basin related to the Council's Fish & Wildlife Program High level overview T. Grover 4 influence salmon survival. Try to predict future survival and fish run returns. · AEM ­ action effectiveness status and trend of fish habitat. It doesn't focus on fish or action effectiveness. The data it provides

  18. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal regimes and their potential (Oncorhynchus spp.) across portions of their natural range, dams have arguably played a major role in many locations (NRC 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Ruckelshaus et al. 2002). Large dams (>15 m tall)­ designed

  19. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-03-01

    This report summarizes the 2011 annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Salmon site1). The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. The Salmon site consists of 1,470 acres. The site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 10 miles west of Purvis, Mississippi, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

  20. Refinery Outages: Fall 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand Cubic Feet)698 1.8732009Fall

  1. Fall 2012 College of engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    · Fall · · 2012 · College of engineering Eranda Nikolla Turning greenhouse gases into fuels thatcan statistics.....................................................14 Commencement, Order of the Engineer, POET ................................................................18 Biomedical engineering..............................................................19 Chemical

  2. AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AWEA Wind Energy Fall Symposium gathers wind energy professionals for informal yet productive interactions with industry peers. Jose Zayas, Director, Wind & Water Power Technologies Office,...

  3. Coins falling in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heisinger, Luke; Kanso, Eva

    2013-01-01

    When a coin falls in water, its trajectory is one of four types determined by its dimensionless moment of inertia $I^\\ast$ and Reynolds number Re: (A) steady; (B) fluttering; (C) chaotic; or (D) tumbling. The dynamics induced by the interaction of the water with the surface of the coin, however, makes the exact landing site difficult to predict a priori. Here, we describe a carefully designed experiment in which a coin is dropped repeatedly in water, so that we can determine the probability density functions (pdf) associated with the landing positions for each of the four trajectory types, all of which are radially symmetric about the center-drop line. In the case of the steady mode, the pdf is approximately Gaussian distributed, with variances that are small, indicating that the coin is most likely to land at the center, right below the point it is dropped from. For the other falling modes, the center is one of the least likely landing sites. Indeed, the pdf's of the fluttering, chaotic and tumbling modes ar...

  4. Analysis of Salmon and Steelhead Supplementation, 1990 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William H.; Coley, Travis C.; Burge, Howard L.

    1990-09-01

    Supplementation or planting salmon and steelhead into various locations in the Columbia River drainage has occurred for over 100 years. All life stages, from eggs to adults, have been used by fishery managers in attempts to establish, rebuild, or maintain anadromous runs. This report summarizes and evaluates results of past and current supplementation of salmon and steelhead. Conclusions and recommendations are made concerning supplementation. Hatchery rearing conditions and stocking methods can affect post released survival of hatchery fish. Stress was considered by many biologists to be a key factor in survival of stocked anadromous fish. Smolts were the most common life stage released and size of smolts correlated positively with survival. Success of hatchery stockings of eggs and presmolts was found to be better if they are put into productive, underseeded habitats. Stocking time, method, species stocked, and environmental conditions of the receiving waters, including other fish species present, are factors to consider in supplementation programs. The unpublished supplementation literature was reviewed primarily by the authors of this report. Direct contact was made in person or by telephone and data compiled on a computer database. Areas covered included Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Alaska, California, British Columbia, and the New England states working with Atlantic salmon. Over 300 projects were reviewed and entered into a computer database. The database information is contained in Appendix A of this report. 6 refs., 9 figs., 21 tabs.

  5. Draft Biological Review: Potential Flow Augmentation Action from Lewiston Dam to Protect Adult Salmon in the Lower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Northern California Coast (SONCC) Coho Salmon in the Klamath/Trinity River basin and Sacramento River winter-run to Protect Adult Salmon in the Lower Klamath River in 2015; August 14, 2015 Introduction Reclamation may November 2015 to protect adult salmon in the lower Klamath River. This document is intended to provide

  6. Coins falling in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luke Heisinger; Paul K Newton; Eva Kanso

    2013-12-08

    When a coin falls in water, its trajectory is one of four types determined by its dimensionless moment of inertia $I^\\ast$ and Reynolds number Re: (A) steady; (B) fluttering; (C) chaotic; or (D) tumbling. The dynamics induced by the interaction of the water with the surface of the coin, however, makes the exact landing site difficult to predict a priori. Here, we describe a carefully designed experiment in which a coin is dropped repeatedly in water, so that we can determine the probability density functions (pdf) associated with the landing positions for each of the four trajectory types, all of which are radially symmetric about the center-drop line. In the case of the steady mode, the pdf is approximately Gaussian distributed, with variances that are small, indicating that the coin is most likely to land at the center, right below the point it is dropped from. For the other falling modes, the center is one of the least likely landing sites. Indeed, the pdf's of the fluttering, chaotic and tumbling modes are characterized by a "dip" around the center. For the tumbling mode, the pdf is a ring configuration about the center-line, with a ring width that depends on the dimensionless parameters $I^\\ast$ and Re and height from which the coin is dropped. For the chaotic mode, the pdf is generally a broadband distribution spread out radially symmetrically about the center-line. For the steady and fluttering modes, the coin never flips, so the coin lands with the same side up as was dropped. For the chaotic mode, the probability of heads or tails is close to 0.5. In the case of the tumbling mode, the probability of heads or tails based on the height of the drop which determines whether the coin flips an even or odd number of times during descent.

  7. Forecasting the Most Likely Status of Wild Salmon in the California Central Valley in 2100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franks, Sierra E.; Lackey, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    harvest level of wild salmon, addressing issues associated with waterand water, and the options for sustaining (much less restoring) wild salmon will be increasingly constrained. Harvestharvest, con- tinued stocking from hatcheries, changing climate, continued human population growth and associated demands for scarce water

  8. JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-16 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-16 September 13, 1995 blank page #12;SECTION 5 JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION September 13, 1995 5-16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM temperature MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-17 September 13, 1995 program. If there are conflicting

  9. Synchronization and portfolio performance of threatened salmon Jonathan W. Moore1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTER Synchronization and portfolio performance of threatened salmon Jonathan W. Moore1 , Michelle Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA 98110, USA 2 School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University salmon decreased risk-adjusted portfolio performance (the ratio of port- folio productivity to variance

  10. Environmental variability and the ecological effects of spawning Pacific salmon on stream biofilm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Scott

    , combining data from different North Pacific Rim ecoregions inflated the confidence interval as comparedEnvironmental variability and the ecological effects of spawning Pacific salmon on stream biofilm of organisms delivering resource subsidies, such as ecosystem engineering by Pacific salmon spawners

  11. Computer simulations of the effects of the Sitka eddy on the migration of sockeye salmon returning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    Computer simulations of the effects of the Sitka eddy on the migration of sockeye salmon returning Ciencias Marinas, La Paz, BCX, Mexico 4 Forest Sciences Department, University of British Columbia and it has been suggested that the eddy could deŻect migrating salmon to the south, thereby reducing

  12. PROCEEDINGS 1 Late-run Sockeye Salmon in the Fraser River, British Columbia,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    PROCEEDINGS · 1 Late-run Sockeye Salmon in the Fraser River, British Columbia, are Experiencing University of Guelph [Note: Figures for Lapointe et al are included at the end of this paper.] Abstract Late-run stocks are unique among Fraser River sockeye salmon populations in that they typically delay in Georgia

  13. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research : 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Andre E. [Shoshone-Bannock Tribes; Griswold, Robert G. [Biolines Environmental Consulting; Taki, Doug [Shoshone-Bannock Tribes

    2009-07-31

    In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) as endangered. Snake River sockeye salmon were officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Project was implemented. This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of Snake River sockeye salmon. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribal goal for this project is two tiered: the immediate goal is to increase the population of Snake River sockeye salmon while preserving the unique genetic characteristics of the evolutionarily significant unit (ESU). The Tribes long term goal is to maintain a viable population that warrants delisting and provides Tribal harvest opportunities. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency Recovery effort. Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2008 calendar year. Project tasks include: (1) monitor limnological parameters of the Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity; (2) conduct lake fertilization in Pettit and Alturas lakes; (3) reduce the number of mature kokanee salmon spawning in Alturas Lake Creek; (4) monitor, enumerate, and evaluate sockeye salmon smolt migration from Pettit and Alturas lakes; (5) monitor spawning kokanee salmon escapement and estimate fry recruitment in Fishhook and Alturas Lake creeks; (6) conduct sockeye and kokanee salmon population surveys; (7) evaluate potential competition and predation between stocked juvenile sockeye salmon and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; and (8) assist IDFG with captive broodstock production activities.

  14. The Sensor Fish - Making Dams More Salmon-Friendly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Keilman, Geogre

    2004-07-31

    This article describes the Sensor Fish, an instrument package that travels through hydroelectric dams collecting data on the hazardous conditions that migrating salmon smolt encounter. The Sensor Fish was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with funding from DOE and the US Army Corps of Engineers and has been used at several federal and utility-run hydroelectric projects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers of the US Pacific Northwest. The article describes the evolution of the Sensor Fish design and provides examples of its use at McNary and Ice Harbor dams.

  15. King Salmon, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrderInformation Kilauea Southwest RiftKimbleCity,Salmon,

  16. Idaho_AmericanFallsRockland

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Power - Idaho Wind Anemometer Loan Program American FallsRockland Site 106 Latitude: N. 42 deg. 40.682' Longitude: W. 112 deg. 46.325' Elevation: 6579' Anemometer Height: 20...

  17. SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ Year #1 Year #2 Year #3 Year #4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    . (if needed) Events During Defense-Semester ECE PhD Time-LinePost-MS 3rd Week Week N - 7 Week N - 1SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ Year #1 Year #2 Year #3 Year #4

  18. Lower Columbia River Salmon Business Plan for Terminal Fisheries : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon For All

    1996-07-01

    Salmon fishing in the Northwest requires a public-private partnership. The public through its decision-makers, agencies, and laws states it will do all that is necessary to protect and preserve the valuable salmon resource. Yet, the public side of the partnership is broken. The Columbia River salmon fishing industry, with over 140 years of documented history, is at a crossroads. This report explores a variety of issues, concerns, and ideas related to terminal fishery development. In some cases recommendations are made. In addition, options are explored with an understanding that those designated as decision-makers must make decisions following considerable discussion and reflection.

  19. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

    2008-12-17

    Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and Johnson 1997; Pravecek and Kline 1998; Kline and Heindel 1999; Hebdon et al. 2000; Flagg et al. 2001; Kline and Willard 2001; Frost et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2003; Kline et al. 2003a; Kline et al. 2003b; Willard et al. 2003a; Willard et al. 2003b; Baker et al. 2004; Baker et al. 2005; Willard et al. 2005; Baker et al. 2006; Plaster et al. 2006; Baker et al. 2007). The immediate goal of the program is to utilize captive broodstock technology to conserve the population's unique genetics. Long-term goals include increasing the number of individuals in the population to address delisting criteria and to provide sport and treaty harvest opportunity. (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake sockeye salmon, culture broodstocks and produce progeny for reintroduction. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program reintroduction efforts. (4) Utilize genetic analysis to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, provide written activity reports, and participate in essential program management and planning activities. Idaho Department of Fish and Game's participation in the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program includes two areas of effort: (1) sockeye salmon captive broodstock culture, and (2) sockeye salmon research and evaluations. Although objectives and tasks from both components overlap and contribute to achieving the same goals, work directly related to sockeye salmon captive broodstock research and enhancement will appear under a separate cover. Research and enhancement activities associated with Snake River sockeye salmon are permitted under NOAA permit numbers 1120, 1124, and 1481. This report details fish

  20. Safe Fall: Humanoid robot fall direction change through intelligent stepping and inertia shaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Seung-kook

    Although fall is a rare event in the life of a humanoid robot, we must be prepared for it because its consequences are serious. In this paper we present a fall strategy which rapidly modifies the robot's fall direction in ...

  1. Salmon fishing boats of the North American Pacific Coast in the era of oar and sail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Charles David

    1993-01-01

    for small craft identification by archaeologists working on the Pacific Coast. The information gained from studying various salmon fishing boats and their distribution reflects changing hull shape due to local sea conditions, competition amid diminishing...

  2. DISTRIBUTION AND MOVEMENT OF JUVENILE SALMON IN BROWNLEE RESERVOIR, 1962-65

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , shitllow, 'Unst.ratified pond when t.he reservoir is full. Juvenile salmon enter the reservoir from the Snake and Powder Rivers en route to the sea, When Brownlee Reservoir was completed, de- tailed knowledge

  3. Salmon Carcasses Increase Stream Productivity More than Inorganic Fertilizer Pellets: A Test on Multiple Trophic Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Salmon Carcasses Increase Stream Productivity More than Inorganic Fertilizer Pellets: A Test experiment, we examined the short-term (6 weeks) comparative effects of artificial nutrient pellets pellet treatment was soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration. Ammonium-nitrogen concentration

  4. The California Salmon Fly as a Food Source in Northeastern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Mark Q

    1985-01-01

    on salmon flies available. Insect foods, however, are oftenFriedrich S. 1951 Insects as Human Food: A Chapter of theAS A FOOD SOURCE Arnett, Ross H. 1985 American Insects: A

  5. Improving hydroturbine pressures to enhance salmon passage survival and recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trumbo, Bradly A.; Ahmann, Martin L.; Renholods, Jon F.; Brown, Richard S.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Deng, Zhiqun

    2014-09-12

    This paper provides an overview of turbine pressure data collection and barotrauma studies relative to fish passage through large Kaplan turbines and how this information may be applied to safer fish passage through turbines. The specific objectives are to 1) discuss turbine pressures defined by Sensor Fish releases; 2) discuss what has been learned about pressure effects on fish and the factors influencing barotrauma associated with simulated turbine passage; 3) elucidate data gaps associated with fish behavior and passage that influence barotrauma during turbine passage; 4) discuss how the results of these studies have led to turbine design criteria for safer fish passage; and 5) relate this information to salmon recovery efforts and safer fish passage for Atlantic and Pacific salmonids.

  6. UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Fall Quarter 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    -centricity September 24, 2013 UC Davis University Library Town Hall 7 #12;State of the Library Report: NATIONAL · OpenUC DAVIS UNIVERSITY LIBRARY TOWN HALL Fall Quarter 2013 September 24, 2013 UC Davis University Library Town Hall 1 #12;TOWN HALL Webcast This session is being live Webcast with Adobe Connect Questions

  7. DEAN'S LIST Fall Semester 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    DEAN'S LIST Fall Semester 2012 Congratulations to these students for earning a 3.5­3.9 grade point Daniel Chacon, Brian M. Chavez, Natalie T. Chen, Hao Chen, Yi Chieh Cohen, Jordan A. Corrales, Tamara G, Jorge Dougless, Austin William Dreier, Robert Duarte, Elisa C. Dunn, Ellen C. Durbin, John R. Dusard

  8. Offered Fall Semester: Biological Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Offered Fall Semester: Biological Physics Physics 466 / Physics 566 (conjoint) provides a fundamental physical understanding of the operation of cells, biomolecules and molecular machines. MWF 4:10-5:00pm, Webster 11 (3 cr) Instructor: Fred Gittes, Clinical Professor of Physics and Astronomy: gittes

  9. 2006 Fall Meeting Search Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    (52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract xxxxx-xx Your query was: "T11A-0425" The selected databases contain one samples, modules, and workflows that can be downloaded and used by other users of the iCronus prototype such as geomagnetic field and atmospheric changes. Different scalings relating to atmospheric attenuation, solar

  10. CHEMISTRY 3100 FALL SEMESTER 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    CHEMISTRY 3100 FALL SEMESTER 2005 TEXT: "Chemistry 3100 Notes," (Parts 1-3 and 4-8) Ernst (required) "Inorganic Chemistry," Housecroft and Sharpe (recommended) CLASS: M W F: 8:05 - 9:25 PM, ROOM 140 JTB RECOMMENDED REFERENCES: *F. Cotton and G. Wilkinson, "Advanced Inorganic Chemistry" *F. Cotton, G. Wilkinson

  11. GENERAL INDEX. Ambloplites rupestris, distribution and food............ 256,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , mussels...... ,.............................. '09 chinook salmon, early history and seaward migration. . . . . 66 migration 47,48,49,53,57,60,62, '10 mlscellaueous collections '" , . .. . 42 Oncorhynchus. migratory.... . .. .. . . .. . . .. .. .. . . .. .. .. . . . 18 check, primary

  12. EIS-0346: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salmon Creek Project, Water Flow Restoration and Streambed Rehabilitation, Providing Passage for Summer Steelhead and Spring Chinook, Funding, Okanogan County, Washington

  13. U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Act (ESA) with regard to listed steelhead and Chinook salmon while the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is responsible for administering the ESA with regard to...

  14. EA-1917-FEA-2012-AppendixB-2012.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Species Listing Status Critical Habitat Protective Regulations Marine and Anadromous Fish Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Lower Columbia River T 62805; 70 FR 37160...

  15. Fall 2013 Composite Data Products - Backup Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

    2013-12-01

    This report includes 28 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Fall 2013 for fuel cell backup power systems.

  16. Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Siting Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, James M.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential and development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  17. Technological change in the salmon farming industry in Chile : using investment decision tools to model an innovation path and a framework for developing a new technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lonza, Carlos (Lonza Robledo)

    2012-01-01

    Salmon farming is one of Chile's main economic activities, as well as a major factor in the country's aquaculture sector, and critical to the economic growth strategies proposed by the government. Chilean salmon farming ...

  18. FALL WEBWORM Clifford S. Sadof, Extension Entomologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    become covered with webs produced by fall webworm caterpillars. These white to tan fuzzy caterpillars, mosthomeownersprefertokeepunsightlywebsofftheirtrees. Large webs of fall webworm on branch buds in the tree Life Cycle Two races of fall webworms on the tips of branches. Caterpillars feed for 6 weeks on leaves while surrounding themselves with webs

  19. BA: Art History Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    BA: Art History Fall--First Year · ART 127 New Major Seminar · ART 222 Caves to Cathedrals · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Second Year · ART 101 Art Studio Foundations I · ART 324 Renaissance Art · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Third Year · ART 328 Art of Greece & Rome

  20. Population Analysis, Fall 2005 1 Population Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, William R.

    Population Analysis, Fall 2005 1 Population Analyses EEOB/AEcl 611 Fall Semester 2005 Scheduled's, including MARK, SAS, DISTANCE, and others. We'll often use the "recitation session" to get you started Cooch and Gary White #12;Population Analysis, Fall 2005 2 2001) that can also be downloaded from Evan

  1. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-08-18

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

  2. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume XVI; Alternative Designs for Future Adult PIT-Tag Detection Studies, 2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Comas, Jose A.; Skalski, John R.

    2000-09-25

    In the advent of the installation of a PIT-tag interrogation system in the Cascades Island fish ladder at Bonneville Dam (BON), and other CRB dams, this overview describes in general terms what can and cannot be estimated under seven different scenarios of adult PIT-tag detection capabilities in the CRB. Moreover, this overview attempted to identify minimal adult PIT-tag detection configurations required by the ten threatened Columbia River Basin (CRB) chinook and steelhead ESUs. A minimal adult PIT-tag detection configuration will require the installation of adult PIT-tag detection facilities at Bonneville Dam and another dam above BON. Thus, the Snake River spring/summer and fall chinook salmon, and the Snake River steelhead will require a minimum of three dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities to guarantee estimates of ''ocean survival'' and at least of one independent, in-river returning adult survival (e.g., adult PIT-tag detection facilities at BON and LGR dams and at any other intermediary dam such as IHR). The Upper Columbia River spring chinook salmon and steelhead will also require a minimum of three dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities: BON and two other dams on the BON-WEL reach. The current CRB dam system configuration and BPA's and COE's commitment to install adult PIT-tag detectors only in major CRB projects will not allow the estimation of an ''ocean survival'' and of any in-river adult survival for the Lower Columbia River chinook salmon and steelhead. The Middle Columbia River steelhead ESU will require a minimum of two dams with adult PIT-tag detection capabilities: BON and another upstream dam on the BON-McN reach. Finally, in spite of their importance in terms of releases, PIT-tag survival studies for the Upper Willamette chinook and Upper Willamette steelhead ESUs cannot be perform with the current CRB dam system configuration and PIT-tag detection capabilities.

  3. Approved Summer 2013 (salmon sheet) Environmental Studies Major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Laura Hill

    of Cultivated Landscapes ENVS/PSS 137 Landscape Design Fundamentals ENVS/PSS 156 Permaculture ENVS/PSS 196 Permaculture Fundamentals ENVS/PSS 212 Advanced Agroecology (*) ENVS/PSS 238 Ecological Landscape Design credits basic bio/eco sci. Fall ENVS/PSS 156 Permaculture NS 3 credits basic bio/eco sci. or P

  4. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) experience relatively high mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the marine environment, where smaller individu- als are believed to experience higher size at sea, when smaller indi- viduals may not have sufficient energy reserves to survive late fall is proportional to fish body length (Francis, 1990; Ricker, Early marine growth in relation to marine

  5. THE STORAGE OF FAT IN THE MUSCULAR TISSUE OF THE KING SALMON AND ITS RESORPTION DURING THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE STORAGE OF FAT IN THE MUSCULAR TISSUE OF THE KING SALMON AND ITS RESORPTION DURING THE FAST. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Types of salmon muscular tissue as regards the storage of fat \\ '.' . . . 136 Explanation of plates ~ 137 71 #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;THE STORAGE OF FAT

  6. October 2002 / Vol. 52 No. 10 BioScience 917 Salmon runs in the Pacific Northwest have been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wipfli, Mark S.

    AND TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS THROUGH SEVERAL PATHWAYS, WHICH GENERATES UNIQUE MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVA- TION ISSUES- tribution of marine inputs to freshwater and terrestrial sys- tems via salmon. We use an expanding group that illustrates salmon-derived prod- ucts and the pathways by which they enter and are retained in aquatic

  7. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    This report summarizes the 2012 annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Salmon site). The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. A revised plan is in preparation. The Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site is intended for release in 2013. The Salmon site consists of 1,470 acres. The site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 10 miles west of Purvis, Mississippi, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi The State of Mississippi owns the surface real estate subject to certain restrictions related to subsurface penetration. The State is the surface operator; the Mississippi Forestry Commission is its agent. The federal government owns the subsurface real estate (including minerals and some surface features), shares right-of-entry easements with the State, and retains rights related to subsurface monitoring. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, is responsible for the long-term surveillance of the subsurface real estate

  8. An Assessment of the Status of Captive Broodstock Technology of Pacific Salmon, 1995 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flagg, Thomas A.; Mahnaken, Conrad V.W.; Hard, Jeffrey J.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides guidance for the refinement and use of captive broodstock technology for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) by bringing together information on the husbandry techniques, genetic risks, physiology, nutrition, and pathology affecting captive broodstocks. Captive broodstock rearing of Pacific salmon is an evolving technology, as yet without well defined standards. At present, we regard captive rearing of Pacific salmon as problematic: high mortality rates and low egg viability were common in the programs we reviewed for this report. One of the most important elements in fish husbandry is the culture environment itself. Many captive broodstock programs for Pacific salmon have reared fish from smolt-to-adult in seawater net-pens, and most have shown success in providing gametes for recovery efforts. However, some programs have lost entire brood years to diseases that transmitted rapidly in this medium. Current programs for endangered species of Pacific salmon rear most fish full-term to maturity in fresh well-water, since ground water is low in pathogens and thus helps ensure survival to adulthood. Our review suggested that captive rearing of fish in either freshwater, well-water, or filtered and sterilized seawater supplied to land-based tanks should produce higher survival than culture in seawater net-pens.

  9. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1 of 2, 1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Carl

    1987-03-01

    The tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, that will be used in conjunction with 1984 and 1985 fish and habitat pre-treatment (baseline) data to evaluate effects of habitat enhancement on the habitat and fish community in Bear Valley Creek overtime. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur in the upper-Salmon River basin. Subproject III involved fish inventories (pre-treatment) in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River, and habitat problem identification on Fivemile and Ramey Creek. Subproject IV involved baseline habitat and fish inventories on the East Fork of the Salmon River, Herd Creek and Big-Boulder Creek. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the four subproject reports. 20 refs., 37 figs., 22 tabs.

  10. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-10-01

    This report summarizes the annual inspection, sampling, and maintenance activities performed on and near the Salmon, Mississippi, Site in calendar year 2009. The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities and the results of sample analyses. This report complies with the annual report requirement. The Salmon, MS, Site is located in Lamar County, MS, approximately 12 miles west of Purvis, MS, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, MS The site encompasses 1,470 acres and is not open to the general public. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), is responsible for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the site. The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) was assigned responsibility for the site effective October 1, 2006

  11. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes inspection and monitoring activities performed on and near the Salmon, Mississippi, Site in calendar year 2007. The Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities and the results of sample analyses. This report is submitted to comply with that requirement. The Tatum Salt Dome was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) for underground nuclear testing during the cold war. The land surface above the salt dome, the Salmon Site, is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 12 miles west of Purvis (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the successor to the AEC, is responsible for long-term surveillance and maintenance of the site. The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) was assigned this responsibility effective October 2006.

  12. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-01

    This report summarizes the annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site in calendar year 2010. The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. The Salmon, MS, Site is a federally owned site located in Lamar County, MS, approximately 12 miles west of Purvis, MS, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, MS (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), is responsible for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the 1,470-acre site. DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the operating agent for the surface and subsurface real estate.

  13. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

    1986-08-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of smolts during the 1985 spring outmigration at three migrant traps, one each on the Snake, Clearwater, and Salmon rivers. Yearling chinook migration rate between Salmon River release sites and the Salmon River scoop trap averaged 23 km per day, about half the migration rate for the same brand groups when migrating from the Salmon River trap to the Snake River trap (48 km/day). Average migration rates for branded chinook and steelhead between release sites and the head of Lower Granite Reservoir were both near 27 km per day. The yearling chinook migration begins in earnest when Salmon River discharge makes a significant rise in early to mid-April. Most yearling chinook pass into Lower Granite Reservoir in April followed by passage of steelhead in May. Chinook smolt recapture data from the Snake River trap suggest a strong dependence of migration rate on quantity of Snake and Salmon river discharge. The ability of the Salmon River trap to catch yearling chinook decreased as discharge increased. No correlation between discharge level and efficiency was observed at the Snake or Clearwater trap for chinook or steelhead smolts. When comparing the size of smolts in the Salmon and Clearwater rivers, the former river has smaller yearling chinook and larger hatchery and wild steelhead. Salmon River hatchery steelhead smolts in 1985 averaged 2 cm smaller than in 1983 and were much healthier than in 1983. 4 refs., 32 figs., 18 tabs.

  14. A fully relativistic radial fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro D. A. M. Spallicci; Patxi Ritter

    2014-07-21

    Radial fall has historically played a momentous role. It is one of the most classical problems, the solutions of which represent the level of understanding of gravitation in a given epoch. A {\\it gedankenexperiment} in a modern frame is given by a small body, like a compact star or a solar mass black hole, captured by a supermassive black hole. The mass of the small body itself and the emission of gravitational radiation cause the departure from the geodesic path due to the back-action, that is the self-force. For radial fall, as any other non-adiabatic motion, the instantaneous identity of the radiated energy and the loss of orbital energy cannot be imposed and provide the perturbed trajectory. In the first part of this letter, we present the effects due to the self-force computed on the geodesic trajectory in the background field. Compared to the latter trajectory, in the Regge-Wheeler, harmonic and all others smoothly related gauges, a far observer concludes that the self-force pushes inward (not outward) the falling body, with a strength proportional to the mass of the small body for a given large mass; further, the same observer notes an higher value of the maximal coordinate velocity, this value being reached earlier on during infall. In the second part of this letter, we implement a self-consistent approach for which the trajectory is iteratively corrected by the self-force, this time computed on osculating geodesics. Finally, we compare the motion driven by the self-force without and with self-consistent orbital evolution. Subtle differences are noticeable, even if self-force effects have hardly the time to accumulate in such a short orbit.

  15. Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowan, Gerald D.

    1993-08-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Acclimation of 109,101 spring chinook salmon and 19,977 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1992. At Minthorn, 47,458 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Control groups of spring chinook salmon were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Acclimation studies with summer steelhead were not conducted in 1992. A total of 237 unmarked adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 18, 1991 through April 24, 1992 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 476,871 green eggs were taken from 86 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 211 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:1 spawning ratio, a total of 195,637 green eggs were taken from 58 females. They were also transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Cell culture assays for replicating agents, including IHNV virus, on all spawned fish were negative. One of 60 summer steelhead tested positive for EIBS virus, while all fall chinook tested we re negative for inclusions. One of 73 summer steelhead sampled for BKD had a high level of antigen, while all others had very low or negative antigen levels. All fall chinook tested had low or negative antigen levels. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1992. The progress of outmigration for juvenile releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Coho and spring chinook yearlings were released in mid-March at Umatilla rivermile (RM) 56 and 60. The peak outmigration period past Westland (RM 27) was mid-April to early May, approximately four to seven weeks after release. Groups of summer steelhead were released from Minthorn (RM 63) and Bonifer (RM 81) in late March and into Meacham Creek near Bonifer in late April. The peak outmigration period past Westland for all groups appeared to be the first two to three weeks in May. Spring chinook yearlings released in mid-April from Bonifer and at Umatilla RM 89, migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period past Westland appeared to be within a week or two after release. Fall and spring chinook subyearlings released in mid-May at RM 42 and 60, respectively, also migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period was within days after release. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to the ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated summer steelhead survival have ranged from 0.03 to 0.61% for releases in which recovery information is complete. Coho survival rates have ranged from 0.15 to 4.14%, and spring chinook yearling survival rates from spring releases have ranged from 0.72 to 0.74%. Survival rates of fall chinook yearlings have ranged from 0.08 to 3.01%, while fall chinook subyearling survival rates have ranged from 0.25 to 0.87% for spring released groups.

  16. IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-22

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  17. Test 1 STAT 47201 Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microsoft account

    2015-08-25

    Test 1. STAT 47201. Fall 2014. October 7, 2014. Copyright Jeffrey Beckley 2014. August 25, 2015. 1. You are given: i. Mortality follows the illustrative life table ii.

  18. River Falls Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Name Utility Administrator River Falls Municipal Utilities Website http:www.rfmu.orgindex.aspx?nid681 Funding Source Wisconsin Focus on Energy State Wisconsin Program Type...

  19. Review: Prof Slipchenko's class, Fall 2013 Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-10-10

    REVIEW. Yingwei Wang. October 10, 2013. Review: Prof Slipchenko's class, Fall 2013. Contents. 1 Hartree energy. 2. 2 Many-body system. 2.

  20. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

    2005-05-01

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  1. Analysis of the Monitoring Network at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-08-01

    The Salmon site in southern Mississippi was the location of two underground nuclear tests and two methane-oxygen gas explosion tests conducted in the Tatum Salt Dome at a depth of 2,715 feet below ground surface. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]) and the U.S. Department of Defense jointly conducted the tests between 1964 and 1970. The testing operations resulted in surface contamination at multiple locations on the site and contamination of shallow aquifers. No radionuclides from the nuclear tests were released to the surface or to groundwater, although radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings were brought to the surface during re-entry drilling. Drilling operations generated the largest single volume of waste materials, including radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings and drilling fluids. Nonradioactive wastes were also generated as part of the testing operations. Site cleanup and decommissioning began in 1971 and officially ended in 1972. DOE conducted additional site characterization between 1992 and 1999. The historical investigations have provided a reasonable understanding of current surface and shallow subsurface conditions at the site, although some additional investigation is desirable. For example, additional hydrologic data would improve confidence in assigning groundwater gradients and flow directions in the aquifers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency monitored groundwater at the site as part of its Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program from 1972 through 2007, when DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) assumed responsibility for site monitoring. The current monitoring network consists of 28 monitoring wells and 11 surface water locations. Multiple aquifers which underlie the site are monitored. The current analyte list includes metals, radionuclides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

  2. 10/12/2004 Comp 120 Fall 2004 1 No class Thursday 14 October (Fall Break!)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Gary

    ·1 10/12/2004 Comp 120 Fall 2004 1 October 12 · No class Thursday 14 October (Fall Break!) · GB gone 17 through 20 October · Review for 2nd Exam on Tuesday 19 October · Ask Questions! 10/12/2004 Comp 120 Fall 2004 2 Chapter 1 · Computer Abstractions · Input/Output/Memory/Datapath/Control · Instruction

  3. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of graduation. C O O P 63 Credits 16 Credits 16

  4. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of graduation. C O O P 63 Credits 16

  5. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of graduation. C O O P 66 Credits

  6. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of gaduation. C O O P 66 Credits 16 Credits 13

  7. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-04-08

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

  8. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Artificial Imprinting and Smoltification in Juvenile Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1994 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

    1995-02-01

    At the kokanee salmon hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt, constructed as partial mitigation for effects from Grand Coulee Dam, adult returns have been poor. The reason may be in the imprinting or in the smoltification. A study was initiated in 1992 to determine if there was a critical period for thyroxine induced alfactory imprinting in kokanee salmon; experiments were conducted on imprinting to morpholine and phenethyl alcohol. Other results showed that chemical imprinting coincided with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992. In this report, imprinting experiments were repeated; results showed that imprinting occurred concomitant with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992 and tested in 1994 as age 3 spawners. Imprinting also occurred at the same time as thyroxine peaks in 1992 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1993 and tested as age 2 spawners. In both groups fish that had the highest whole body thyroxine content (swimup stage) also had the highest percentage of fish that were attracted to their exposure odor in behavioral tests. So, kokanee salmon imprinted to chemical cues during two sensitive periods during development, at the alevin/swimup and smolt stages. A field test was conducted in Lake Roosevelt on coded wire tagged fish. Smoltification experiments were conducted from 1992 to 1994. Recommendations are made for the Lake Roosevelt kokanee hatcheries.

  9. A model of the ocean migration of Pacific salmon Chloe Bracis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    advection by ocean currents with fish swimming behavior to model trajectories of salmon. The behavior rules are based on possible responses to components of the earth's magnetic field, and the ocean currents the high seas to the Columbia River, including the effects of interannual variability in ocean currents

  10. THE LOW-TEMPERATURE THRESHOLD FOR PINK SALMON EGGS IN RELATION TO A PROPOSED HYDROELECTRIC INSTALLATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE LOW-TEMPERATURE THRESHOLD FOR PINK SALMON EGGS IN RELATION TO A PROPOSED HYDROELECTRIC INSTALLATION JACK E. BAILEY' AND DALE R. EVANS' ABSTRACT A proposed hydroelectric installation in southeastern hydroelectric installation could result in temperatures as low as 4.5 0 C during spawning and initial incubation

  11. Abstract--Data storage tags (DSTs) were applied to Atlantic salmon (Salmo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Ueno2; Godř and Michalsen, 2000; Reddin et al., 2004). Direct tracking, although valuable, has a number and sea temperatures recorded at migration routes by data stor- age tags. ICES C.M. (council meeting) 1995/M: 17, 13 p. 2 Wada, K. and Y. Ueno. 1999. Homing behavior of chum salmon determined by an archival

  12. PROPAGATION AND PROTECTION OF THE RHINE SALMON By P. P. C. Hoek, Ph. D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Countries (the Netherlands) nearer the mouth of the river. It is impossible to treat of the propagation to the sea. They reach the mouth of the river on their way to the ocean in the month of May, their length that the salmon swim up the river at the expense of the fat stored in their muscles, etc., from a general economic

  13. PREDAnON ON JUVENILE PACIFIC SALMON BY A MARINE ISOPOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the isopods alternately rested on the sides of the tank and swam about in random patterns. One iso- pod suspended at the sea surface. The collected organisms were poured into a tank containing over 1000 young of the same species. The pink salmon fed vigorously on large numbers of amphipods in the tank, whereas

  14. Data Salmon: A Greedy Mobile Basestation Protocol for Efficient Data Collection in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosun, Ali Saman

    in a timely fashion, avoiding latencies due to long-term buffering. Our protocol progressively relocates consumed Data mules random long-term high low Predictable MB periodic long-term high low MES self-controlled long-term medium low Data salmon network-controlled short-term low medium Table 1. Comparison of MB

  15. Spawning sockeye salmon fossils in Pleistocene lake beds of Skokomish Valley, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Spawning sockeye salmon fossils in Pleistocene lake beds of Skokomish Valley, Washington Gerald R Research Center and Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Box 351310, University of Washington, Seattle 98501, USA d Burke Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA Received 19 July 2006

  16. STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56 By ROBERT R. PORTLAND. OREGON ABSTRACT To determine loss or delay of salmonids in passing Rock Island Dam tagged and released both above and below the dam in 1954-56. They were subsequently observed passing

  17. Assessing the Willingness to Pay in the Pacific Northwest for Salmon Produced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of fish and extractive aquaculture species at one site to simulate a balanced natural system and reduce Pacific Northwest perceive IMTA and its products compared to other salmon aquaculture methods and products-Multi-Trophic Aquaculture Network for their input, and The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council for providing

  18. SALMON GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 4 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 4-5 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    assessment of production opportunities. The Council recognizes that any action has the potential for causing of principle number five, below. The best available data and assessment tools should be used to evaluate. Because most of the loss of salmon and steelhead production as a result of hydroelectric development has

  19. Some Effects of Mt. St. Helens Volcanic Ash on Juvenile Salmon Smolts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Some Effects of Mt. St. Helens Volcanic Ash on Juvenile Salmon Smolts TIMOTHY W. NEWCOMB and THOMAS. Helens, which was completely decimated with vol- canic ash and mud slides. Heavy sediment loads smolts were exposed to various concentrations ofairborne volcanic ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption

  20. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS : Appendices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described. The document concludes with an evaluation of the potential effects that could result from implementing proposed actions. The conclusions are based on evaluation of existing data, utilization of numerical models, and application of logical inference. This volume contains the appendices.

  1. June 2014 | Executive Summary S 1 Snake RiverSockeyeSalmon Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Oncorhynchus nerka). Snake River Sockeye Salmon were listed as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1991. The listing was reaffirmed in 2005. The species remains at risk of extinction these mainstem rivers and through eight major federal dams, four on the Columbia River and four on the lower

  2. Global Assessment of Extinction Risk to Populations of Sockeye Salmon Oncorhynchus nerka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Mart

    and publishes its results on the Red List of Threatened Species. However, the focus is on the species level habitat loss, dams, hatcheries, and changing ocean conditions. Conclusions/Significance: Although sockeye, the biodiversity loss in salmon would be greatly underrepresented on the Red List. We urge government, conservation

  3. Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams W. Nicholas dams in the Columbia/Snake River hydrosystem may delay the upstream passage of the adults. To evaluate-to-day variations of spill and upstream fish passage at the eight dams of the Columbia/Snake river hydrosystem

  4. Calibrating acoustic acceleration transmitters for estimating energy use by wild adult Pacific salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    and estimate energy consumption of adult Pacific salmon throughout their homeward spawning migration. © 2012 successfully used as a proxy for energy use in fish, with tailbeat frequency (TBF) (e.g. Brett, 1965, 1995Calibrating acoustic acceleration transmitters for estimating energy use by wild adult Pacific

  5. STATISTICAL REVIEW OF THE ALASKA SALMON FISHERIES PART III: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, COPPER RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATISTICAL REVIEW OF THE ALASKA SALMON FISHERIES PART III: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, COPPER RIVER Assistant, Alaska Service CONTENTS Introduction_ ~ _~ _ Prince William Sound__ ~ ~ _ Western part _ Knight 217 218 220 221 Prince William Sound-Continued. Eastern part _ Valdez Arm districL _ Port Fidalgo

  6. THERMAL TOLERANCE OF JUVENILE PACIFIC SALMON AND STEELHEAD TROUT IN RELATION TO SUPERSATURATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : VOL. 69, NO.4, 1971. Several nuclear power plants have been pro- posed for the Columbia River quality criteria for the Columbia River. It therefore contracted the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries (BCF; pres- ently designated as NMFS) to determine the changes in tolerance of juvenile salmon and trout

  7. ECONOMIC EMERGENCY PROGRAM International Falls Plant Shutdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    . announced plans to shut down two of the four paper machines at its International Falls paper millECONOMIC EMERGENCY PROGRAM International Falls Plant Shutdown On Thursday, May 2rd , Boise Inc with University of Minnesota Extension, has prepared this economic emergency report. WHAT IS AN ECONOMIC EMERGENCY

  8. BA: Art History Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    · ART 3/4xx (Art History) · Elective(s) (advisor approval) and/or LSP coursework Fall--Fourth Year · ART(s) and/or LSP coursework Spring--Fourth Year · ART 437 Senior Thesis II OR ART 3/4xx (Art HistoryBA: Art History Fall--First Year · ART 127 New Major Seminar · ART 222 Caves to Cathedrals

  9. Music BM Performance Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Music ­ BM Performance Fall--First Year MUSI 130: Music Analysis I MUSI 132: Aural Skills in Music I MUSI 279: Concert and Recital Atten. MUSI 153: Keyboard Skills I MUSI xxx: Major Instrument) coursework Fall--Second Year MUSI 230: Music Analysis III MUSI 232: Aural Skills in Music III MUSI 339

  10. Riparian Forest Grows Trees fall in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riparian Forest Grows Trees Die Trees fall in the lake Trees leave the littoral zone "Life" Cycle of Coarse Woody Habitat #12;Riparian Forest Grows What factors drive the species composition and stand factors drive the species composition and stand structure? Trees Die Trees fall in the lake Trees leave

  11. Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P.; Loffink, Ken; Duke, Bill

    2008-12-31

    Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from June 7, 2007 to August 11, 2008. A total of 3,133 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,487 adult, 1,067 jack, and 999 subjack fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha); 5,140 adult and 150 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,009 adult, 517 jack, and 128 subjack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 1,442 summer steelhead and 88 adult and 84 jack spring Chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 1,497 summer steelhead; 609 adult, 1,018 jack and 979 subjack fall Chinook; 5,036 adult and 144 jack coho; and 1,117 adult, 386 jack and 125 subjack spring Chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 110 summer steelhead; 878 adult and 43 jack fall Chinook; and 560 adult and 28 jack spring Chinook were collected as broodstock for the Umatilla River hatchery program. In addition, there were 241 adult and 15 jack spring Chinook collected at Threemile Dam for outplanting in the South Fork Walla Walla River and Mill Cr, a tributary of the mainstem Walla Walla River. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at river mile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for out-migrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 158 days between February 11, 2008 and July 18, 2008. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 150 days and were trapped 6 days. There were also 2 days when fish were directed into and held in the canal forebay between the time the bypass was closed and the trap opened. An estimated 64 pounds of fish were transported from the Westland trapping facility. Approximately 25.8% of the fish transported were salmonids. In addition, one adult Pacific lamprey was trapped and released above the Westland ladder this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on March 11, 2008 in conjunction with water deliveries and continued through the summer. West Extension Irrigation District (WEID) discontinued diverting live flow on June 24, 2008 but the bypass remained open throughout the project year. The juvenile trap was not operated this project year.

  12. EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project- Fall Chinook and Coho Research Program, Yakima and Klickitat River Basins, Washington

  13. Drought Conditions Force Difficult Management Decisions For Sacramento River Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperatures in the river that could be catastrophic for endangered winter-run Chinook salmon. The Sacramento and everything. The winter-run Chinook salmon may not survive losses in the Sacramento River similar to last year of the river during the critical winter-run spawning and early rearing period. However, the equipment used

  14. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and River Operations SUBJECT: Study update on the survival and run timing of adult spring/summer Chinook salmon through the lower Columbia River to Bonneville Dam At the November 4th Fish and Wildlife Committee information on the survival and run timing of adult spring/summer Chinook salmon migrating through the lower

  15. Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaattari, Stephen

    1988-06-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) has been and remains a chronic contributory problem limiting the productivity of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Control of this disease will not come easily, but it would lead to a tremendous increase in the health and numbers of salmon populations. Vaccination of salmon to Renibacterium salmoninarum (KDB) is a potentially successful method of controlling this disease. To date, however, no successful vaccine has been developed for general use. A possible solution to this problem, and thus the goal of this research, is to isolate the antigenic components of KDB and enhance their ability to activate the host defenses. This will be accomplished by the chemical modification of these antigens with potent immunomodulatory substances. These modified antigens will then be tested for their effectiveness in inducing immunity to BKD and thereby preventing the disease. The goal of the project's fourth year was to test the immunogenicity and prophylactic value in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) of various--chemical conjugates of Renibacterium salmoninarum cell and major antigens. This was accomplished by assessing the serum antibody response, the cellular immune response (chemiluminescence), and the kinetics of mortality after lethal injections of the bacteria. The studies completed this year have: (1) identified immunization procedures which enhance the induction of high levels of antibody; (2) identified functionally distinct serum antibodies which may possess different abilities to protect salmon against BKD; (3) begun the isolation and characterization of anti-R. salmoninarum antibodies which may correlate with varying degrees of protection; (4) identified chemiluminescence as a potential method for assessing cellular immunity to bacterial kidney disease; and (5) characterized two monoclonal antibodies to R. salmoninarum which will be of benefit in the diagnosis of this disease.

  16. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Andre E.; Taki, Doug (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Griswold, Robert G. (Biolines, Stanley, ID)

    2004-08-01

    In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list the Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) as endangered. As a result of that petition the Snake River sockeye salmon was officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Program was implemented (Project Number 91-71, Intergovernmental Contract Number DE-BI79-91bp22548). This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of O. nerka. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribal goal for this project is two tiered: The immediate goal is to increase the population of Snake River sockeye salmon while preserving the unique genetic characteristics of the Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU). The Tribes long term goal is to maintain a viable population that warrants delisting and provides Tribal harvest opportunities. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency recovery program through the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPCFWP). Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2002 calendar year. Project objectives include: (1) monitor over-winter survival and emigration of juvenile anadromous O. nerka stocked from the captive rearing program; (2) fertilize Redfish Lake (3) conduct kokanee salmon (non-anadromous O. nerka) population surveys; (4) monitor spawning kokanee escapement and estimate fry recruitment on Fishhook, Alturas Lake, and Stanley Lake creeks; (5) evaluate potential competition and predation between stocked juvenile O. nerka and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; and (6) monitor limnological parameters of Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity.

  17. HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Hatchery Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Arriving Run) Table B.7. Tribal Harvest Thresholds for Upper Columbia River 99 Summer/Fall Chinook (Later-Arriving Run) Table B.8 Harvest Thresholds for Upper Columbia River 100 Summer/Fall Chinook (Early-Arriving Run/Operator: Watershed and Region: Date Submitted: Date Last Updated: OKANOGAN SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPPER COLUMBIA RIVER

  18. Accident Investigation of the September 20, 2012 Fatal Fall from...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    20, 2012 Fatal Fall from the Dworshak-Taft 1 Transmission Tower, at the Bonneville Power Marketing Administration Accident Investigation of the September 20, 2012 Fatal Fall...

  19. City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperatur...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating...

  20. 56 BULLETIW OF THE UNITED STA'FES FISH COMMISSION. Nowcastle hatchery, Ontario ___..---_.-.-----..._.__.__..salmon trout.. 4,000,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    56 BULLETIW OF THE UNITED STA'FES FISH COMMISSION. Nowcastle hatchery, Ontario ___..---_.-.- ---- ..._.__.__..salmon trout.. 4,000,000 Nemcaktle hatchery, Ontario._---..-...----..----- ..---.speckled trout.. 50,000 iVe\\rcastlo hatchery, Ontario .---....---..--- .----..----.__-.whitefish.. 3,000,000 Smdmich

  1. U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | National Marine Fisheries Service 2011 Report to Congress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nal MariNe Fisheries service Science, Service, Stewardship #12;II 1989 Sacramento River winter-run Chinook). 1991 Snake River sockeye are listed as endangered. 1994 Sacramento River winter-run Chinook are listed the West Coast. 1992 Snake River spring/ summer-run Chinook and Snake River fall-run Chinook are listed

  2. AMST Courses --Fall 2014 Tulsa Based Classes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    AMST Courses -- Fall 2014 Tulsa Based Classes: Globalization & Am Culture AMST 3253 Gray M 4 in trips to the Philbrook, Philbrook Downtown, and Gilcrease Museums and attend events of the Tulsa

  3. MA-504, Fall 2015, Test 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-10-23

    MA-504, Fall 2015, Test 2. Name: Answers. Problem 1. (a) Using the ?–? definition, prove that f(x)=1/x is continuous on R \\ {0}. (b) Prove that the same function ...

  4. STAT 472 Fall 2014 Test 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microsoft account

    2015-08-25

    Copyright Jeffrey Beckley 2014. August 25, 2015. STAT 472. Fall 2014. Test 2. November 11, 2014. 1. (6 points) You are given: i. 2. 0.450 x. A + = ii. 0.04 i = iii.

  5. CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Fall, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Fall, 2001 Received 79 completed surveys out of 126 students who graduated in Dec, 2001 21 (27%) Have fulltime positions (9 temporary and 12 permanent) 3 (4

  6. Fall 2012 Composite Data Products - Backup Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes 15 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Fall 2012 for fuel cell backup power systems.

  7. Fall 2012 FUPWG Meeting Welcome: Southern Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the Southern Company's retail service territory, financials, customers and sales, power generation, U.S. military projects, and more.

  8. Idaho Falls Power- Residential Weatherization Loan Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Residential customers with permanently installed electric heat who receive service from the City of Idaho Falls, are eligible for 0% weatherization loans. City Energy Service will conduct an energy...

  9. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    . Example of a flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) (from the Center-inch OLED television coming on the market this fall (from LG) !" + 0-vibration couplings Luminescent materials Basic concepts of light absorption

  10. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R.

    2003-11-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer Chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer Chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer Chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2002 and their respective adult returns through 2004.

  11. EIS-0163-S: Supplemental EIS/1993 Interim Columbia and Snake Rivers Flow Improvement Measures for Salmon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Walla Walla District has prepared this statement to assess alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency in developing this supplement due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement in March of 1993. This statement supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis Environmental Impact Statement, which evaluated ways to alter water management operations in 1992 on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers to enhance the survival of wild Snake River salmon.

  12. Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

  13. SEABIRDS NEAR AN OREGON ESTUARINE SALMON HATCHERY IN 1982 AND DURING THE 1983 EL NINO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEABIRDS NEAR AN OREGON ESTUARINE SALMON HATCHERY IN 1982 AND DURING THE 1983 EL NINO RANGE D Nino was present. 22,800 26.800 26.800 26,BOO 322,000 398 528 536 541 1,231 418 653 1,581 1,727 3 the coast of Peru and Ecuador (Barber and Chavez 1983); an EI Nino of varying intensity oc- curs

  14. Data Mining on Large Data Set for Predicting Salmon Spawning Habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, YuLong; Murray, Christopher J.; Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.

    2008-07-01

    Hydraulic properties related to river flow affect salmon spawning habitat. Accurate prediction of salmon spawning habitat and understanding the influential properties on the spawning behavior are of great interest for hydroelectric dam management. Previous research predicted salmon spawning habitat through deriving river specific spawning suitability indices and employing a function estimate method like logistic regression on several static river flow related properties and had some success. The objective of this study was two-fold. First dynamic river flow properties associated with upstream dam operation were successfully derived from a huge set of time series of both water velocity and water depth for about one fifth of a million habitat cells through principal component analysis (PCA) using nonlinear iterative partial least squares (NIPLAS). The inclusion of dynamic variables in the models greatly improved the model prediction. Secondly, nine machine learning methods were applied to the data and it was found that decision tree and rule induction methods were generally outperformed usually used logistic regression. Specifically random forest, an advanced decision tree algorithm, provided unanimous better results. Over-prediction problem in previous studies were greatly alleviated.

  15. Retrofit Savings Determination for Wichita Falls Independent School District 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, X.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Claridge, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory Wichita Falls ISD Texas A&M University Carrigan Center Energy Systems Laboratory Texas Engineering Experiment station Wichita Falls ISD Texas A&M University College Station. TX Carrigan Center Energy Systems Laboratory Wichita Falls ISO Texas A...&M University Denver Center Energy Systems Laboratory Texas Engineering Experiment Station Wichita Falls ISD Texas A&M University College station. TX Denver Center Energy Systems Laboratory Wichita Falls ISO Texas A&M University Fannin Elementary Energy Systems...

  16. Interior cavern conditions and salt fall potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Myers, R.E. [Strategic Petroleum Reserve, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    A relatively large number of salt caverns are used for fluid hydrocarbon storage, including an extensive set of facilities in the Gulf Coast salt domes for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Attention is focused on the SPR caverns because of available histories that detail events involving loss and damage of the hanging string casing. The total number of events is limited, making the database statistically sparse. The occurrence of the events is not evenly distributed, with some facilities, and some caverns, more susceptible than others. While not all of these events could be attributed to impacts from salt falls, many did show the evidence of such impacts. As a result, a study has been completed to analyze the potential for salt falls in the SPR storage caverns. In this process, it was also possible to deduce some of the cavern interior conditions. Storage caverns are very large systems in which many factors could possibly play a part in casing damage. In this study, all of the potentially important factors such as salt dome geology, operational details, and material characteristics were considered, with all being logically evaluated and most being determined as secondary in nature. As a result of the study, it appears that a principal factor in determining a propensity for casing damage from salt falls is the creep and fracture characteristics of salt in individual caverns. In addition the fracture depends strongly upon the concentration of impurity particles in the salt. Although direct observation of cavern conditions is not possible, the average impurity concentration and the accumulation of salt fall material can be determined. When this is done, there is a reasonable correlation between the propensity for a cavern to show casing damage events and accumulation of salt fall material. The accumulation volumes of salt fall material can be extremely large, indicating that only a few of the salt falls are large enough to cause impact damage.

  17. UCLA BIOCHEMISTRY MAJOR FALL 2011 For students who declare the major Fall 2011 and thereafter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Alex J.

    UCLA BIOCHEMISTRY MAJOR FALL 2011 For students who declare the major Fall 2011 and thereafter BIOCHEMISTRY MAJOR (B.S.): This major is designed primarily for students who are interested in attending graduate school in Biochemistry or related areas. It also satisfies many of the requirements of pre

  18. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery .

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  19. BS Program in Physics Effective Fall 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Michael W.

    BS Program in Physics Effective Fall 2013 9/17/2013 CHMG- 141 or BIOL-101 General & Analytical-xxx General Physics Elective (c) 3 PHYS-451 Capstone Project 3 Open elective 3 PHYS-xxx Physics Elective (b) 3 Chemistry I or General Biology I 3 CHMG- 142 or BIOL-102 General & Analytical Chemistry II or General

  20. Enrollment Analysis Final for Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Management and Director of Strategic Research and Analysis Project Support: Office of Strategic Research Management and Director of Strategic Research and Analysis o Mr. Paul Wilver, Assistant Director, DecisionEnrollment Analysis Final for Fall 2014 Office of Strategic Research & Analysis November 11, 2014

  1. 7: Network Security Comp 361, Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golin, Mordecai J.

    "securely" Trudy (intruder) may intercept, delete, add messages secure sender secure receiver channel Alice, Alice be? ... well, real-life Bobs and Alices! Web browser/server for electronic transactions (e updates other examples? #12;7: Network Security 6 Comp 361, Fall 2003 There are bad guys (and girls) out

  2. fall & winter 2011 University of Nebraska Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    fall & winter 2011 University of Nebraska Press #12;Literary Collections 18, 50­51 Literary Backlist 56 Journals 58 Index 62 Ordering Information 64 Support the Press Help the University of Nebraska Press continue its vital program of scholarly and regional book publishing by becoming a Friend

  3. GEOL 205 Syllabus, Fall 2015 Earth Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;GEOL 205 Syllabus, Fall 2015 Energy resources and availability, including fossil fuels (oil, natural gas, coal), nuclear, and renewable energy sources, including environmental impacts of different energy, affluence and technology, change the use and needs for different natural resources and energy. (Carolina

  4. GIS Fundamentals SUR 6934-FALL 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    GIS Fundamentals SUR 6934- FALL 2013 School of Forest Resources and ConservationGulf Coast Research _________________________________________________________________________________ GIS Fundamentals Description: This course introduces geographic information systems to Geomatics practical skills needed in many applications. Students learn basic GIS data modeling and managing concepts

  5. Fall Semester 2014 Registration for MUSIC 291

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Fall Semester 2014 Registration for MUSIC 291 (Chamber Music Workshop) Students: To register for Chamber Music, you must complete ALL of the fields below, consult the Coordinator of Chamber Music and secure a spot with the appropriate Chamber Music Coach. Once you have all signed the completed form

  6. FINANCE DEPARTMENT Office Hours Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    FINANCE DEPARTMENT Office Hours Fall 2014 NAME OFFICE HOURS COURSE # COURSE TITLE DAY TIME ROOM-1515 and by appointment FIN 323.8 FIN 323.9 FIN 323.11 FIN 326.1 Fundamentals of Finance Fundamentals of Finance Fundamentals of Finance Financial Institution Mgt TTH TTH TH TTH 0930-1045 1100-1215 1600-1840 1230-1345 GMCS

  7. PSYCHOLOGY, B. A. (Fall 2015-Summer 2016)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    PSYCHOLOGY, B. A. (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements: ____ 32 credits at 200 level credits 300­400 level ____2.0 GPA Degree/Major/Gen Ed ____C- or above in Major/Gen Ed PSYCHOLOGY CORE in major. ______ 3 PSY 12000 Elementary Psychology ______ 3 PSY 14000 Critical Foundations for Psychology

  8. BIOMECHANICS THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE FALL 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Benjamin M.

    1 BIOMECHANICS ANTH 595 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE ­ FALL 2013 Instructor: Benjamin M. Auerbach to bblearn.utk.edu for announcements and to access the course readings. Course Description Biomechanics is the study of functional morphology. Broadly, in biomechanical studies, we examine the activities

  9. Electromagnetic Field Theory Fall 2014 Course Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haimovich, Alexander

    ECE 620 Electromagnetic Field Theory Fall 2014 Course Outline Instructor: Dr. Gerald Whitman Text of electromagnetic phenomena that vary sinusoidally in time. Course Learning Outcome: Students will learn fundamental knowledge of ac electromagnetic theory, which is needed for a broad spectrum of electrical engineering

  10. A DELICATE BALANCE ELA 4000, FALL 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Gregory G.

    A DELICATE BALANCE ELA 4000, FALL 2005 MR 11:00 am - 12:15 pm Instructor: Office: Phone: Email-1:45 pm; Thur. 1-3 pm; or by appointment. Course Overview: A Delicate Balance is the capstone course of informing public policy in order to address these pressing environmental concerns. A Delicate Balance

  11. IcelandIc for Fall and Spring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    IcelandIc for foreIgners Fall and Spring SemeSterS #12;I- 103 Icel IcelandIc for fore to introduce the basic structure of icelandic as well as increasing the cultural awareness of the participants or no knowledge of icelandic. Main emphasis will be on the basic grammar structures and vocabulary used in common

  12. Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Biomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2014 Biomechanics Advisor: Scott Hollister, Ph.D. BIOMECHANICS (select one course): BIOMEDE 456 Tissue Mechanics (3) (I) BIOMEDE 476 Biofluid Mechanics (4) (II) GENERAL (both courses are required): BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550

  13. Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Biomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2014 Biomaterials Advisor: David Kohn, Ph.D. BIOMATERIALS: BIOMEDE 410 Design and Applications of Biomaterials (3) (I) GENERAL (both courses are required): BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I) BIOMEDICAL

  14. Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Bioelectrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2014 Bioelectrical Advisor: Cynthia Chestek, Ph.D. BIOELECTRICAL: BIOMEDE 417 Electrical Biophysics (4) (II) GENERAL (both courses are required): BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I) BIOMEDICAL

  15. Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2014 Biotechnology Advisor: Michael Mayer, Ph.D. BIOTECHNOLOGY (select one course): BIOMEDE 410 Design and Applications of Biomaterials (3) (I) BIOMEDE 556 Cellular and Molecular Biomechanics (3) (I) BIOMEDE 574 Cells in Their Environment (3) (II) BIOMEDE 616

  16. Fall/Winter 2005 CELEBRATING 100 YEARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Fall/Winter 2005 CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF ENGINEERING AND ANNOUNCING THE MORK FAMILY DEPARTMENT Mankin PAGE 29 All in the Family John Mork (BSPE '70) and his family leave a lasting legacy by Diane Park Casino Hotel Malcolm R. Currie Retired, Hughes Aircraft Company Kenneth C. Dahlberg, MSEE '69

  17. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  18. Save Energy and be Festive this Fall | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and be Festive this Fall September 18, 2014 - 1:05pm Addthis Fall means cooler weather, changing leaves, and festive decorations, now your decorations can help save energy...

  19. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Andre E.; Taki, Doug (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Griswold, Robert G. (Biolines, Stanley, ID)

    2004-08-01

    In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list the Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered. As a result of that petition the Snake River sockeye salmon was officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Program was implemented (Project Number 91-71, Intergovernmental Contract Number DE-BI79-91bp22548). This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of O. nerka. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency recovery program through the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program (Council). Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2001 calendar year. Project objectives include: (1) monitor over-winter survival and emigration of juvenile anadromous O. nerka stocked from the captive rearing program; (2) fertilize Redfish Lake, fertilization of Pettit and Alturas lakes was suspended for this year; (3) conduct kokanee (non-anadromous O. nerka) population surveys; (4) monitor spawning kokanee escapement and estimate fry recruitment on Fishhook, Alturas Lake, and Stanley Lake creeks; (5) evaluate potential competition and predation interactions between stocked juvenile O. nerka and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; (6) monitor limnological parameters of Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity.

  20. Galen Sasaki EE 361 University of Hawaii Fall C functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Galen H.

    Galen Sasaki EE 361 University of Hawaii Fall 2003 1 Road Map · C functions ­ Computation flow Sasaki EE 361 University of Hawaii Fall 2003 2 EE 361 University of Hawaii Implementation of C functions and MIPS machine language [MIPSb Notes] #12;Galen Sasaki EE 361 University of Hawaii Fall 2003 3 C

  1. BA: Art (Liberal Arts) Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    BA: Art (Liberal Arts) Fall--First Year ART 127 New Major Seminar ART 101 Art Studio Foundations I Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Second Year ART 190 Foundations Proficiency Review Major Studio I ART 222, 223, or 224 (Art History) Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall

  2. Fall--First Year Liberal Studies Program (LSP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Fall--Fourth Year · SPAN 353 · SPAN 450 · SPAN 460 · SPAN 473 · SPAN 4XX · Class towards minor or area Program (LSP) coursework · Class towards minor or area of interest Spring--Fourth Year · SPAN 362 · SPANSPANISH Fall--First Year · SPAN 101 · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Second Year

  3. Communication Disorders: BA/BS Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    : The Speech Mechanism · CMDS 472: Audiology · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Fourth Year Program (LSP) coursework Spring--Fourth Year · CMDS 480: Clinical Practice (if not taken fall--fourth yearCommunication Disorders: BA/BS Fall--First Year · CMDS 200: Intro to Comm. Disorders · CMDS 101

  4. 31 August 2004 Comp120 Fall 2004 1 Email addresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Gary

    1 31 August 2004 Comp120 Fall 2004 1 August 31 · Email addresses · Drop box · Questions? 31 August 2004 Comp120 Fall 2004 2 The Really Big Ideas · Just bits for data and program · Program is a sequence of "variables" (registers) 31 August 2004 Comp120 Fall 2004 3 Just Bits · Program and data have the same

  5. BIOCHEMISTRY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2010 or later)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wen

    BIOCHEMISTRY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2010 or later) Graduation Requirements, Intro. To Evolution & Ecology (2 cr.; fall) 9. One of these four options: (Biochemistry majors must & Measurement in Physical Biochemistry (3 cr.; fall) 13. Two of these courses: A. BIOL 41600 Viruses and Viral

  6. Automatic Fall Detection Based on Doppler Radar Motion Signature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhihai "Henry"

    than one third of adults 65 and older fall each year in the United States. To address the problem, we above age 65 [2]. The death rate caused by falls among elders is increasing quickly over the past decade classification; SVM; kNN I. INTRODUCTION Falls are the leading causes of accidental death in the US population

  7. Assessment of Arm Motions with Fall Direction in Human Subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Bhargavi

    2012-08-31

    Abstract Falls are a common and serious problem among older adults. This study examined the role of the direction of fall on the movement of arms. The specific aims of the study were to characterize the arm motion in response to a fall perturbation...

  8. Common Name Scientific Name Status Critical Habitat in AK? Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae Endangered No

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Threatened No Lower Columbia River Coho Salmon* Oncorhynchus kisutch Threatened No Hood Canal Summer Run Chum Lepidochelys olivacea Threatened No Upper Columbia River Spring Chinook Salmon* Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Endangered No Snake River Sockeye Salmon* Oncorhynchus nerka Endangered No WHALES PINNIPEDS REPTILES FISH

  9. Viscosimeter on a Microfluidic Chip Pierre Guillot,* Pascal Panizza, Jean-Baptiste Salmon, Mathieu Joanicot, and Annie Colin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Charles-Henri

    Viscosimeter on a Microfluidic Chip Pierre Guillot,* Pascal Panizza, Jean-Baptiste Salmon, Mathieu on a microfluidic chip is presented. The physical principle of this system is to use laminar parallel flows in a microfluidic channel. The fluid to be studied flows side by side with a reference fluid of known viscosity

  10. Multifilamentation transmission through fog G. Mjean, J. Kasparian,* J. Yu, E. Salmon, S. Frey, and J.-P. Wolf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skupin, Stefan

    Multifilamentation transmission through fog G. Méjean, J. Kasparian,* J. Yu, E. Salmon, S. Frey, it is shown that dense fogs dissipate quasi-linearly the energy in the beam envelope and diminish the number of view, numerical computations confirm that a dense fog composed of micrometric droplets acts like

  11. The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed, Washington, to evaluate the effects of nutrient enhancement on measures of stream and fish production. We compared low level water chemistry, water quality, and periphyton, insect, and fish production

  12. PAC I F I C C OAS T S A L M O N Pacific Coast Salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recreationally and commercially in the Pacific Ocean, Puget Sound, and in freshwater rivers on their spawning of gear depending on location: in the Pacific Ocean all harvest is by trolling; in Puget Sound, gillnetsPAC I F I C C OAS T S A L M O N 1 U N I T 12 Pacific Coast Salmon Unit 12 ROBERT G. KOPE NMFS

  13. Stream flows for salmon and society: managing water for human and ecosystem needs in Mediterranean-climate California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantham, Theodore Evan William

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic assessment of environmental flow regimes to facilitate fish passage through natural riffles: Shoalhaven River below Tallowa Dam,hydraulic models have to evaluate habitat- discharge relationships have focused on relatively large rivers regulated by upstream dams (hydraulic modeling for salmon passage flow assessments in northern California streams A BSTRACT The fragmentation of river networks from dams

  14. CHEM 3311, Fall 2010 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    CHEM 3311, Fall 2010 Professor Walba First Hour Exam September 23, 2010 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) CU-book exam. The use of notes, calculators, scratch paper, or cell phones will not be allowed during the exam the backs of the pages for scratch. ! H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

  15. CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 1998 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    Name: -1- CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 1998 Professor Walba Third Hour Exam November 19, 1998 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) PLEASE read the questions carefully! This is a closed-book "open model" exam. You may use for scratch. H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

  16. CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    Name: -1- CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba Third Hour Exam November 16, 2000 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) PLEASE read the questions carefully! This is a closed-book "open model" exam. You may use for scratch. H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

  17. CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    Name: -1- CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba Second Hour Exam October 26, 2000 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) PLEASE read the questions carefully! This is a closed-book "open model" exam. You may use for scratch. H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

  18. CHEM 3311, Fall 2010 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    CHEM 3311, Fall 2010 Professor Walba Second Hour Exam October 21, 2010 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) CU-book exam. The use of notes, calculators, scratch paper, or cell phones will not be allowed during the exam the backs of the pages for scratch. ! H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

  19. Mental Health First Aid Fall Trainings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, John

    Mental Health First Aid Fall Trainings Faculty/Staff Training Dates: 12/14-12/16 8:30am-12:00pm@caps.ucla.edu What is Mental Health First Aid? Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is an internationally recognized to a spectrum of mental health problems and crises. Since its US launch in 2008 more than 100,000 people have

  20. Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference will be held from November 19–20, 2014, at the Richland Community College in Decatur, Illinois. The event will focus on bioenergy and sustainable agriculture and explore topics ranging from logistics, energy conversion technologies, and markets for grass biomass. BETO Sustainability Program Technology Manager Kristen Johnson will be speaking about the Energy Department’s perspective on sustainable bioenergy landscapes and will focus on BETO’s recent work with landscape design. The conference will be November 19–20 only. On November 18, participants may choose to participate in a pre-conference field tour.

  1. Bioenergy Deployment Consortium (BDC) 2014 Fall Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2014 BDC Fall Symposium will be held on October 21–22, 2014 in Fort Myers, Florida. The event will include a tour of the Algenol facility on Wednesday morning. The symposium will have panels for progress reports from current cellulosic bio-product companies, updates on government policy from several agencies, scale-up strategies,and lessons learned. POET-DSM will provide the after dinner success story. Neil Rossmeissl, Program Manager, Algal Program, Bioenergy Technologies Office, will be delivering the keynote address on expanding the bioeconomy.

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont, SouthLaboratoryDiv - NYCorp -EraTexas Falls City,

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01)govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBAgovCampaignsFall

  4. Benton Falls Associates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:BajoBelpower Srl Jump to:Falls Associates Jump to:

  5. An Archaeological Survey for the Falls-on-the-Brazos Park in Falls County Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-28

    An archaeological survey at the site of Falls-on-the-Brazos Park was performed by Brazos Valley Research Associates (BVRA) on October 24, 2006. This investigation examined the site of a proposed observation tower and an area where outdoor cooking...

  6. Chapter 1: Introduction 1Comp361, Fall 2003 COMP 361 "Networks I" Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golin, Mordecai J.

    & service models 1.8 Internet backbones, NAPs, ISPs 1.9 history Chapter goal: get context, overview Featuring The Internet, 2nd ed., Addison Wesley, 2002 Course material is based on lecture notes and chapters: Introduction 6Comp361, Fall 2003 Chapter 1: Computer Networks and the Internet Overview: 1.1 what

  7. #tipsEnergy: Weatherizing Your Home for Fall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the start of colder weather, we are sharing fall energy-saving tips that will help you save money and stay comfortable.

  8. Idaho Falls Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Falls Power offers rebates to eligible customers for installing energy efficient equipment and pursuing whole building efficiency measures.  Rebates rebates are available for air source and...

  9. Fall 2001 Vol. 2, No. 4 ii Colorado Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Climate Fall 2001 Vol. 2, No. 4 #12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents On Being a Small . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 July 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 August 2001

  10. Seating Final Exam, Fall 2011, Bailey classes, Lambert Fieldhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Charlotte M

    2011-12-07

    Seating Final Exam, Fall 2011, KLOSTER classes, Lambert. Fieldhouse. NAME. ROW. SEAT NUMBER. Arrington, Brook L. 1. 1. Blevins, Sash M. 2. 1. Brown ...

  11. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R.

    2000-10-01

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT tag was recorded along with a measurement of length, a determination of sex, and a scale sample. The returns to the hatchery rack were adjusted for any sport and tribal harvest to provide an estimate of total return to the hatchery. Adult and jack return data from return years 1997 through 1999 are covered in this status report. Only the returns from the 1996 migration year are complete. A very low overall average of 0.136% survival rate from Lower Granite Dam and back to Lower Granite Dam was estimated for the 1996 migrants. The outcome expected for the 1997 migrants is much better. With one year of returns still to come, the overall average Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite Dam survival rate is 0.666%, with the McCall Hatchery and Imnaha Hatchery fish already producing return rates in excess of 1%. With 635 returning adults (plus jacks) from the 1997 migration year detected at Lower Granite Dam to date, and one additional year of returns to come, there will be a large sample size for statistically testing differences in transportation versus in- river survival rates next year. From the conduct of this study over a series of years, in addition to obtaining estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates, we should be able to investigate what factors may be causing differences in survival rates among the various hatchery stocks used in this study.

  12. HEAD INJURY ASSESSMENT IN JUVENILE CHINOOK USING THE ALPHA II-SPECTRIN BIOMARKER: EFFECTS OF PRESSURE CHANGES AND PASSAGE THROUGH A REMOVABLE SPILLWAY WEIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonason, C.; Miracle, A.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeletal protein alpha II-spectrin has specifi c neurodegenerative mechanisms that allow the necrotic (injury-induced) and apoptotic (non-injury-induced) pathways of proteolysis to be differentiated in an immunoblot. Consequently, ?II-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) are potential biomarkers for diagnosing traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of the following investigation, consisting of two studies, was to evaluate the utility of the spectrin biomarker in diagnosing TBI in fi sh that travel through hydroelectric dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The fi rst study used hyperbaric pressure chambers to simulate the pressure changes that affect fi sh during passage through a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Kaplan turbine. The second study tested the effect of a removable spillway weir (RSW) on the passage of juvenile chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). This study was conducted in tandem with a balloon-tag study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Brain samples from fi sh were collected and analyzed using an immunoblot for SBDPs, and imaging software was used to quantify the protein band density and determine the ratio of cleaved protein to total protein. The biomarker analyses found higher SBDP expression levels in fi sh that were exposed to lower pressure nadirs and fi sh that passed through the RSW at a deep orientation. In general, the incidence of injuries observed after treatment positively correlated with expression levels, suggesting that the biomarker method of analysis is comparable to traditional methods of injury assessment. It was also found that, for some treatments, the 110 kDa spectrin fragment (SBDP 110) correlated more strongly with necrotic head injury incidence and mortality rates than did the total cleaved protein or the 120 kDa fragment. These studies will be informative in future decisions regarding the design of turbines and fi sh passage structures in hydroelectric dams and will hopefully contribute to the development of faster and more accurate techniques for diagnosing TBI in fi sh.

  13. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinson, Rick D.; Kovalchuk, Gregory M.; Ballinger, Dean

    2006-04-01

    2005 was an average to below average flow year at John Day and Bonneville Dams. A large increase in flow in May improved migration conditions for that peak passage month. Spill was provided April through August and averaged about 30% and 48% of river flow at John Day and Bonneville Dams, respectively. Water temperature graphs were added this year that show slightly lower than average water temperature at John Day and slightly higher than average temperatures at Bonneville. The number of fish handled at John Day decreased from 412,797 in 2004 to 195,293 this year. Of the 195,293 fish, 120,586 (61.7%) were collected for researchers. Last year, 356,237 (86.3%) of the fish sampled were for researchers. This dramatic decline is the result of (1) fewer research fish needed (2) a smaller, lighter tag which allowed for tagging of smaller fish, and (3) a larger average size for subyearling chinook. These factors combined to reduce the average sample rate to 10.8%, about half of last year's rate of 18.5%. Passage timing at John Day was similar to previous years, but the pattern was distinguished by larger than average passage peaks for spring migrants, especially sockeye. The large spike in mid May for sockeye created a very short middle 80% passage duration of just 16 days. Other spring migrants also benefited from the large increase in flow in May. Descaling was lower than last year for all species except subyearling chinook and below the historical average for all species. Conversely, the incidence of about 90% of the other condition factors increased. Mortality, while up from last year for all species and higher than the historical average for all species except sockeye, continued to be low, less than 1% for all species. On 6 April a slide gate was left closed at John Day and 718 fish were killed. A gate position indicator light was installed to prevent reoccurrences. Also added this year was a PIT tag detector on the adult return-to-river flume. For the first time this year, we successfully held Pacific lamprey ammocetes. The number of fish sampled at Bonneville Dam was also down this year to 260,742, from 444,580 last year. Reasons for the decline are the same as stated above for John Day. Passage timing at Bonneville Dam was quite similar to previous years with one notable exception, sockeye. Sockeye passage was dominated by two large spikes in late May that greatly condensed the passage pattern, with the middle 80% passing Bonneville in just 18 days. Unlike John Day, passage for the rest of the species was well disbursed from late April through early June. Fish condition was good, with reductions in descaling rates for all species except unclipped steelhead and sockeye. Sockeye mortality matched last year's rate but was considerably lower for all other species. Rare species sampled at Bonneville this year included a bull trout and a eulachon.

  14. OTOLITH THERMAL MARKING WDFW OTOLITH LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2007 Pacific Rim Releases (Brood Year 2006) NPAFC not yet published. Table 4. Number of otolith marked salmon released from Pacific Rim hatcheries in 2007. Sockeye Pink Chum Chinook Coho Masu Total

  15. Monitoring Fine Sediment; Grande Ronde and John Day Rivers, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Greene, M. Jonas; Purser, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    This project was initiated to monitor surface fine sediment levels and overwinter intrusion of fine sediment in spring chinook salmon spawning habitat in the North Folk John Day and Grande Ronde Rivers, for five years.

  16. Validation of a New Method for Population Assessment of Pacific Salmonids Using Genetic Markers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemento, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    also identified Feather River spring-run parents for some ofFeather River Hatchery in the Central Valley, the spring-runrun Chinook Salmon Symposium, hosted by the Salmonid Restoration Federation and South Yuba River

  17. ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2011 or later)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Environmental Issues (3 cr.; fall) BIOL 49300 Intro. to Ethology (3 cr.; fall) FNR 50100 Limnology (3 cr.; fall Analysis (3 cr.; spring) POL 52300 Environmental Politics and Public Policy (3 cr.; fall) BIOL 59700 SexECOLOGY, EVOLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2011 or later

  18. Bi-Annual Report 2010-2011: Shaping pulse flows to meet environmental and energy objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    This report describes a bioenergetic model developed to allocate seasonal pulse flows to benefit salmon growth. The model links flow with floodplain inundation and production of invertebrate prey eaten by juvenile Chinook salmon. A unique quantile modeling approach is used to describe temporal variation among juvenile salmon spawned at different times. Preliminary model outputs are presented and future plans to optimize flows both to maximize salmon growth and hydropower production are outlined.

  19. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David

    2007-04-01

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  20. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R.; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase

    2008-02-04

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  1. Bruce A. Measure Dick Wallace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Snake River migrants that were collected and transported from mainstem Snake River hydropower dams survival for Snake River yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead through the hydropower system (Snake River hydropower system survival for yearling Chinook was 54.8%, which is higher than the average of 49

  2. N O R T H W E S T P O W E R A N D C O N S E R VAT I O N C O U N C I L COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the Columbia River Basin in recent years. While no single factor can be credited for the increased run sizes allowed to set gillnets in the river during the summer run of chinook salmon for the first time in 38,000 angler trips were recorded for the run of spring chinook. The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife

  3. Slips,Trips and Falls RISK MANAGEMENT BULLETINWINTER 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    Preventing Slips,Trips and Falls RISK MANAGEMENT BULLETINWINTER 2014 Slips, Trips and Falls with a membership of 61 Canadian universities. CURIE risk management, campus loss control and focused training-profit cost-effective alternative to traditional insurance. Formed in 1988, CURIE is a risk sharing pool

  4. MPO 502-03 OCEANOGRAPHY 2 (PHYSICAL) Fall Semester 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    1 MPO 502-03 OCEANOGRAPHY 2 (PHYSICAL) Fall Semester 2012 Monday and Wednesday, 1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. In the RSMAS Library rare book room Professor John Van Leer 1) Aug. 22 Introduction to Physical Oceanography Eddy and Frontal Processes in the Ocean MPO 502 OCEANOGRAPHY 2 (PHYSICAL) #12;2 Fall Semester 20012

  5. Physics 171 General Information Fall 2014 Instructor: Howard Haber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 171 General Information Fall 2014 Instructor: Howard Haber Office: ISB, Room 326 Phone;Physics 171 General Relativity, Black Holes and Cosmology Fall 2014 Course Outline Topic Reading 1. Introduction to Tensors Chapter 10 of Boas 2. Covariance of Physical Laws Chapter 2.1 3. Special Relativity

  6. Chemistry B.S. Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    I & Lab · PHYS 196 (or 186) Physics w Calc II LSP coursework Fall--Fourth Year · CHEM 445 Senior Chemistry II & Lab · Elective(s) and/or LSP coursework Spring--Fourth Year · CHEM 310 Modern MethodsChemistry B.S. Fall--First Year · CHEM 130 Chemical Principles I* · CHEM 145 Freshman Seminar

  7. Agricultural Science BS (Science Track) Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Fourth Year · AGSC 415: Ethical Issues in Sustainable · AGSC 490 · Ag.Sci. Learning Plan Elective(s) · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Spring--Fourth Year Elective(s) · B.S. Requirement Course · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Fourth Year · AGSC

  8. ENV 6105 Page 1 of 6 Fall 2011 Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Amy L.

    ENV 6105 Page 1 of 6 Fall 2011 Syllabus Air Pollution ENV 6105.901 (ref# 90504) Fall 2011 Course Description: A study of air pollution. Emphasis is given to principles underlying our understanding of ambient air pollution, its sources, its effects, and mechanisms for its management. Credit Hours and Work

  9. Music BA Liberal Arts Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Music ­ BA Liberal Arts Fall--First Year MUSI 130: Music Analysis I MUSI 132: Aural Skills in Music I MUSI 279: Concert and Recital Atten. MUSI 153: Keyboard Skills I Major Applied Area Major Ensemble Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Second Year MUSI 230: Music Analysis III MUSI

  10. BIOCHEMISTRY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2011 or later)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wen

    1 BIOCHEMISTRY (for students entering Biology in Fall 2011 or later) Graduation Requirements Requirement: Choose one of these four options: (Biochemistry majors must choose BIOL 39500, Macromolecules) A Biochemistry (3 cr.; fall) 13. Biology Electives: Two of these courses: A. BIOL 41600 Viruses and Viral

  11. Fall 2011 | PCI Journal106 Editor's quick points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fall 2011 | PCI Journal106 Editor's quick points This paper summarizes the results in the sixth edition of the PCI Design Handbook: Precast and Prestressed Con- crete6 often results in conservative, heavy reinforcement #12;107PCI Journal | Fall 2011 results1 to study the various parameters

  12. COMPENSATION MANAGEMENT HRMK 516.110 -Fall 2013 CRN: 86731

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diestel, Geoff

    and skills competencies: #12;HRM 516.110 Fall 2013 - p. 2 A. Strategic Human Resource Management: Knowledge resource law, ethics, scorecard metrics, global HRM, etc.) related to designing and implementing effective;HRM 516.110 Fall 2013 - p. 3 etc.) related to administering efficient and effective organizational

  13. Chemistry B.S. Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Chemistry B.S. Fall--First Year CHEM 130 Chemical Principles I* CHEM 145 Freshman Seminar MATH Intro to Quant Analysis CHEM 245 Sophomore Seminar CHEM 329 Organic Chemistry I MATH 264 Calculus III LSP coursework Fall--Third Year CHEM 345 Junior Seminar CHEM 323/324 Physical Chemistry I & Lab

  14. Math Credit-By-Exam Procedures Fall Semester, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Math Credit-By-Exam Procedures Fall Semester, 2015 Credit-By-Exams will be available the first week of the Fall 2015 semester for the following courses: MATH 1014, 1025, 1026, 1114, 1224, 1225, and 1226 Spa and register for the appropriate course. Credit-By-Exam for Math 1014, 1025, 1026, 1114, or 1224

  15. Geography 347: Water as a Resource Lecture Schedule -Fall, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    Geography 347: Water as a Resource Lecture Schedule - Fall, 2012 Instructor: Dr. Allan James; Room: an essential resource Ch.1 2 Tu History of Hydrology; Physical Properties of Water Ch.2 Th Global Hydrologic Flood Hazards Management scan Ch.15 & 16 Th Fall Break, no classes ------- #12;Geography 347: Water

  16. Quantum ballistic experiment on antihydrogen fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voronin, A Yu; Dufour, G; Reynaud, S

    2015-01-01

    We study an interferometric approach to measure gravitational mass of antihydrogen. The method consists of preparing a coherent superposition of antihydrogen quantum state localized near a material surface in the gravitational field of the Earth, and then observing the time distribution of annihilation events followed after the free fall of an initially prepared superposition from a given height to the detector plate. We show that a corresponding time distribution is related to the momentum distribution in the initial state that allows its precise measurement. This approach is combined with a method of production of a coherent superposition of gravitational states by inducing a resonant transition using oscillating gradient magnetic field. We estimate an accuracy of measuring the gravitational mass of antihydrogen atom which could be deduced from such a measurement.

  17. Long-term surveillance plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Falls City disposal site, Falls City, Texas, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal site. DOE will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

  18. Long-term Surveillance Plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Falls City disposal site, Falls City, Texas, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

  19. U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | National Marine Fisheries Service 2010 Report to Congress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tribes of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation (NV)). PCSRF Timeline 1989 Sacramento River winter-run Service under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). 1992 Snake River spring/summer-run Chinook and Snake River fall-run Chinook are listed as threatened under ESA. 1994 Sacramento River winter-run Chinook

  20. Fall 2014 1,540 1,261 29,175 31,976 Fall 2013 1,660 1,222 29,466 32,348

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Year Potomac State WVU- Tech WVU- Main All WVU Fall 2014 1,540 1,261 29,175 31,976 Fall 2013 1,660 1,222 29,466 32,348 Fall 2012 1,781 1,107 29,707 32,595 Fall 2011 1,800 1,316 29,617 32,733 Fall 2010 1,836 1,209 29,306 32,351 Fall 2009 1,810 1,244 28,898 31,952 Fall 2008 1,582 1,224 28,840 31

  1. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Falls City site, Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Falls City site in order to update the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranum mill tailings at Falls City, Texas. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrolgy and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.5 million tons of tailings at the Falls City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $21,700,000 for stabilization in place, to about $35,100,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Falls City tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The tailings piles are presently being rewashed for uranium recovery by Solution Engineering, Inc. The cost for further reprocessing would be about $250/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive for the foreseeable future.

  2. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 Fall 2001 Fall 2001 Biology 111 Exam #1 -Cellular Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    this exam take you to complete (excluding typing)? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 ­ Fall 2001 2 Lab/v IDH if your stock solutions are 28.8 mM NADP+ , 500 mM isocistrate and 100 mM IDH (to be considered 100% IDH stock solution). 10 mL NADP stock + 20 mL isocitrate + 14 mL IDH + water to a final volume

  3. Why the Apple Doesn’t Fall Far: Understanding Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Sandra; Devereux, Paul; Salvanes, Kjell

    2004-01-01

    Kjell G. Salvanes. 2003. “Why the Apple Doesn’t Fall Far:Why the Apple Doesn't Fall Far: UnderstandingPaper Series Why the Apple Doesn’t Fall Far: Understanding

  4. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    2009-04-15

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

  5. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Nelson, V. Lance

    1990-01-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of smolts during the 1988 spring outmigration at two migrant traps; one each on the Snake and Clearwater rivers. Due to the low runoff year, chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was very low. Steelhead trout catch was higher than normal, probably due to trap modifications and because the trap was moved to the east side of the river. Chinook salmon and steelhead trout catch at the Clearwater River trap was similar to 1987. Total cumulative recovery of PIT tagged fish at the three dams, with PIT tag detection systems was: 55% for chinook salmon, 73% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 75% for wild steelhead trout. Travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir, was affected by discharge. Statistical analysis showed that as discharge increased from 40 kcfs to 80 kcfs, chinook salmon travel time decreased three fold, and steelhead trout travel time decreased two fold. There was a statistical difference between estimates of travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged and freeze branded steelhead trout, but not for chinook salmon. These differences may be related to the estimation techniques used for PIT tagged and freeze branded groups, rather than real differences in travel time. 10 figs, 15 tabs.

  6. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01

    Seismic  and  Acoustic  Investigations  of  Rock  Fall  Initiation,  Processes,  Seismic  and  Acoustic  Investigations  of  Rock  Fall  Initiation,  Processes,  other  seismic  sources  was  an  iterative  process.    

  7. Combined dynamics of mercury and terrigenous organic matter following impoundment of Churchill Falls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falls Hydroelectric Reservoir, Labrador Roman Teisserenc · Marc Lucotte · Rene´ Canuel · Matthieu Moingt in the Churchill Falls Hydroelectric complex in Labrador, Canada. Lignin biomarkers in TOM, which exclusively

  8. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-12-01

    The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

  9. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Progam; Thyroid-Induced Chemical Imprinting in Early Life Stages and Assessment of Smoltification in Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1993 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Galloway, Heather; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

    1994-06-01

    In 1991, two hatcheries were built to provide a kokanee salmon and rainbow trout fishery for Lake Roosevelt as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead caused by construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Sherman Creek Hatchery, located on a tributary of Lake Roosevelt to provide an egg collection and imprinting site, is small with limited rearing capability. The second hatchery was located on the Spokane Indian Reservation because of a spring water source that supplied cold, pure water for incubating and rearing eggs.`The Spokane Tribal Hatchery thus serves as the production facility. Fish reared there are released into Sherman Creek and other tributary streams as 7-9 month old fry. However, to date, returns of adult fish to release sites has been poor. If hatchery reared kokanee imprint to the hatchery water at egg or swim up stages before 3 months of age, they may not be imprinting as 7-9 month old fry at the time of stocking. In addition, if these fish undergo a smolt phase in the reservoir when they are 1.5 years old, they could migrate below Grand Coulee Dam and out of the Lake Roosevelt system. In the present investigation, which is part of the Lake Roosevelt monitoring program to assess hatchery effectiveness, kokanee salmon were tested to determine if they experienced thyroxine-induced chemical imprinting and smoltification similar to anadromous salmonids. Determination of the critical period for olfactory imprinting was determined by exposing kokanee to different synthetic chemicals (morpholine or phenethyl alcohol) at different life stages, and then measuring the ability to discriminate the chemicals as sexually mature adults. Whole body thyroxine content and blood plasma thyroxine concentration was measured to determine if peak thyroid activity coincided with imprinting or other morphological, physiological or behavioral transitions associated with smoltification.

  10. Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

    1996-01-01

    BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s (Council`s) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because fisheries resources are severely reduced from historical levels and because there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) die construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Examined in addition to No Action are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of reestablishing naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 is the preferred action. A central hatchery would be built for either alternative, as well as three sites with six raceways each for acclimation and release of spring chinook smolts. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

  11. ECE/CS 584: Fall 2012 Embedded System Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    powerful software tools (model checkers, SMT solvers, & theorem provers) for designing & analyzing systems · Real-time and hybrid system models, stability verification: Multiple Lyapunov functions, slow switchingECE/CS 584: Fall 2012 Embedded System Verification URL: http

  12. Fall 2000 Vol. 1, No. 4 22 Colorado Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Climate Fall 2000 Vol. 1, No. 4 #12;22 Colorado Climate Table of Contents Climate Memories ............................................................................................ 1 Climate on the Web ­ Natural Resources Conservation Service? ....................................................................................................... 6 Colorado Climate in Review

  13. 9.00W Introduction to Psychology, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. ...

  14. EIS-0106: Great Falls-Conrad Transmission Line Project, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of a 230-kilovolt transmission line from Great Falls, Montana, to Conrad, Montana.

  15. Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory I'm sure you've noticed the change in seasons by now. Fall brings cooler weather, and with it my thoughts turn to warm things like putting blankets on the couch,...

  16. Fall 2013 Course Announcement EEE 598 ADVANCED PHOTOVOLTAICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    Fall 2013 Course Announcement EEE 598 ADVANCED PHOTOVOLTAICS Professor Meng Tao (meng a role will photovoltaics play in this new energy infrastructure? There are fundamental bottlenecks for current photovoltaic technologies to become a noticeable source of energy: material availability, energy

  17. UNIVERSITY OF Department of Chemical Engineering Seminar Schedule: Fall 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapletal, Jindrich

    UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Department of Chemical Engineering Seminar Schedule: Fall 2013 26 August Mr (Host: ) Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida "Spatial-Temporal Instability (Host: Butler) Dept. Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois "New Frontiers

  18. FALL 2014 Film and Media Studies Guide 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    GUIDEBOOK FALL 2014 #12;Film and Media Studies Guide 1 Table of Contents What is Film and Media Studies? 2 Why Study Film and Media 5 Graduate Certificate in Film & Media Studies 5 Requirements

  19. FALL 2015 Film and Media Studies Guide 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    GUIDEBOOK FALL 2015 #12;Film and Media Studies Guide 1 Table of Contents What is Film and Media Studies? 2 Why Study Film and Media 5 Graduate Certificate in Film & Media Studies 5 Requirements

  20. Global Change and Sustainability Center Fall Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center Fall Seminar Series that mitigate negative effects of human activities and sustain ecosystems. Noted project focused on environmental sustainability and funded by a cooperative agreement

  1. Web Page for Math 266 Section 131 Fall 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Math 266 Section 131 Fall 2015. Announcements. Extra office hours are Friday, Sept. 25, 1:00-3:00. Here is a flyer showing how to enroll in WileyPLUS for this ...

  2. University of Connecticut Lecture Notes for ME5507 Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    University of Connecticut Lecture Notes for ME5507 Fall 2014 Engineering Analysis I Part II: Matrix of Mechanical Engineering University of Connecticut xchen@engr.uconn.edu #12;Xu Chen Matrix, Linear Algebra

  3. University of Connecticut Lecture Notes for ME5507 Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    University of Connecticut Lecture Notes for ME5507 Fall 2014 Engineering Analysis I Part I of Mechanical Engineering University of Connecticut xchen@engr.uconn.edu #12;Xu Chen Ordinary Differential

  4. ED1 Exam 2 Problems Fall 2012 Section 16.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peale, Robert E.

    ED1 Exam 2 Problems Fall 2012 Section 16. 1. Find the scalar and vector potentials of a point charge density is (in SI units) A(r) = (µ0 a/3) ( x r) for r

  5. Idaho Falls Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Falls Power's Energy Efficiency Loan Program offers zero interest loans for qualifying customers to purchase and install efficient electric appliances. The program will loan up to 100% of the...

  6. 6.450 Principles of Digital Communication - I, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallager, Robert G.

    6.450 was offered in Fall 2002 as a relatively new elective on digital communication. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of ...

  7. University of Massachusetts Amherst Forestry alumni survey Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    University of Massachusetts ­ Amherst Forestry alumni survey ­ Fall 2014 For undergraduate needs ___n=1_ o Personalreasons ___n=1__ o Lack of interest; my priorities changedfromwhen Iwas andplantidentification __5___ Planning ___4__Leadership ___3__Easement monitoring __4___Conflict resolution Other______1

  8. Nonlocal description of a falling body through the air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok Sau Fa

    2008-10-02

    In this present work we consider a falling body through the air under the influence of gravity. In particular, we consider the experimental data based upon the free fall of six men in the atmosphere of the earth. In order to describe this process we employ a nonlocal dissipative force. We show that our description, by using an exponential memory kernel, can fit the experimental data as well as that of a local dissipative force.

  9. A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-05-26

    In Part 1 of this paper [1], we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.06 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.05 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the case study at John Day Dam during 2008, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities.

  10. First Year SAMPLE FOUR YEAR SCHEDULE FOR POLITICS MAJOR FALL SPRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galles, David

    FALL SPRING 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 Third Year FALL SPRING 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 Fourth Year FALL SPRING 1 1 2 2 3 3First Year SAMPLE FOUR YEAR SCHEDULE FOR POLITICS MAJOR FALL SPRING 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 Second Year

  11. Course Number Course Name Prerequisites Semesters Offered C MATH 2325 Functions & Modeling 2413 Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Casey

    MATH 3425 Foundations of Mathematics 2414 Fall, Spring MATH 3315 Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory 2414, 3425 Fall MATH 3336 Abstract Algebra I 3425 Spring MATH 3345 Analysis I 3425 Fall MATH 3365 Geometric Course Name Prerequisites Semesters Offered C MATH 4336 Abstract Algebra II 3336 Fall Pure MATH 4341

  12. The effects of total dissolved gas on chum salmon fry survival, growth, gas bubble disease, and seawater tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.; Linley, Timothy J.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2013-02-01

    Chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta alevin developing in gravel habitats downstream of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are exposed to elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) when water is spilled at the dam to move migrating salmon smolts downstream to the Pacific Ocean. Current water quality criteria for the management of dissolved gas in dam tailwaters were developed primarily to protect salmonid smolts and are assumed to be protective of alevin if adequate depth compensation is provided. We studied whether chum salmon alevin exposed to six levels of dissolved gas ranging from 100% to 130% TDG at three development periods between hatch and emergence (hereafter early, middle, and late stage) suffered differential mortality, growth, gas bubble disease, or seawater tolerance. Each life stage was exposed for 50 d (early stage), 29 d (middle stage), or 16 d (late stage) beginning at 13, 34, and 37 d post-hatch, respectively, through 50% emergence. The mortality for all stages from exposure to emergence was estimated to be 8% (95% confidence interval (CI) of 4% to 12%) when dissolved gas levels were between 100% and 117% TDG. Mortality significantly increased as dissolved gas levels rose above 117% TDG,; with the lethal concentration that produced 50% mortality (LC50 ) was estimated to be 128.7% TDG (95% CI of 127.2% to 130.2% TDG) in the early and middle stages. By contrast, there was no evidence that dissolved gas level significantly affected growth in any life stage except that the mean wet weight at emergence of early stage fish exposed to 130% TDG was significantly less than the modeled growth of unexposed fish. The proportion of fish afflicted with gas bubble disease increased with increasing gas concentrations and occurred most commonly in the nares and gastrointestinal tract. Early stage fish exhibited higher ratios of filament to lamellar gill chloride cells than late stage fish, and these ratios increased and decreased for early and late stage fish, respectively, as gas levels increased; however, there were no significant differences in mortality between life stages after 96 h in seawater. The study results suggest that current water quality guidelines for the management of dissolved gas appear to offer a conservative level of protection to chum salmon alevin incubating in gravel habitat downstream of Bonneville Dam.

  13. Imprinting Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, 1979 Annual Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatick, Emil

    1980-08-01

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), under contract to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), is conducting research on imprinting Pacific salmon and steelhead for homing. Imprinting is defined as a rapid and irreversible learning experience that provides fish with the ability to return to natal streams or a preselected site. The ability to activate the imprint mechanism at the proper time should assure a suitable homing cue that coupled with transportation (Park et al. 1979) will result in high smolt survival and ensure adequate returns to the homing site or hatchery. in our study, we use single imprints and sequential imprints. Single imprinting is cueing fish to a unique, single water supply prior to release. Various mechanical stimuli may be used in combination with the unique water source to achieve the single imprint. Sequential imprinting is cueing fish to two or more water sources in a step-by-step process which establishes a series of signposts for the route ''home''. The primary objectives of our homing research are as follows: (1) Determine whether a single imprint or a series of stimuli (sequential imprinting) are necessary to assure homing for various stocks of salmonids. (2) Determine a triggering mechanism to activate the homing imprint in salmonids. (3) Determine the relationship between the physiological condition of fish (gill Na+-K+ ATPase activity , etc.) and their ability to imprint. Our study began in 1978, and the first year's activities were reported by Slatick et al. (1979) and Sovotny and Zaugg (1979). This report covers the research for the second year (1979). The specific activities of the second year's research were divided into three categories: (1) mark and release additional groups of juvenile salmonids to test imprinting techniques; (2) determine health profiles and monitor smoltification status of juvenile test fish; and (3) monitor and evaluate adult returns, from juveniles marked and released in 1978, to determine the efficacy of the imprinting techniques.

  14. AbstractWe estimated the impact of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) pre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that winter-run chinook salmon face a seri ous extinction risk without augmenta tion of the striped bass in predation rate affect tion might increase the risk of extinc the prey population viability. Predation tion-consuming, bass prey upon juvenile Atlantic salmon labor-intensive, and difficult because in east-coast rivers

  15. RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 3 An Alternative Conceptual Foundation50

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETURN TO THE RIVER - 2000 Chapter 3 An Alternative Conceptual Foundation50 Return to Table RIVER SALMONIDS "Conservation efforts must nurture the whole life history, not focus inordinate salmon and its relevance to conservation of the Sacramento winter run of chinook salmon. Conservation

  16. Math Department TA Positions, Fall 2015 If you are interested in a Math TA position in any of the introductory Calculus courses in Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Math Department TA Positions, Fall 2015 If you are interested in a Math TA position in any of the introductory Calculus courses in Fall 2015, please fill out the Math Fall 2015 TA Application, which you can to be a Math major. Our students come from all over the University, and our TAs do too. As a TA, your duties

  17. Long-term changes in legacy trace organic contaminants and mercury in Lake Ontario salmon in relation to source controls, trophodynamics, and climatic variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Don

    Long-term changes in legacy trace organic contaminants and mercury in Lake Ontario salmon Queen's University, Department of Biology and School of Environmental Studies, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Ontario M5S 3G5, Canada John M. Casselman Queen's University, Department of Biology, Kingston, Ontario K7L

  18. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall-Griswold, J.A.; Petrosky, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring trends in juvenile spring and summer chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and steelhead trout, O. mykiss, populations in the Salmon, Clearwater, and lower Snake River drainages for the past 12 years. This work is the result of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. Project 91-73, Idaho Natural Production Monitoring, consists of two subprojects: General Monitoring and Intensive Monitoring. This report updates and summarizes data through 1995 for the General Parr Monitoring (GPM) database to document status and trends of classes of wild and natural chinook salmon and steelhead trout populations. A total of 281 stream sections were sampled in 1995 to monitor trends in spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss parr populations in Idaho. Percent carrying capacity and density estimates were summarized for 1985--1995 by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon, and natural spring and summer chinook salmon. The 1995 data were also summarized by subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992--1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

  19. Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1996-1998 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maynard, Desmond J.

    2001-09-13

    This report covers the 1996-1998 Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) research for increasing hatchery salmon postrelease survival and producing fish with more wild-like behavior, physiology, and morphology prior to release. Experiments were conducted evaluating automatic subsurface feeders; natural diets; exercise systems; seminatural raceway habitat enriched with cover, structure, and substrate; and predator avoidance conditioning for hatchery salmonids. Automatic subsurface feed delivery systems did not affect chinook salmon depth distribution or vulnerability to avian predators. Live-food diets only marginally improved the ability of chinook salmon to capture prey in stream enclosures. A prototype exercise system that can be retrofitted to raceways was developed, however, initial testing indicated that severe amounts of exercise may increase in culture mortality. Rearing chinook salmon in seminatural raceway habitat with gravel substrate, woody debris structure, and overhead cover improved coloration and postrelease survival without impacting in-culture health or survival. Steelhead fry reared in enriched environments with structure, cover, and point source feeders dominated and outcompeted conventionally reared fish. Exposing chinook salmon to caged predators increased their postrelease survival. Chinook salmon showed an antipredator response to chemical stimuli from injured conspecifics and exhibited acquired predator recognition following exposure to paired predator-prey stimuli. The report also includes the 1997 Natural Rearing System Workshop proceedings.

  20. Genetic and otolith isotopic markers identify salmon populations in the Columbia River at broad and fine geographic scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett-Johnson, Rachel; Teel, David J; Casillas, Edmundo

    2010-01-01

    mainstem mainstem mainstem River Run 1 Collection Rearingand Upper Colum- bia River spring-run populations and fromUpper Columbia River summer/fall-run (UCR Su/F) population.