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1

Proposal to Acquire Experimental Data and to Model the Results with a Monte Carlo Calculation of a Secondary Source Correction Factor for Area Source Acquisitions of Holdup y-PHA Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an interference observed when acquiring y-ray holdup data. The interference comes from secondary contaminated surfaces that contribute to the y-ray signal when acquiring data in the area source configuration. It is often the case that these unwanted contributions can not be isolated and eliminated, so it is necessary to mathematically correct for the contribution. In this report we propose experiments to acquire the necessary data to determine the experimental correction factor specifically for highly enriched uranium holdup measurements. We then propose to use the MCNP Monte Carlo computer code to model the contribution in several acquisition configurations and for multiple interfering y-ray energies. Results will provide a model for calculation of this secondary source correction factor for future holdup measurements. We believe the results of the experiments and modeling of the data acquired in this proposal will have a significant impact on deactivation and de commissioning activities throughout the DOE weapons complex.

Dewberry, R.

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

Calculation of source terms for NUREG-1150  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The source terms estimated for NUREG-1150 are generally based on the Source Term Code Package (STCP), but the actual source term calculations used in computing risk are performed by much smaller codes which are specific to each plant. This was done because the method of estimating the uncertainty in risk for NUREG-1150 requires hundreds of source term calculations for each accident sequence. This is clearly impossible with a large, detailed code like the STCP. The small plant-specific codes are based on simple algorithms and utilize adjustable parameters. The values of the parameters appearing in these codes are derived from the available STCP results. To determine the uncertainty in the estimation of the source terms, these parameters were varied as specified by an expert review group. This method was used to account for the uncertainties in the STCP results and the uncertainties in phenomena not considered by the STCP.

Breeding, R.J.; Williams, D.C.; Murfin, W.B.; Amos, C.N.; Helton, J.C.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Appendix II. Calculation of Slope Factors for Naturally Occurring Radionuclides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix II. Calculation of Slope Factors for Naturally Occurring Radionuclides In developing calculates the slope factors for the naturally occurring radionuclides under consideration. The Radionuclide products with half-lives of less than 6 months). As explained below, naturally occurring radionuclides

4

Scoping calculations of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical memorandum describes models and calculational procedures to fully characterize the nuclear island of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. Two computer codes were written: one for the gas-cooled NERVA derivative reactor and the other for liquid metal-cooled fuel pin reactors. These codes are going to be interfaced by NASA with the balance of plant in order to making scoping calculations for mission analysis.

Difilippo, F.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Calculation of Accurate Hexagonal Discontinuity Factors for PARCS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study we derive a methodology for calculating discontinuity factors consistent with the Triangle-based Polynomial Expansion Nodal (TPEN) method implemented in PARCS for hexagonal reactor geometries. The accuracy of coarse-mesh nodal methods is greatly enhanced by permitting flux discontinuities at node boundaries, but the practice of calculating discontinuity factors from infinite-medium (zero-current) single bundle calculations may not be sufficiently accurate for more challenging problems in which there is a large amount of internodal neutron streaming. The authors therefore derive a TPEN-based method for calculating discontinuity factors that are exact with respect to generalized equivalence theory. The method is validated by reproducing the reference solution for a small hexagonal core.

Pounders. J., Bandini, B. R. , Xu, Y, and Downar, T. J.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

Traub, Richard J.

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

7

A Generalized Finite Source Calibration Factor: A Natural Improvement to the Finite Source Correction Factor for Uranium Holdup Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes refinements to the finite source correction factor used in holdup measurements. Specifically it focuses on a more general method to estimate the average detector response for a finite source. This proposed method for the average detector response is based directly on the Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) assay method. First, the finite source correction factor as originally proposed is reviewed in this paper. Following this review the GGH assay method is described. Lastly, a new finite area calibration factor based on GGH is then proposed for finite point and line sources. As an alternative to the direct use of the finite arca calibration factor, finite source correction factors are also derived from this calibration factor. This new correction factor can be used in a manner similar to the finite source correction factor as currently implemented.

Gunn, C.A.; Oberer, R.B.; chiang, L.G.; Ceo, R.N.

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure provides source energy factors and emission factors to calculate the source (primary) energy and emissions from a building's annual site energy consumption. This report provides the energy and emission factors to calculate the source energy and emissions for electricity and fuels delivered to a facility and combustion of fuels at a facility. The factors for electricity are broken down by fuel type and presented for the continental United States, three grid interconnections, and each state. The electricity fuel and emission factors are adjusted for the electricity and the useful thermal output generated by combined heat and power (CHP) plants larger than one megawatt. The energy and emissions from extracting, processing, and transporting the fuels, also known as the precombustion effects, are included.

Deru, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Calculation of dose to soft tisse from implanted beta sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for beta dose calculations are reported in the literature. Monte Carlo codes are very often used but are cumbersome. A Monte Carlo code can be used to model the exact path and energies that a particle assumes as it passes through a medium using random...

Dauffy, Lucile

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Calculation of the compressibility factor and thermodynamic properties for methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Saturated Vapor Volumes Reported by Bloomer and Parent (5) and Those Calculated in This Work Thermodynamic Properties Calculated by Use of Berlin Equation Thermodynamic Properties Calculated by Use of Benedict-Webb-Rubin Equation 35 36 39 40 48..., and Smith (15), Gardoso (7), and Bloomer and Parent (5) have reported experimental vapor pressure data and values for the saturated liquid density. Cardoso (7) and Bloomer and Parent (5) have also reported values for saturated vapor densities. A critical...

Dowling, Dennis William

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements of dosimetric parameters of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd brachytherapy source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents a brachytherapy source having {sup 103}Pd adsorbed onto a cylindrical silver rod that has been developed by the Agricultural, Medical, and Industrial Research School for permanent implant applications. Dosimetric characteristics (radial dose function, anisotropy function, and anisotropy factor) of this source were experimentally and theoretically determined in terms of the updated AAPM Task group 43 (TG-43U1) recommendations. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the dose rate constant. Measurements were performed using TLD-GR200A circular chip dosimeters using standard methods employing thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Perspex phantom. Precision machined bores in the phantom located the dosimeters and the source in a reproducible fixed geometry, providing for transverse-axis and angular dose profiles over a range of distances from 0.5 to 5 cm. The Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code, version 4C simulation techniques have been used to evaluate the dose-rate distributions around this model {sup 103}Pd source in water and Perspex phantoms. The Monte Carlo calculated dose rate constant of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd source in water was found to be 0.678 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} with an approximate uncertainty of {+-}0.1%. The anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), and the radial dose function, g(r), of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd source were also measured in a Perspex phantom and calculated in both Perspex and liquid water phantoms.

Sadeghi, Mahdi; Raisali, Gholamreza; Hosseini, S. Hamed; Shavar, Arzhang [Nuclear Medicine Research Group, Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, P.O. Box 31485-498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Engineering Faculty, Science and Research Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14515-775, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radiation Applications Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Engineering Faculty, Science and Research Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14515-775, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); SSDL Group, Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Neutron source in the MCNPX shielding calculating for electron accelerator driven facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of an experimental neutron source facility. It is an accelerator driven system (ADS) utilizing a subcritical assembly driven by electron accelerator. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear researches, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been utilized as a design tool due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons at high energies. However the facility shielding calculations with MCNPX need enormous computational resources and the small neutron yield per electron makes sampling difficulty for the Monte Carlo calculations. A method, based on generating and utilizing neutron source file, was proposed and tested. This method reduces significantly the required computer resources and improves the statistics of the calculated neutron dose outside the shield boundary. However the statistical errors introduced by generating the neutron source were not directly represented in the results, questioning the validity of this methodology, because an insufficiently sampled neutron source can cause error on the calculated neutron dose. This paper presents a procedure for the validation of the generated neutron source file. The impact of neutron source statistic on the neutron dose is examined by calculating the neutron dose as a function of the number of electron particles used for generating the neutron source files. When the value of the calculated neutron dose converges, it means the neutron source has scored sufficient records and statistic does not have apparent impact on the calculated neutron dose. In this way, the validity of neutron source and the shield analyses could be verified. (authors)

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y. [Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

A robust and efficient method for calculating the magnification of extended sources caused by gravitational lenses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To determine the magnification of an extended source caused by gravitational lensing one has to perform a two-dimensional integral over point-source magnifications in general. Since the point-source magnification jumps to an infinite value on caustics, special care is required. For a uniformly bright source, it has been shown earlier that the calculation simplifies if one determines the magnification from the area of the images of the extended source by applying Green's theorem so that one ends up with a one-dimensional integration over the image boundaries. This approach is discussed here in detail, and it is shown that it can be used to yield a robust and efficient method also for limb-darkened sources. It is also shown that the centroid shift can be calculated in a similar way.

M. Dominik

1998-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

SOURCES 4A: A Code for Calculating (alpha,n), Spontaneous Fission, and Delayed Neutron Sources and Spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SOURCES 4A is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from ({alpha},n) reactions, spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron emission due to the decay of radionuclides. The code is capable of calculating ({alpha},n) source rates and spectra in four types of problems: homogeneous media (i.e., a mixture of {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), two-region interface problems (i.e., a slab of {alpha}-emitting source material in contact with a slab of low-Z target material), three-region interface problems (i.e., a thin slab of low-Z target material sandwiched between {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), and ({alpha},n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of {alpha}-particles incident on a slab of target material. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, and Watt spectrum parameters for 43 actinides. The ({alpha},n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the center-of-mass system with a library of 89 nuclide decay {alpha}-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated ({alpha},n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional {alpha}-particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code outputs the magnitude and spectra of the resultant neutron source. It also provides an analysis of the contributions to that source by each nuclide in the problem.

Madland, D.G.; Arthur, E.D.; Estes, G.P.; Stewart, J.E.; Bozoian, M.; Perry, R.T.; Parish, T.A.; Brown, T.H.; England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.; Charlton, W.S.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

SOURCES 4C : a code for calculating ([alpha],n), spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron sources and spectra.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SOURCES 4C is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from ({alpha},n) reactions, spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron emission due to radionuclide decay. The code is capable of calculating ({alpha},n) source rates and spectra in four types of problems: homogeneous media (i.e., an intimate mixture of a-emitting source material and low-Z target material), two-region interface problems (i.e., a slab of {alpha}-emitting source material in contact with a slab of low-Z target material), three-region interface problems (i.e., a thin slab of low-Z target material sandwiched between {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), and ({alpha},n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of {alpha}-particles incident on a slab of target material. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, and Watt spectrum parameters for 44 actinides. The ({alpha},n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the center-of-mass system with a library of 107 nuclide decay {alpha}-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated ({alpha},n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional {alpha}-particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code provides the magnitude and spectra, if desired, of the resultant neutron source in addition to an analysis of the'contributions by each nuclide in the problem. LASTCALL, a graphical user interface, is included in the code package.

Wilson, W. B. (William B.); Perry, R. T. (Robert T.); Shores, E. F. (Erik F.); Charlton, W. S. (William S.); Parish, Theodore A.; Estes, G. P. (Guy P.); Brown, T. H. (Thomas H.); Arthur, Edward D. (Edward Dana),; Bozoian, Michael; England, T. R.; Madland, D. G.; Stewart, J. E. (James E.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verification of commercial low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel takes place at the fuel fabrication facility as part of the overall international nuclear safeguards solution to the civilian use of nuclear technology. The fissile mass per unit length is determined nondestructively by active neutron coincidence counting using a neutron collar. A collar comprises four slabs of high density polyethylene that surround the assembly. Three of the slabs contain {sup 3}He filled proportional counters to detect time correlated fission neutrons induced by an AmLi source placed in the fourth slab. Historically, the response of a particular collar design to a particular fuel assembly type has been established by careful cross-calibration to experimental absolute calibrations. Traceability exists to sources and materials held at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 35 years. This simple yet powerful approach has ensured consistency of application. Since the 1980's there has been a steady improvement in fuel performance. The trend has been to higher burn up. This requires the use of both higher initial enrichment and greater concentrations of burnable poisons. The original analytical relationships to correct for varying fuel composition are consequently being challenged because the experimental basis for them made use of fuels of lower enrichment and lower poison content than is in use today and is envisioned for use in the near term. Thus a reassessment of the correction factors is needed. Experimental reassessment is expensive and time consuming given the great variation between fuel assemblies in circulation. Fortunately current modeling methods enable relative response functions to be calculated with high accuracy. Hence modeling provides a more convenient and cost effective means to derive correction factors which are fit for purpose with confidence. In this work we use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with neutron coincidence tallies to calculate the influence of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable poison on the measurement of fresh pressurized water reactor fuel. To empirically determine the response function over the range of historical and future use we have considered enrichments up to 5 wt% {sup 235}U/{sup tot}U and Gd weight fractions of up to 10 % Gd/UO{sub 2}. Parameterized correction factors are presented.

Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

17

SOURCES-3A: A code for calculating ({alpha}, n), spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron sources and spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many systems, it is imperative to have accurate knowledge of all significant sources of neutrons due to the decay of radionuclides. These sources can include neutrons resulting from the spontaneous fission of actinides, the interaction of actinide decay {alpha}-particles in ({alpha},n) reactions with low- or medium-Z nuclides, and/or delayed neutrons from the fission products of actinides. Numerous systems exist in which these neutron sources could be important. These include, but are not limited to, clean and spent nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2}, MOX, etc.), enrichment plant operations (UF{sub 6}, PuF{sub 4}, etc.), waste tank studies, waste products in borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic mixtures, and weapons-grade plutonium in storage containers. SOURCES-3A is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from ({alpha},n) reactions, spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron emission due to the decay of radionuclides in homogeneous media (i.e., a mixture of {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material) and in interface problems (i.e., a slab of {alpha}-emitting source material in contact with a slab of low-Z target material). The code is also capable of calculating the neutron production rates due to ({alpha},n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of {alpha}-particles incident on a slab of target material. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, and Watt spectrum parameters for 43 actinides. The ({alpha},n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the center-of-mass system with a library of 89 nuclide decay {alpha}-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated ({alpha},n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional {alpha}-particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code outputs the magnitude and spectra of the resultant neutron source. It also provides an analysis of the contributions to that source by each nuclide in the problem.

Perry, R.T.; Wilson, W.B.; Charlton, W.S.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Journal of Power Sources xxx (2005) xxxxxx Vehicle-to-grid power fundamentals: Calculating capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Vehicle-to-grid power; Ancillary services; V2G 1. Introduction The electric power grid and light vehicle-drive vehicles (EDVs), that is, vehicles with an electric-drive motor powered by batteries, a fuel cellJournal of Power Sources xxx (2005) xxx­xxx Vehicle-to-grid power fundamentals: Calculating

Firestone, Jeremy

19

How to calculate structure factors of self-assembling anisotropic particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the particle shape anisotropy exerts a crucial influence on the behaviour of the structure factors. 1How to calculate structure factors of self-assembling anisotropic particles Sofia Kantorovich,*abc Elena Pyanzina,a Cristiano De Micheleb and Francesco Sciortinob We put forward a theoretical approach

Sciortino, Francesco

20

The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Efficiency and stray light measurements and calculations of diffraction gratings for the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water-cooled gratings manufactured for spherical grating monochromators of the Advanced Light Source beamlines 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0 were measured with the laser plasma source and reflectometer in the Center for X-ray Optics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The square-wave gratings are ion milled into the polished electroless nickel surface after patterning by holographic photolithography. Absolute efficiency data are compared with exact electromagnetic theory calculation. Interorder stray light and groove depths can be estimated from the measurements.

McKinney, W.R.; Mossessian, D. (Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Gullikson, E. (Materials Sciences Division, Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Heimann, P. (Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Uncertainties in source term calculations generated by the ORIGEN2 computer code for Hanford Production Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORIGEN2 computer code is the primary calculational tool for computing isotopic source terms for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The ORIGEN2 code computes the amounts of radionuclides that are created or remain in spent nuclear fuel after neutron irradiation and radioactive decay have occurred as a result of nuclear reactor operation. ORIGEN2 was chosen as the primary code for these calculations because it is widely used and accepted by the nuclear industry, both in the United States and the rest of the world. Its comprehensive library of over 1,600 nuclides includes any possible isotope of interest to the HEDR Project. It is important to evaluate the uncertainties expected from use of ORIGEN2 in the HEDR Project because these uncertainties may have a pivotal impact on the final accuracy and credibility of the results of the project. There are three primary sources of uncertainty in an ORIGEN2 calculation: basic nuclear data uncertainty in neutron cross sections, radioactive decay constants, energy per fission, and fission product yields; calculational uncertainty due to input data; and code uncertainties (i.e., numerical approximations, and neutron spectrum-averaged cross-section values from the code library). 15 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Heeb, C.M.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Measured and Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors: Accuracy and comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The journal Medical Physics recently published two papers that determine beam quality conversion factors, k{sub Q}, for large sets of ion chambers. In the first paper [McEwen Med. Phys. 37, 2179-2193 (2010)], k{sub Q} was determined experimentally, while the second paper [Muir and Rogers Med. Phys. 37, 5939-5950 (2010)] provides k{sub Q} factors calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. This work investigates a variety of additional consistency checks to verify the accuracy of the k{sub Q} factors determined in each publication and a comparison of the two data sets. Uncertainty introduced in calculated k{sub Q} factors by possible variation of W/e with beam energy is investigated further. Methods: The validity of the experimental set of k{sub Q} factors relies on the accuracy of the NE2571 reference chamber measurements to which k{sub Q} factors for all other ion chambers are correlated. The stability of NE2571 absorbed dose to water calibration coefficients is determined and comparison to other experimental k{sub Q} factors is analyzed. Reliability of Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors is assessed through comparison to other publications that provide Monte Carlo calculations of k{sub Q} as well as an analysis of the sleeve effect, the effect of cavity length and self-consistencies between graphite-walled Farmer-chambers. Comparison between the two data sets is given in terms of the percent difference between the k{sub Q} factors presented in both publications. Results: Monitoring of the absorbed dose calibration coefficients for the NE2571 chambers over a period of more than 15 yrs exhibit consistency at a level better than 0.1%. Agreement of the NE2571 k{sub Q} factors with a quadratic fit to all other experimental data from standards labs for the same chamber is observed within 0.3%. Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors are in good agreement with most other Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors. Expected results are observed for the sleeve effect and the effect of cavity length on k{sub Q}. The mean percent differences between experimental and Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors are -0.08, -0.07, and -0.23% for the Elekta 6, 10, and 25 MV nominal beam energies, respectively. An upper limit on the variation of W/e in photon beams from cobalt-60 to 25 MV is determined as 0.4% with 95% confidence. The combined uncertainty on Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors is reassessed and amounts to between 0.40 and 0.49% depending on the wall material of the chamber. Conclusions: Excellent agreement (mean percent difference of only 0.13% for the entire data set) between experimental and calculated k{sub Q} factors is observed. For some chambers, k{sub Q} is measured for only one chamber of each type--the level of agreement observed in this study would suggest that for those chambers the measured k{sub Q} values are generally representative of the chamber type.

Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Ottawa Medical Physics Institute (OMPI), Ottawa Carleton Institute for Physics, Carleton University Campus, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Ottawa Medical Physics Institute (OMPI), Ottawa Carleton Institute for Physics, Carleton University Campus, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Overview of Existing Literature On Diversity Factors and Schedules for Energy and Cooling Load Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used in simulation. The goal of ASHRAE 1093-RP was to compile a library of schedules and diversity factors based on measured electricity consumption data for use in energy simulations and peak cooling load calculations in office buildings... consumption data for commercial buildings. The literature on diversity factors and load shapes was examined with particular attention to the descriptions of methods used, references to existing databases of monitored whole-building energy use and end...

Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J.S.; Claridge, D.E

25

Lattice calculation of the pion form factor with Ginsparg-Wilson-type fermions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results for Monte Carlo calculations of the electromagnetic vector and scalar form factors of the pion in a quenched simulation are presented. We work with two different lattice volumes up to a spatial size of 2.4 fm at a lattice spacing of 0.148 fm. The pion form factors in the spacelike region are determined for pion masses down to 340 MeV.

Capitani, Stefano; Gattringer, Christof; Lang, C.B. [Institut fuer Physik, FB Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A lattice calculation of the pion form factor with Ginsparg-Wilson-type fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results for Monte Carlo calculations of the electromagnetic vector and scalar form factors of the pion in a quenched simulation are presented. We work with two different lattice volumes up to a spatial size of 2.4 fm at a lattice spacing of 0.148 fm. The pion form factors in the space-like region are determined for pion masses down to 340 MeV.

Stefano Capitani; Christof Gattringer; C. B. Lang

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

Calculation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N GoodsMexico's EnergyCalculation of

28

Computational Benchmark Calculations Relevant to the Neutronic Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide an intense source of low-energy neutrons for experimental use. The low-energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of a high-energy (1.0 GeV) proton beam on a mercury (Hg) target and slowed down in liquid hydrogen or light water moderators. Computer codes and computational techniques are being benchmarked against relevant experimental data to validate and verify the tools being used to predict the performance of the SNS. The LAHET Code System (LCS), which includes LAHET, HTAPE ad HMCNP (a modified version of MCNP version 3b), have been applied to the analysis of experiments that were conducted in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the AGS experiments, foils of various materials were placed around a mercury-filled stainless steel cylinder, which was bombarded with protons at 1.6 GeV. Neutrons created in the mercury target, activated the foils. Activities of the relevant isotopes were accurately measured and compared with calculated predictions. Measurements at BNL were provided in part by collaborating scientists from JAERI as part of the AGS Spallation Target Experiment (ASTE) collaboration. To date, calculations have shown good agreement with measurements.

Gallmeier, F.X.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Yugo, J.J.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

29

Calculation of extremity neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Figure 4. Comparison of NCRP 38 and Siebert and Schuhmacher quality factors. Table 2. PNNL dose equivalent averaged quality factors (Q). * Phantom Finger Wrist 30 cm ICRU sphere Composition PMMA PMMA Tissue-and-bone Tissue-and-bone PMMA PMMA... Tissue-and-bone Tissue-and-bone PM MA PMMA (???) 'Adapted from reference 53. Source Bare Cf Moderated Cf Bare Cf Moderated Cf Bare Cf Moderated Cf Bare Cf Moderated Cf Bare Cf Moderated Cf 9. 2 9. 7 9. 2 9. 7 9. 4 9. 7 9. 4 9. 7 10...

Wood-Zika, Annmarie Ruth

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV and RPV cavity of the VVER-440 reacto rand located axially at the position of maximum power and at the position of the weld. Both of these methods (the effective source and the adjoint function) are briefly described in the present paper. The paper also describes their application to the solution of fast neutron fluence and detectors activities for the VVER-440 reactor. (authors)

Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V. [Calculation Dept., Skoda JS plc, Orlik 266, 31606 Plzen (Czech Republic)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A framework for the calculation of the $?N?^*$ transition form factor on the lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the non-relativistic effective field theory framework in a finite volume, we discuss the extraction of the $\\Delta N\\gamma^*$ transition form factors from lattice data. A counterpart of the L\\"uscher approach for the matrix elements of unstable states is formulated. In particular, we thoroughly discuss various kinematic settings, which are used in the calculation of the above matrix element on the lattice. The emerging L\\"uscher-Lellouch factor and the analytic continuation of the matrix elements into the complex plane are also considered in detail. A full group-theoretical analysis of the problem is made, including the partial-wave mixing and projecting out the invariant form factors from data.

Andria Agadjanov; Véronique Bernard; Ulf-G. Meißner; Akaki Rusetsky

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

32

Calculation of conversion factors for effective dose for various interventional radiology procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To provide dose-area-product (DAP) to effective dose (E) conversion factors for complete interventional procedures, based on in-the-field clinical measurements of DAP values and using tabulated E/DAP conversion factors for single projections available from the literature. Methods: Nine types of interventional procedures were performed on 84 patients with two angiographic systems. Different calibration curves (with and without patient table attenuation) were calculated for each DAP meter. Clinical and dosimetric parameters were recorded in-the-field for each projection and for all patients, and a conversion factor linking DAP and effective doses was derived for each complete procedure making use of published, Monte Carlo calculated conversion factors for single static projections. Results: Fluoroscopy time and DAP values for the lowest-dose procedure (biliary drainage) were approximately 3-fold and 13-fold lower, respectively, than those for the highest-dose examination (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, TIPS). Median E/DAP conversion factors from 0.12 (abdominal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty) to 0.25 (Nephrostomy) mSvGy{sup -1} cm{sup -2} were obtained and good correlations between E and DAP were found for all procedures, with R{sup 2} coefficients ranging from 0.80 (abdominal angiography) to 0.99 (biliary stent insertion, Nephrostomy and TIPS). The DAP values obtained in this study showed general consistency with the values provided in the literature and median E values ranged from 4.0 mSv (biliary drainage) to 49.6 mSv (TIPS). Conclusions: Values of E/DAP conversion factors were derived for each procedure from a comprehensive analysis of projection and dosimetric data: they could provide a good evaluation for the stochastic effects. These results can be obtained by means of a close cooperation between different interventional professionals involved in patient care and dose optimization.

Compagnone, Gaetano; Giampalma, Emanuela; Domenichelli, Sara; Renzulli, Matteo; Golfieri, Rita [Medical Physics Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Radiology Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Medical Physics Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Radiology Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

HELIOS-K: An Ultrafast, Open-source Opacity Calculator for Radiative Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an ultrafast opacity calculator for application to exoplanetary atmospheres, which we name HELIOS-K. It takes a line list as an input, computes the shape of each spectral line (e.g., a Voigt profile) and provides an option for grouping an enormous number of lines into a manageable number of bins. We implement a combination of Algorithm 916 and Gauss-Hermite quadrature to compute the Voigt profile, write the code in CUDA and optimise the computation for graphics processing units (GPUs). We use the k-distribution method to reduce $\\sim 10^5$ to $10^8$ lines to $\\sim 10$ to $10^4$ wavenumber bins, which may then be used for radiative transfer, atmospheric retrieval and general circulation models. We demonstrate that the resampling of the k-distribution function, within each bin, is an insignificant source of error across a broad range of wavenumbers and column masses. By contrast, the choice of line-wing cutoff for the Voigt profile is a significant source of error and affects the value of the compute...

Grimm, Simon L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Scoping Analysis of Source Term and Functional Containment Attenuation Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to meet future regulatory requirements, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project must fully establish and validate the mechanistic modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) source term. This is not possible at this stage in the project, as significant uncertainties in the final design remain unresolved. In the interim, however, there is a need to establish an approximate characterization of the source term. The NGNP team developed a simplified parametric model to establish mechanistic source term estimates for a set of proposed HTGR configurations.

Pete Lowry

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Scoping Analysis of Source Term and Functional Containment Attenuation Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to meet future regulatory requirements, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project must fully establish and validate the mechanistic modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) source term. This is not possible at this stage in the project, as significant uncertainties in the final design remain unresolved. In the interim, however, there is a need to establish an approximate characterization of the source term. The NGNP team developed a simplified parametric model to establish mechanistic source term estimates for a set of proposed HTGR configurations.

Pete Lowry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Scoping Analysis of Source Term and Functional Containment Attenuation Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to meet future regulatory requirements, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project must fully establish and validate the mechanistic modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) source term. This is not possible at this stage in the project, as significant uncertainties in the final design remain unresolved. In the interim, however, there is a need to establish an approximate characterization of the source term. The NGNP team developed a simplified parametric model to establish mechanistic source term estimates for a set of proposed HTGR configurations.

Pete Lowry

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Tooling Factor Calculation In order to yield a more accurate indication of a deposited film's thickness, the rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tooling Factor Calculation In order to yield a more accurate indication of a deposited film's thickness, the rate monitor's tooling factor attempts to compensate for necessary differences member before changing an established tooling factor. 1. Position a sample, masked on a half

Kim, Philip

39

Calculating the Loss factor of the LCLS Beam Line Elements for Ultra-Shrot Bunches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE 1.5-15 {angstrom} x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility. Since an ultra-short intense bunch is used in the LCLS operation one might suggest that wake fields, generated in the vacuum chamber, may have an effect on the x-ray production because these fields can change the beam particle energies thereby increasing the energy spread in a bunch. At LCLS a feedback system precisely controls the bunch energy before it enters a beam transport line after the linac. However, in the transport line and later in the undulator section the bunch energy and energy spread are not under feedback control and may change due to wake field radiation, which depends upon the bunch current or on a bunch length. The linear part of the energy spread can be compensated in the upstream linac; the energy loss in the undulator section can be compensated by varying the K-parameter of the undulators, however we need a precise knowledge of the wake fields in this part of the machine. Resistive wake fields are known and well calculated. We discuss an additional part of the wake fields, which comes from the different vacuum elements like bellows, BPMs, transitions, vacuum ports, vacuum valves and others. We use the code 'NOVO' together with analytical estimations for the wake potential calculations.

Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

40

Monte Carlo calculated TG-60 dosimetry parameters for the {beta}{sup -} emitter {sup 153}Sm brachytherapy source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The formalism recommended by Task Group 60 (TG-60) of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is applicable for {beta} sources. Radioactive biocompatible and biodegradable {sup 153}Sm glass seed without encapsulation is a {beta}{sup -} emitter radionuclide with a short half-life and delivers a high dose rate to the tumor in the millimeter range. This study presents the results of Monte Carlo calculations of the dosimetric parameters for the {sup 153}Sm brachytherapy source. Methods: Version 5 of the (MCNP) Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to calculate two-dimensional dose distributions around the source. The dosimetric parameters of AAPM TG-60 recommendations including the reference dose rate, the radial dose function, the anisotropy function, and the one-dimensional anisotropy function were obtained. Results: The dose rate value at the reference point was estimated to be 9.21{+-}0.6 cGy h{sup -1} {mu}Ci{sup -1}. Due to the low energy beta emitted from {sup 153}Sm sources, the dose fall-off profile is sharper than the other beta emitter sources. The calculated dosimetric parameters in this study are compared to several beta and photon emitting seeds. Conclusions: The results show the advantage of the {sup 153}Sm source in comparison with the other sources because of the rapid dose fall-off of beta ray and high dose rate at the short distances of the seed. The results would be helpful in the development of the radioactive implants using {sup 153}Sm seeds for the brachytherapy treatment.

Sadeghi, Mahdi; Taghdiri, Fatemeh; Hamed Hosseini, S.; Tenreiro, Claudio [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial School, P.O. Box 31485-498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Engineering Faculty, Research and Science Campus, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Energy Science, SungKyunKwan University, 300 Cheoncheon-dong, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Compilation of Diversity Factors and Schedules for Energy and Cooling Load Calculations, ASHRAE Research Project 1093-RP, Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are developed, b) graphical output of the diversity profiles, and c) ready-to-use input files for the DOE-2, BLAST and EnergyPlus simulation programs. Electronic copies of all the diversity factor profiles in this report are provided in the accompanying CDROM... 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Spreadsheet for Diversity Factor Calculation 3.2.1 Preprocessing the Raw Data 3.2.2 Basic Calculation 3.2.3 Producing Tables and Graphs 3.2.4 Producing the DOE-2, BLAST, and EnergyPlus Input Files 3.2.5 Using...

Abushakra, B.; Sreshthaputra, A.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Calculation of the neutron source distribution in the venus PWR engineering mock-up and comparison with experimental measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The VENUS experiment is sponsored by the USNRC in conjunction with CEN/SCK in Mol, Belgium. The VENUS configuration consists of a central water hole, surrounded by a 2.888 cm thick inner sheet baffle. The inner core zone in the immediate vicinity of the inner baffle contains 752 3.3% /sup 235/U, zircalloy fuel cells, with 48 pyrex rods interspersed among them. The outer core zone contains 1800 4.0% /sup 235/U, steel clad fuel cells. The core itself is surrounded by a 2.858 cm thick outer steel baffle, a water reflector, a 4.972 cm thick steel core barrel, a water gap, a neutron pad, and the pressure vessel. The primary aim of this study is to calculate the VENUS neutron source distribution, as part of the USNRC's overall program goal of benchmarking RPV fluence calculations. Of particular concern is the accuracy of the source calculation near the core-baffle interface, which is the important region for contributing to RPV fluence. The accuracy of the calculations is evaluated by comparison with gamma scan measurements performed by CEN/SCK.

Morakinyo, P.; Williams, M.L.; Kam, F.B.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

THE CALCULATION OF QUALITY FACTOR OF FILM BULK ACOUSTIC RESONATORS WITH THE CONSIDERATION OF VISCOSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elastic constants which are proportional to vibration frequency. The actual value of the viscosity factor is given as an equivalent parameter. Such a procedure is useful in understanding the effect of viscosity factor, viscosity, electrical circuit parameters, layered structures, piezoelectric, film, FBAR 1

Wang, Ji

44

Source Apportionment of Stack Emissions from Research and Development Facilities Using Positive Matrix Factorization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emissions from research and development (R&D) facilities are difficult to characterize due to the wide variety of processes used, changing nature of research, and large number of chemicals. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) concentrations measured in the main exhaust stacks of four different R&D buildings to identify the number and composition of major contributing sources. PMF identified from 9-11 source-related factors contributing to the stack emissions depending on the building. The factors that were similar between buildings were major contributors to trichloroethylene (TCE), acetone, and ethanol emissions. Several other factors had similar profiles for two or more buildings but not for all four. One factor for each building was a combination of p/m-xylene, o-xylene and ethylbenzene. At least one factor for each building was identified that contained a broad mix of many species and constraints were used in PMF to modify the factors to resemble more closely the off-shift concentration profiles. PMF accepted the constraints with little decrease in model fit. Although the PMF model predicted the profiles of the off-shift samples, the percent of total emissions was under-predicted by the model versus the measured data.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Larson, Timothy V.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A summary of the sources of input parameter values for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant final porosity surface calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary of the input parameter values used in final predictions of closure and waste densification in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room is presented, along with supporting references. These predictions are referred to as the final porosity surface data and will be used for WIPP performance calculations supporting the Compliance Certification Application to be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report includes tables and list all of the input parameter values, references citing their source, and in some cases references to more complete descriptions of considerations leading to the selection of values.

Butcher, B.M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Application of ex-vessel neutron dosimetry combined with in-core measurements for correction of neutron source used for RPV fluence calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with calculated and semi-analytical evaluations of VVER-1000 reactor core neutron source distributions and their influence on measurements and calculations of the integral through-vessel neutron leakage. Neutron activation measurements analyzed in the paper were carried out in an ex-vessel air cavity at different nuclear power plant units with VVER-1000 during different fuel cycles. The time-integrated neutron source distributions used for DORT calculations were prepared via two different approaches based on (a) calculated fuel burnup (standard routine procedure) and (b) in-core measurements by means of self-powered detectors (SPDs) and thermocouples (TCs) (new approach). Considering that fuel burnup distributions in operating VVER may be evaluated now by the use of analytical methods (calculations) only, it is necessary to develop new approaches for the testing and correction of calculated evaluations of a neutron source. The results presented in this paper allow one to consider the reverse task of the alternative estimation of fuel burnup distributions. The proposed approach is based on the adjustment (fitting) of time-integrated neutron source distributions, and thus fuel burnup patterns, in some part of the reactor core, taking into account neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations, and in-core SPD and TC measurement data. (authors)

Borodkin, P.G.; Borodkin, G.I.; Khrennikov, N.N. [Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety SEC NRS, Malaya Krasnoselskaya ul., 2/8, Bld. 5, 107140 Moscow (Russian Federation); Konheiser, J. [Helmholz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf HZDR, Postfach 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nuclear analysis of an annular Li{sub 2}O blanket system surrounding an artificially simulated 14-MeV line source and comparison of calculations to measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental simulation to a line source has been realized at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) Fusion Neutronics Source within the U.S. Department of Energy/JAERI collaborative program on fusion neutronics. This simulation, achieved by cyclic movement of an annular Li{sub 2}O test assembly relative to a stationary point source, was a step forward in better simulation of the energy and angular distributions of the incident neutron source found in tokamak plasmas. Thus, compared with other experiments previously performed with a stationary point source, the uncertainties (that are system dependent) in calculating important neutronics parameters, such as tritium production rate (TPR), will be more representative of those anticipated in a fusion reactor. Calculations were performed independently by the United States and JAERI for many measured items that included TPR from {sup 6}Li(T{sub 6}), {sup 7}Li(T{sub 7}), in-system spectrum measurements, and various activation measurements. In this paper, the calculated-to-measured values for the aforementioned measured items are given, as obtained separately by the United States and JAERI. In addition, the mean value of the prediction uncertainties of the local and line-integrated TPR and the associated standard deviations are given based on the calculational and experimental results obtained in all the experiments. 34 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

Youssef, M.Z.; Abdou, M.A.; Kumar, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from Major Evaluated Data Libraries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellianaveraged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented.

Pritychenko, B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Numerical Simulation of a Displacement Ventilation System with Multi-heat Sources and Analysis of Influential Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doctor Instructor Professor The key laboratory of clean coal power generation and combustion technology of the ministry of education, southeast university College of energy sources & environment, Inner Mongolia University of Science & Technology...ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity and IAQ Vol.I-7-1 Numerical Simulation of a Displacement Ventilation System with Multi-heat Sources and Analysis of Influential Factors Xuan Wu Jingfang Gao Wenfei Wu...

Wu, X.; Gao, J.; Wu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

SOURCE?  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Department of Energy (DOE) in partnership with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is an open-source code package designed to be a common, low-cost, standardized tool...

51

Using Local and Regional Air Quality Modeling and Source Apportionment Tools to Evaluate Vehicles and Biogenic Emission Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and inventories of CO, NO_(x) and VOCs from on-road vehicles estimated by vehicle emission factor models and biogenic emissions of isoprene estimated by a popular biogenic emission model are evaluated using local and regional scale air quality modeling and source...

Kota, Sri H

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

52

CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAPHITE SLEEVES FROM BUGEY 1 EDF PLANT FOR PERMANENT DISPOSAL--MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF SCALING FACTORS FOR DIFFICULT-TO-MEASURE NUCLIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricite De France's Bugey-1 reactor, with graphite moderator, was shutdown permanently in 1994. The natural uranium elements are encased in graphite sleeves to facilitate handling. 2,000 m3 of concrete containers, containing non conditioned graphite sleeves, must be characterized and conditioned before shipment to the national repository site called ''Centre de l'Aube''. The characterization work consists in quantifying Difficult-To-Measure nuclides (DTM) by the use of Scaling Factors (SF), which use Co-60 as tracer. Bugey developed an industrial method for the gamma counting of each package to perform easily and rapidly the measurement of the Co-60 content. Depending upon the DTM radionuclide, Co-60 scaling factors are determined, or by measurement on graphite samples (case of C-14, Cl-36, Ni-63, H-3), either by using a calculation technique which is based upon the impurities present in the graphite sleeves. This method is applied for the other pure beta emitters all DTM radionucli des : Ag-108m, Be-10, Ca-41, Cd-109, Cd-113m, Co-57, Cs-135, Cs-137, Eu-155, Fe-55, Gd-153, Mo-93, Nb- 93m, Nb-94, Ni-59, Pd-107, Pm-147, Sm-151, Sn-119m, Sn-121m, Sn-126, Sr-90, Tc-99, V-49 and Zr-93. Calculations use six sleeve history cases : 1 year at 50% power, 2 years at 50 % power, 3 years at 50 % power, 4 years at 50 % power, 1 year at 100 % power and 2 years at 100 % power. The DTM nuclides have been calculated from impurity concentrations for each of these six cases, and the greatest scaling factor has been kept. The calculation is based upon two impurity sets: First impurity set : a reverse activation calculation provides us with the best estimate value of impurities calculated from the measured mean gamma spectrum and from measured scaling factors. It consists in solving a system of simultaneous equations for the impurities as a function of the mean gamma radioactive spectrum and of the measured scaling factors. The concerned calculated impurities are Co, Cl, Li, Ag, Cs, Eu, Fe, Ni, Sb, Sc, Zn and Sn. Second impurity set: The other impurities which were not available by this reverse calculation are originated from the greatest value, which has been measured in the graphite and sometimes by using the detection limit. This method allows us to avoid some detection limit problems and statistical weaknesses. It gets better, cheaper and faster characterization by mixing easy gamma spectrum measurement and simple linear calculation.

PONCET, Bernard R.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

53

Dehydrated alfalfa leaf meal as a source of vitamin K and unidentified factors for the mature fowl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEHYDRATED ALFALFA LEAF MEAL AS A SOUR1'. E OF VITAMIN K AND UNI DEN TI FIED FACTORS FOR THE MATURE FOWL by Richard Leais Jacobs A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Martial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Major Subject: Biochemistry and Nutrition January 1955 DEHYDRATED ALFALFA LEAF h%/L AS A SOURCE OF VITAMIN K AND UNIDENTIFIED FACTORS FOR THE NATURE FOWL A Thesis by Richard Lewis...

Jacobs, Richard Lewis

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

55

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

56

The use of fish meals, unidentified factor sources and amino acid supplementation in laying hen diets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diet. In recent years, several ingredients have been reported to contain one or more unidentified factors necessary for maximum hatchability of eggs and maximum growth of chicks and poults. A number of experiments have been conducted 'nvolving... of light breed birds. Fish meals~ in general~ have been siiown to contain comparatively high levels of lysine and the sulfur-containing amino acids. The presence of unidentified factors required for optimum growth and reproduction has also been reported...

Bul Bul, Sayed Muhammed

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Compilation of Diversity Factors and Schedules for Energy and Cooling Load Calculations, ASHRAE Research Project 1093, Phase III Draft Report, Compilation of Diversity Factors and Load Shapes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and diversity factors from: ? 27 Office Buildings monitored by ESL ? 9 Office Buildings provided by LBNL (Energy-Edge Buildings). If time allows we will process 28 additional buildings provided to us by PNNL. These additional buildings were monitored under... The Final set of the RP-1093 buildings. 7 Further Data from PNNL Mr. Todd Taylor, from PNNL, provided us with 28 ELCAP office buildings data. These ELCAP buildings are in Seattle (WA), Oregon, and Idaho, and were monitored by the Bonneville Power...

Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Sreshthaputra, A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Calculation of collective effects and beam lifetimes for the LBL (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory) 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In designing a third-generation high brightness synchrotron radiation source, attention must be paid to the various collective effects that can influence beam performance. We report on calculations, performed with the code ZAP, of the bunch length, the transverse emittance and the beam lifetime (from both Touschek and gas scattering) for our 1-2 GeV storage ring. In addition, we estimate the growth times for both longitudinal and transverse coupled bunch instabilities. Bunch lengths of about 20 ps should be obtainable and intrabeam scattering emittance growth is small. For a limiting undulator gap of 1 cm and residual gas pressure of 1n Torr, the beam lifetime is about 5 hours in the single-bunch mode; in the multibunch mode, lifetimes in excess of 6 hours are expected. These results indicate that all performance goals for the facility should be achievable.

Chattopadhyay, S.; Zisman, M.S.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Dark matter conversion as a source of boost factor for explaining the cosmic ray positron and electron excesses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In interacting multi-component dark matter (DM) models, if the DM components are nearly degenerate in mass and the interactions between them are strong enough, the relatively heavy DM components can be converted into lighter ones at late time after the thermal decoupling. Consequently, the relic density of the lightest DM component can be considerably enhanced at late time. This may contribute to an alternative source of boost factor required to explain the positron and electron excesses reported by the recent DM indirect search experiments such as PAMELA, Fermi-LAT and HESS etc..

Ze-Peng Liu; Yue-Liang Wu; Yu-Feng Zhou

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

Effect of boron and gadolinium concentration on the calculated neutron multiplication factor of U(3)O/sub 2/ fuel pins in optimum geometries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The KENO-Va improved Monte Carlo criticality program is used to calculate the neutron multiplication factor for TMI-U2 fuel compositions in a variety of configurations and to display parametric regions giving rise to maximum reactivity contributions. The lattice pitch of UO/sub 2/ fuel pins producing a maximum k/sub eff/ is determined as a function of boron concentrations in the coolant for infinite and finite systems. The characteristics of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-coolant mixtures of interest to modeling the rubble region of the core are presented. Several disrupted core configurations are calculated and comparisons made. The results should be useful to proposed defueling of the TMI-U2 reactor.

Thomas, J.T.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional potential factor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

These conversion... factors allow companies and individuals to calculate greenhouse gas (GHG) ... Source: Forest Research Agency of the UK Forestry Commission Collection:...

62

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 16010 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

charlotb

2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

63

Performance Evaluation and Impact of Weighting Factors on an Energy and Delay Aware Dynamic Source Routing Protocol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Typical applications of the mobile ad-hoc network, MANET, are in disaster recovery operations which have to respect time constraint needs. Since MANET is affected by limited resources such as power constraints, it is a challenge to respect the deadline of a real-time data. This paper proposes the Energy and Delay aware based on Dynamic Source Routing protocol, ED-DSR. ED-DSR efficiently utilizes the network resources such as the intermediate mobile nodes energy and load. It ensures both timeliness and energy efficiency by avoiding low-power and overloaded intermediate mobile nodes. Through simulations, we compare our proposed routing protocol with the basic routing protocol Dynamic Source Routing, DSR. Weighting factors are introduced to improve the route selection. Simulation results, using the NS-2 simulator, show that the proposed protocol prolongs the network lifetime (up to 66%), increases the volume of packets delivered while meeting the data flows real-time constraints and shortens the endto- end delay...

Rekik, Jihen Drira; Ghezala, Henda Ben

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15800 – Calculators – GOOD AND BAD. ONLY ONE-LINE scientific calculators are permitted. *RECOMMENDED CALCULATOR: TI-30XA(See Below).

charlotb

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Identification of potential sources and source regions of fine ambient particles measured at Gosan background site in Korea using advanced hybrid receptor model combined with positive matrix factorization - article no. D22217  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The size- and time-resolved measurement of particulate trace elements was made using an eight-stage Davis Rotating Unit for Monitoring sampler and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence system from 29 March to 29 May in 2002 at Gosan, Korea, which is one of the representative background sites in east Asia. A sa result, continuous 3-hour average concentrations were obtained for 19 elements including S, Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Cl, Cu, Zn, Ti, K, Mn, Pb, Ni, V, Se, As, Rb, Cr, and Br. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) method was applied to the size-resolved aerosol data sets in order to identify the possible sources and to estimate their contribution to particulate matter mass in each size range. Twelve sources were then resolved in the fine size range ( 0.07 to 1.15 {mu}m), including continental aerosol, biomass burning, coal combustion, oil heating furnace, residual oil-fired boiler, municipal incineration, nonferrous metal source, ferrous metal source, gasoline vehicle, diesel vehicle, copper smelter, and volcanic emission. A newly developed hybrid receptor model, concentration, retention time, and source emission weighted trajectory (CRSWT) was then applied to the source intensities derived from the PMF analysis by incorporating meteorological and source inventory information of the study region in order to suggest the regional information of long-range transported fine aerosol sources. The CRSWT model was able to resolve highly potential source areas and pathways for the fine ambient aerosol at the Gosan background site.

Han, J.S.; Moon, K.J.; Kim, Y.J. [National Institute of Environmental Research, Inchon (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Air Quality Research

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Evaluated teletherapy source library  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The Evaluated Teletherapy Source Library (ETSL) is a system of hardware and software that provides for maintenance of a library of useful phase space descriptions (PSDs) of teletherapy sources used in radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The PSDs are designed to be used by PEREGRINE, the all-particle Monte Carlo dose calculation system. ETSL also stores other relevant information such as monitor unit factors (MUFs) for use with the PSDs, results of PEREGRINE calculations using the PSDs, clinical calibration measurements, and geometry descriptions sufficient for calculational purposes. Not all of this information is directly needed by PEREGRINE. It also is capable of acting as a repository for the Monte Carlo simulation history files from which the generic PSDs are derived.

Cox, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schach Von Wittenau, Alexis E. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15300 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

charlotb

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15910 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

charlotb

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

Compilation of Diversity Factors and Schedules for Energy and Cooling Load Calculations, Phase II Report - Identified Relevant Data Sets, Methods, and Variability Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for classifying the Office building categories; (3) the relevant methods for daytyping necessary for creating the typical load shapes for energy and cooling load calculation; (4) the relevant robust variability (uncertainty) analysis; (5) typical load shapes...

Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

Wen, J

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Atmospheric Pb deposition since the Industrial Revolution recorded by five Swiss peat profiles: Enrichment factors, fluxes, isotopic composition, and sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric Pb deposition since the Industrial Revolution was studied in western, central, and southern Switzerland using five rural peat bogs. Similar temporal patterns were found in western and central Switzerland, with two distinct periods of Pb enrichment relative to the natural background: between 1880 and 1920 with enrichments ranging from 40 to 80 times, and between 1960 and 1980 with enrichments ranging from 80 to 100 times. The fluxes also were generally elevated in those time periods: in western Switzerland between 1.16 and 1.55 {micro}g cm{sup {minus}2} y{sup {minus}1} during the second period. Between the Industrial Revolution and 1985, nonradiogenic Pb became increasingly important in all five cores because of the replacement of coal by oil after ca. 1920, the use of Australian Pb in industry, and the extensive combustion of leaded gasoline after 1950. The introduction of unleaded gasoline in 1985 had a pronounced effect on the Pb deposition in all five cores. Enrichments dropped sharply, and the isotopic ratios reverted back toward natural values. The cores from western and central Switzerland showed very similar isotopic trends throughout the time period studied, implying that these sites were influenced contemporaneously by similar pollution sources and atmospheric pathways. Southern Switzerland revealed a different record with respect to the Pb pollution: it was dominated by a single massive Pb enrichment dated between 1930 and 1950.

Weiss, D.; Shotyk, W.; Kramers, J.D. [Univ. of Bern (Switzerland)] [Univ. of Bern (Switzerland); Appleby, P.G. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences] [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences; Cheburkin, A.K. [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. of Geological Sciences] [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. of Geological Sciences

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

73

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

74

MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

OwenDavis

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

75

Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel-and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City D. A. Thornhill, A. E. Williams, T. B be low. The second figure shows the background versus diesel factors. There may be a slight horizontal factors. In this case, even when the diesel factor's contributions are very high, the background factor

Meskhidze, Nicholas

76

How Do Calculators Calculate? Helmut Knaust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not convert numbers to base 2. They use a binary-coded decimal (BCD) system instead. Calculators can only

Knaust, Helmut

77

Investigations of factors affecting the use of uranium metal as a source of alpha particles for the evaluation of alpha track detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, an uranium foil was used as the alpha particle source. The foil created new problems which needed to be studied in detail. Among these problems, the effect of the thickness of the oxide layer on the uranium metal foil surface was the most important. To study...

Voirin, Marc

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Original Impact Calculations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

79

FLAG-SGH Sedov calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We did not run with a 'cylindrically painted region'. However, we did compute two general variants of the original problem. Refinement studies where a single zone at each level of refinement contains the entire internal energy at t=0 or A 'finite' energy source which has the same physical dimensions as that for the 91 x 46 mesh, but consisting of increasing numbers of zones with refinement. Nominal mesh resolution: 91 x 46. Other mesh resolutions: 181 x 92 and 361 x 184. Note, not identical to the original specification. To maintain symmetry for the 'fixed' energy source, the mesh resolution was adjusted slightly. FLAG Lagrange or full (Eulerian) ALE was used with various options for each simulation. Observation - for either Lagrange or ALE, point or 'fixed' source, calculations converge on density and pressure with mesh resolution, but not energy, (not vorticity either).

Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schofield, Sam [LLNL; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

New Optical Evaluation Approach for Parabolic Trough Collectors: First-Principle OPTical Intercept Calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new analytical method -- First-principle OPTical Intercept Calculation (FirstOPTIC) -- is presented here for optical evaluation of trough collectors. It employs first-principle optical treatment of collector optical error sources and derives analytical mathematical formulae to calculate the intercept factor of a trough collector. A suite of MATLAB code is developed for FirstOPTIC and validated against theoretical/numerical solutions and ray-tracing results. It is shown that FirstOPTIC can provide fast and accurate calculation of intercept factors of trough collectors. The method makes it possible to carry out fast evaluation of trough collectors for design purposes. The FirstOPTIC techniques and analysis may be naturally extended to other types of CSP technologies such as linear-Fresnel collectors and central-receiver towers.

Zhu, G.; Lewandowski, A.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Simulating variable source problems via post processing of individual particle tallies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo is an extremely powerful method of simulating complex, three dimensional environments without excessive problem simplification. However, it is often time consuming to simulate models in which the source can be highly varied. Similarly difficult are optimization studies involving sources in which many input parameters are variable, such as particle energy, angle, and spatial distribution. Such studies are often approached using brute force methods or intelligent guesswork. One field in which these problems are often encountered is accelerator-driven Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of cancers. Solving the reverse problem of determining the best neutron source for optimal BNCT treatment can be accomplished by separating the time-consuming particle-tracking process of a full Monte Carlo simulation from the calculation of the source weighting factors which is typically performed at the beginning of a Monte Carlo simulation. By post-processing these weighting factors on a recorded file of individual particle tally information, the effect of changing source variables can be realized in a matter of seconds, instead of requiring hours or days for additional complete simulations. By intelligent source biasing, any number of different source distributions can be calculated quickly from a single Monte Carlo simulation. The source description can be treated as variable and the effect of changing multiple interdependent source variables on the problem's solution can be determined. Though the focus of this study is on BNCT applications, this procedure may be applicable to any problem that involves a variable source.

Bleuel, D.L.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Vujic, J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments.

Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

83

Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate recommendations for reference dosimetry of electron beams and gradient effects for the NE2571 chamber and to provide beam quality conversion factors using Monte Carlo simulations of the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose-to-water and the dose to the gas in fully modeled ion chambers as a function of depth in water. Electron beams are modeled using realistic accelerator simulations as well as beams modeled as collimated point sources from realistic electron beam spectra or monoenergetic electrons. Beam quality conversion factors are calculated with ratios of the doses to water and to the air in the ion chamber in electron beams and a cobalt-60 reference field. The overall ion chamber correction factor is studied using calculations of water-to-air stopping power ratios. Results: The use of an effective point of measurement shift of 1.55 mm from the front face of the PTW Roos chamber, which places the point of measurement inside the chamber cavity, minimizes the difference betweenR{sub 50}, the beam quality specifier, calculated from chamber simulations compared to that obtained using depth-dose calculations in water. A similar shift minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth to the practical range and reduces the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors at the reference depth as a function of R{sub 50}. Similarly, an upstream shift of 0.34 r{sub cav} allows a more accurate determination of R{sub 50} from NE2571 chamber calculations and reduces the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth. The determination of the gradient correction using a shift of 0.22 r{sub cav} optimizes the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors if all beams investigated are considered. However, if only clinical beams are considered, a good fit to results for beam quality conversion factors is obtained without explicitly correcting for gradient effects. The inadequacy of R{sub 50} to uniquely specify beam quality for the accurate selection of k{sub Q} factors is discussed. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are analyzed for the NE2571 chamber and amount to between 0.4% and 1.2% depending on assumptions used. Conclusions: The calculated beam quality conversion factors for the PTW Roos chamber obtained here are in good agreement with literature data. These results characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of electron beams even in low-energy beams.

Muir, B. R., E-mail: bmuir@physics.carleton.ca; Rogers, D. W. O., E-mail: drogers@physics.carleton.ca [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)] [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Multiphase flow calculation software  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - appendix vi calculation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

facility, calculations showing compliance... ) (D) (vi) The noise emission abatement system; Appendix B (h) ... Source: California Energy Commission Collection: Energy...

86

Source waters Several factors influence the selection of source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

less damage to marine life. However, if the geology Desalination Methods for Producing Drinking Water of water are produced: · Treated fresh water that has low concentra- tions of salts and minerals day (mgd) using a long vertical tube distil- lation (LVT) process to produce water for the City

87

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Calculating Vessel Volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This summarizes a demonstration at the "Metron" conference (April 2002, Yale University), using a computer program to calculate the capacity of pots drawn on the computer screen and then given one dimension (e.g., its ...

Younger, John G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Solar radiation intensity calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

Levine, Randolph Steven

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Damien Allain Ingnieur recherche, dveloppement, calcul scientifique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 5 articles publiés. · Administration du parc de machines de calculs Linux. 01/2003­03/2003 Ingénieur données, la réparation de code source en C/C++, de téléchargement de patch et de conversion d'image pour

91

Unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: RRKM calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on reaction thermochemistry and estimates of Arrhenius A-factors, it is expected that Si-C bond cleavage, C-H bond cleavage, and HCl elimination will be the primary channels for the unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane. Using RRKM theory, we calculated rate constants for these three reactions. The calculations support the conclusion that these three reactions are the major decomposition pathways. Rate constants for each reaction were calculated in the high-pressure limit (800--1500 K) and in the falloff regime (1300--1500 K) for bath gases of both helium and hydrogen. These calculations thus provide branching fractions as well as decomposition rates. We also calculated bimolecular rate constants for the overall decomposition in the low-pressure limit. Interesting and surprising kinetic behavior of this system and the individual reactions is discussed. The reactivity of this chlorinated organosilane is compared to that of other organosilanes.

Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis a city in ChittendenPartnersCabot

93

A SIMPLIFIED PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING THE EFFECTS OF DAYLIGHT FROM CLEAR SKIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. , "The Calculation of Daylight Factor for Clear Skyand Predetermination of Daylight Illumination," ILLUMINATINGA MEASURING DIAGRAM FOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION, Batsford,

Bryan, Harvey J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Historical river flow rates for dose calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

Carlton, W.H.

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

95

Carbon Footprint Calculator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

96

PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION MANUAL (ACM) APPROVAL METHOD for the 2013 2012 CEC400201200715DAY #12;201308 Residential ACM Approval Manual 2-2 1. Overview Minimum Modeling Capabilities 1. Overview This Manual explains the requirements for approval of residential Alternative

97

Calculate viscosities for 355 liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid viscosities are important factors in process design and operation. The viscosity of a liquid determines its flow properties, such as velocity and pressure drop. In addition, the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of a liquid are affected by its viscosity. An equation can be used to calculate liquid viscosities as a function of temperature. In the accompanying table, regression coefficients are included for 355 compounds with five, six or seven carbon atoms--generally the most-widely used in the chemical and petroleum industries. To calculate the viscosity of a liquid at any temperature between its melting and critical points (T[sub min] and T[sub max]), use the following equation: log[sub 10] [eta][sub liq] = A + B/T + CT + DT[sup 2] where [eta][sub liq] = viscosity, cP, A,B,C and D = regression coefficients, and T = liquid temperature, K. Insert the temperature into the equation along with the corresponding regression coefficients from the table. The chemical formulae are listed by the number of carbon atoms.

Yaws, C.L.; Lin, Xiaoyan; Li Bu (Lamar Univ., TX (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nonlinear generalized source method for modeling second-harmonic generation in diffraction gratings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a versatile numerical method for modeling light diffraction in periodically patterned photonic structures containing quadratically nonlinear non-centrosymmetric optical materials. Our approach extends the generalized source method to nonlinear optical interactions by incorporating the contribution of nonlinear polarization sources to the diffracted field in the algorithm. We derive the mathematical formalism underlying the numerical method and introduce the Fourier-factorization suitable for nonlinear calculations. The numerical efficiency and runtime characteristics of the method are investigated in a set of benchmark calculations: the results corresponding to the fundamental frequency are compared to those obtained from a reference method and the beneficial effects of the modified Fourier-factorization rule on the accuracy of the nonlinear computations is demonstrated. In order to illustrate the capabilities of our method, we employ it to demonstrate strong enhancement of second-harmonic genera...

Weismann, Martin; Panoiu, Nicolae C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Uncertainties Associated with Theoretically Calculated N2-Broadened Half-Widths of H2O Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be calculated theoretically. The accuracy of these calculated values depends on many factors such as the line-shape1 Uncertainties Associated with Theoretically Calculated N2- Broadened Half-Widths of H2O Lines Q-offs used in the theoretical calculations, we have carried out extensive numerical calculations of the N2

Gamache, Robert R.

100

Review of Subcritical Source-Driven Noise Analysis Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcritical source-driven noise measurements are simultaneous Rossi-{alpha} and randomly pulsed neutron measurements that provide measured quantities that can be related to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. In fact, subcritical source-driven noise measurements should be performed in lieu of Rossi-{alpha} measurements because of the additional information that is obtained from noise measurements such as the spectral ratio and the coherence functions. The basic understanding of source-driven noise analysis measurements can be developed from a point reactor kinetics model to demonstrate how the measured quantities relate to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. More elaborate models can also be developed using a generalized stochastic model. These measurements can be simulated using Monte Carlo codes to determine the subcritical neutron multiplication factor or to determine the sensitivity of calculations to nuclear cross section data. The interpretation of the measurement using a Monte Carlo method is based on a perturbation model for the relationship between the spectral ratio and the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. The subcritical source-driven noise measurement has advantages over other subcritical measurement methods in that reference measurements at delayed critical are not required for interpreting the measurements. Therefore, benchmark or in-situ subcritical measurements can be performed outside a critical experiment facility. Furthermore, a certain ratio of frequency spectra has been shown to be independent of detection efficiency thereby making the measurement more robust and unaffected by drifts or changes in instrumentation during the measurement. Criteria have been defined for application of this measurement method for benchmarks and in-situ subcritical measurements. An extension of the source-driven subcritical noise measurement has also been discussed that eliminates the few technical challenges for in-situ applications.

Valentine, T.E.

1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EPA - Rainfall Erosivity Factor Calculator webpage | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified as ASHRAEDuvalJustice webpage Jump to:Writers|

102

EPA Rainfall Erosivity Factor Calculator Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified as ASHRAEDuvalJustice webpageClass VTSDF GuideWebsite

103

Horizontal well IPR calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the calculation of near-wellbore skin and non-Darcy flow coefficient for horizontal wells based on whether the well is drilled in an underbalanced or overbalanced condition, whether the well is completed openhole, with a slotted liner, or cased, and on the number of shots per foot and phasing for cased wells. The inclusion of mechanical skin and the non-Darcy flow coefficient in previously published horizontal well equations is presented and a comparison between these equations is given. In addition, both analytical and numerical solutions for horizontal wells with skin and non-Darcy flow are presented for comparison.

Thomas, L.K.; Todd, B.J.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

ARM - Relative Humidity Calculations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstruments Related LinksCalculatorsRelative

105

ARM - Index of Calculators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [FacilityIndiaGVAX NewsCalculators Outreach Home Room

106

Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for light nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground and low-lying excited states for nuclei with A {le} 8 are made using a realistic Hamiltonian that fits NN scattering data. Results for more than 30 different (j{sup {prime}}, T) states, plus isobaric analogs, are obtained and the known excitation spectra are reproduced reasonably well. Various density and momentum distributions and electromagnetic form factors and moments have also been computed. These are the first microscopic calculations that directly produce nuclear shell structure from realistic NN interactions.

Wiringa, R.B.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Pulse superimposition calculational methodology for estimating the subcritcality level of nuclear fuel assemblies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the subcriticality level of a nuclear fuel assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology simulating the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the experimental and analytical reaction rates and the obtained subcriticality levels. In this methodology, the reaction rate is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the delayed fission neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction rate is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is then superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The analytical results of this new calculation methodology have shown an excellent agreement with the experimental data available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. This methodology can be used to calculate Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Rabiti, C.; Aliberti, G.; Kondev, F.; Smith, D.; Zhong, Z.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.; Serafimovich, I. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (INL); (Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

109

Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Lipinski, Ronald J. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hensen, Danielle L. [Risk and Reliability Department Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis! Temperature Eppley (1972) Light Sverdrup's Critical Depth-493, but the general concept is still valid! ! #12;PB opt & Temperature! #12;Photosynthesis & Temperature! Remember: in the laboratory, we can measure photosynthesis versus irradiance (PvsE) and calculate Ek, Pmax, and alpha

Kudela, Raphael M.

112

Ghost Diffraction: Causal Explanation via Correlated Trajectory Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use trajectory calculations to successfully explain two-photon "ghost" diffraction, a phenomenon previously explained via quantum mechanical entanglement. The diffraction patterns are accumulated one photon pair at a time. The calculations are based on initial correlation of the trajectories in the crystal source and a trajectory-wave ordering interaction with a variant generator inherent in its structure. Details are presented in comparison with ordinary diffraction calculated with the same trajectory model.

Bill Dalton

2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

113

Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We fi nd that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Kinetics of the Reaction of the Heaviest Hydrogen Atom with H2, the 4He? + H2 -> 4He?? + H Reaction: Experiments, Accurate Quantal Calculations, and Variational Transition State Theory, including Kinetic Isotope Effects for a Factor of 36.1 in Isotopic Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutral muonic helium atom {sup 4}He{mu}, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of {sup 4}He{mu} with molecular hydrogen, {sup 4}He{mu} + H{sub 2} {yields} {sup 4}He{mu}H + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a {mu}SR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k{sub He{mu}}, are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k{sub He{mu}} are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k{sub He{mu}} on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H{sub 2} and Mu + H{sub 2} reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H{sub 2} reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant.

Fleming, Donald G.; Arseneau, Donald J.; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H.; Mielke, Steven L.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schatz, George C.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Peterson, Kirk A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Nucleon Form Factor Measurements and Interpretation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data base for the form factors of the nucleon obtained from elastic ep scattering is discussed, as well as some recent developments in their calculation.

Charles F. Perdrisat

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

116

LCEs for Naval Reactor Benchmark Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this engineering calculation is to document the MCNP4B2LV evaluations of Laboratory Critical Experiments (LCEs) performed as part of the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology program. LCE evaluations documented in this report were performed for 22 different cases with varied design parameters. Some of these LCEs (10) are documented in existing references (Ref. 7.1 and 7.2), but were re-run for this calculation file using more neutron histories. The objective of this analysis is to quantify the MCNP4B2LV code system's ability to accurately calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for various critical configurations. These LCE evaluations support the development and validation of the neutronics methodology used for criticality analyses involving Naval reactor spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository.

W.J. Anderson

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

Diversity employment and recruitment sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective human resources management has been identified as one of four critical success factors in the Department of Energy Strategic Plan. The Plan states relative to this factor: ``The Department seeks greater alignment of resources with agency priorities and increased diversification of the workforce, including gender, ethnicity, age, and skills. This diversification will bring new thinking and perspectives that heretofore have not had a voice in departmental decision-making.`` This Guide has been developed as a key tool to assist Department of Energy management and administrative staff in achieving Goal 2 of this critical success factor, which is to ``Ensure a diverse and talented workforce.`` There are numerous sources from which to recruit minorities, women and persons with disabilities. Applying creativity and proactive effort, using traditional and non-traditional approaches, and reaching out to various professional, academic and social communities will increase the reservoir of qualified candidates from which to make selections. In addition, outreach initiatives will undoubtedly yield further benefits such as a richer cultural understanding and diversity awareness. The resource listings presented in this Guide are offered to encourage active participation in the diversity recruitment process. This Guide contains resource listings by state for organizations in the following categories: (1) African American Recruitment Sources; (2) Asian American/Pacific Islander Recruitment Sources; (3) Hispanic Recruitment Sources; (4) Native American/Alaskan Native Recruitment Sources; (5) Persons with Disabilities Recruitment Sources; and (6) Women Recruitment Sources.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ENRAF gauge reference level calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the method for calculating reference levels for Enraf Series 854 Level Detectors as installed in the tank farms. The reference level calculation for each installed level gauge is contained herein.

Huber, J.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

Nucleon electromagnetic form factors from lattice QCD using a nearly physical pion mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present lattice QCD calculations of nucleon electromagnetic form factors using pion masses $m_\\pi$ = 149, 202, and 254 MeV and an action with clover-improved Wilson quarks coupled to smeared gauge fields, as used by the Budapest-Marseille-Wuppertal collaboration. Particular attention is given to removal of the effects of excited state contamination by calculation at three source-sink separations and use of the summation and generalized pencil-of-function methods. The combination of calculation at the nearly physical mass $m_\\pi$ = 149 MeV in a large spatial volume ($m_\\pi L_s$ = 4.2) and removal of excited state effects yields agreement with experiment for the electric and magnetic form factors $G_E(Q^2)$ and $G_M(Q^2)$ up to $Q^2$ = 0.5 GeV$^2$.

J. R. Green; J. W. Negele; A. V. Pochinsky; S. N. Syritsyn; M. Engelhardt; S. Krieg

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

120

Burnup calculation methodology in the serpent 2 Monte Carlo code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents two topics related to the burnup calculation capabilities in the Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code: advanced time-integration methods and improved memory management, accomplished by the use of different optimization modes. The development of the introduced methods is an important part of re-writing the Serpent source code, carried out for the purpose of extending the burnup calculation capabilities from 2D assembly-level calculations to large 3D reactor-scale problems. The progress is demonstrated by repeating a PWR test case, originally carried out in 2009 for the validation of the newly-implemented burnup calculation routines in Serpent 1. (authors)

Leppaenen, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O.Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Isotalo, A. [Aalto Univ., Dept. of Applied Physics, P.O.Box 14100, FI-00076 AALTO (Finland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Iterative acceleration methods for Monte Carlo and deterministic criticality calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If you have ever given up on a nuclear criticality calculation and terminated it because it took so long to converge, you might find this thesis of interest. The author develops three methods for improving the fission source convergence in nuclear criticality calculations for physical systems with high dominance ratios for which convergence is slow. The Fission Matrix Acceleration Method and the Fission Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (FDSA) Method are acceleration methods that speed fission source convergence for both Monte Carlo and deterministic methods. The third method is a hybrid Monte Carlo method that also converges for difficult problems where the unaccelerated Monte Carlo method fails. The author tested the feasibility of all three methods in a test bed consisting of idealized problems. He has successfully accelerated fission source convergence in both deterministic and Monte Carlo criticality calculations. By filtering statistical noise, he has incorporated deterministic attributes into the Monte Carlo calculations in order to speed their source convergence. He has used both the fission matrix and a diffusion approximation to perform unbiased accelerations. The Fission Matrix Acceleration method has been implemented in the production code MCNP and successfully applied to a real problem. When the unaccelerated calculations are unable to converge to the correct solution, they cannot be accelerated in an unbiased fashion. A Hybrid Monte Carlo method weds Monte Carlo and a modified diffusion calculation to overcome these deficiencies. The Hybrid method additionally possesses reduced statistical errors.

Urbatsch, T.J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

REMOVAL OF THE CALIFORNIUM SOURCES FROM THE 222-S LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document develops a proposal for removal of 2-Californium sources from the 222-S Laboratory. Included in this document are assessments of shipping packages and decay calculations.

LINSTRUM D; BAUNE HL

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

DOE's Roof Savings Calculator (RSC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy consumption, 2006 Source: Building Energy Data Book, U.S. DOE, Prepared by D&R International, Ltd and windows Source: Building Energy Data Book, U.S. DOE, Prepared by D&R International, Ltd., September 2008. Figure 3. Commercial energy loads attributed to envelope and windows Source: Building Energy Data Book, U

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

124

CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International RecommendationsCalculation of Natural Daylight," CIE PUBLICATION No. 16,Committee E-3.2, "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

Bryan, Harvey J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International Recommendationsthe Calculation of Natural Daylight, 11 CIE PUBLICATION No.Committee E-3.2 1 "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

Bryan, Harvey J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Angular Size-Redshift: Experiment and Calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper the next attempt is made to clarify the nature of the Euclidean behavior of the boundary in the angular size-redshift cosmological test. It is shown experimentally that this can be explained by the selection determined by anisotropic morphology and anisotropic radiation of extended radio sources. A catalogue of extended radio sources with minimal flux densities of about 0.01 Jy at 1.4 GHz was compiled for conducting the test. Without the assumption of their size evolution, the agreement between the experiment and calculation was obtained both in the Lambda CDM model (Omega_m=0.27 , Omega_v=0.73.) and the Friedman model (Omega = 0.1 ).

Amirkhanyan, V R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Source depth for solar p-modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretically calculated power spectra are compares with observed solar p-mode velocity power spectra over a range of mode degree and frequency. The depth for the sources responsible for exciting p-modes of frequency 2.0 mHz is determined from the asymmetry of their power spectra and found to be about 800 km below the photosphere for quadrupole sources and 150 km if sources are dipole. The source depth for high frequency oscillations of frequency greater than about 6 mHz is 180 (50) km for quadrupole (dipole) sources.

Pawan Kumar; Sarbani Basu

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Radiation source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB). Users' manual and technical documentation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released May 31, 2012 which includes corn, as did the previous CCLUB version, and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. CCLUB calculations are based upon two data sets: land change areas and above- and below-ground carbon content. Table 1 identifies where these data are stored and used within the CCLUB model, which is built in MS Excel. Land change area data is from Purdue University's Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model, a computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic model. Section 2 describes the GTAP data CCLUB uses and how these data were modified to reflect shrubland transitions. Feedstock- and spatially-explicit below-ground carbon content data for the United States were generated with a surrogate model for CENTURY's soil organic carbon sub-model (Kwon and Hudson 2010) as described in Section 3. CENTURY is a soil organic matter model developed by Parton et al. (1987). The previous CCLUB version used more coarse domestic carbon emission factors. Above-ground non-soil carbon content data for forest ecosystems was sourced from the USDA/NCIAS Carbon Online Estimator (COLE) as explained in Section 4. We discuss emission factors used for calculation of international greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Section 5. Temporal issues associated with modeling LUC emissions are the topic of Section 6. Finally, in Section 7 we provide a step-by-step guide to using CCLUB and obtaining results.

Mueller, S; Dunn, JB; Wang, M (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

130

Computational Tools for Supersymmetry Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present a brief overview of a variety of computational tools for supersymmetry calculations, including: spectrum generators, cross section and branching fraction calculators, low energy constraints, general purpose event generators, matrix element event generators, SUSY dark matter codes, parameter extraction codes and Les Houches interface tools.

Howard Baer

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

131

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. ARRRG and FOOD: computer programs for calculating radiation dose to man from radionuclides in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer programs ARRRG and FOOD were written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from the radionuclides in the environment and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Using ARRRG, radiation doses to man may be calculated for radionuclides released to bodies of water from which people might obtain fish, other aquatic foods, or drinking water, and in which they might fish, swim or boat. With the FOOD program, radiation doses to man may be calculated from deposition on farm or garden soil and crops during either an atmospheric or water release of radionuclides. Deposition may be either directly from the air or from irrigation water. Fifteen crop or animal product pathways may be chosen. ARRAG and FOOD doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. Doses calculated are a one-year dose and a committed dose from one year of exposure. The exposure is usually considered as chronic; however, equations are included to calculate dose and dose commitment from acute (one-time) exposure. The equations for calculating internal dose and dose commitment are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated farm fields or shorelines are calculated assuming an infinite flat plane source of radionuclides. A factor of two is included for surface roughness. A modifying factor to compensate for finite extent is included in the shoreline calculations.

Napier, B.A.; Roswell, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Selected nucleon form factors and a composite scalar diquark J. C. R. Bloch, C. D. Roberts, and S. M. Schmidt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, however, the calculation of meson-baryon form factors is an essential element of contemporary phenomenol

Bloch, Jacques C.R.

133

Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the volcanic ash exposure scenario, and the development of dose factors for calculating inhalation dose during volcanic eruption. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters, their development and the relationship between the parameters and specific features, events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the volcanic ash exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and from the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169671]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; and BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis''. The objective of this analysis was to develop the BDCFs for the volcanic ash exposure scenario and the dose factors for calculating inhalation doses during volcanic eruption (eruption phase of the volcanic event). For the volcanic ash exposure scenario, the mode of radionuclide release into the biosphere is a volcanic eruption through the repository with the resulting entrainment of contaminated waste in the tephra and the subsequent atmospheric transport and dispersion of contaminated material in the biosphere. The biosphere process model for this scenario uses the surface deposition of contaminated ash as the source of radionuclides in the biosphere. The initial atmospheric transport and dispersion of the ash as well as its subsequent redistribution by fluvial and aeolian processes are not addressed within the biosphere model. These processes influence the value of the source term that is calculated elsewhere and then combined with the BDCFs in the TSPA model to calculate expected dose to the receptor. Another objective of this analysis was to re-qualify the output of the previous revision (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163958]).

M. Wasiolek

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

134

Development of a criteria based strategic sourcing model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategic sourcing is a key factor in enhancing Nike's competitiveness and organizational and operational performances. As Nike faces increasing pressure to expand margins and reduce source base risk during a climate of ...

Quiñonez, Carlo G. (Carlo Gabriel)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

Burdick, A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Calculations of multiquark functions in effective models of strong interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present our results of the investigation of multiquark equations in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with chiral symmetry of SU(2) group in the mean-field expansion. To formulate the mean-field expansion we have used an iteration scheme of solution of the Schwinger-Dyson equations with the fermion bilocal source. We have considered the equations for Green functions of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model up to third step for this iteration scheme. To calculate the high-order corrections to the mean-field approximation, we propose the method of the Legendre transformation with respect to the bilocal source, which allows effectively to take into account the symmetry constraints related with the chiral Ward identity. We discuss also the problem of calculating the multiquark functions in the mean-field expansion for Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type models with other types of the multifermion sources.

Jafarov, R. G., E-mail: raufjafarov@bsu.az [Institute for Physical Problems of Baku State University (Azerbaijan); Rochev, V. E. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Theoretical Division (Russian Federation)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Theoretical Division (Russian Federation)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Radiant-interchange configuration factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIANT-INTERCHANGE CONFIGURATION FACTORS A Thesis By THOMAS E DW ARD RE D DIN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1965 Major... wife, Dorene, whose patience and encouragement have been a constant source of inspiration. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I . INTRODUCTION PAGE ~ 0 1 II. THE GEOMETRY OF THE BLACK BODY CONFIGURATION FACTOR. . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1...

Reddin, Thomas Edward

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Calculations in support of a potential definition of large release  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated a hierarchy of safety goals with the qualitative safety goals as Level I of the hierarchy, backed up by the quantitative health objectives as Level II and the large release guideline as Level III. The large release guideline has been stated in qualitative terms as a magnitude of release of the core inventory whose frequency should not exceed 10{sup -6} per reactor year. However, the Commission did not provide a quantitative specification of a large release. This report describes various specifications of a large release and focuses, in particular, on an examination of releases which have a potential to lead to one prompt fatality in the mean. The basic information required to set up the calculations was derived from the simplified source terms which were obtained from approximations of the NUREG-1150 source terms. Since the calculation of consequences is affected by a large number of assumptions, a generic site with a (conservatively determined) population density and meteorology was specified. At this site, various emergency responses (including no response) were assumed based on information derived from earlier studies. For each of the emergency response assumptions, a set of calculations were performed with the simplified source terms; these included adjustments to the source terms, such as the timing of the release, the core inventory, and the release fractions of different radionuclides, to arrive at a result of one mean prompt fatality in each case. Each of the source terms, so defined, has the potential to be a candidate for a large release. The calculations show that there are many possible candidate source terms for a large release depending on the characteristics which are felt to be important.

Hanson, A.L.; Davis, R.E.; Mubayi, V.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A COMPARISON OF MEASURED AND CALCULATED GAMMA RAY ATTENUATION FOR A COMMON COUNTING GEOMETRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to perform quantitative gamma spectroscopy, it is necessary to know the sample-specific detection efficiency for photons as a function of energy. The detection efficiency, along with the branching ratio for the isotope and gamma ray of interest, is used to convert observed counts/second to actual disintegrations/second, and, hence, has a large effect on the accuracy of the measurement. In cases where the geometry of the source is simple and reproducible, such as a point source, small vial of solid, or jar of liquid, geometry-specific standards may be counted to determine the detection efficiency. In cases where the samples are large, irregular, or unique, this method generally cannot be used. For example, it is impossible to obtain a NIST-traceable standard glovebox or 55-gallon drum. In these cases, a combination of measured absolute detector efficiency and calculated sample-specific correction factors is commonly used. The correction factors may be calculated via Monte Carlo simulation of the item (the method used by Canberra's ISOCS system), or via semi-empirical calculation of matrix and container attenuations based on the thickness and composition of the container and radioactive matrix (ISOTOPIC by EG&G Ortec uses this method). The accuracy of these correction factors for specific geometries is often of vital interest when assessing the quality of gamma spectroscopy data. During the Building 251 Risk-Reduction Project, over 100 samples of high activity actinides will be characterized via gamma spectroscopy, typically without removing the material from the current storage containers. Most of the radioactive materials in B-251 are stored in cylindrical stainless steel canisters (called USV containers, after the Underground Storage Vaults they are commonly stored in), 13 cm in diameter, by 28 cm high, with walls that are 1.8 mm thick. While the actual samples have a variety of configurations inside the USV container, a very common configuration is the material (usually as an oxide powder pellet of approximately 2 cm diameter by {approx}2 mm thick) in a squat glass jar, with the jar placed in a thin steel food-pack can, which is then placed in the bottom of the USV canister. During data acquisition, the USV containers are typically rotated at approximately 4 rpm on a turntable to eliminate errors due to the material not being centered in the can, or attenuation not being isotropic. An aluminum plate is placed over the container, secured by three vertical rods, to securely hold the container. Pictures of both the containers, and this typical counting configuration are shown below.

Gaylord, R F

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A BrachyPhantom for verification of dose calculation of HDR brachytherapy planning system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a calibration phantom for {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy units that renders possible the direct measurement of absorbed dose to water and verification of treatment planning system.Methods: A phantom, herein designated BrachyPhantom, consists of a Solid Water™ 8-cm high cylinder with a diameter of 14 cm cavity in its axis that allows the positioning of an A1SL ionization chamber with its reference measuring point at the midheight of the cylinder's axis. Inside the BrachyPhantom, at a 3-cm radial distance from the chamber's reference measuring point, there is a circular channel connected to a cylindrical-guide cavity that allows the insertion of a 6-French flexible plastic catheter from the BrachyPhantom surface. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to calculate a factor, P{sub sw}{sup lw}, to correct the reading of the ionization chamber to a full scatter condition in liquid water. The verification of dose calculation of a HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system was performed by inserting a catheter with a dummy source in the phantom channel and scanning it with a CT. The CT scan was then transferred to the HDR computer program in which a multiple treatment plan was programmed to deliver a total dose of 150 cGy to the ionization chamber. The instrument reading was then converted to absorbed dose to water using the N{sub gas} formalism and the P{sub sw}{sup lw} factor. Likewise, the absorbed dose to water was calculated using the source strength, S{sub k}, values provided by 15 institutions visited in this work.Results: A value of 1.020 (0.09%, k= 2) was found for P{sub sw}{sup lw}. The expanded uncertainty in the absorbed dose assessed with the BrachyPhantom was found to be 2.12% (k= 1). To an associated S{sub k} of 27.8 cGy m{sup 2} h{sup ?1}, the total irradiation time to deliver 150 cGy to the ionization chamber point of reference was 161.0 s. The deviation between the absorbed doses to water assessed with the BrachyPhantom and those calculated by the treatment plans and using the S{sub k} values did not exceed ±3% and ±1.6%, respectively.Conclusions: The BrachyPhantom may be conveniently used for quality assurance and/or verification of HDR planning system with a priori threshold level to spot problems of 2% and ±3%, respectively, and in the long run save time for the medical physicist.

Austerlitz, C. [Clinica Diana Campos, Recife, PE 52020-030 (Brazil)] [Clinica Diana Campos, Recife, PE 52020-030 (Brazil); Campos, C. A. T. [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22451-900 (Brazil)] [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22451-900 (Brazil)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

History and evolution of buildup factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gamma-ray buildup factor is a term whose origin is lost in the mists of the early history of the Manhattan Project.' Its introduction stems from the observation that the calculations for the uncollided photons, i.e., those that have arrived at R without suffering any collisions, are usually a relatively simple matter, involving only an exponential kernel. The buildup factor is then a multiplicative factor, which corrects the answer that is proportional to the uncollided flux density to include the effects of the scattered photons. This paper further summarizes and traces efforts since 1954 at calculating and mathematically defining buildup factors.

Trubey, D.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Adaptive Calculation of Variable Coefficients Elliptic Differential Equations via Wavelets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Description Generating a "good" discrete representation for continuous operators is one of the basic problemsAdaptive Calculation of Variable Coefficients Elliptic Differential Equations via Wavelets Amir rather than in the original physical space can speed up the performance of the sparse solver by a factor

Averbuch, Amir

144

Monte Carlo calculations of nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear many-body calculations have the complication of strong spin- and isospin-dependent potentials. In these lectures the author discusses the variational and Green`s function Monte Carlo techniques that have been developed to address this complication, and presents a few results.

Pieper, S.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

BWR Source Term Generation and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculation is a revision of a previous calculation (Ref. 7.5) that bears the same title and has the document identifier BBAC00000-01717-0210-00006 REV 01. The purpose of this revision is to remove TBV (to-be-verified) -41 10 associated with the output files of the previous version (Ref. 7.30). The purpose of this and the previous calculation is to generate source terms for a representative boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly for the first one million years after the SNF is discharged from the reactors. This calculation includes an examination of several ways to represent BWR assemblies and operating conditions in SAS2H in order to quantify the effects these representations may have on source terms. These source terms provide information characterizing the neutron and gamma spectra in particles per second, the decay heat in watts, and radionuclide inventories in curies. Source terms are generated for a range of burnups and enrichments (see Table 2) that are representative of the waste stream and stainless steel (SS) clad assemblies. During this revision, it was determined that the burnups used for the computer runs of the previous revision were actually about 1.7% less than the stated, or nominal, burnups. See Section 6.6 for a discussion of how to account for this effect before using any source terms from this calculation. The source term due to the activation of corrosion products deposited on the surfaces of the assembly from the coolant is also calculated. The results of this calculation support many areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR), which include thermal evaluation, radiation dose determination, radiological safety analyses, surface and subsurface facility designs, and total system performance assessment. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (Ref. 7.27, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (Ref. 7.28). The performance of the calculation and development of this document are carried out in accordance with AP-3.124, ''Design Calculation and Analyses'' (Ref. 7.29).

J.C. Ryman

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Electrolytes for power sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

Protected Water Sources (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter designates protected water sources, which are subject to additional special conditions regarding water use. Permit applications for water withdrawals from these sources may still be...

149

Bioaccumulation factor of {sup 137}Cs in some marine biotas from West Bangka Indonesia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclides may be released from nuclear facilities to the marine environment. Concentrations of radionuclides within marine biotic systems can be influenced by a number of factors, including the type of biota, its source, the radionuclide, and specific characteristics of the sampled specimens and the marine environment (salinity, etc.). The bioconcentration factor for a marine organism is the ratio of the concentration of a radionuclide in that organism to the concentration found in its marine water environment - under conditions of equilibrium. Information on the bioaccumulation of Cs-137 in marine organisms is required to risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health. Bioaccumulation of Cs was investigated in marine biota from west Bangka such as Marine cat fish (Arius thalassinus), Baramundi (Lates calcarifer), Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson), Striped eel catfish (Plotosus lineatus), eel tailed fish (Euristhmus microceps), Yellowtail fusilier (Caesio erythrogaster), Coastal crab (Scylla sp), White shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis) and marine bivalve mollusk (Anadara granosa). Muscle of these marine biota, sediments and water were assayed for Cs-137 by HPGe gamma spectrometer. The bioaccumulation factor for fishes were calculated by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in water. The bioaccumulation factor for mollusks were calculates by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in sediments. The bioaccumulation factor were range 4.99 to 136.34.

Suseno, Heny, E-mail: henis@batan.go.id [Radioactive Waste Technology Center - The Indonesia Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

Proliferation Potential of Accelerator-Drive Systems: Feasibility Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerator-driven systems for fissile materials production have been proposed and studied since the early 1950s. Recent advances in beam power levels for small accelerators have raised the possibility that such use could be feasible for a potential proliferator. The objective of this study is to review the state of technology development for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources and subcritical reactors. Energy and power requirements were calculated for a proton accelerator-driven neutron spallation source and subcritical reactors to produce a significant amount of fissile material--plutonium.

Riendeau, C.D.; Moses, D.L.; Olson, A.P.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

anthracis lethal factor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B -> K Jpsi data to extract a set of parameters which give the relevant hadronic matrix elements in terms of factorized amplitudes. Various sources of theoretical uncertainties...

152

alfa como factor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B -> K Jpsi data to extract a set of parameters which give the relevant hadronic matrix elements in terms of factorized amplitudes. Various sources of theoretical uncertainties...

153

End-to-end calculation of the radiation characteristics of VVER-1000 spent fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of end-to-end calculation of the radiation characteristics of VVER-1000 spent nuclear fuel are presented. Details of formation of neutron and gamma-radiation sources are analyzed. Distributed sources of different types of radiation are considered. A comparative analysis of calculated radiation characteristics is performed with the use of nuclear data from different ENDF/B and EAF files and ANSI/ANS and ICRP standards.

Linge, I. I.; Mitenkova, E. F., E-mail: mit@ibrae.ac.ru; Novikov, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Nuclear Safety Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9,...

155

GEOMETRIC SOURCE SEPARATION: MERGING CONVOLUTIVE SOURCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adaptive beamforming algorithms by a cross-power criteria, we gain new geometric source separation with convo- lutive blind source separation. We concentrate on cross-power spectral min- imization which is su to ambiguities in the choice of separating lters. There are in theory multiple lters that invert the room

Parra, Lucas C.

156

Daily dispersion model calculations of the Kuwait oil fire smoke plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provided daily forecasts of the position and spatial character of the Kuwait oil fire smoke plume to the NSF-coordinated research aircraft missions in the Persian Gulf. ARAC also provided daily plume dispersion products to various nations in the Persian Gulf region under the auspices of the World Meteorological Organization for a period of nearly 5 months. Forecasted three dimensional winds were provided to ARAC from the US Air Force Global Weather Central's Relocatable Wind Model (RWM). The RWM winds were spaced approximately 90 km in the horizontal and were located at the surface, 1000 ft., 2000 ft, 5000 ft and every 5000 ft up to 30,000 ft elevation. The forecast periods were 0, 6, 24, and 36 hours from both 0000 and 1200 UTC. A wind field model (MATHEW) corrected for terrain influences on the wind. The smoke plume was dispersed using a three dimensional particle-in-cell code (ADPIC) with buoyant plume rise capability. Multiple source locations were used to represent the burning oil fields. Improved estimates of the source term and emission factors for the smoke were incorporated into the ADPIC calculations as the field measurement data were made available.

Ellis, J.S.; Foster, C.S.; Foster, K.T.; Sullivan, T.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Baskett, R.L.; Nasstrom, J.S.; Schalk, W.W. III (EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)); Greenly, G.D. (IT Corp., Irvine, CA (United States))

1992-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

157

Daily dispersion model calculations of the Kuwait oil fire smoke plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provided daily forecasts of the position and spatial character of the Kuwait oil fire smoke plume to the NSF-coordinated research aircraft missions in the Persian Gulf. ARAC also provided daily plume dispersion products to various nations in the Persian Gulf region under the auspices of the World Meteorological Organization for a period of nearly 5 months. Forecasted three dimensional winds were provided to ARAC from the US Air Force Global Weather Central`s Relocatable Wind Model (RWM). The RWM winds were spaced approximately 90 km in the horizontal and were located at the surface, 1000 ft., 2000 ft, 5000 ft and every 5000 ft up to 30,000 ft elevation. The forecast periods were 0, 6, 24, and 36 hours from both 0000 and 1200 UTC. A wind field model (MATHEW) corrected for terrain influences on the wind. The smoke plume was dispersed using a three dimensional particle-in-cell code (ADPIC) with buoyant plume rise capability. Multiple source locations were used to represent the burning oil fields. Improved estimates of the source term and emission factors for the smoke were incorporated into the ADPIC calculations as the field measurement data were made available.

Ellis, J.S.; Foster, C.S.; Foster, K.T.; Sullivan, T.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Baskett, R.L.; Nasstrom, J.S.; Schalk, W.W. III [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Greenly, G.D. [IT Corp., Irvine, CA (United States)

1992-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

158

E-Print Network 3.0 - atherosclerotic risk factors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

risk factors... of atherosclerotic ... Source: Jadvar, Hossein - Departments of Biomedical Engineering & Radiology, University of Southern California Collection: Biology and...

159

Ultrabright Backward-wave Biphoton Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the properties of a biphoton source based on resonant backward-wave spontaneous parametric down-conversion. We show that the biphotons are generated in a single longitudinal mode having a subnatural linewidth and a Glauber correlation time exceeding 65 ns.

Chih-Sung Chuu; S. E. Harris

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Calculation of TMD Evolution for Transverse Single Spin Asymmetry Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sivers transverse single spin asymmetry (TSSA) is calculated and compared at different scales using the TMD evolution equations applied to previously existing extractions. We apply the Collins-Soper-Sterman (CSS) formalism, using the version recently developed by Collins. Our calculations rely on the universality properties of TMD-functions that follow from the TMD-factorization theorem. Accordingly, the non-perturbative input is fixed by earlier experimental measurements, including both polarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and unpolarized Drell-Yan (DY) scattering. It is shown that recent COMPASS measurements are consistent with the suppression prescribed by TMD evolution.

S. Mert Aybat; Alexei Prokudin; Ted C. Rogers

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

162

Field-theory calculation of the electric dipole moment of the neutron and paramagnetic atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric dipole moments (edms) of bound states that arise from the constituents having edms are studied with field-theoretic techniques. The systems treated are the neutron and a set of paramagnetic atoms. In the latter case it is well known that the atomic edm differs greatly from the electron edm when the internal electric fields of the atom are taken into account. In the nonrelativistic limit these fields lead to a complete suppression, but for heavy atoms large enhancement factors are present. A general bound-state field theory approach applicable to both the neutron and paramagnetic atoms is set up. It is applied first to the neutron, treating the quarks as moving freely in a confining spherical well. It is shown that the effect of internal electric fields is small in this case. The atomic problem is then revisited using field-theory techniques in place of the usual Hamiltonian methods, and the atomic enhancement factor is shown to be consistent with previous calculations. Possible application of bound-state techniques to other sources of the neutron edm is discussed.

S. A. Blundell; J. Griffith; J. Sapirstein

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources a significant effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 15

164

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.0 pounds

165

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.5 pounds

166

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.3 pounds

167

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per Capita Consumption 84 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.3 pounds

168

Study the sensitivity of dose calculation in prism treatment planning system using Monte Carlo simulation of 6 MeV electron beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prism is a non-commercial Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System (RTPS) develop by Ira J. Kalet from Washington University. Inhomogeneity factor is included in Prism TPS dose calculation. The aim of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of dose calculation on Prism using Monte Carlo simulation. Phase space source from head linear accelerator (LINAC) for Monte Carlo simulation is implemented. To achieve this aim, Prism dose calculation is compared with EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation. Percentage depth dose (PDD) and R50 from both calculations are observed. BEAMnrc is simulated electron transport in LINAC head and produced phase space file. This file is used as DOSXYZnrc input to simulated electron transport in phantom. This study is started with commissioning process in water phantom. Commissioning process is adjusted Monte Carlo simulation with Prism RTPS. Commissioning result is used for study of inhomogeneity phantom. Physical parameters of inhomogeneity phantom that varied in this study are: density, location and thickness of tissue. Commissioning result is shown that optimum energy of Monte Carlo simulation for 6 MeV electron beam is 6.8 MeV. This commissioning is used R50 and PDD with Practical length (R{sub p}) as references. From inhomogeneity study, the average deviation for all case on interest region is below 5 %. Based on ICRU recommendations, Prism has good ability to calculate the radiation dose in inhomogeneity tissue.

Hardiansyah, D.; Haryanto, F. [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Laboratory, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) (Indonesia); Male, S. [Radiotherapy Division, Research Hospital of Hassanudin University (Indonesia)

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Gas Deliverability Using the Method of Distributed Volumetric Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

larger part of the well lifetime and these pseudosteady-state productivity calculations become less applicable in prediction of the reservoir?s production behavior. The Distributed Volumetric Sources (DVS) method seems able to fill this gap. Our method...

Jin, Xiaoze

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

On calculation of microlensing light curve by gravitational lens caustic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For an analysis of microlensing observational data in case of binary gravitational lenses as well as for an interpretation of observations of high magnification events in multiple images of a lensed quasar it is necessary to calculate for a given source the microlensing light curve by a fold caustic. This problem comes to the numerical calculation of a singular integral. We formulated the sufficient condition of a convergence of the integral sum for this singular integral. The strictly approach to the problem of a comparison of model results with the unequally sampled observational data consists in calculation of the model light curve in equidistant points of the canonical dissection of the integration segment and a following interpolation of its values at the moments of observations.

M. B. Bogdanov

2001-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

171

Monte Carlo reactor calculation with substantially reduced number of cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new Monte Carlo (MC) eigenvalue calculation scheme that substantially reduces the number of cycles is introduced with the aid of coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) formulation. First, it is confirmed in terms of pin power errors that using extremely many particles resulting in short active cycles is beneficial even in the conventional MC scheme although wasted operations in inactive cycles cannot be reduced with more particles. A CMFD-assisted MC scheme is introduced as an effort to reduce the number of inactive cycles and the fast convergence behavior and reduced inter-cycle effect of the CMFD assisted MC calculation is investigated in detail. As a practical means of providing a good initial fission source distribution, an assembly based few-group condensation and homogenization scheme is introduced and it is shown that efficient MC eigenvalue calculations with fewer than 20 total cycles (including inactive cycles) are possible for large power reactor problems. (authors)

Lee, M. J.; Joo, H. G. [Seoul National Univ., 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D. [Ulsan National Inst. of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan, 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Smith, K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Heavy quark impact factor for the LHC phenomenology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We comment on the calculation of the finite part of the heavy quark impact factor at next-to-leading logarithmic (NLx) accuracy. The result is presented in a form suitable for phenomenological studies such as the calculation of the cross-section for single heavy quark production at the LHC within the kT-factorization scheme.

Grigorios Chachamis; Michal Deak; German Rodrigo

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

173

Assessment of emerging energy sources. Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a broad review and analysis of the commercialization potential for eight emerging sources of energy: tight gas sands; heavy oil; methane from geopressured aquifers; oil shale; enhanced oil recovery; advanced coal mining technologies; and underground coal gasification. Each source of energy or technology was evaluated with respect to six factors affecting commercialization: size and characteristics of resource; technical and economic performance; relevant energy market growth rates; logistical considerations; development lead times; and regulatory and institutional factors. The evaluation was based on a review of existing literature, extensive interviews with industry experts and Booz-Allen and Hamilton's overall assessment of the degree to which these factors would constrain commercial development. In addition estimates were made of supply potential from each emerging energy. This report summarizes Booz Allen's findings with respect to these factors.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Energy CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS Michael Rub August 1981 TWO-WEEK LOAN

Rubin, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and human pulmonary deposition calculations for Nuclear Site 201, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study determined the plutonium-aerosol fluxes from the soil to quantify (1) the extent of potential human exposure by deep-lung retention of alpha-emitting particles; (2) the source term should there be any significant, long-term, transport of plutonium aerosols; and (3) the resuspension factor and rate so that, for the first time at any nuclear site, one may calculate how long it will take for wind erosion to carry away a significant amount of the contaminated soil. High-volume air samplers and cascade impactors were used to characterize the plutonium aerosols. Meteorological flux-profile methods were used to calculate dust and plutonium aerosol emission rates. A floorless wind tunnel (10-m long) was used to examine resuspension under steady-state, high wind speed. The resuspension factor was two orders of magnitude lower than the other comparable sites at NTS and elsewhere, and the average resuspension rate of 5.3 x 10/sup -8//d was also very low, so that the half-time for resuspension by wind erosion was about 36,000 y.

Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

176

Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

relationship between the sensor orientation and the received artificial electromagnetic interference, influence of weather conditions on the data quality and so on. The results...

177

Tanning bed use, deviance regulation theory, and source factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions were successful. If participants thought their peers were receiving flu shots, messages which emphasized the negative attribute of 13 irresponsibility for people who did not receive a flu shot were effective at changing individuals...

Head, Katharine J.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil JumpAltergyExperiments | Open EnergyRejection/Recycling

179

Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

ESTIMATING THE UNCERTAINTY IN REACTIVITY ACCIDENT NEUTRONIC CALCULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the uncertainty in calculations of the rod ejection accident in a pressurized water reactor is being carried out for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper is a progress report on that study. Results are presented for the sensitivity of core energy deposition to the key parameters: ejected rod worth, delayed neutron fraction, Doppler reactivity coefficient, and fuel specific heat. These results can be used in the future to estimate the uncertainty in local fuel enthalpy given some assumptions about the uncertainty in the key parameters. This study is also concerned with the effect of the intra-assembly representation in calculations. The issue is the error that might be present if assembly-average power is calculated, and pin peaking factors from a static calculation are then used to determine local fuel enthalpy. This is being studied with the help of a collaborative effort with Russian and French analysts who are using codes with different intra-assembly representations. The US code being used is PARCS which calculates power on an assembly-average basis. The Russian code being used is BARS which calculates power for individual fuel pins using a heterogeneous representation based on a Green's Function method.

DIAMOND,D.J.; YANG,C.Y.; ARONSON,A.L.

1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Estimating the uncertainty in reactivity accident neutronic calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the uncertainty in calculations of the rod ejection accident in a pressurized water reactor is being carried out for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper is a progress report on that study. Results are presented for the sensitivity of core energy deposition to the key parameters: ejected rod worth, delayed neutron fraction, Doppler reactivity coefficient, and fuel specific heat. These results can be used in the future to estimate the uncertainty in local fuel enthalpy given some assumptions about the uncertainty in the key parameters. This study is also concerned with the effect of the intra-assembly representation in calculations. The issue is the error that might be present if assembly-average power is calculated, and pin peaking factors from a static calculation are then used to determine local fuel enthalpy. This is being studied with the help of a collaborative effort with Russian and French analysts who are using codes with different intra-assembly representations. The US code being used is PARCS which calculates power on an assembly-average basis. The Russian code being used is BARS which calculates power for individual fuel pins using a heterogeneous representation based on a Green`s Function method.

Diamond, D.J.; Yang, C.Y.; Aronson, A.L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Automated convergence detection in Monte Carlo criticality calculations using student's bridge statistics based on K{sub eff} or Shannon entropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo (MC) criticality calculations are based on an iterative method. It requires a converged fission source distribution before beginning tallying the effective multiplication factor (K{sub eff}) or other quantities of interest. However, it is pretty difficult to locate on the run, the end of the source convergence and scores may be biased by an initial transient. This paper deals with a method that locates and suppresses the transient due to the initialization in an output series, applied here to K{sub eff} and Shannon entropy. It relies on modeling stationary series by an order 1 auto regressive process and applying statistical tests based on a Student Bridge statistics. It should be noticed that the initial transient suppression only aims at obtaining stationary output series and cannot guarantee any kind of convergence. The truncation method is applied on both K{sub eff} and Shannon entropy on three test cases. (authors)

Jinaphanh, A.; Miss, J.; Richet, Y. [Inst. for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety IRSN, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-Aux-Roses Cedex (France); Jacquet, O. [Independent Consultant (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

DC source assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

184

RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Calculation of free-energy differences and potentials of mean force by a multi-energy gap method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculation of free-energy differences and potentials of mean force by a multi-energy gap method the convergence of free-energy calculations. It introduces a bias factor in Monte Carlo simulations or.e., the difference in energy function between two states, and is therefore specifically designed for calculating free-energy

Weston, Ken

186

Calculator Tips for TI-30XA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TI-30XA Calculator Tips. Calculator Memory. - To use the memory function, hit the STO key to store a number in either memory 1, 2, or 3. o To store the product of ...

Owen Davis

2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Application of the sources code in nuclear safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sources Code System provides a greatly expanded calculational capacity in the field of nuclear safeguards. It is becoming more common that we are called upon to perform assays on materials for which no standards exist. These materials tend to be mixtures of nuclear materials and low-Z compounds (spent fuels in a variety of matrices, in-process compounds such as UF6, MOX with varying water content). We will present soma applications of the Sources Code and discuss the application calculated (a,n) source terms in neutron coincidence counting for nuclear safeguards.

Beddingfield, D. H. (David H.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

Wang, Lin-Wang

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations Charles G. Nathanson1. , Corina E. Here we provide a general formula for calculating evolutionary dynamics in a wide class of structured) Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations. PLoS Comput Biol 5(12): e1000615. doi:10

Nowak, Martin A.

190

User`s Manual for the SOURCE1 and SOURCE2 Computer Codes: Models for Evaluating Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Source Terms (Version 2.0)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SOURCE1 and SOURCE2 computer codes calculate source terms (i.e. radionuclide release rates) for performance assessments of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. SOURCE1 is used to simulate radionuclide releases from tumulus-type facilities. SOURCE2 is used to simulate releases from silo-, well-, well-in-silo-, and trench-type disposal facilities. The SOURCE codes (a) simulate the degradation of engineered barriers and (b) provide an estimate of the source term for LLW disposal facilities. This manual summarizes the major changes that have been effected since the codes were originally developed.

Icenhour, A.S.; Tharp, M.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Dynamic radioactive particle source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

on Energy and Water Development U.S. House of Representatives The Honorable Lamar Alexander Ranking Member SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION...

193

SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -  

Energy Savers [EERE]

on Energy and Water Development U.S. House of Representatives The Honorable Lamar Alexander SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (FAR)...

194

Bioavailability of PAHs: Effects of Soot Carbon and PAH Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biota-sediment-accumulation factors (BSAF). BSAF values were calculated from individual PAH of the bioaccumulation experiments. BSAF values for petrogenic PAH were greater than those for pyrogenic PAH (e.g., 1 when calculating BSAF values, and using PAH

Cope, W. Gregory

195

The Small Town Carbon Calculator (STOCC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs Source: Energy Information Administration #12;Rising Oil Costs Source: Energy Information energy inventory tool (Excel spreadsheet) Decision relevant information Energy cost Carbon dioxide emissions Energy use Represents a key step towards improving a town's energy efficiency Inventory Audit

New Hampshire, University of

196

MILDOS - A Computer Program for Calculating Environmental Radiation Doses from Uranium Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MILDOS Computer Code estimates impacts from radioactive emissions from uranium milling facilities. These impacts are presented as dose commitments to individuals and the regional population within an 80 km radius of the facility. Only airborne releases of radioactive materials are considered: releases to surface water and to groundwater are not addressed in MILDOS. This code is multi-purposed and can be used to evaluate population doses for NEPA assessments, maximum individual doses for predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations, or maximum offsite air concentrations for predictive evaluations of 10 CFR 20 compliance. Emissions of radioactive materials from fixed point source locations and from area sources are modeled using a sector-averaged Gaussian plume dispersion model, which utilizes user-provided wind frequency data. Mechanisms such as deposition of particulates, resuspension. radioactive decay and ingrowth of daughter radionuclides are included in the transport model. Annual average air concentrations are computed, from which subsequent impacts to humans through various pathways are computed. Ground surface concentrations are estimated from deposition buildup and ingrowth of radioactive daughters. The surface concentrations are modified by radioactive decay, weathering and other environmental processes. The MILDOS Computer Code allows the user to vary the emission sources as a step function of time by adjustinq the emission rates. which includes shutting them off completely. Thus the results of a computer run can be made to reflect changing processes throughout the facility's operational lifetime. The pathways considered for individual dose commitments and for population impacts are: • Inhalation • External exposure from ground concentrations • External exposure from cloud immersion • Ingestioo of vegetables • Ingestion of meat • Ingestion of milk • Dose commitments are calculated using dose conversion factors, which are ultimately based on recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). These factors are fixed internally in the code, and are not part of the input option. Dose commitments which are available from the code are as follows: • Individual dose commitments for use in predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations (Radon and short-lived daughters are excluded) • Total individual dose commitments (impacts from all available radionuclides are considered) • Annual population dose commitments (regional, extraregional, total and cummulative). This model is primarily designed for uranium mill facilities, and should not be used for operations with different radionuclides or processes.

Strange, D. L.; Bander, T. J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Lithium ion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIFAN 1866 Lithium ion sources by Prabir K. Roy, Wayne G.No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Lithium ion sources Prabir K. RoyUSA Abstract A 10.9 cm diameter lithium alumino-silicate ion

Roy, Prabir K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ion beam energy spectrum calculation via dosimetry data deconvolution.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of a H{sup +} beam generated within the HERMES III accelerator is calculated from dosimetry data to refine future experiments. Multiple layers of radiochromic film are exposed to the beam. A graphic user interface was written in MATLAB to align the film images and calculate the beam's dose depth profile. Singular value regularization is used to stabilize the unfolding and provide the H{sup +} beam's energy spectrum. The beam was found to have major contributions from 1 MeV and 8.5 MeV protons. The HERMES III accelerator is typically used as a pulsed photon source to experimentally obtain photon impulse response of systems due to high energy photons. A series of experiments were performed to explore the use of Hermes III to generate an intense pulsed proton beam. Knowing the beam energy spectrum allows for greater precision in experiment predictions and beam model verification.

Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Sharp, Andrew Clinton (A& M University, College Station, TX)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Neutron sources and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Photonic crystal light source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

202

Piezotube borehole seismic source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A piezoelectric borehole source capable of permanent or semipermanent insertion into a well for uninterrupted well operations is described. The source itself comprises a series of piezoelectric rings mounted to an insulative mandrel internally sized to fit over a section of well tubing, the rings encased in a protective housing and electrically connected to a power source. Providing an AC voltage to the rings will cause expansion and contraction sufficient to create a sonic pulse. The piezoelectric borehole source fits into a standard well, and allows for uninterrupted pass-through of production tubing, and other tubing and electrical cables. Testing using the source may be done at any time, even concurrent with well operations, during standard production.

Daley, Tom M; Solbau, Ray D; Majer, Ernest L

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

203

Pulsed ion beam source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

Knobloch,Jürgen

205

Pion form factor with chirally improved fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results for Monte Carlo calculations of the electromagnetic vector and scalar form factors of the pion in a quenched simulation. We work at a lattice spacing of 0.15 fm and use two lattice volumes up to a spatial size of 2.4 fm. The pion form factors in the space-like region are determined for pion masses down to 340 MeV.

Stefano Capitani; Christof Gattringer; C. B. Lang

2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

206

Proton induced activation in mercury: Comparison of measurements and calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements and simulations of the proton beam interaction with the mercury target were performed to support Spallation Neutron Source design. Due to the abundance of isotopes produced in mercury, the long delay between the irradiation and the measurements, and the self-shielding of the mercury sample, the measurements were difficult to perform and the activities of several isotopes have large uncertainties. Calculations predicted the activities of the most reliably measured isotopes within 20%/40%; however, some large discrepancies were observed for some isotopes for which the measurements were considered less reliable. Predicted dose rates were in very good agreement with the measurements.

Remec, Igor [ORNL; Glasgow, David C [ORNL; Haines, John R [ORNL; Johnson, Jeffrey O [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Directional measurements for sources of fission neutrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although penetrating neutron and gamma-ray emissions arguably provide the most effective signals for locating sources of nuclear radiation, their relatively low fluxes make searching for radioactive materials a tedious process. Even assuming lightly shielded sources and detectors with large areas and high efficiencies, estimated counting times can exceed several minutes for source separations greater than ten meters. Because determining the source position requires measurements at several locations, each with its own background, the search procedure can be lengthy and difficult to automate. Although directional measurements can be helpful, conventional collimation reduces count rates and increases the detector size and weight prohibitively, especially for neutron instruments. We describe an alternative approach for locating radiation sources that is based on the concept of a polarized radiation field. In this model, the presence of a source adds a directional component to the randomly oriented background radiation. The net direction of the local field indicates the source angle, and the magnitude provides an estimate of the distance to the source. The search detector is therefore seen as a device that responds to this polarized radiation field. Our proposed instrument simply substitutes segmented detectors for conventional single-element ones, so it requires little or no collimating material or additional weight. Attenuation across the detector creates differences in the count rates for opposite segments, whose ratios can be used to calculate the orthogonal components of the polarization vector. Although this approach is applicable to different types of radiation and detectors, in this report we demonstrate its use for sources of fission neutrons by using a prototype fast-neutron detector, which also provides background-corrected energy spectra for the incident neutrons.

Byrd, R.C.; Auchampaugh, G.F.; Feldman, W.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The M31 population of supersoft sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 1991 ROSAT PSPC M31 X-ray point source catalog has been screened in order to set up a sample of candidate supersoft sources in this galaxy, additional to the 16 supersoft sources of Supper et al. (1997). 26 candidates have been found. Absorbing hydrogen column densities, effective temperatures and white dwarf masses (assuming the sources are on the stability line of surface nuclear burning) are derived. An observed white dwarf mass distribution is derived which indicates that the masses are constrained to values above 0.90 solar masses. The entire population of supersoft sources in M31 is estimated taking a theoretical white dwarf mass distribution into account, assuming that the observationally derived sample is restricted to white dwarf masses above 0.90 solar, and taking into account that the gas and the source population have a different scale height. A total number of at least 200-500 and at most 6,000-15,000 sources is deduced depending on the used galaxy N_H model, making use of the population synthesis calculation of Yungelson (1996). The spatial distribution favors a disk (or spiral-arm) dominated young stellar population with a ratio of 1/(4-7) of bulge/disk systems. Assuming that all supersoft sources with masses in excess of 0.5 solar masses are progenitors of supernovae of type Ia, a SN Ia rate of (0.8-7) 10^-3 yr^-1 is derived for M31 based on these progenitors. Supersoft sources might account for 20-100% of the total SN Ia rate in a galaxy like M31.

Peter Kahabka

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

209

Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Radiation Doses to Members of the U.S. Population from Ubiquitous Radionuclides in the Body: Part 2, Methods and Dose Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is part two of a three-part series investigating annual effective doses to residents of the United States from intakes of ubiquitous radionuclides, including radionuclides occurring naturally, radionuclides whose concentrations are technologically enhanced, and anthropogenic radionuclides. This series of papers explicitly excludes intakes from inhaling 222Rn, 220Rn, and their short-lived decay products; it also excludes intakes of radionuclides in occupational and medical settings. Part one reviewed, summarized, characterized, and grouped all published and some unpublished data for U.S. residents on ubiquitous radionuclide concentrations in tissues and organs. Assumptions about equilibrium with long-lived parents are made for the 28 other radionuclides in these series lacking data. This paper describes the methods developed to group the collected data into source regions described in the Radiation Dose Assessment Resource (RADAR) dosimetric methodology. Methods for converting the various units of data published over 50 years into a standard form are developed and described. Often, meaningful values of uncertainty of measurements were not published so that variability in data sets is confounded with measurement uncertainty. A description of the methods developed to estimate variability is included in this paper. The data described in part one are grouped by gender and age to match the RADAR dosimetric phantoms. Within these phantoms, concentration values are grouped into source tissue regions by radionuclide, and they are imputed for source regions lacking tissue data. Radionuclide concentrations are then imputed for other phantoms’ source regions with missing concentration values, and the uncertainties of the imputed values are increased. The content concentrations of hollow organs are calculated, and activities are apportioned to the bone source regions using assumptions about each radionuclide’s bone-seeking behavior. The data sets are then ready to be used to estimate equivalent doses to target tissues from these source regions. The target tissues are then mapped to lists of tissues with International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) tissue weighting factors, or they are mapped to surrogate tissue regions when there is no direct match. Effective doses, using ICRP tissue weighting factors recommended in 1977, 1990, and 2007, are calculated from tissue and organ equivalent doses.

Watson, David J.; Strom, Daniel J.

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

211

Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors: Consequences of Current Design Practices for LED's  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synopsis: Light loss factors are used to help lighting systems meet quantitative design criteria throughout the life of the installation, but they also influence energy use. As the light sources currently being specified continue to evolve, it is necessary to reevaluate the methods used in calculating light loss factors, as well as carefully consider the consequences of different product performance attributes. Because of the unique operating characteristics of LEDs and lack of a comprehensive lifetime rating—as well as the problematic relationship between lifetime and lumen maintenance—determining an appropriate lamp lumen depreciation (LLD) factor for LED products is difficult. As a result, a unique solution has been advocated: when quantity of light is an important design consideration, the IES recommends using an LLD of not greater than 0.70. This method deviates from the typical practice for conventional sources of using the ratio of mean to initial lumen output, and can misrepresent actual performance, increase energy use, and inhibit comparisons between products. This paper discusses the complications related to LLD and LEDs, compares the performance of conventional and LED products, and examines alternatives to a maximum LLD of 0.70 for LEDs.

Royer, Michael P.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

212

Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

Zhong, X H; Ning, P Z

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

X. H. Zhong; L. Li; P. Z. Ning

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

214

Tunable terahertz radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terahertz radiation source and method of producing terahertz radiation, said source comprising a junction stack, said junction stack comprising a crystalline material comprising a plurality of self-synchronized intrinsic Josephson junctions; an electrically conductive material in contact with two opposing sides of said crystalline material; and a substrate layer disposed upon at least a portion of both the crystalline material and the electrically-conductive material, wherein the crystalline material has a c-axis which is parallel to the substrate layer, and wherein the source emits at least 1 mW of power.

Boulaevskii, Lev; Feldmann, David M; Jia, Quanxi; Koshelev, Alexei; Moody, Nathan A

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

215

Microfabricated diffusion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Filter diagonalization of shell-model calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a method of filter diagonalization for shell-model calculations. This method is based on the Sakurai and Sugiura (SS) method, but extended with the help of the shifted complex orthogonal conjugate gradient (COCG) method. A salient feature of this method is that it can calculate eigenvalues and eigenstates in a given energy interval. We show that this method can be an alternative to the Lanczos method for calculating ground and excited states, as well as spectral strength functions. With an application to the M-scheme shell-model calculations we demonstrate that several inherent problems in the widely used Lanczos method can be removed or reduced.

Mizusaki, Takahiro [Institute of Natural Sciences, Senshu University, Tokyo 101-8425 (Japan); Kaneko, Kazunari [Department of Physics, Kyushu Sangyo University, Fukuoka 813-8503 (Japan); Honma, Michio [Center for Mathematical Sciences, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, 965-8580 (Japan); Sakurai, Tetsuya [Department of Computer Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Calculators and Science and Engineering Calculus Occasionally ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on examinations and quizzes. These courses do spend some class time discussing the use of graphing calculators, and some of the pitfalls into which graphing ...

1910-10-51T23:59:59.000Z

218

Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

219

Extended correlations of porosity, permeability, and formation resistivity factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the second is an empirically established correlation between the individual parameters. Although the two relationships are of the same form, the empirical form permits an independent detezmination of characterizing factors that appear in the rela..., and the characterizing factors for several formations have been calculated. These characterizing factors may have some merit for characterizing formations in general. Methods are also suggested for estimating these factors when limited data is available...

Ellis, Keith Wade

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Present state of the SOURCES computer code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In various stages of development for over two decades, the SOURCES computer code continues to calculate neutron production rates and spectra from four types of problems: homogeneous media, two-region interfaces, three-region interfaces and that of a monoenergetic alpha particle beam incident on a slab of target material. Graduate work at the University of Missouri - Rolla, in addition to user feedback from a tutorial course, provided the impetus for a variety of code improvements. Recently upgraded to version 4B, initial modifications to SOURCES focused on updates to the 'tape5' decay data library. Shortly thereafter, efforts focused on development of a graphical user interface for the code. This paper documents the Los Alamos SOURCES Tape1 Creator and Library Link (LASTCALL) and describes additional library modifications in more detail. Minor improvements and planned enhancements are discussed.

Shores, E. F. (Erik F.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Discrepancies in the prediction of solar wind using potential field source surface model: An investigation of possible sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrepancies in the prediction of solar wind using potential field source surface model expansion factor (FTE) at the source surface and the solar wind speed (SWS) observed at Earth, which has been made use of in the prediction of solar wind speed near the Earth with reasonable accuracy. However

California at Berkeley, University of

222

Comparison of different global information sources used in surface radiative flux calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), the Laboratoire de Me´te´orologie Dynamique, NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer project Spectroradiometer product, the NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Surface Radiation Budget project surface albedos in the near-infrared remain poorly constrained (highly uncertain), they do not cause too

223

LS-35 6 GeV Light Source Storage Ring Quadrupole and Sextupole Magnet Field Calculations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34 2 Grand5

224

Back-calculating emission rates for ammonia and particulate matter from area sources using dispersion modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is built upon the basic continuity assumption z cu y cu x cu t c i z i y i x i ? ?+ ? ?+ ? ?+ ? ? () )21 t z cK z cK y cK x i i zz i yy i xx ? ????? ??? ??? ? ? ??? ? ? ? ? ?+? ? ?? ? ? ? ? ? ?= (3.6) for i = 1, 2, ?N, where ci denotes..., ? ................................................................ 15 4.1 Determining the Uncertainty for an Experiment ................................. 27 4.2 Breakdown of Gravimetric Sampling Equations ................................ 30 4.3 TAMU ? Q ? 0.000278 m3s-1 (0.6 cfm) ? Uncertainty Analysis...

Price, Jacqueline Elaine

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

A surface ionization source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main part of the work described herein is the development and testing of a surface ionization source for use on a collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy apparatus. A description of the previously existing fast beam apparatus is given...

Buzatu, Daniel J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

National Synchrotron Light Source  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

227

Galactic Superluminal Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new class of X-ray sources was clearly established with the discovery of highly relativistic radio jets from the galactic sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40. Both of these objects have given us a broader view of black holes and the formation of jets, yet they also show the complexity of the accretion environment near relativistic objects. The fast apparent motion of the jets, their luminosity and variability, their high energy spectrum, and approximate scaling to the behavior of active galactic nuclei, certainly warrant the description "microquasar". I present a review of the observational data on these sources, and discuss where we stand on a physical picture of GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40 as taken from multi-wavelength studies. I also point out other galactic sources which share some of the properties of the microquasars, and what to look for as a high energy "signature" in future observations.

B. A. Harmon

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

228

ION SOURCES FOR CYCLOTRONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

These utilize lasers, plasma focus, sparks, and ex­ plodingextractor voltage A plasma focus device has been used byf n a s Fig. 22: The plasma focus high charge state source

Clark, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Computerized Energy Information Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many computerized files of energy- and energy conservation-related information are currently available through commercial and governmental sources such as Lockheed Information Systems, System Development Corporation, and DOE/RECON. Private...

Gordon, D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

National Synchrotron Light Source  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

BNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Magnetron sputtering source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, WA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Grabner, R. Fred (Brentwood, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Magnetron sputtering source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal. 12 figs.

Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.; Grabner, R.F.; Ramsey, P.B.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

234

Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wang, Z. R.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Manickam, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Calculation of nuclear matrix elements in neutrinoless double electron capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double electron capture on $^{152}$Gd, $^{164}$Er and $^{180}$W nuclei. Recent precise mass measurements for these nuclei have shown a large resonance enhancement factor that makes them the most promising candidates for observing this decay mode. We use an advanced energy density functional method which includes beyond mean-field effects such as symmetry restoration and shape mixing. Our calculations reproduce experimental charge radii and $B(E2)$ values predicting a large deformation for all these nuclei. This fact reduces significantly the values of the NMEs leading to half-lives larger than $10^{29}$ years for the three candidates.

Tomas R. Rodriguez; Gabriel Martinez-Pinedo

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

236

Review of Subcritical Source-Driven Noise Analysis Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcritical source-driven noise measurements are simultaneous Rossia and randomly pulsed neutron measurements that provide measured quantities that can be related to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. In fact, subcritical source-driven noise measurements should be performed in lieu of Rossia measurements because of the additional information that is obtained from noise measurements such as the spectral ratio and the coherence functions. The basic understanding of source-driven noise analysis measurements can be developed from a point reactor kinetics model to demonstrate how the measured quantities relate to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor.

Valentine, T.E.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Multigamma-ray calibration sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have calibrated a self-consistent set of multigamma-ray standards using the automated multi-spectrometry ..gamma..-ray counting facility at LLNL's Nuclear Chemistry Division. Pure sources of long-lived activity were produced by mass separation and/or chemical purification. The sources were counted individually and in combination on several different calibrated spectrometer systems. These systems utilize various detectors ranging from small (x-ray) detectors to large volume high-purity Ge detectors. This has allowed the use of the most ideal individual detector-efficiency characteristics for the determination of the relative ..gamma..-ray intensities. Precise energy measurements, reported earlier (Meyer, 1976) have been performed by an independent method. Both the energy and ..gamma..-ray-emission probabilities determined compare well with independently established values such as the recent ICRM intercomparison of /sup 152/Eu. We discuss our investigations aimed at resolving the shape of the efficiency response function up to 10 MeV for large volume Ge(Li) and high-purity Ge detectors. Recent results on the ..gamma..-ray-emission probabilities per decay for /sup 149/Gd and /sup 168/Tm multigamma-ray sources are discussed. For /sup 168/Tm, we deduce a 0.01% ..beta../sup -/ branch to the 87.73-keV level in /sup 168/Yb rather than the previous value which was a factor of 200 greater. In addition, we describe current cooperative efforts aimed at establishing a consistent set of data for short-lived fission products. Included are recent measurements on the bromine fission products with ..gamma.. rays up to 7 MeV.

Meyer, R.A.; Massey, T.N.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

PVWatts (R) Calculator India (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PVWatts (R) Calculator for India was released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2013. The online tool estimates electricity production and the monetary value of that production of grid-connected roof- or ground-mounted crystalline silicon photovoltaics systems based on a few simple inputs. This factsheet provides a broad overview of the PVWatts (R) Calculator for India.

Not Available

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ris-M-2584 RELIABILITY CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-M-2584 RELIABILITY CALCULATIONS Improvements of methods intended for calculation of reliability of structures and systems Kurt E. Petersen Abstract. Risk and reliability analysis is increasingly being used in evaluations of plant safety and plant reliability. The analysis can be performed either

240

First principles calculations for analysis martensitic transformations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The change in crystal energy is calculated for atomic displacements corresponding to phonons, elastic shears, and lattice transformations. Anomalies in the phonon dispersion curves of NiAl and NiTi are analyzed and recent calculations for TiPd alloys are presented.

Harmon, B.N.; Zhao, G.L.; Ho, K.M.; Chan, C.T.; Ye, Y.Y.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, B.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

242

Quark model calculation of the EMC effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a potential model, we calculate quark distributions for a six-quark quasi-deuteron, including the effects of the Pauli Principle and quark tunneling between nuclei. Using a phenomenological sea distribution, the EMC ratio is calculated and found to be in qualitative agreement with experiment.

Benesh, C.J.; Goldman, T.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office #12;AGENDA Guiding Principles Rate Proposal Building Office supplies for budget manager reconciliationOffice supplies for budget manager reconciliation: Equipment Compensated Leave #12;CALCULATING A RATE Budgeted Expenses Budgeted Usage BaseBudgeted Usage Base

Weston, Ken

244

Relativistic QRPA calculation of muon capture rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from $^{12}$C to $^{244}$Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the PN-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the PN-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value $g_A = 1.262$ by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.

T. Marketin; N. Paar; T. Niksic; D. Vretenar

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Review of critical factors affecting crude corrosivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lower quality opportunity crudes are now processed in most refineries and the source of the crudes may vary daily. These feedstocks, if not properly handled, can result in reduction in service life of equipment as well as costly failure and downtime. Analytical tools are needed to predict their high temperature corrosivity toward distillation units. Threshold in total sulfur and total acid number (TAN) have been used for many years as rules of thumb for predicting crude corrosivity, However, it is now realized that they are not accurate in their predictive ability. Crudes with similar composition and comparable with respect to process considerations have been found to be entirely different in their impact on corrosion. Naphthenic acid content, sulfur content, velocity, temperature, and materials of construction are the main factors affecting the corrosion process, Despite progress made in elucidating the role of the different parameters on the crude corrosivity process, the main problem is in calculating their combined effect, especially when the corroding stream is such a complex mixture. The TAN is usually related directly to naphthenic acid content. However, discrepancies between analytical methods and interference of numerous components of the crude itself lead to unreliable reported content of naphthenic acid. The sulfur compounds, with respect to corrosivity, appear to relate more to their decomposition at elevated temperature to form hydrogen sulfide than to their total content in crude. This paper reviews the present situation regarding crude corrosivity in distillation units, with the aim of indicating the extent of available information, and areas where further research is necessary.

Tebbal, S.; Kane, R.D. [CLI International, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Algorithm for Building a Spectrum for NREL's One-Sun Multi-Source Simulator: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, the tools used at NREL to compensate for the difference between a reference spectrum and a simulator spectrum have been well-matched reference cells and the application of a calculated spectral mismatch correction factor, M. This paper describes the algorithm for adjusting the spectrum of a 9-channel fiber-optic-based solar simulator with a uniform beam size of 9 cm square at 1-sun. The combination of this algorithm and the One-Sun Multi-Source Simulator (OSMSS) hardware reduces NREL's current vs. voltage measurement time for a typical three-junction device from man-days to man-minutes. These time savings may be significantly greater for devices with more junctions.

Moriarty, T.; Emery, K.; Jablonski, J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Accident source terms for Light-Water Nuclear Power Plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1962 tile US Atomic Energy Commission published TID-14844, ``Calculation of Distance Factors for Power and Test Reactors`` which specified a release of fission products from the core to the reactor containment for a postulated accident involving ``substantial meltdown of the core``. This ``source term``, tile basis for tile NRC`s Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4, has been used to determine compliance with tile NRC`s reactor site criteria, 10 CFR Part 100, and to evaluate other important plant performance requirements. During the past 30 years substantial additional information on fission product releases has been developed based on significant severe accident research. This document utilizes this research by providing more realistic estimates of the ``source term`` release into containment, in terms of timing, nuclide types, quantities and chemical form, given a severe core-melt accident. This revised ``source term`` is to be applied to the design of future light water reactors (LWRs). Current LWR licensees may voluntarily propose applications based upon it.

Soffer, L.; Burson, S.B.; Ferrell, C.M.; Lee, R.Y.; Ridgely, J.N.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Pulsed ion beam source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

Greenly, J.B.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

249

Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for thermo-hydraulic calculation of research reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input parameters on thermohydraulic calculations for a research reactor has successfully done in this research. The uncertainty analysis was carried out on input parameters for thermohydraulic calculation of sub-channel analysis using Code COOLOD-N. The input parameters include radial peaking factor, the increase bulk coolant temperature, heat flux factor and the increase temperature cladding and fuel meat at research reactor utilizing plate fuel element. The input uncertainty of 1% - 4% were used in nominal power calculation. The bubble detachment parameters were computed for S ratio (the safety margin against the onset of flow instability ratio) which were used to determine safety level in line with the design of 'Reactor Serba Guna-G. A. Siwabessy' (RSG-GA Siwabessy). It was concluded from the calculation results that using the uncertainty input more than 3% was beyond the safety margin of reactor operation.

Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics - National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)] [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics - National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia); Isnaeni, Muh Darwis [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety- National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)] [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety- National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nuclear physics in soft-wall AdS/QCD: deuteron electromagnetic form factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a calculation of the deuteron electromagnetic form factors in a soft-wall AdS/QCD approach. The power scaling of the deuteron form factors is consistent with quark counting rules.

Gutsche, Thomas; Schmidt, Ivan; Vega, Alfredo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Dual source heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX); Pietsch, Joseph A. (Dallas, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Calculated structures and fluoride affinities for fluorides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that SCF-MO calculations provide good estimates of the energies of the processes MF/sub n/ ..-->.. M/sup n+/ + nF/sup -/ where M/sup n+/ is an ion of a first- or second-row element in a closed-shell or s/sup 2/ configuration. The fluoride ion affinities are then calculated for a number of molecules and ions. Where comparison with experiment is possible, the agreement is generally good when allowance is made for experimental uncertainties. In favorable cases, accurate heats of formation may be calculated from fluoride affinities.

O'Keeffe, M.

1986-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

253

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ``Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core`` problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Use of computers for multicomponent distillation calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The corrected values for the b 's are best cal- i culated by multiplying (b. /d ) by (d. ) The compositions for each component in the vapor and liquid streams leaving plate j are calculated by use of the following equations. ('i/ i)ca ( i)co y. ji c Z (v... . . /b. ) (b. ) ji i ca i co i=1 , f a j x N+1 C (47-b) A temperature profile may be calculated by making either bubble or dew point calculations based on the compositions obtained by use of Equations (46) and (47). The specified distillate rate must...

Sullivan, Samuel Lane

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

INEEL Source Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, Gerald

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Individual Dose Calculations with Use of the Revised Techa River Dosimetry System TRDS-2009D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An updated deterministic version of the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS-2009D) has been developed to estimate individual doses from external exposure and intake of radionuclides for residents living on the Techa River contaminated as a result of radioactive releases from the Mayak plutonium facility in 1949–1956. The TRDS-2009D is designed as a flexible system that uses, depending on the input data for an individual, various elements of system databases to provide the dosimetric variables requested by the user. Several phases are included in the computation schedule. The first phase includes calculations with use of a common protocol for all cohort members based on village-average-intake functions and external dose rates; individual data on age, gender and history of residence are included in the first phase. This phase results in dose estimates similar to those obtained with system TRDS-2000 used previously to derive risks of health effects in the Techa River Cohort. The second phase includes refinement of individual internal doses for those persons who have had body-burden measurements or exposure parameters specific to the household where he/she lived on the Techa River. The third phase includes summation of individual doses from environmental exposure and from radiological examinations. The results of TRDS-2009D dose calculations have demonstrated for the ETRC members on average a moderate increase in RBM dose estimates (34%) and a minor increase (5%) in estimates of stomach dose. The calculations for the members of the ETROC indicated similar small changes for stomach, but significant increase in RBM doses (400%). Individual-dose assessments performed with use of TRDS-2009D have been provided to epidemiologists for exploratory risk analysis in the ETRC and ETROC. These data provide an opportunity to evaluate the possible impact on radiogenic risk of such factors as confounding exposure (environmental and medical), changes in the Techa River source-term data and the change of the approach to individual internal dose estimation (90Sr-body burden measurements and family correlations vs. village averages). Our further plan is to upgrade the TRDS-2009D and to complete a stochastic version of the dosimetry system.

Degteva, M. O.; Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

259

Method for determining formation quality factor from seismic data  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for calculating the quality factor Q from a seismic data trace. The method includes calculating a first and a second minimum phase inverse wavelet at a first and a second time interval along the seismic data trace, synthetically dividing the first wavelet by the second wavelet, Fourier transforming the result of the synthetic division, calculating the logarithm of this quotient of Fourier transforms and determining the slope of a best fit line to the logarithm of the quotient.

Taner, M. Turhan; Treitel, Sven

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

260

(beta beta)_{0 nu}-decay: a possible test of the nuclear matrix element calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existing calculations of the nuclear matrix elements of the neutrinoless double beta-decay differ by about a factor three. This uncertainty prevents quantative interpretation of the results of experiments searching for this process. We suggest here that the observation of the neutrinoless double beta-decay of several nuclei in future experiments of could allow to test different calculations of the nuclear matrix elements through the direct comparison of them with the experimental data.

S. M. Bilenky; J. A. Grifols

2002-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

OLED area illumination source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Bound Nucleon Form Factors, Quark-Hadron Duality, and the Nuclear EMC Effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the electromagnetic form factors, axial form factors, and structure functions of a nucleon bound in the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model. Free space nucleon form factors are calculated using the improved cloudy bag model (ICBM). After describing finite nuclei and nuclear matter in the quark-based (EMC) model, the in-medium modification of the bound nucleon form factors is calculated in the same model. Finally, the bound nucleon structure function, F2, is extracted using the calculated in-medium electromagnetic form factors and Bloom-Gilman (quark-hadron) duality.

K. Tsushima; D.H. Lu; W. Melnitchouk; K. Saito; A.W. Thomas

2002-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

264

Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada Ralph L. Seiler sources. Tungsten concentrations in 100 ground water samples from all aquifers used as drinking water indicates that W exhibits Tungsten con- centrations are strongly and positively correlated

265

Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper sets up a mathematical model of three-dimensional steady turbulence heat transfer in an air-conditioned room of multi-polluting heat sources. Numerical simulation helps identify key factors in displacement ventilation systems that affect...

Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

SIS Calculator User Guide 1 What's Inside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................................2 Measurement of Soil Moisture by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide general potential water and energy savings estimates, the calculator creates water and energy savings estimates associated with implementing SIS on a particular field

267

Essential Value, Pmax, and Omax Automated Calculator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavioral economic measures of demand are often calculated in sophisticated spreadsheet programs. Unfortunately, no closed form models for exact pmax (point of unit elasticity) and omax (response output at pmax) can be ...

Kaplan, Brent A.; Reed, Derek D.

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values using the ORNL MIRD phantom, x-ray phototherapy effectiveness, prostate brachytherapy lifetime dose calculations, and a radiograph of the head using the Zubal head phantom. Also...

Lazarine, Alexis D

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Hartree-Fock calculations of nuclear masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hartree-Fock calculations pertaining to the determination of nuclear binding energies throughout the whole chart of nuclides are reviewed. Such an approach is compared with other methods. Main techniques in use are shortly presented. Advantages and drawbacks of these calculations are also discussed with a special emphasis on the extrapolation towards nuclei far from the stability valley. Finally, a discussion of some selected results from light to superheavy nuclei, is given.

Quentin, P

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Signal probability calculations using partial functional manipulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALCULATIONS IV THE CUTTING ALGORITHM 14 V RESULTS 17 VI CONCLUSIONS . . REFERENCES APPENDIX A 32 35 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page I Characteristic table of all ISCAS combinational benchmarks II Number of ambiguous lines using the single best ordering... heuristics can be used to generate orderings, in a few cpu seconds [17]. These heuristics have a very low cost of generation, as compared to that of the best ordering. Iterative OPDD calculations with difFerent variable orderings were made, and the best...

Kodavarti, Ravishankar

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Selective ion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

Leung, K.N.

1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Selective ion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) interim policy and to provide guidance for sealed radioactive source accountability. The directive does not cancel any directives. Extended by DOE N 5400.10 to 12-24-93 & Extended by DOE N 5400.12 to 12-24-94.

1991-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Notice extends DOE N 5400.9, Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability, of 12-24-91, until 12-24-95, unless sooner superseded or rescinded. The contents of DOE N 5400.9 will be updated and incorporated in the revised DOE O 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers.

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

275

Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom. Results: Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were generated for each applicator and agreed well with the measured values. A method of output verification was created that allows users to determine the applicator-specific dose to water at the treatment surface based on a measured air-kerma rate. Conclusions: The novel output verification methods described in this work will reduce uncertainties in dose delivery for treatments with these kinds of surface applicators, ultimately improving patient care.

Fulkerson, Regina K., E-mail: rmkenned@gmail.com; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

CALCULATIONS OF TRITIUM FLOW BETWEEN THE BUFFER VESSEL UP TO THE FIRST VACUUM SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALCULATIONS OF TRITIUM FLOW BETWEEN THE BUFFER VESSEL UP TO THE FIRST VACUUM SYSTEM Felix Sharipov diff., Eq.(32) µ viscosity of tritium Pa s 1 Introduction The present work is a continuation of the previous report [1], where the preliminary results were obtained for the tritium flow through the source

Sharipov, Felix

277

An inverse source location algorithm for radiation portal monitor applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation portal monitors are being deployed at border crossings throughout the world to prevent the smuggling of nuclear and radiological materials; however, a tension exists between security and the free-flow of commerce. Delays at ports-of-entry have major economic implications, so it is imperative to minimize portal monitor screening time. We have developed an algorithm to locate a radioactive source using a distributed array of detectors, specifically for use at border crossings. To locate the source, we formulated an optimization problem where the objective function describes the least-squares difference between the actual and predicted detector measurements. The predicted measurements are calculated by solving the 3-D deterministic neutron transport equation given an estimated source position. The source position is updated using the steepest descent method, where the gradient of the objective function with respect to the source position is calculated using adjoint transport calculations. If the objective function is smaller than the convergence criterion, then the source position has been identified. This paper presents the derivation of the underlying equations in the algorithm as well as several computational test cases used to characterize its accuracy.

Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Charlton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A demonstration of variance and covariance calculations using MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Good decision-making in materials accounting requires a valid calculation of control limits and detection sensitivity for facilities handling special nuclear materials (SNM). A difficult aspect of this calculation is determining the appropriate variance and covariance values for the terms in the materials balance (MB) equation. Computer software such as MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator) can efficiently select and combine variance terms. These programs determine the variance and covariance of an MB equation by first obtaining relations for the variance and covariance of each term in the MB equation through propagating instrument errors and then substituting the measured quantities and their uncertainties into these relations. MAVARIC is a custom spreadsheet used with the second release of LOTUS 1-2-3.** PROFF is a stand-alone menu-driven program requiring no commercial software. Programs such as MAVARIC and PROFF facilitate the complex calculations required to determine the detection sensitivity of an SNM facility. These programs can also be used to analyze materials accounting systems.

Barlich, G.L.; Nasseri, S.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The possible test of the calculations of nuclear matrix elements of the $(??)_{0?}$-decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existing calculations of the nuclear matrix elements of the neutrinoless double $\\beta$-decay differ by about a factor three. This uncertainty prevents quantitative interpretation of the results of experiments searching for this process. We suggest here that the observation of the neutrinoless double $\\beta$-decay of {\\em several} nuclei could allow to test calculations of the nuclear matrix elements through the comparison of the ratios of the calculated lifetimes with experimental data. It is shown that the ratio of the lifetimes is very sensitive to different models.

S. M. Bilenky; J. A. Grifols

2002-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - action psychosocial factors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

studies relating psychosocial factors to health and long... . SOLOMON, D. CRUESS, J. BARROSO & M. STIVERS. 1995. Psychosocial ... Source: Meagher, Mary - Department of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

E-Print Network 3.0 - age-related rheumatoid factors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

88% 83% 16 (1... , rheumatoid factor, calendar year, duration of ... Source: Robins, James M.- Departments of Biostatistics & Epidemiology, Harvard University Collection:...

282

apoptosis-inducing factor aif: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B -> K Jpsi data to extract a set of parameters which give the relevant hadronic matrix elements in terms of factorized amplitudes. Various sources of theoretical uncertainties...

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - activityand dietary factors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

methodologies for ... Source: Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3 The NIH Office of Dietary Sup-plements (ODS) has released Summary: of risk factors associated...

284

SUPPLEMENT 1 The procedure for calculating the SOx emission factor from fuel sulphur content is given  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is given below. The units are given in parenthesis. SFOC = Specific Fuel Oil Consumption (g/kWh) SC in parenthesis. SFOC = Specific Fuel Oil Consumption (g/kWh) CC = Carbon content of fuel (mass-%) M(C) = Molar_CRD = Crude Oil tankers, T_PROD = Oil Product tankers, BULK = Bulk Cargo ships, RoPax = Roll On ­ Roll Off

Meskhidze, Nicholas

285

Coupling delay calculation using Miller factors under exponential Selahattin Sayil* and Uday Kiran Borra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* and Uday Kiran Borra Department of Electrical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, USA (Received 21 *Corresponding author. Email: sayil@ee.lamar.edu International Journal of Electronics 2008, 1­16, iFirst article

Sayil, Selahattin

286

Power Factor Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

High-power laser source evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports progress in these areas: EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM NOVA: TAMPED XENON UNDERDENSE X-RAY EMITTERS; MODELING MULTI-KEV RADIATION PRODUCTION OF XENON-FILLED BERYLLIUM CANS; MAPPING A CALCULATION FROM LASNEX TO CALE; HOT X RAYS FROM SEEDED NIF CAPSULES; HOHLRAUM DEBRIS MEASUREMENTS AT NOVA; FOAM AND STRUCTURAL RESPONSE CALCULATIONS FOR NIF NEUTRON EXPOSURE SAMPLE CASE ASSEMBLY DESIGN; NON-IGNITION X-RAY SOURCE FLUENCE-AREA PRODUCTS FOR NUCLEAR EFFECTS TESTING ON NIF. Also appended are reprints of two papers. The first is on the subject of ``X-Ray Production in Laser-Heated Xe Gas Targets.`` The second is on ``Efficient Production and Applications of 2- to 10-keV X Rays by Laser-Heated Underdense Radiators.``

Back, C.A.; Decker, C.D.; Dipeso, G.J.; Gerassimenko, M.; Managan, R.A.; Serduke, F.J.D.; Simonson, G.F.; Suter, L.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave. Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Hernandez, Michael [XScell corp., 2134 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

289

Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cook, Jeremy L. (Greeley, CO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Source Four Ellipsoidal Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parallel-blade U-ground connector -B two-pin and ground, 20 amp connector -c grounded, 20 amp, twistlock. to convert data when using any other HpL lamp, use the lumen or candela multiplying factors (Lm mf or cd mf) for that specific lamp, listed in the Lamps table in this datasheet. for lumen data, multiply by the Lm mf

Martin, Jeff

291

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

Voltage controlled current source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seven decade, voltage controlled current source is described for use in testing intermediate range nuclear instruments that covers the entire test current range of from 10 picoamperes to 100 microamperes. High accuracy is obtained throughout the entire seven decades of output current with circuitry that includes a coordinated switching scheme responsive to the input signal from a hybrid computer to control the input voltage to an antilog amplifier, and to selectively connect a resistance to the antilog amplifier output to provide a continuous output current source as a function of a preset range of input voltage. An operator controlled switch provides current adjustment for operation in either a real-time simulation test mode or a time response test mode.

Casne, Gregory M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The European Spallation Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a 5 MW, 2.5 GeV long pulse proton linac, to be built and commissioned in Lund, Sweden. The Accelerator Design Update (ADU) project phase is under way, to be completed at the end of 2012 by the delivery of a Technical Design Report. Improvements to the 2003 ESS design will be summarised, and the latest design activities will be presented.

Peggs, S; Eshraqi, M; Hahn, H; Jansson, A; Lindroos, M; Ponton, A; Rathsman, K; Trahern, G; Bousso, S; Calaga, R; Devanz, G; Duperrier, R D; Eguia, J; Gammino, S; Moller, S P; Oyon, C; Ruber, R.J.M.Y.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Capillary discharge source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Debris generation from an EUV electric discharge plasma source device can be significantly reduced or essentially eliminated by encasing the electrodes with dielectric or electrically insulating material so that the electrodes are shielded from the plasma, and additionally by providing a path for the radiation to exit wherein the electrodes are not exposed to the area where the radiation is collected. The device includes: (a) a body, which is made of an electrically insulating material, that defines a capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end and that defines at least one radiation exit; (b) a first electrode that defines a first channel that has a first inlet end that is connected to a source of gas and a first outlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore, wherein the first electrode is positioned at the distal end of the capillary bore; (c) a second electrode that defines a second channel that has a second inlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore and an outlet end, wherein the second electrode is positioned at the proximal end of the capillary bore; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the first and second electrodes, wherein radiation generated within the capillary bore is emitted through the at least one radiation exit and wherein the first electrode and second electrode are shielded from the emitted radiation.

Bender, III, Howard Albert

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

Global Distributions and Natural Sources of Brominated very Short-Lived Substances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VSLS is likely controlled by complex biogeochemical factors in the ecosystems. CH_(2)Br_(2) was thought to be derived from the same source(s) as CHBr_(3), but results presented in this dissertation suggest they may in fact be derived from disparate sources...

Liu, Yina

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

296

Center of pressure calculations for a bent-axis vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bent-axis maneuvering vehicles provide a unique type of control for a variety of supersonic and hypersonic missions. Unfortunately, large hinge moments, incomplete pitching moment predictions, and a misunderstanding of corresponding center of pressure calculations have prevented their application. A procedure is presented for the efficient design of bent-axis vehicles given an adequate understanding of origins of pitching moment effects. In particular,sources of pitching moment contributions will be described including not only normal force, but inviscid axial force and viscous effects as well. Off-centerline center of pressure effects are first reviewed for symmetric hypersonic sphere-cone configurations. Next the effects of the bent-axis geometry are considered where axial force, acting on the deflected tail section, can generate significant pitching moment components. The unique relationship between hinge moments and pitching moments for the bent-axis class of vehicles is discussed. 15 refs.

Rutledge, W.H.; Polansky, G.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Calculating the chiral condensate diagrammatically at strong coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the chiral condensate of QCD at infinite coupling as a function of the number of fundamental fermion flavours using a lattice diagrammatic approach inspired by recent work of Tomboulis, and other work from the 80's. We outline the approach where the diagrams are formed by combining a truncated number of sub-diagram types in all possible ways. Our results show evidence of convergence and agreement with simulation results at small Nf. However, contrary to recent simulation results, we do not observe a transition at a critical value of Nf. We further present preliminary results for the chiral condensate of QCD with symmetric or adjoint representation fermions at infinite coupling as a function of Nf for Nc = 3. In general, there are sources of error in this approach associated with miscounting of overlapping diagrams, and over-counting of diagrams due to symmetries. These are further elaborated upon in a longer paper.

Christensen, Alexander S; Pedersen, Peter D; Rosseel, Jan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Phase and Frequency Locked Magnetrons for SRF Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is great potential for a magnetron power source that can be controlled both in phase and frequency. Such a power source could revolutionize many particle accelerator systems that require lower capital cost and/or higher power efficiency. Beyond the accelerator community, phase and frequency locked magnetons could improve radar systems around the world and make affordable phased arrays for wireless power transmission for solar powered satellites. This joint project of Muons, Inc., Fermilab, and L-3 CTL was supported by an STTR grant monitored by the Nuclear Physics Office of the DOE Office of Science. The object of the program was to incorporate ferrite materials into the anode of a magnetron and, with appropriate biasing of the ferrites, to maintain frequency lock and to allow for frequency adjustment of the magnetron without mechanical tuners. If successful, this device would have a dual use both as a source for SRF linacs and for military applications where fast tuning of the frequency is a requirement. In order to place the materials in the proper location, several attributes needed to be modeled. First the impact of the magnetron’s magnetic field needed to be shielded from the ferrites so that they were not saturated. And second, the magnetic field required to change the frequency of the magnetron at the ferrites needed to be shielded from the region containing the circulating electrons. ANSYS calculations of the magnetic field were used to optimize both of these parameters. Once the design for these elements was concluded, parts were fabricated and a complete test assembly built to confirm the predictions of the computer models. The ferrite material was also tested to determine its compatibility with magnetron tube processing temperatures. This required a vacuum bake out of the chosen material to determine the cleanliness of the material in terms of outgassing characteristics, and a subsequent room temperature test to verify that the characteristics of the ferrite had not changed. A major problem that remains is to develop a ferrite material with low enough loss that it does not reduce the quality factor of the magnetron to an unacceptable level.

Neubauer, Michael [Muons, Inc.; Johnson, Rolland

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel iso-topes, with improvements on two aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. The other, which is unprecedented, is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.33%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 30% smaller.

Ma, X B; Wang, L Z; Chen, Y X; Cao, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Monte Carlo calculation of helical tomotherapy dose delivery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Helical tomotherapy delivers intensity modulated radiation therapy using a binary multileaf collimator (MLC) to modulate a fan beam of radiation. This delivery occurs while the linac gantry and treatment couch are both in constant motion, so the beam describes, from a patient/phantom perspective, a spiral or helix of dose. The planning system models this continuous delivery as a large number (51) of discrete gantry positions per rotation, and given the small jaw/fan width setting typically used (1 or 2.5 cm) and the number of overlapping rotations used to cover the target (pitch often <0.5), the treatment planning system (TPS) potentially employs a very large number of static beam directions and leaf opening configurations to model the modulated fields. All dose calculations performed by the system employ a convolution/superposition model. In this work the authors perform a full Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation of tomotherapy deliveries to phantom computed tomography (CT) data sets to verify the TPS calculations. All MC calculations are performed with the EGSnrc-based MC simulation codes, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc. Simulations are performed by taking the sinogram (leaf opening versus time) of the treatment plan and decomposing it into 51 different projections per rotation, as does the TPS, each of which is segmented further into multiple MLC opening configurations, each with different weights that correspond to leaf opening times. Then the projection is simulated by the summing of all of the opening configurations, and the overall rotational treatment is simulated by the summing of all of the projection simulations. Commissioning of the source model was verified by comparing measured and simulated values for the percent depth dose and beam profiles shapes for various jaw settings. The accuracy of the MLC leaf width and tongue and groove spacing were verified by comparing measured and simulated values for the MLC leakage and a picket fence pattern. The validated source and MLC configuration were then used to simulate a complex modulated delivery from fixed gantry angle. Further, a preliminary rotational treatment plan to a delivery quality assurance phantom (the 'cheese' phantom) CT data set was simulated. Simulations were compared with measured results taken with an A1SL ionization chamber or EDR2 film measurements in a water tank or in a solid water phantom, respectively. The source and MLC MC simulations agree with the film measurements, with an acceptable number of pixels passing the 2%/1 mm gamma criterion. 99.8% of voxels of the MC calculation in the planning target volume (PTV) of the preliminary plan passed the 2%/2 mm gamma value test. 87.0% and 66.2% of the voxels in two organs at risk (OARs) passed the 2%/2 mm tests. For a 3%/3 mm criterion, the PTV and OARs show 100%, 93.2%, and 86.6% agreement, respectively. All voxels passed the gamma value test with a criterion of 5%/3 mm. The TomoTherapy TPS showed comparable results.

Zhao Yingli; Mackenzie, M.; Kirkby, C.; Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Sequential Covariance Calculation for Exoplanet Image Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct imaging of exoplanets involves the extraction of very faint signals from highly noisy data sets, with noise that often exhibits significant spatial, spectral and temporal correlations. As a results, a large number of post-processing algorithms have been developed in order to optimally decorrelate the signal from the noise. In this paper, we explore four such closely related algorithms, all of which depend heavily on the calculation of covariances between large data sets of imaging data. We discuss the similarities and differences between these methods, and demonstrate how the use sequential calculation techniques can significantly improve their computational efficiencies.

Savransky, Dmitry

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Nonperturbative calculations in light-front QED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods of light-front quantization and Pauli-Villars regularization are applied to a nonperturbative calculation of the dressed-electron state in quantum electrodynamics. This is intended as a test of the methods in a gauge theory, as a precursor to possible methods for the nonperturbative solution of quantum chromodynamics. The electron state is truncated to include at most two photons and no positrons in the Fock basis, and the wave functions of the dressed state are used to compute the electrons's anomalous magnetic moment. A choice of regularization that preserves the chiral symmetry of the massless limit is critical for the success of the calculation.

Chabysheva, Sophia S. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota-Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota 55812 (United States)

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

Giant magnetoresistance calculated from first principles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Layer Korringa Kohn Rostoker-Coherent Potential Approximation technique was used to calculate the low temperature Giant Magnetoresistance from first principles for Co{vert_bar}Cu and permalloy{vert_bar}Cu superlattices. Our calculations predict large giant magnetoresistance ratios for Co{vert_bar}Cu and extremely large ratios for permalloy{vert_bar}Cu for current perpendicular to the layers. Mechanisms such as spin-orbit coupling which mix spin channels are expected to greatly reduce the GMR effect for permalloy{vert_bar}Cu.

Butler, W.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); MacLaren, J.M. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Zhang, X.G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Computational Sciences

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Feedback from Clustered Sources During Reionization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reionization history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high redshift (z > 6) was likely strongly shaped by several global feedback processes. Because the earliest ionizing sources formed at the locations of the rare density peaks, their spatial distribution was strongly clustered. Here we demonstrate that this clustering significantly boosts the impact of feedback processes operating at high redshift. We build a semi-analytical model to include feedback and clustering simultaneously, and apply this model to the suppression of star-formation in minihalos due to photoionization. The model is built on the excursion-set-based formalism of Furlanetto, Zaldarriaga and Hernquist (2004), which incorporates the clustering of ionizing sources, and which we here extend to include suppression of star formation in minihalos. We find that clustering increases the mean HII bubble size by a factor of several, and it dramatically increases the fraction of minihalos that are suppressed, by a factor of up to 60 relative to a randomly distributed population. This enhanced suppression can significantly reduce the electron scattering optical depth, as required by the three-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We argue that source clustering is likely to similarly boost the importance of a variety of other feedback mechanisms.

Roban Hultman Kramer; Zoltan Haiman; S. Peng Oh

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

A PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH ACommittee E-3.2, "Daylight: International RecommendationsCalcula- tion of Natural Daylight," CIE PUBLICATION No. 16,

Bryan, H.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Analysis of 3-panel and 4-panel microscale ionization sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two designs of a microscale electron ionization (EI) source are analyzed herein: a 3-panel design and a 4-panel design. Devices were fabricated using microelectromechanical systems technology. Field emission from carbon nanotube provided the electrons for the EI source. Ion currents were measured for helium, nitrogen, and xenon at pressures ranging from 10{sup -4} to 0.1 Torr. A comparison of the performance of both designs is presented. The 4-panel microion source showed a 10x improvement in performance compared to the 3-panel device. An analysis of the various factors affecting the performance of the microion sources is also presented. SIMION, an electron and ion optics software, was coupled with experimental measurements to analyze the ion current results. The electron current contributing to ionization and the ion collection efficiency are believed to be the primary factors responsible for the higher efficiency of the 4-panel microion source. Other improvements in device design that could lead to higher ion source efficiency in the future are also discussed. These microscale ion sources are expected to find application as stand alone ion sources as well as in miniature mass spectrometers.

Natarajan, Srividya; Parker, Charles B.; Glass, Jeffrey T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Piascik, Jeffrey R.; Gilchrist, Kristin H. [Center for Materials and Electronic Technologies, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Stoner, Brian R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Center for Materials and Electronic Technologies, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Source Four Ellipsoidal Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel-blade U-ground connector -B Two-pin and ground, 20 amp connector -C grounded, 20 amp, twistlock lamp, use the lumen or candela multiplying factors (Lm mF or Cd mF) for that specific lamp, listed in the Lamps table in this datasheet. For lumen data, multiply by the Lm mF. For candela or footcandle data

Martin, Jeff

308

A MODIFIED TRANSMISSION LINE MODEL FOR LIGHTNING RETURN STROKE FIELD CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 229 - 44Hl A MODIFIED TRANSMISSION LINE MODEL FOR LIGHTNING RETURN STROKE FIELD CALCULATIONS V. The modifications considered differ from each other by the height dependent attenuation factor for the return stroke data available. Some problems with modeling of the early and late stages of the return stroke process

Florida, University of

309

Lab Project Civl 3010 Clayton, DoriAnn Calculation of Settlement Beneath a Rectangular Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foundation The purpose of this code is to determine the increase in vertical stress, the ultimate. The depth of the water table and the length, width, and surface stress of the applied load (foundation of measure. The influence factor caused by the rectangular foundation is calculated for both the center

Clement, Prabhakar

310

2004 NET SYSTEM POWER CALCULATION COMMISSIONREPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 2004 NET SYSTEM POWER CALCULATION COMMISSIONREPORT April 2005 CEC-300 on net system power [Senate Bill 1305, (Sher), Chapter 796, Statute of 1997]1 . Net system power in California. Net system power plays a role in California's retail disclosure program, which requires every

311

FIRST PRINCIPLES CALCULATIONS OF TOKAMAK ENERGY TRANSPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy losses have prevented the experimental demonstration of net fusion energy production fromFIRST PRINCIPLES CALCULATIONS OF TOKAMAK ENERGY TRANSPORT M. KOTSCHENREUTHER, W. DORLAND, Q.P. LIU Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, United States of America G.W. HAMMETT, M

Hammett, Greg

312

CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY By: Yasser Dessouky #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply chain for a single

Su, Xiao

313

New correlation calculates reliable paraffin solubilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new correlation based on boiling point has been developed which accurately calculates paraffin solubilities in water. The correlation provides reliable solubility values down to very low concentrations (parts per million and less), for which the API correlation is not accurate. It can be used for initial engineering studies, including those involving health, safety, and environmental considerations.

Yaws, C.L.; Pan, X. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (US))

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

Oberseminar -ICP Temperature Calculation for Tribological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and passing to third parties. 0 #12;Overview Where to calculate the heat: diesel injection pump First focus: journal bearings DS/ETI2 Vortrag 24.01.05.tex 24.01.05 c Robert Bosch GmbH reserves all rights even;Approach Some assessments: Heat diffuses 30µm in diesel in the time of one rotation of the shaft

Harting, Jens

315

SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Compact ion accelerator source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion source includes a conductive substrate, the substrate including a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips formed on the substrate. A conductive catalytic coating is formed on the nanostructures and substrate for dissociation of a molecular species into an atomic species, the molecular species being brought in contact with the catalytic coating. A target electrode placed apart from the substrate, the target electrode being biased relative to the substrate with a first bias voltage to ionize the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips and attract the ionized atomic species from the substrate in the direction of the target electrode.

Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

The European Spallation Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

Lindroos M.; Calaga R.; Bousson S.; Danared H.; Devanz G. et al

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

318

Photon Source Parameters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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319

Source Selection Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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320

Source Selection Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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321

SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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322

Photon Source Parameters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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323

Sources of tritium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of tritium sources is presented. The tritium production and release rates are discussed for light water reactors (LWRs), heavy water reactors (HWRs), high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), and molten salt breeder reactors (MSBRs). In addition, release rates are discussed for tritium production facilities, fuel reprocessing plants, weapons detonations, and fusion reactors. A discussion of the chemical form of the release is included. The energy producing facilities are ranked in order of increasing tritium production and release. The ranking is: HTGRs, LWRs, LMFBRs, MSBRs, and HWRs. The majority of tritium has been released in the form of tritiated water.

Phillips, J.E.; Easterly, C.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Calculation of Kinetics Parameters for the NBSR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime have been calculated at different times in the fuel cycle for the NBSR when fueled with both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The best-estimate values for both the delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron lifetime are the result of calculations using MCNP5-1.60 with the most recent ENDFB-VII evaluations. The best-estimate values for the total delayed neutron fraction from fission products are 0.00665 and 0.00661 for the HEU fueled core at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. For the LEU fuel the best estimate values are 0.00650 and 0.00648 at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. The present recommendations for the delayed neutron fractions from fission products are smaller than the value reported previously of 0.00726 for the HEU fuel. The best-estimate values for the contribution from photoneutrons will remain as 0.000316, independent of the fuel or time in the cycle.The values of the prompt neutron lifetime as calculated with MCNP5-1.60 are compared to values calculated with two other independent methods and the results are in reasonable agreement with each other. The recommended, conservative values of the neutron lifetime for the HEU fuel are 650 {micro}s and 750 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. For LEU fuel the recommended, conservative values are 600 {micro}s and 700 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. In all three calculations, the prompt neutron lifetime was determined to be longer for the end-of-cycle equilibrium condition when compared to the startup condition. The results of the three analyses were in agreement that the LEU fuel will exhibit a shorter prompt neutron lifetime when compared to the HEU fuel.

Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

Calculation of TMD Evolution for Transverse Single Spin Asymmetry Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this letter, we show that it is necessary to include the full treatment of QCD evolution of Transverse Momentum Dependent parton densities to explain discrepancies between HERMES data and recent COMPASS data on a proton target for the Sivers transverse single spin asymmetry in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS). Calculations based on existing fits to TMDs in SIDIS, and including evolution within the Collins-Soper-Sterman with properly defined TMD PDFs are shown to provide a good explanation for the discrepancy. The non-perturbative input needed for the implementation of evolution is taken from earlier analyses of unpolarized Drell-Yan (DY) scattering at high energy. Its success in describing the Sivers function in SIDIS data at much lower energies is strong evidence in support of the unifying aspect of the QCD TMD-factorization formalism.

Mert Aybat, Ted Rogers, Alexey Prokudin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Radionuclide release calculations for selected severe accident scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the results of source term calculations that were performed in support of the NUREG-1150 study. Severe Accident Risks: An Assessment for Five US Nuclear Power Plants.'' This is the sixth volume of a series of reports. It supplements results presented in the earlier volumes. Analyses were performed for three of the NUREG-1150 plants: Peach Bottom, a Mark I, boiling water reactor; Surry, a subatmospheric containment, pressurized water reactor; and Sequoyah, an ice condenser containment, pressurized water reactor. Complete source term results are presented for the following sequences: short term station blackout with failure of the ADS system in the Peach Bottom plant; station blackout with a pump seal LOCA for the Surry plant; station blackout with a pump seal LOCA in the Sequoyah plant; and a very small break with loss of ECC and spray recirculation in the Sequoyah plant. In addition, some partial analyses were performed which did not require running all of the modules of the Source Term Code Package. A series of MARCH3 analyses were performed for the Surry and Sequoyah plants to evaluate the effects of alternative emergency operating procedures involving primary and secondary depressurization on the progress of the accident. Only thermal-hydraulic results are provided for these analyses. In addition, three accident sequences were analyzed for the Surry plant for accident-induced failure of steam generator tubes. In these analyses, only the transport of radionuclides within the primary system and failed steam generator were examined. The release of radionuclides to the environment is presented for the phase of the accident preceding vessel meltthrough. 17 refs., 176 figs., 113 tabs.

Denning, R.S.; Leonard, M.T.; Cybulskis, P.; Lee, K.W.; Kelly, R.F.; Jordan, H.; Schumacher, P.M.; Curtis, L.A. (Battelle Columbus Div., OH (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Federal Funding Sources of Information Sources for Automatic Funding Notices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Federal Funding Sources of Information r Grant Programs & Deadlines q World Health Organization - GrantFederal Funding Sources of Information Sources for Automatic Funding Notices q Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance q Grants.Gov q FedBizOpps q The Foundation Center r RFP Bulletin r Philanthropy News

328

Burnup calculation by the method of first-flight collision probabilities using average chords prior to the first collision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique to calculate the burnup of materials of cells and fuel assemblies using the matrices of first-flight neutron collision probabilities rebuilt at a given burnup step is presented. A method to rebuild and correct first collision probability matrices using average chords prior to the first neutron collision, which are calculated with the help of geometric modules of constructed stochastic neutron trajectories, is described. Results of calculation of the infinite multiplication factor for elementary cells with a modified material composition compared to the reference one as well as calculation of material burnup in the cells and fuel assemblies of a VVER-1000 are presented.

Karpushkin, T. Yu., E-mail: timka83@yandex.ru [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Meson electromagnetic form factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electromagnetic structure of the pseudoscalar meson nonet is completely described by the sophisticated Unitary&Analytic model, respecting all known theoretical properties of the corresponding form factors.

Stanislav Dubnicka; Anna Z. Dubnickova

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

330

Consistent neutron kinetics data generation for nodal transient calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current three-dimensional transient codes for thermal reactors are mostly based on two-group diffusion-theory nodal models. In the two-group approach no explicit distinction is made between prompt fission neutrons and delayed neutrons. Consequently, effective delayed neutron fractions have traditionally been used in an attempt to compensate for this shortcoming. A fundamentally better approach would be to solve the nodal kinetics equations in a sufficient number of energy groups to explicitly capture neutron emission spectrum effects. However, this would require the availability of a multi-group nodal transient code as well as a lattice code to generate the appropriate multi-group nodal data for the simulator. One such simulator is the PARCS nodal transient code, which is widely used and recognized as representative of the current state-of-the-art. Unfortunately, a proper nodal data preparation path between PARCS and a lattice code is not available. Even though several industrial lattice codes could be considered as candidates, most of them are tailored to producing two-group nodal data and would require modifications to produce multi-group prompt and delayed neutron emission spectra. In this paper, the particular modifications required to match the TransLAT lattice code and the PARCS nodal transient code for BWR transient applications are reported. Some modifications to PARCS were also required to make two-group and multi-group applications fully consistent. Numerical results are presented both to verify the proper functioning of these modifications and to illuminate the impact of various nodal kinetics data approximations in a selected transient calculation. In particular, the significance of blending rodded and un-rodded kinetics data in partially rodded nodes is demonstrated. It is also confirmed that the use of delayed neutron importance factors in two-group calculations notably reduces the differences between two-group and multi-group kinetics calculations. (authors)

Akdeniz, B. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mueller, E.; Panayotov, D. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, SE - 721 63 Vaesteraas (Sweden); Ivanov, K. N. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

C.E. Sanders

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

332

Plasma studies of the permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Peking University  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Peking University (PKU) we have developed several 2.45 GHz Permanent Magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources for PKUNIFTY, SFRFQ, Coupled RFQ and SFRFQ, and Dielectric-Wall Accelerator (DWA) projects (respectively, 50 mA of D{sup +}, 10 mA of O{sup +}, 10 mA of He{sup +}, and 50 mA of H{sup +}). In order to improve performance of these ion sources, it is necessary to better understand the principal factors that influence the plasma density and the atomic ion fraction. Theoretical analysis about microwave transmission and cut-off inside the discharge chamber were carried out to study the influence of the discharge chamber diameters. As a consequence, experimental studies on plasma density and ion fraction with different discharge chamber sizes have been carried out. Due to the difficulties in measuring plasma density inside the discharge chamber, the output beam current was measured to reflect the plasma density. Experimental results show that the plasma density increases to the maximum and then decreases significantly as the diameter changed from 64 mm to 30 mm, and the atomic ion fraction has the same tendency. The maximum beam intensity was obtained with the diameter of 35 mm, but the maximum atomic ion fraction with a diameter of 40 mm. The experimental results are basically accordant with the theoretical calculation. Details are presented in this paper.

Ren, H. T.; Peng, S. X., E-mail: sxpeng@pku.edu.cn; Xu, Y.; Zhao, J.; Lu, P. N.; Chen, J.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhang, T.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Upgrade to Advanced Photon Source announced by Department Of Energy. Read more: http://go.usa.gov/ivZ

Mitchell, John; Gibson, Murray; Young, Linda; Joachimiak, Andrzej

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

CFD calculations of S809 aerodynamic characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady-state, two-dimensional CFD calculations were made for the S809 laminar-flow, wind-turbine airfoil using the commercial code CFD-ACE. Comparisons of the computed pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data from the Delft University 1.8 m x 1.25 m low-turbulence wind tunnel. This work highlights two areas in CFD that require further investigation and development in order to enable accurate numerical simulations of flow about current generation wind-turbine airfoils: transition prediction and turbulence modeling. The results show that the laminar-to-turbulent transition point must be modeled correctly to get accurate simulations for attached flow. Calculations also show that the standard turbulence model used in most commercial CFD codes, the k-{epsilon} model, is not appropriate at angles of attack with flow separation.

Wolfe, W.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ochs, S.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Improvements in EBR-2 core depletion calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for accurate core depletion calculations in Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-2) is discussed. Because of the unique physics characteristics of EBR-2, it is difficult to obtain accurate and computationally efficient multigroup flux predictions. This paper describes the effect of various conventional and higher order schemes for group constant generation and for flux computations; results indicate that higher-order methods are required, particularly in the outer regions (i.e. the radial blanket). A methodology based on Nodal Equivalence Theory (N.E.T.) is developed which allows retention of the accuracy of a higher order solution with the computational efficiency of a few group nodal diffusion solution. The application of this methodology to three-dimensional EBR-2 flux predictions is demonstrated; this improved methodology allows accurate core depletion calculations at reasonable cost. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Finck, P.J.; Hill, R.N.; Sakamoto, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Precipitation chemistry: its behavior and its calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of this paper are twofold. The first of these is to present a rational basis for examining the aggregate set of scavenging-calculation techniques, and for guiding the reader in his course toward choosing the most appropriate technique for his particular application. The second purpose of this paper is to present a somewhat brief survey of our current understanding of scavenging and precipitation chemistry. Both objectives will be implemented by a flowchart approach, which attempts to draw the various facets of scavenging calculations together and present a generalized approach to the problem in total. The mathematical level of this paper is restricted to the presentation of the equations necessary to provide the reader with a basic appreciation of the fundamental concepts involved. References to more detailed mathematical treatments are cited at appropriate juncture points, for the reader interested in more detailed pursuit.

Hales, J.M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

How to Calculate Molecular Column Density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The calculation of the molecular column density from molecular spectral (rotational or ro-vibrational) transition measurements is one of the most basic quantities derived from molecular spectroscopy. Starting from first principles where we describe the basic physics behind the radiative and collisional excitation of molecules and the radiative transfer of their emission, we derive a general expression for the molecular column density. As the calculation of the molecular column density involves a knowledge of the molecular energy level degeneracies, rotational partition functions, dipole moment matrix elements, and line strengths, we include generalized derivations of these molecule-specific quantities. Given that approximations to the column density equation are often useful, we explore the optically thin, optically thick, and low-frequency limits to our derived general molecular column density relation. We also evaluate the limitations of the common assumption that the molecular excitation temperature is con...

Mangum, Jeffrey G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Analytic calculation of properties of holographic superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate analytically properties of holographic superconductors in the probe limit. We analyze the range $1/2 3/2$. We also obtain the frequency dependence of the conductivity by solving analytically the wave equation of electromagnetic perturbations. We show that the real part of the DC conductivity behaves as $e^{-\\Delta_g /T}$ and estimate the gap $\\Delta_g$ analytically. Our results are in good agreement with numerical results.

George Siopsis; Jason Therrien

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

339

Diffusion Simulation and Lifetime Calculation at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam lifetime is an important parameter for any storage ring. For protons in RHIC it is dominated by the non-linear nature of the head-on collisions that causes the particles to diffuse outside the stable area in phase space. In this report we show results from diffusion simulation and lifetime calculation for the 2006 and 2008 polarized proton runs in RHIC.

Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation #12;Basic Thermodynamics Helmoholtz free energy A = U ­ TS + i Ni dA = wrev (reversible, const N V T) eq (22.9) McQuarrie & Simon Gibbs free energy G = U;Implication of Free Energy A B Keq = [A]/[B] Keq = exp (-G0 /RT) G0 = -RT ln Keq G = G0 + RT ln Q G > 0

Nielsen, Steven O.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Calculations of Heat-Capacities of Adsorbates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 14, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOBER 1976 Calculations of heat capacities of adsorbates W. R. Lawrence and R. E. Allen Department of Physics, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 2 September 1975) The phonon... the substrate has a perfect (100) surface and the adsorbate goes down as a solid monolayer in registry with the substrate. The quasiharmonic approximation was used, and the results for Ne adsorbates were considerably different from those obtained...

LAWRENCE, WR; Allen, Roland E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

China 2050 Pathways Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuoCatalystPathways Calculator Jump to: navigation, search

343

Infrared source test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

Ott, L.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Thulium-170 heat source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

Walter, Carl E. (Pleasanton, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard (Livermore, CA); VanSant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Multiple source heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

SEECAL: Program to calculate age-dependent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the computer program SEECAL, which calculates specific effective energies (SEE) to specified target regions for ages newborn, 1 y, 5 y, 10 y, 15 y, a 70-kg adult male, and a 58-kg adult female. The dosimetric methodology is that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and is generally consistent with the schema of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose committee of the US Society of Nuclear Medicine. Computation of SEEs is necessary in the computation of equivalent dose rate in a target region, for occupational or public exposure to radionuclides taken into the body. Program SEECAL replaces the program SEE that was previously used by the Dosimetry Research Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program SEE was used in the dosimetric calculations for occupational exposures for ICRP Publication 30 and is limited to adults. SEECAL was used to generate age-dependent SEEs for ICRP Publication 56, Part 1. SEECAL is also incorporated into DCAL, a radiation dose and risk calculational system being developed for the Environmental Protection Agency. Electronic copies of the program and data files and this report are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cosmology calculations almost without general relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Friedmann equation is derived for a Newtonian universe. Changing mass density to energy density gives exactly the Friedmann equation of general relativity. Accounting for work done by pressure then yields the two Einstein equations that govern the expansion of the universe. Descriptions and explanations of radiation pressure and vacuum pressure are added to complete a basic kit of cosmology tools. It provides a basis for teaching cosmology to undergraduates in a way that quickly equips them to do basic calculations. This is demonstrated with calculations involving: characteristics of the expansion for densities dominated by radiation, matter, or vacuum; the closeness of the density to the critical density; how much vacuum energy compared to matter energy is needed to make the expansion accelerate; and how little is needed to make it stop. Travel time and luninosity distance are calculated in terms of the redshift and the densities of matter and vacuum energy, using a scaled Friedmann equation with the constant in the curvature term determined by matching with the present values of the Hubble parameter and energy density. General relativity is needed only for the luminosity distance, to describe how the curvature of space, determined by the energy density, can change the intensity of light by changing the area of the sphere to which the light has spread. Thirty-one problems are included.

Thomas F. Jordan

2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

Mean-Field Calculation Based on Proton-Neutron Mixed Energy Density Functionals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed calculations based on the Skyrme energy density functional (EDF) that includes arbitrary mixing between protons and neutrons. In this framework, single-particle states are generalized as mixtures of proton and neutron components. The model assumes that the Skyrme EDF is invariant under the rotation in isospin space and the Coulomb force is the only source of the isospin symmetry breaking. To control the isospin of the system, we employ the isocranking method, which is analogous to the standard cranking approach used for describing high-spin states. Here, we present results of the isocranking calculations performed for the isobaric analog states in $A = 40$ and $A = 54$ nuclei.

Koichi Sato; Jacek Dobaczewski; Takashi Nakatsukasa; Wojciech Satu?a

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

The signal from an emitting source moving in a Schwarzschild spacetime under the influence of a radiation field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The motion of matter immersed in a radiation field is affected by radiation drag, as a result of scattering or absorption and re-emission. The resulting friction-like drag, also known as Poynting-Robertson effect, has been recently studied in the general relativistic background of the Schwarzschild and Kerr metric, under the assumption that all photons in the radiation field possess the same angular momentum. We calculate here the signal produced by an emitting point-like specific source moving in a Schwarzschild spacetime under the influence of such a radiation field. We derive the flux, redshift factor and solid angle of the hot spot as a function of (coordinate) time, as well as the time-integrated image of the hot spot as seen by an observer at infinity. The results are then compared with those for a spot moving on a circular geodesic in a Schwarzschild metric.

Donato Bini; Maurizio Falanga; Andrea Geralico; Luigi Stella

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Control Dewar Subcooler Heat Exchanger Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calculations done to size the control dewar subcooler were done to obtain a sufficient subcooler size based on some conservative assumptions. The final subcooler design proposed in the design report will work even better because (1) It has more tubing length, and (2) will have already subcooled liquid at the inlet due to the transfer line design. The subcooler design described in the 'Design Report of the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid for the Fermilab D0 Detector Upgrade' is the final design proposed. A short description of this design follows. The subcooler is constructed of 0.50-inch OD copper tubing with 1.0-inch diameter fins. It has ten and one half spirals at a 11.375-inch centerline diameter to provide 31 feet of tubing length. The liquid helium supply for the solenoid flows through the subcooler and then is expanded through a J-T valve. The subcooler spirals are immersed in the return two phase helium process stream. The return stream is directed over the finned tubing by an annulus created by a 10-inch pipe inside a 12-inch pipe. The transfer line from the refrigerator to the control dewar is constructed such that the liquid helium supply tube is in the refrigerator return stream, thereby subcooling the liquid up to the point where the u-tubes connect the transfer line to the control dewar. The subcooler within the control dewar will remove the heat picked up in the helium supply u-tube/bayonets. The attached subcooler/heat exchanger calculations were done neglecting any subcooling in the transfer line. All heat picked up in the transfer line from the refrigerator storage dewar to the control dewar is absorbed by the supply stream. The subcooler was sized such that the two phase supply fluid is subcooled at 1.7 atm pressure and when expanded through a JT valve to 1.45 atm pressure it is at a saturated liquid state. The calculations apply during steady state operation and at a flow rate of 16 g/s. The analysis of the heat exchanger was broken into two parts relating to the heat transfer mode taking place. The first part is considered the condensing part in which the helium supply stream is changed from two phase fluid to one phase liquid. The second part is the subcooling part where the liquid temperature is lowered, i.e.. subcooled. A summary of the calculations and results appears on the next page. The raw calculations follow the summary.

Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

351

Observing non-Gaussian sources in heavy-ion reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the possibility of extracting non-Gaussian sources from two-particle correlations in heavy-ion reactions. Non-Gaussian sources have been predicted in a variety of model calculations and may have been seen in various like-meson pair correlations. As a tool for this investigation, we have developed an improved imaging method that relies on a basis spline expansion of the source functions with an improved implementation of constraints. We examine under what conditions this improved method can distinguish between Gaussian and non-Gaussian sources. Finally, we investigate pion, kaon, and proton sources from the p-Pb reaction at 450 GeV/nucleon and from the S-Pb reaction at 200 GeV/nucleon studied by the NA44 experiment. Both the pion and kaon sources from the S-Pb correlations seem to exhibit a Gaussian core with an extended, non-Gaussian halo. We also find evidence for a scaling of the source widths with particle mass in the sources from the p-Pb reaction.

Brown, D. A.; Danielewicz, P.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Efficiency and stray light measurements and calculations of diffraction gratings for the ALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water cooled gratings manufactured for spherical grating monochromators of the Advanced Light Source beamlines 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0 were measured with the laser plasma source and reflectometer in the Center for X-ray Optics at LBL. The square-wave gratings are ion-milled into the polished electroless nickel surface after patterning by holographic photolithography. Absolute efficiency data are compared with exact electromagnetic theory calculation. Inter-order stray light and groove depths can be estimated from the measurements.

McKinney, W.R.; Mossessian, D.; Gullikson, E.; Heimann, P.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Separation phenomena in the tritium source and numerical simulations of turbo-molecular pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Separation phenomena in the tritium source and numerical simulations of turbo-molecular pumps Felix In the previous works [1, 2], the results of numerical calculations of tritium flow from the buffer vessel up to the first vacuum system were reported. Two values of the tritium source temperature were considered, i.e. 27

Sharipov, Felix

354

Commissioning of output factors for uniform scanning proton beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Current commercial treatment planning systems are not able to accurately predict output factors and calculate monitor units for proton fields. Patient-specific field output factors are thus determined by either measurements or empirical modeling based on commissioning data. The objective of this study is to commission output factors for uniform scanning beams utilized at the ProCure proton therapy centers. Methods: Using water phantoms and a plane parallel ionization chamber, the authors first measured output factors with a fixed 10 cm diameter aperture as a function of proton range and modulation width for clinically available proton beams with ranges between 4 and 31.5 cm and modulation widths between 2 and 15 cm. The authors then measured the output factor as a function of collimated field size at various calibration depths for proton beams of various ranges and modulation widths. The authors further examined the dependence of the output factor on the scanning area (i.e., uncollimated proton field), snout position, and phantom material. An empirical model was developed to calculate the output factor for patient-specific fields and the model-predicted output factors were compared to measurements. Results: The output factor increased with proton range and field size, and decreased with modulation width. The scanning area and snout position have a small but non-negligible effect on the output factors. The predicted output factors based on the empirical modeling agreed within 2% of measurements for all prostate treatment fields and within 3% for 98.5% of all treatment fields. Conclusions: Comprehensive measurements at a large subset of available beam conditions are needed to commission output factors for proton therapy beams. The empirical modeling agrees well with the measured output factor data. This investigation indicates that it is possible to accurately predict output factors and thus eliminate or reduce time-consuming patient-specific output measurements for proton treatments.

Zheng Yuanshui; Ramirez, Eric; Mascia, Anthony; Ding Xiaoning; Okoth, Benny; Zeidan, Omar; Hsi Wen; Harris, Ben; Schreuder, Andries N.; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Monte Carlo source convergence and the Whitesides problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The issue of fission source convergence in Monte Carlo eigenvalue calculations is of interest because of the potential consequences of erroneous criticality safety calculations. In this work, the authors compare two different techniques to improve the source convergence behavior of standard Monte Carlo calculations applied to challenging source convergence problems. The first method, super-history powering, attempts to avoid discarding important fission sites between generations by delaying stochastic sampling of the fission site bank until after several generations of multiplication. The second method, stratified sampling of the fission site bank, explicitly keeps the important sites even if conventional sampling would have eliminated them. The test problems are variants of Whitesides' Criticality of the World problem in which the fission site phase space was intentionally undersampled in order to induce marginally intolerable variability in local fission site populations. Three variants of the problem were studied, each with a different degree of coupling between fissionable pieces. Both the superhistory powering method and the stratified sampling method were shown to improve convergence behavior, although stratified sampling is more robust for the extreme case of no coupling. Neither algorithm completely eliminates the loss of the most important fissionable piece, and if coupling is absent, the lost piece cannot be recovered unless its sites from earlier generations have been retained. Finally, criteria for measuring source convergence reliability are proposed and applied to the test problems.

Blomquist, R. N.

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

356

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Rate...

357

Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating Loads Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating Loads During this webinar, Building America Research Team IBACOS...

358

Iso-vector form factors of the delta and nucleon in QCD sum rules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Form factors are important non-perturbative properties of hadrons. They give information about the internal structure of the hadrons. In this work, iso-vector axial-vector and iso-vector tensor form factors of the nucleon and the iso-vector axial-vector {Delta}{yields}N transition form factor calculations in QCD Sum Rules are presented.

Ozpineci, A. [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University, 06800 (Turkey)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Multi-Fuel Boiler Efficiency Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to calculate the heat losses, a complete stack analysis is required. In 1956 when Buna's paper was published, stack analysis was done by Orsat analysis which gave the composition of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and oxygen. Nitrogen was assumed to make... up the difference. It was known that sulfur dioxide (if present) would be absorbed with carbon dioxide. Table 2 shows the components in the stack gas and the analysis of the combustion air. The total analysis of the stack gas is estimated by a...

Likins, M. R., Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nucleotide capacitance calculation for DNA sequencing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a first-principles linear response theory, the capacitance of the DNA nucleotides, adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine, are calculated. The difference in the capacitance between the nucleotides is studied with respect to conformational distortion. The result suggests that although an alternate current capacitance measurement of a single-stranded DNA chain threaded through a nano-gap electrodes may not sufficient to be used as a stand alone method for rapid DNA sequencing, the capacitance of the nucleotides should be taken into consideration in any GHz-frequency electric measurements and may also serve as an additional criterion for identifying the DNA sequence.

Lu, Jun-Qiang [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SB EE Calculator | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards A(SAPC) WorkingB.ProgramCalculator

362

USAID Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTagusparkCalculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH

363

AXIAL SOURCE PROFILE EFFECT ON WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER SHIELDING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this scoping calculation is to support preliminary design of the Waste Package (WP) transporter radiation shield configuration. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) is highly radioactive and site personnel must be protected during the period that the WPs are emplaced. Personnel protection is accomplished via a heavily shielded WP transporter that moves the waste from the surface to the emplacement drift. All previous WP transporter shielding calculations have assumed a Design Basis Fuel (DBF) in which the fuel burnup is uniform (e.g. Ref. 7.3, Ref. 7.4, and Ref. 7.12). In reality, SNF burnup varies significantly from one end of the fuel assembly to the other. Since source strengths are dependent upon fuel burnup, a model which varies the fuel burnup along the assembly axis will produce a more accurate depiction of the radiation field surrounding the WP transporter. The objective of this calculation is to determine the need for using the actual axial profile, as opposed to the uniform burnup assumption, in the WP transporter shield design. The scope of the calculation is as follows: (1) Determine the impact of axial source term variation on WP transporter contact dose rates. (2) Determine appropriate shielding modifications to account for expected dose rate peaking effects. Consistent with the previous subsurface shielding analyses, this calculation considers the bounding 21 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP only. The calculation will need to be revised and extended to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) SNF upon selection of the WP design for the License Application (LA) and availability of the source terms from the WP Operations Group.

A. Nielsen

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater exposure scenario, and the development of conversion factors for assessing compliance with the groundwater protection standard. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA-LA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters, their development, and the relationship between the parameters and specific features events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the groundwater exposure scenario. The objectives of this analysis are to develop BDCFs for the groundwater exposure scenario for the three climate states considered in the TSPA-LA as well as conversion factors for evaluating compliance with the groundwater protection standard. The BDCFs will be used in performance assessment for calculating all-pathway annual doses for a given concentration of radionuclides in groundwater. The conversion factors will be used for calculating gross alpha particle activity in groundwater and the annual dose from drinking water for beta- and photon-emitting radionuclides. Another objective of this analysis was to re-qualify the output of the previous revision (BSC 2003 [DIRS 164403]).

M. Wasiolek

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

In-Source Fragmentation and the Sources of Partially Tryptic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

using three biological samples, including a standard protein mixture, a mouse brain tissue homogenate, and a mouse plasma sample. Since the in-source fragments of a...

366

Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the AGR-1 Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an effort to quantify the uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) fuel irradiation experiment conducted in the INL’s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) R&D program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR-1 test, the results of the numerical simulations can be used in combination with the statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. Additionally, the temperature simulation data for AGR tests can be used for validation of the fuel transport and fuel performance simulation models. The crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. The report is organized into three chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification program and provides overviews of AGR-1 measured data, AGR-1 test configuration and test procedure, and thermal simulation. Chapters 2 describes the uncertainty quantification procedure for temperature simulation data of the AGR-1 experiment, namely, (i) identify and quantify uncertainty sources; (ii) perform sensitivity analysis for several thermal test conditions; (iii) use uncertainty propagation to quantify overall response temperature uncertainty. A set of issues associated with modeling uncertainties resulting from the expert assessments are identified. This also includes the experimental design to estimate the main effects and interactions of the important thermal model parameters. Chapter 3 presents the overall uncertainty results for the six AGR-1 capsules. This includes uncertainties for the daily volume-average and peak fuel temperatures, daily average temperatures at TC locations, and time-average volume-average and time-average peak fuel temperatures.

Binh T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson; Grant L. Hawkes

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the AGR-1 Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an effort to quantify the uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) fuel irradiation experiment conducted in the INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) R&D program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR-1 test, the results of the numerical simulations can be used in combination with the statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. Additionally, the temperature simulation data for AGR tests can be used for validation of the fuel transport and fuel performance simulation models. The crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. The report is organized into three chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification program and provides overviews of AGR-1 measured data, AGR-1 test configuration and test procedure, and thermal simulation. Chapters 2 describes the uncertainty quantification procedure for temperature simulation data of the AGR-1 experiment, namely, (i) identify and quantify uncertainty sources; (ii) perform sensitivity analysis for several thermal test conditions; (iii) use uncertainty propagation to quantify overall response temperature uncertainty. A set of issues associated with modeling uncertainties resulting from the expert assessments are identified. This also includes the experimental design to estimate the main effects and interactions of the important thermal model parameters. Chapter 3 presents the overall uncertainty results for the six AGR-1 capsules. This includes uncertainties for the daily volume-average and peak fuel temperatures, daily average temperatures at TC locations, and time-average volume-average and time-average peak fuel temperatures.

Binh T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson; Grant L. Hawkes

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Non-perturbative calculation of Z_m using Asqtad fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report progress on a non-perturbative calculation of the light quark mass renormalization factor Z_m, using dynamical Asqtad fermions. This quantity is used to determine the light quark masses in the conventional MS-bar scheme. Such a non-perturbative determination of Z_m removes uncertainties due to truncation of its perturbative expansion, currently known to two loops. These calculations have been carried out using publicly available MILC lattices with spacings of approximately 0.125 and 0.09 fm.

Andrew T. Lytle

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

A hybrid Monte Carlo and response matrix Monte Carlo method in criticality calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Full core calculations are very useful and important in reactor physics analysis, especially in computing the full core power distributions, optimizing the refueling strategies and analyzing the depletion of fuels. To reduce the computing time and accelerate the convergence, a method named Response Matrix Monte Carlo (RMMC) method based on analog Monte Carlo simulation was used to calculate the fixed source neutron transport problems in repeated structures. To make more accurate calculations, we put forward the RMMC method based on non-analog Monte Carlo simulation and investigate the way to use RMMC method in criticality calculations. Then a new hybrid RMMC and MC (RMMC+MC) method is put forward to solve the criticality problems with combined repeated and flexible geometries. This new RMMC+MC method, having the advantages of both MC method and RMMC method, can not only increase the efficiency of calculations, also simulate more complex geometries rather than repeated structures. Several 1-D numerical problems are constructed to test the new RMMC and RMMC+MC method. The results show that RMMC method and RMMC+MC method can efficiently reduce the computing time and variations in the calculations. Finally, the future research directions are mentioned and discussed at the end of this paper to make RMMC method and RMMC+MC method more powerful. (authors)

Li, Z.; Wang, K. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing, 100084 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Line asymmetry of solar p-modes: Properties of acoustic sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observed solar p-mode velocity power spectra are compared with theoretically calculated power spectra over a range of mode degree and frequency. The shape of the theoretical power spectra depends on the depth of acoustic sources responsible for the excitation of p-modes, and also on the multipole nature of the source. We vary the source depth to obtain the best fit to the observed spectra. We find that quadrupole acoustic sources provide a good fit to the observed spectra provided that the sources are located between 700 km and 1050 km below the top of the convection zone. The dipole sources give a good fit for significantly shallower source, with a source-depth of between 120 km and 350 km. The main uncertainty in the determination of depth arises due to poor knowledge of nature of power leakages from modes with adjacent degrees, and the background in the observed spectra.

Pawan Kumar; Sarbani Basu

1999-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

Sensitivity analysis of coupled criticality calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perturbation theory based sensitivity analysis is a vital part of todays' nuclear reactor design. This paper presents an extension of standard techniques to examine coupled criticality problems with mutual feedback between neutronics and an augmenting system (for example thermal-hydraulics). The proposed procedure uses a neutronic and an augmenting adjoint function to efficiently calculate the first order change in responses of interest due to variations of the parameters describing the coupled problem. The effect of the perturbations is considered in two different ways in our study: either a change is allowed in the power level while maintaining criticality (power perturbation) or a change is allowed in the eigenvalue while the power is constrained (eigenvalue perturbation). The calculated response can be the change in the power level, the reactivity worth of the perturbation, or the change in any functional of the flux, the augmenting dependent variables and the input parameters. To obtain power- and criticality-constrained sensitivities power- and k-reset procedures can be applied yielding identical results. Both the theoretical background and an application to a one dimensional slab problem are presented, along with an iterative procedure to compute the necessary adjoint functions using the neutronics and the augmenting codes separately, thus eliminating the need of developing new programs to solve the coupled adjoint problem. (authors)

Perko, Z.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Applied Physics, Dept. of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Electron mobility calculation for graphene on substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By a semiclassical Monte Carlo method, the electron mobility in graphene is calculated for three different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The calculations account for polar and non-polar surface optical phonon (OP) scatterings induced by the substrates and charged impurity (CI) scattering, in addition to intrinsic phonon scattering in pristine graphene. It is found that HfO{sub 2} is unsuitable as a substrate, because the surface OP scattering of the substrate significantly degrades the electron mobility. The mobility on the SiO{sub 2} and h-BN substrates decreases due to CI scattering. However, the mobility on the h-BN substrate exhibits a high electron mobility of 170?000?cm{sup 2}/(V·s) for electron densities less than 10{sup 12?}cm{sup ?2}. Therefore, h-BN should be an appealing substrate for graphene devices, as confirmed experimentally.

Hirai, Hideki; Ogawa, Matsuto [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Hideaki, E-mail: tsuchiya@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Kamakura, Yoshinari; Mori, Nobuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

373

FGF growth factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

374

Method and system for imaging a radiation source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for imaging a radiation source, and a device that utilizes these methods that in one embodiment include the steps of: calculating at least one Compton cone of a first parameter of a radiation emission from information received from a sensor occurrence; and tracing this Compton cone on to a unit sphere having preselected characteristics using an estimated angular uncertainty to limit at least a portion of said tracing. In another embodiment of the invention at least two Compton cones are calculated and then intersected upon a predefined surface such as a sphere. These intersection points can then be iterated over a preselected series of prior events.

Myjak, Mitchell J. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Seifert, Carolyn E. (Kennewick, WA) [Kennewick, WA; Morris, Scott J. (Kennewick, WA) [Kennewick, WA

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

375

Pion electromagnetic form factor in the Covariant Spectator Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pion electromagnetic form factor at spacelike momentum transfer is calculated in relativistic impulse approximation using the Covariant Spectator Theory. The same dressed quark mass function and the equation for the pion bound-state vertex function as discussed in the companion paper are used for the calculation, together with a dressed quark current that satisfies the Ward-Takahashi identity. The results obtained for the pion form factor are in agreement with experimental data, they exhibit the typical monopole behavior at high momentum transfer and they satisfy some remarkable scaling relations.

Biernat, Elmar P. [CFTP, Institute Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Gross, Franz L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Pena, Teresa [CFTP, Institute Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Stadler, Alfred [University of Evora, Lisboa (Portugal)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Portable Source Identification Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the primary enforcement agency protecting the nation’s ports of entry. CBP is enhancing its capability to interdict the illicit import of nuclear and radiological materials and devices that may be used by terrorists. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing scientific and technical support to CBP in their goal to enable rapid deployment of nuclear and radiation detection systems at U. S. ports of entry to monitor 100% of the incoming international traffic and cargo while not adversely impacting the operations or throughput of the ports. As the deployment of radiation detection systems proceeds, there is a need to adapt the baseline radiation portal monitor (RPM) system technology to operations at these diverse ports of entry. When screening produces an alarm in the primary inspection RPM, the alarming vehicle is removed from the flow of commerce and the alarm is typically confirmed in a secondary inspection RPM. The portable source identification device (PSID) is a radiation sensor panel (RSP), based on thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detector and gamma spectroscopic analysis hardware and software, mounted on a scissor lift on a small truck. The lift supports a box containing a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) sodium iodide detector that provides real-time isotopic identification, including neutron detectors to interdict Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and radiation dispersion devices (RDD). The scissor lift will lower the detectors to within a foot off the ground and raise them to approximately 24 feet in the air, allowing a wide vertical scanning range.

Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.; Gervais, Kevin L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Constricted glow discharge plasma source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Dickinson, Michael (San Leandro, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Winnetka, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Improved approximate formulas for flux from cylindrical and rectangular sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides two new approximate formulas for the flux at detector points outside the radial and axial extensions of a homogeneous cylindrical source and improved approximate formulas for the flux at points opposite rectangular surface sources. These formulas extend the range of geometries for which analytic approximations may be used by shield design engineers to make rapid scoping studies and check more extensive calculations for reasonableness. These formulas can be used to support skeptical, independent evaluations and are also valuable teaching tools for introducing shield designers to complex shield analyses.

Wallace, O.J.; Bokharee, S.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

ANALYTICAL APPROACH TO TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION IN COOLING LOAD CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equation in cooling load calculations. The performance of nine different procedures (the four methods and

Michal Duška; Martin Barták; František Drkal; Jan Hensen

380

Electrode design and performance of the ORNL positive ion sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutral beam development group at ORNL has designed, constructed, and shipped four 50-kV, 100-A sources to PPL to be used for neutral beam heating of the confined plasma on the PDX tokamak. These sources have higher current capability than scaled-down sources, and they are required to run for 0.5 s as opposed to the 0.3-s requirement for PLT and ISX-B sources. Due to an innovative electrode design, these higher power sources met these requirements and achieved a higher transmission efficiency - 76% of the total input power on target vs 60% for the original ISX-B and modified PLT sources or 40% for the original PLT sources. Using the same electrode design with a tetrode accelerating structure and a new, indirectly heated cathode, repeatable long pulse, high energy conditions of 70 kV, 7 A, 8 s, and 90 kV, 9 A, 5 s were achieved. Grid deformation calculations and Monte Carlo beam line gas deposition algorithms will be discussed. A direct-magnetic-electron-blocking, direct-recovery device is described, and theoretical considerations of it are discussed.

Whealton, J.H.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Linac Coherent Light Source Overview  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

382

Linac Coherent Light Source Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

383

Alternative Energy Sources – Myths and Realities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alternative Energy Sources - Myths and Realities Walterneed to think about alternative energy sources; the worlddepletion of oil? Alternative energy sources can be divided

Youngquist, Walter

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

MONTE-CARLO BURNUP CALCULATION UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION AND PROPAGATION DETERMINATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MONTEBURNS is a Monte-Carlo depletion routine utilizing MCNP and ORIGEN 2.2. Uncertainties exist in the MCNP transport calculation, but this information is not passed to the depletion calculation in ORIGEN or saved. To quantify this transport uncertainty and determine how it propagates between burnup steps, a statistical analysis of a multiple repeated depletion runs is performed. The reactor model chosen is the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) in a single assembly, infinite lattice configuration. This model was burned for a 25.5 day cycle broken down into three steps. The output isotopics as well as effective multiplication factor (k-effective) were tabulated and histograms were created at each burnup step using the Scott Method to determine the bin width. It was expected that the gram quantities and k-effective histograms would produce normally distributed results since they were produced from a Monte-Carlo routine, but some of results do not. The standard deviation at each burnup step was consistent between fission product isotopes as expected, while the uranium isotopes created some unique results. The variation in the quantity of uranium was small enough that, from the reaction rate MCNP tally, round off error occurred producing a set of repeated results with slight variation. Statistical analyses were performed using the {chi}{sup 2} test against a normal distribution for several isotopes and the k-effective results. While the isotopes failed to reject the null hypothesis of being normally distributed, the {chi}{sup 2} statistic grew through the steps in the k-effective test. The null hypothesis was rejected in the later steps. These results suggest, for a high accuracy solution, MCNP cell material quantities less than 100 grams and greater kcode parameters are needed to minimize uncertainty propagation and minimize round off effects.

Nichols, T.; Sternat, M.; Charlton, W.

2011-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fingerprints of Disorder Source in Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a systematic study of the electronic, transport and optical properties of disordered graphene including the next-nearest-neighbor hopping. We show that this hopping has a non-negligible effect on resonant scattering but is of minor importance for long-range disorder such as charged impurities, random potentials or hoppings induced by strain fluctuations. Different types of disorder can be recognized by their fingerprints appearing in the dc conductivity, carrier mobility, optical spectroscopy and Landau level spectrum. By matching our calculations to the experimental observations, we conclude that the long-range disorder potential induced by strain is the most important source of disorder in high-quality graphene on a substrate.

Zhao, Pei-liang; Katsnelson, M I; De Raedt, H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Scatter factors assessment in microbeam radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The success of the preclinical studies in Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) paved the way to the clinical trials under preparation at the Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Within this framework, an accurate determination of the deposited dose is crucial. With that aim, the scatter factors, which translate the absolute dose measured in reference conditions (2 x 2 cm{sup 2} field size at 2 cm-depth in water) to peak doses, were assessed. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed with two different widely used codes, PENELOPE and GEANT4, for the sake of safety. The scatter factors were obtained as the ratio of the doses that are deposited by a microbeam and by a field of reference size, at the reference depth. The calculated values were compared with the experimental data obtained by radiochromic (ISP HD-810) films and a PTW 34070 large area chamber. Results: The scatter factors for different microbeam field sizes assessed by the two MC codes were in agreement and reproduced the experimental data within uncertainty bars. Those correction factors were shown to be non-negligible for the future MRT clinical settings: an average 30% lower dose was deposited by a 50 {mu}m microbeam with respect to the reference conditions. Conclusions: For the first time, the scatter factors in MRT were systematically studied. They constitute an essential key to deposit accurate doses in the forthcoming clinical trials in MRT. The good agreement between the different calculations and the experimental data confirms the reliability of this challenging micrometric dose estimation.

Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sanchez, M. [Laboratoire Imagerie et Modelisation en Neurobiologie et Cancerologie IMNC-UMR 8165, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Campus Universitaire, Bat. 440, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain) and ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Servicio de Radiofisica, Complejo Hospitalario de Santiago de Compostela, Rua Choupana S/N, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

Ivanova, Tatiana [IRSN; Laville, Cedric [IRSN; Dyrda, James [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Mennerdahl, Dennis [E. Mennerdahl Systems; Golovko, Yury [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Raskach, Kirill [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Tsiboulia, Anatoly [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Lee, Gil Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Woo, Sweng-Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Bidaud, Adrien [Labratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmolo-gie (LPSC); Patel, Amrit [NRC; Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Numerical calculations of ultrasonic fields. [STEALTH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A code for calculating ultrasonic fields has been developed by revisng the thermal-hydraulics code STEALTH. This code may be used in a wide variety of situations in which a detailed knowledge of a propagating wave field is required. Among the potential used are: interpretation of pulse-echo or pitch-catch ultrasonic signals in complicated geometries; ultrasonic transducer modeling and characterization; optimization and evaluation of transducer design; optimization and reliability of inspection procedures; investigation of the response of different types of reflectors; flaw modeling; and general theoretical acoustics. The code is described, and its limitations and potential are discussed. A discussion of the required input and of the general procedures for running the code is presented. Three sample problems illustrate the input and the use of the code.

Johnson, J.A.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

LMR thermal hydraulics calculations in the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide range of thermal hydraulics computer codes have been developed by various organizations in the US. These codes cover an extensive range of purposes from within-assembly-wise pin temperature calculations to plant wide transient analysis. The codes are used for static analysis, for analysis of protected anticipated transients, and for analysis of a wide range of unprotected transients for the more recent inherently safe LMR designs. Some of these codes are plant-specific codes with properties of a specific plant built into them. Other codes are more general and can be applied to a number of plants or designs. These codes, and the purposes for which they have been used, are described.

Dunn, F.E.; Malloy, D.J.; Mohr, D.

1987-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Calculable Toy Model of the Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by recent discussions of the string-theory landscape, we propose field-theoretic realizations of models with large numbers of vacua. These models contain multiple U(1) gauge groups, and can be interpreted as deconstructed versions of higher-dimensional gauge theory models with fluxes in the compact space. We find that the vacuum structure of these models is very rich, defined by parameter-space regions with different classes of stable vacua separated by boundaries. This allows us to explicitly calculate physical quantities such as the supersymmetry-breaking scale, the presence or absence of R-symmetries, and probabilities of stable versus unstable vacua. Furthermore, we find that this landscape picture evolves with energy, allowing vacua to undergo phase transitions as they cross the boundaries between different regions in the landscape. We also demonstrate that supergravity effects are crucial in order to stabilize most of these vacua, and in order to allow the possibility of cancelling the cosmological constant.

Keith R. Dienes; Emilian Dudas; Tony Gherghetta

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

391

Density matrix renormalization group and wave function factorization for nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) and the wave function factorization method for the numerical solution of large scale nuclear structure problems. The DMRG exhibits an improved convergence for problems with realistic interactions due to the implementation of the finite algorithm. The wave function factorization of fpg-shell nuclei yields rapidly converging approximations that are at the present frontier for large-scale shell model calculations.

T. Papenbrock; D. J. Dean

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

On the stability of thermonuclear shell sources in stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a quantitative criterion for the thermal stability of thermonuclear shell sources. We find the thermal stability of shell sources to depend on exactly three factors: they are more stable when they are geometrically thicker, less degenerate and hotter. This confirms and unifies previously obtained results in terms of the geometry, temperature and density of the shell source, by a simplified but quantitative approach to the physics of shell nuclear burning. We present instability diagrams in the temperature-density plane for hydrogen and helium shell burning, which allow a simple evaluation of the stability conditions of such shell sources in stellar models. The performance of our stability criterion is demonstrated in various numerical models: in a 3 Msun AGB star, in helium accreting CO white dwarfs, in a helium white dwarf which is covered by a thin hydrogen envelope, and in a 1.0 Msun giant.

S. -C. Yoon; N. Langer; M. van der Sluys

2004-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Methods for point source analysis in high energy neutrino telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino telescopes are moving steadily toward the goal of detecting astrophysical neutrinos from the most powerful galactic and extragalactic sources. Here we describe analysis methods to search for high energy point-like neutrino sources using detectors deep in the ice or sea. We simulate an ideal cubic kilometer detector based on real world performance of existing detectors such as AMANDA, IceCube, and ANTARES. An unbinned likelihood ratio method is applied, making use of the point spread function and energy distribution of simulated neutrino signal events to separate them from the background of atmospheric neutrinos produced by cosmic ray showers. The unbinned point source analyses are shown to perform better than binned searches and, depending on the source spectral index, the use of energy information is shown to improve discovery potential by almost a factor of two.

Jim Braun; Jon Dumm; Francesco De Palma; Chad Finley; Albrecht Karle; Teresa Montaruli

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hollow electrode plasma excitation source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

Ballou, N.E.

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

395

BSTBacterial Source Tracking Conference Proceedings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BSTBacterial Source Tracking Conference Proceedings 2012 Bacterial Source Tracking State Conference Conference Proceedings Prepared by: Lucas Gregory, Texas Water Resources Institute Courtney Smith of the Science Conference Texas Water Resources Institute TR-427 June 2012 #12;#12;Texas Water Resources

396

Multi-factor authentication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Parametric calculations of fatigue-crack growth in piping. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major objective of this program is to provide data that can be used to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Section XI and regulatory requirements for inservice inspection of piping and pressure vessels. This study presents calculations of the growth of piping flaws produced by fatigue. Flaw growth was predicted as a function of the initial flaw size, the level and number of stress cycles, the piping material, and environmental factors.

Simonen, F.A.; Goodrich, C.W.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astrophysical sources are extremely efficient accelerators. Some sources emit photons up to multi-TeV energies, a signature of the presence, within them, of particles with energies much higher than those achievable with the largest accelerators on Earth. Even more compelling evidence comes from the study of Cosmic Rays, charged relativistic particles that reach the Earth with incredibly high energies: at the highest energy end of their spectrum, these subatomic particles are carrying a macroscopic energy, up to a few Joules. Here I will address the best candidate sources and mechanisms as cosmic particle accelerators. I will mainly focus on Galactic sources such as Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which being close and bright, are the best studied among astrophysical accelerators. These sources are held responsible for most of the energy that is put in relativistic particles in the Universe, but they are not thought to accelerate particles up to the highest individual energies, $\\approx 10^{20}$ eV...

Amato, Elena

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Intact and Degraded Component Criticality Calculations of N Reactors Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this calculation is to perform intact and degraded mode criticality evaluations of the Department of Energy's (DOE) N Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel codisposed in a 2-Defense High-Level Waste (2-DHLW)/2-Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Waste Package (WP) and emplaced in a monitored geologic repository (MGR) (see Attachment I). The scope of this calculation is limited to the determination of the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for both intact and degraded mode internal configurations of the codisposal waste package. This calculation will support the analysis that will be performed to demonstrate the technical viability for disposing of U-metal (N Reactor) spent nuclear fuel in the potential MGR.

L. Angers

2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Stellar electron-capture rates calculated with the finite-temperature relativistic random-phase approximation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a self-consistent microscopic theoretical framework for modeling the process of electron capture on nuclei in stellar environment, based on relativistic energy density functionals. The finite-temperature relativistic mean-field model is used to calculate the single-nucleon basis and the occupation factors in a target nucleus, and J{sup {pi}}=0{sup {+-}}, 1{sup {+-}}, and 2{sup {+-}} charge-exchange transitions are described by the self-consistent finite-temperature relativistic random-phase approximation. Cross sections and rates are calculated for electron capture on {sup 54,56}Fe and {sup 76,78}Ge in stellar environment, and results compared with predictions of similar and complementary model calculations.

Niu, Y. F. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Paar, N.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Meng, J. [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch 7602 (South Africa)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Enrico Fermi Fast Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Criticality Calculations: Degraded Mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this calculation is to characterize the nuclear criticality safety concerns associated with the codisposal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Enrico Fermi (EF) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) in a 5-Defense High-Level Waste (5-DHLW) Waste Package (WP) and placed in a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The scope of this calculation is limited to the determination of the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for the degraded mode internal configurations of the codisposal WP. The results of this calculation and those of Ref. 8 will be used to evaluate criticality issues and support the analysis that will be performed to demonstrate the viability of the codisposal concept for the Monitored Geologic Repository.

D.R. Moscalu; L. Angers; J. Monroe-Rammsey; H.R. Radulesca

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

402

Sealed source peer review plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sealed sources are known quantities of radioactive materials that have been encapsulated in quantities that produce known radiation fields. Sealed sources have multiple uses ranging from instrument calibration sources to sources that produce radiation fields for experimental applications. The Off-Site Source Recovery (OSR) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), created in 1999, under the direction of the Waste Management Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque has been assigned the responsibility to recover and manage excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources from the public and private sector. LANL intends to ship drums containing qualified sealed sources to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Prior to shipping, these drums must be characterized with respect to radiological content and other parameters. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that ten radionulcides be quantified and reported for every container of waste to be disposed in the WIPP. The methods traditionally approved by the EPA include non-destructive assay (NDA) in accordance with Appendix A of the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE, 2002) (CH WAC). However, because of the nature and pedigree of historical records for sealed sources and the technical infeasibility of performing NDA on these sources, LANL proposes to characterize the content of these waste drums using qualified existing radiological data in lieu of direct measurement. This plan describes the process and documentation requirements for the use of the peer review process to qualify existing data for sealed radiological sources in lieu of perfonning radioassay. The peer review process will be performed in accordance with criteria provided in 40 CFR {section} 194.22 which specifies the use of the NUREG 1297 guidelines. The plan defines the management approach, resources, schedule, and technical requirements for the subject peer review.

Feldman, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leonard, Lee [RETIRED; Burns, Ron [CONTRACTOR

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies 2005 Diesel Engine...

404

Evolving Adjustments to External (Gamma) Slope Factors for CERCLA Risk and Dose Assessments - 12290  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To model the external exposure pathway in risk and dose assessments of radioactive contamination at Superfund sites, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses slope factors (SFs), also known as risk coefficients, and dose conversion factors (DCFs). Without any adjustment these external radiation exposure pathways effectively assumes that an individual is exposed to a source geometry that is effectively an infinite slab. The concept of an 'infinite slab' means that the thickness of the contaminated zone and its aerial extent are so large that it behaves as if it were infinite in its physical dimensions. EPA has been making increasingly complex adjustments to account for the extent of the contamination and its corresponding radiation field to provide more accurate risk and dose assessment modeling when using its calculators. In most instances, the more accurate modeling results derived from these gamma adjustments are less conservative. The notable exception are for some radionuclides in rooms with contaminated walls, ceiling, and floors, and the receptor is in location of the room with the highest amount of radiation exposure, usually the corner of small rooms and the center of large conference rooms. (authors)

Walker, Stuart [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

GUIDE TO CALCULATING TRANSPORT EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS IN OCCUPATIONAL AIR SAMPLING SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report will present hand calculations for transport efficiency based on aspiration efficiency and particle deposition losses. Because the hand calculations become long and tedious, especially for lognormal distributions of aerosols, an R script (R 2011) will be provided for each element examined. Calculations are provided for the most common elements in a remote air sampling system, including a thin-walled probe in ambient air, straight tubing, bends and a sample housing. One popular alternative approach would be to put such calculations in a spreadsheet, a thorough version of which is shared by Paul Baron via the Aerocalc spreadsheet (Baron 2012). To provide greater transparency and to avoid common spreadsheet vulnerabilities to errors (Burns 2012), this report uses R. The particle size is based on the concept of activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD). The AMAD is a particle size in an aerosol where fifty percent of the activity in the aerosol is associated with particles of aerodynamic diameter greater than the AMAD. This concept allows for the simplification of transport efficiency calculations where all particles are treated as spheres with the density of water (1 g?cm-3). In reality, particle densities depend on the actual material involved. Particle geometries can be very complicated. Dynamic shape factors are provided by Hinds (Hinds 1999). Some example factors are: 1.00 for a sphere, 1.08 for a cube, 1.68 for a long cylinder (10 times as long as it is wide), 1.05 to 1.11 for bituminous coal, 1.57 for sand and 1.88 for talc. Revision 1 is made to correct an error in the original version of this report. The particle distributions are based on activity weighting of particles rather than based on the number of particles of each size. Therefore, the mass correction made in the original version is removed from the text and the calculations. Results affected by the change are updated.

Hogue, M.; Hadlock, D.; Thompson, M.; Farfan, E.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

406

FACET: a radiation view factor computer code for axisymmetric, 2D planar, and 3D geometries with shadowing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer code FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors for input to finite-element heat-transfer analysis codes. The first section of this report is a brief review of previous radiation-view-factor computer codes. The second section presents the defining integral equation for the geometric view factor between two surfaces and the assumptions made in its derivation. Also in this section are the numerical algorithms used to integrate this equation for the various geometries. The third section presents the algorithms used to detect self-shadowing and third-surface shadowing between the two surfaces for which a view factor is being calculated. The fourth section provides a user's input guide followed by several example problems.

Shapiro, A.B.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Calculated criticality for sup 235 U/graphite systems using the VIM Monte Carlo code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations for highly enriched uranium and graphite systems gained renewed interest recently for the new production modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). Experiments to validate the physics calculations for these systems are being prepared for the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) reactor at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL-West) and in the Compact Nuclear Power Source facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The continuous-energy Monte Carlo code VIM, or equivalently the MCNP code, can utilize fully detailed models of the MHTGR and serve as benchmarks for the approximate multigroup methods necessary in full reactor calculations. Validation of these codes and their associated nuclear data did not exist for highly enriched {sup 235}U/graphite systems. Experimental data, used in development of more approximate methods, dates back to the 1960s. The authors have selected two independent sets of experiments for calculation with the VIM code. The carbon-to-uranium (C/U) ratios encompass the range of 2,000, representative of the new production MHTGR, to the ratio of 10,000 in the fuel of TREAT. Calculations used the ENDF/B-V data.

Collins, P.J.; Grasseschi, G.L.; Olsen, D.N. (Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls (United States)); Finck, P.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ab initio calculation of the Hoyle state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hoyle state plays a crucial role in the hydrogen burning of stars heavier than our sun and in the production of carbon and other elements necessary for life. This excited state of the carbon-12 nucleus was postulated by Hoyle [1] as a necessary ingredient for the fusion of three alpha particles to produce carbon at stellar temperatures. Although the Hoyle state was seen experimentally more than a half century ago [2,3], nuclear theorists have not yet uncovered the nature of this state from first principles. In this letter we report the first ab initio calculation of the low-lying states of carbon-12 using supercomputer lattice simulations and a theoretical framework known as effective field theory. In addition to the ground state and excited spin-2 state, we find a resonance at -85(3) MeV with all of the properties of the Hoyle state and in agreement with the experimentally observed energy. These lattice simulations provide insight into the structure of this unique state and new clues as to the amount of fine-tuning needed in nature for the production of carbon in stars.

Evgeny Epelbaum; Hermann Krebs; Dean Lee; Ulf-G. Meißner

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

409

Public Health FAT FACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: THE UNITED STATES SPENDS MORE ON HEALTH CARE THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY. YET WE CONTINUE TO FALL FAR BEHIND States spends an astonishing percent of our gross domestic product on health care--significantly moreColumbia Public Health HOT TOPIC Climate Change FAT FACTORS Obesity Prevention BOOK SMART

Qian, Ning

410

Springtime Arctic haze contributions of submicron organic particles from European and Asian combustion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion sources Amanda A. Frossard,1 Patrick M. Shaw,1 Lynn M. Russell,1 Jesse H. Kroll,2,3 Manjula R factorization (PMF) and elemental tracer analysis indicate that mixed combustion sources account for more than. Correlations with typical combustion tracers (S, Zn, K, Br, V) provide evidence for the contribution

Russell, Lynn

411

Discrepancies in the Prediction of Solar Wind using Potential Field Source Surface Model: An  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrepancies in the Prediction of Solar Wind using Potential Field Source Surface Model. This inverse relation has been made use of in the prediction of solar wind speed at 1 AU using a potential between the magnetic flux tube expansion factor (FTE) at the source surface and the solar wind speed

Zhao, Xuepu

412

Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part II. High dose rate {sup 192}Ir sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper discussed the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources. Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the {sup 192}Ir sources were completed with several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom. Results: Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were generated for each applicator and agreed well with the measured values. A method of output verification was created that allows users to determine the applicator-specific dose to water at the treatment surface based on a measured air-kerma rate. Conclusions: The novel output verification methods described in this work will reduce uncertainties in dose delivery for treatments with these kinds of surface applicators, ultimately improving patient care.

Fulkerson, Regina K., E-mail: rmkenned@gmail.com; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

International Data on Radiological Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Unified description of kaon electroweak form factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A calculation of the semileptonic decays of the kaon (K{sub l3}) is presented. The results are direct predictions of a covariant model of the pion and kaon introduced earlier by Ito, Buck, Gross. The weak form factors for K{sub l3} are predicted with absolutely no parameter adjustments of the model. The authors obtained for the form factor parameters: f{sub {minus}}(q{sup 2}=m{sub l}{sup 2})/f{sub +}(q{sup 2}=m{sub l}{sup 2})={minus}0.28 and {lambda}{sub +}= 0.028, both within experimental error bars. Connections of this approach to heavy quark symmetry will also be discussed.

A. Afanasev; W. Buck

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Factorization in B to V gamma Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/mb using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resume perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, T

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

Purcell factor of Mie resonators featuring electric and magnetic modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a modal approach to compute the Purcell factor in Mie resonators exhibiting both electric and magnetic resonances. The analytic expressions of the normal modes are used to calculate the effective volumes. We show that important features of the effective volume can be predicted thanks to the translation-addition coefficients of a displaced dipole. Using our formalism, it is easy to see that, in general, the Purcell factor of Mie resonators is not dominated by a single mode, but rather by a large superposition. Finally we consider a silicon resonator homogeneously doped with electric dipolar emitters, and we show that the average electric Purcell factor dominates over the magnetic one.

Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Slow neutron leakage spectra from spallation neutron sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An efficient technique is described for Monte Carlo simulation of neutron beam spectra from target-moderator-reflector assemblies typical of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The technique involves the scoring of the transport-theoretical probability that a neutron will emerge from the moderator surface in the direction of interest, at each collision. An angle-biasing probability is also introduced which further enhances efficiency in simple problems. These modifications were introduced into the VIM low energy neutron transport code, representing the spatial and energy distributions of the source neutrons approximately as those of evaporation neutrons generated through the spallation process by protons of various energies. The intensity of slow neutrons leaking from various reflected moderators was studied for various neutron source arrangements. These include computations relating to early measurements on a mockup-assembly, a brief survey of moderator materials and sizes, and a survey of the effects of varying source and moderator configurations with a practical, liquid metal cooled uranium source Wing and slab, i.e., tangential and radial moderator arrangements, and Be vs CH/sub 2/ reflectors are compared. Results are also presented for several complicated geometries which more closely represent realistic arrangements for a practical source, and for a subcritical fission multiplier such as might be driven by an electron linac. An adaptation of the code was developed to enable time dependent calculations, and investigated the effects of the reflector, decoupling and void liner materials on the pulse shape.

Das, S.G.; Carpenter, J.M.; Prael, R.E.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Improvement of Photon Buildup Factors for Radiological Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slant-path buildup factors for photons between 1 keV and 10 MeV for nine radiation shielding materials (air, aluminum, concrete, iron, lead, leaded glass, polyethylene, stainless steel, and water) are calculated with the most recent cross-section data available using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods. Discrete ordinates calculations use a 244-group energy structure that is based on previous research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), but extended with the results of this thesis, and its focused studies on low-energy photon transport and the effects of group widths in multigroup calculations. Buildup factor calculations in discrete ordinates benefit from coupled photon/electron cross sections to account for secondary photon effects. Also, ambient dose equivalent (herein referred to as dose) buildup factors were analyzed at lower energies where corresponding response functions do not exist in literature. The results of these studies are directly applicable to radiation safety at LANL, where the dose modeling tool Pandemonium is used to estimate worker dose in plutonium handling facilities. Buildup factors determined in this thesis will be used to enhance the code's modeling capabilities, but should be of interest to the radiation shielding community.

F.G. Schirmers

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Three chamber negative ion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

It is an object of this invention provide a negative ion source which efficiently provides a large flux of negatively ionized particles. This invention provides a volume source of negative ions which has a current density sufficient for magnetic fusion applications and has electrons suppressed from the output. It is still another object of this invention to provide a volume source of negative ions which can be electrostatically accelerated to high energies and subsequently neutralized to form a high energy neutral beam for use with a magnetically confined plasma.

Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Hiskes, J.R.

1983-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

420

Wind-Wave Model with an Optimized Source Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the basis of the author's earlier results, a new source function for a numerical wind-wave model optimized by the criterion of accuracy and speed of calculation is substantiated. The proposed source function includes (a) an optimized version of the discrete interaction approximation for parametrization of the nonlinear evolution mechanism, (b) a generalized empirical form of the input term modified by adding a special block of the dynamic boundary layer of the atmosphere, and (c) a dissipation term quadratic in the wave spectrum. Particular attention is given to a theoretical substantiation of the least investigated dissipation term. The advantages of the proposed source function are discussed by its comparison to the analogues used in the widespread models of the third generation WAM and WAVEWATCH. At the initial stage of assessing the merits of the proposed model, the results of its testing by the system of academic tests are presented. In the course of testing, some principals of this procedure are form...

Polnikov, Vladislav

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater exposure scenario, and the development of conversion factors for assessing compliance with the groundwater protection standards. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA-LA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters, their development, and the relationship between the parameters and specific features events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the groundwater exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis'' (Figure 1-1). The objectives of this analysis are to develop BDCFs for the groundwater exposure scenario for the three climate states (present day, monsoon, and glacial transition) considered in the TSPA-LA, as well as conversion factors for compliance evaluation with the groundwater protection standards. The BDCFs will be used in performance assessment for calculating all-pathway annual doses for a given concentration of radionuclides in groundwater. The conversion factors will be used for calculating gross alpha particle activity in groundwater and the annual dose from drinking water for beta- and photon-emitting radionuclides.

M.A. Wasiolek

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

422

Simple LMFBR axial-flow friction-factor correlation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complicated LMFBR axial lead-length averaged friction-factor correlations are reduced to an easy, ready-to-use function of bundle Reynolds number for wire-wrapped bundles. The function together with the power curves to calculate the associated constants are incorporated in a computer preprocessor, EZFRIC. The constants required for the calculation of the subchannels and bundle friction factors are derived and correlated into power curves of geometrical parameters. A computer program, FRIC, which can alternatively be used to accurately calculate these constants is also included. The accurate values of the constants and the corresponding values predicted by the power curves and percentage error of prediction are tabulated for a wide variety of geometries of interest.

Chan, Y.N.; Todreas, N.E.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Summary and Comparison of the Time of Delivery Factors Developed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to similar factors used in other applications (e.g. Qualifying Facility avoided cost calculations.) KEYWORDS Appendix B: QF Avoided Cost TOU Period Definitions..................................... 26 #12;1 CHAPTER 1

424

An evaluation of gender-based weighting factors for internal dosimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

body irradiation. Weighting factors are used in the calculation of effective dose formerly called the effective dose equivalent. The 1990 recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 60 introduce a set...

Spiars, Joanna Hamilton

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Determination of the ?(1232) axial and pseudoscalar form factors from lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a lattice QCD calculation of the ?(1232) matrix elements of the axial-vector and pseudoscalar currents. The decomposition of these matrix elements into the appropriate Lorentz invariant form factors is carried ...

Alexandrou, Constantia

426

Disruptive Event Biosphere Doser Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to, and the results of, development of radionuclide-, exposure scenario-, and ash thickness-specific Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postulated postclosure extrusive igneous event (volcanic eruption) at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations were done for seventeen radionuclides. The selection of radionuclides included those that may be significant dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, as well as radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure. The approach documented in this report takes into account human exposure during three different phases at the time of, and after, volcanic eruption. Calculations of disruptive event BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. The pathway analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. BDCFs for volcanic eruption, when combined with the concentration of radioactivity deposited by eruption on the soil surface, allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculation of radioactivity deposition is outside the scope of this report and so is the transport of contaminated ash from the volcano to the location of the receptor. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), in which doses are calculated to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

M. Wasiolek

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to development of the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postclosure nominal performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations concerned twenty-four radionuclides. This selection included sixteen radionuclides that may be significant nominal performance dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, five additional radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure, and three relatively short-lived radionuclides important for the human intrusion scenario. Consideration of radionuclide buildup in soil caused by previous irrigation with contaminated groundwater was taken into account in the BDCF development. The effect of climate evolution, from the current arid conditions to a wetter and cooler climate, on the BDCF values was evaluated. The analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. Calculations of nominal performance BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. BDCFs for the nominal performance, when combined with the concentrations of radionuclides in groundwater allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculated estimates of radionuclide concentration in groundwater result from the saturated zone modeling. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) to calculate doses to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

Wasiolek, Maryla A.

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

428

SUBJECT: CALCULATION OF JOB CREATION THROUGH RECOVERY ACT FUNDING...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SUBJECT: CALCULATION OF JOB CREATION THROUGH RECOVERY ACT FUNDING SUBJECT: CALCULATION OF JOB CREATION THROUGH RECOVERY ACT FUNDING wpn10-14asep10-07aeecbg10-08a.pdf More...

429

Radiation source with shaped emission  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Employing a source of radiation, such as an electric discharge source, that is equipped with a capillary region configured into some predetermined shape, such as an arc or slit, can significantly improve the amount of flux delivered to the lithographic wafers while maintaining high efficiency. The source is particularly suited for photolithography systems that employs a ringfield camera. The invention permits the condenser which delivers critical illumination to the reticle to be simplified from five or more reflective elements to a total of three or four reflective elements thereby increasing condenser efficiency. It maximizes the flux delivered and maintains a high coupling efficiency. This architecture couples EUV radiation from the discharge source into a ring field lithography camera.

Kubiak, Glenn D.; Sweatt, William C.

2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

430

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the...

431

The feasibility of source segregation as the first step for a municipal solid waste disposal scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis Incineration. Pyrolysis Composting. Anaerobic Digestion. Material Recovery. . 28 . 28 . 29 . 30 ~ 30 . 49 . 53 . 61 CHAPTER V APPLICATION AND IMPLEMENTATION. Waste Stream Balance. . . Collection Equipment Implementation of Source... Factor A. . 71 Materials Value Versus Compost Valu Factor B. . 74 LIST OF PLATES Plate Page Water-wall Incinerator Schematic. ~ ~ 33 Nodular Incinerator Schematic. . . 34 RDF Process Flowchart ~ ~ 35 Pyrolysis Process Schematic. 50 Pyrolysis...

Fiedler, Charles Walter

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Relativistic Winds from Compact Gamma-Ray Sources: II. Pair Loading and Radiative Acceleration in Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the effects of rapid pair creation by an intense pulse of gamma-rays propagating ahead of a relativistic shock. Side-scattered photons colliding with the main gamma-ray beam amplify the density of scattering charges. The acceleration rate of the pair-loaded medium is calculated, and its limiting bulk Lorentz factor related to the spectrum and compactness of the photon source. One obtains, as a result, a definite prediction for the relative inertia in baryons and pairs. The deceleration of a relativistic shock in the moving medium, and the resulting synchrotron emissivity, are compared with existing calculations for a static medium. The radiative efficiency is increased dramatically by pair loading. When the initial ambient density exceeds a critical value, the scattering depth traversed by the main gamma-ray pulse rises above unity, and the pulse is broadened. These considerations place significant constraints on burst progenitors: a pre-burst mass loss rate exceeding 10^{-5} M_\\odot per year is difficult to reconcile with individual pulses narrower than 10 s, unless the radiative efficiency is low. An anisotropic gamma-ray flux (on an angular scale \\Gamma^{-1} or larger) drives a large velocity shear that greatly increases the energy in the seed magnetic field forward of the propagating shock.

Christopher Thompson; Piero Madau

2000-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

433

TDHF fusion calculations for spherical+deformed systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We outline a formalism to carry out TDHF calculations of fusion cross sections for spherical + deformed nuclei. The procedure incorporates the dynamic alignment of the deformed nucleus into the calculation of the fusion cross section. The alignment results from multiple E2/E4 Coulomb excitation of the ground state rotational band. Implications for TDHF fusion calculations are discussed. TDHF calculations are done in an unrestricted three-dimensional geometry using modern Skyrme force parametrizations.

A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

MATLAB Tutorial Getting Started with Calculations, Graphing and Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB Tutorial Getting Started with Calculations, Graphing and Programming Nicholas R. Kirchner UI 2 Calculations with MATLAB Standard Calculations and Variables Matrices and Vectors 3 Graphing NRK;Matrices and Vectors, Definitions MATLAB is short for MATrix LABoratory. It was built for high-speed matrix

Weinberger, Hans

435

Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing master calculation list  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This supporting document has been prepared to make the Master Calculation List readily retrievable. The list gives the status of the calculation (as-built, not used, applied, etc.), the calculation title, its originator, comments, and report number under which it was issued. Tank 241-C-106 has been included on the High Heat Load Watch List.

Bailey, J.W.

1998-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG Master of Science Thesis Carlo reactor physics criticality calculations. This is achieved by optimising the number of neutron for more efficient Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations, giving results with errors that can

Haviland, David

437

Entropy Calculations and the Third Law of Thermodynamics Chemistry 223  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Entropy Calculations and the Third Law of Thermodynamics Chemistry 223 1. Entropy Calculations I We heat of fusion, sublimation, or vaporization) is added to the system, with no resulting change, 2014 #12;Entropy Calculations and the Third Law -2- Chemistry 223 STiT f = T0 Ti CP,i(T, P, N) T d

Ronis, David M.

438

Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume IV. United States: WYEC data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities using Weather Year for Energy Calculations (WYEC) source weather data. Considerable overlap is present in cities (21) covered by both the TRY and WYEC data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about ?3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than ?1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet ?3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were ?7% for {sup 60}Co, ?0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and ?2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For lower energy radionuclides like {sup 169}Yb, bolus may be needed; and (iii) for the interstitial case, at least a 0.1 cm bolus is advised for {sup 60}Co to avoid underdosing superficial target layers. For {sup 192}Ir and {sup 169}Yb, no bolus is needed. For those cases where no bolus is needed, its use might be detrimental as the lack of radiation scatter may be beneficial to the patient, although the 2% tolerance for dose calculation accuracy recommended in the AAPM TG-56 report is not fulfilled.

Granero, Domingo, E-mail: dgranero@eresa.com [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain)] [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain)] [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, Javier [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain)] [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain)] [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Development of a coupling code for PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming is important for the safe of the personnel and equipment, thus calculation has to be performed to evaluate the neutron flux distribution around the reactor. For this calculation, the deterministic codes have difficulties in fine geometrical modeling and need huge computer resource; and the Monte Carlo codes require very long sampling time to obtain results with acceptable precision. Therefore, a coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this study, we develop a coupling code named DORT2MCNP to link the Sn code DORT and Monte Carlo code MCNP. DORT2MCNP is used to produce a combined surface source containing top, bottom and side surface simultaneously. Because SDEF card is unsuitable for the combined surface source, we modify the SOURCE subroutine of MCNP and compile MCNP for this application. Numerical results demonstrate the correctness of the coupling code DORT2MCNP and show reasonable agreement between the coupling method and the other two codes (DORT and MCNP). (authors)

Zheng, Z.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, H.; Wang, M. [NECP Laboratory, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ., Xi'an Shaanxi 710049 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors sources calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Calculation of shielding door thicknesses for radiation therapy facilities using the ITS Monte Carlo program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shielding calculations for door thicknesses for megavoltage radiotherapy facilities with mazes are generally straightforward. To simplify the calculations, the standard formalism adopts several approximations relating to the average beam path, scattering coefficients, and the mean energy of the spectrum of scattered radiation. To test the accuracy of these calculations, the Monte Carlo program, ITS, was applied to this problem by determining the dose and energy spectrum of the radiation at the door for 4- and 10-MV bremsstrahlung beams incident on a phantom at isocenter. This was performed for mazes, one termed 'standard' and the other a shorter maze where the primary beam is incident on the wall adjacent to the door. The peak of the photon-energy spectrum at the door was found to be the same for both types of maze, independent of primary beam energy, and also, in the case of the conventional maze, of the primary beam orientation. The spectrum was harder for the short maze and for 10 MV vs. 4 MV. The thickness of the lead door for a short maze configuration was 1.5 cm for 10 MV and 1.2 cm for 4 MV vs. approximately less than 1 mm for a conventional maze. For the conventional maze, the Monte Carlo calculation predicts the dose at the door to be lower than given by NCRP 49 and NCRP 51 by about a factor of 2 at 4 MV but to be the same at 10 MV. For the short maze, the Monte Carlo predicts the dose to be a factor of 3 lower for 4 MV and about a factor of 1.5 lower for 10 MV. Experimental results support the Monte Carlo findings for the short maze.

Biggs, P.J. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Influence of Non-technical Factors on Code Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Influence of Non-technical Factors on Code Review Olga Baysal, Oleksii Kononenko, Reid Holmes, personal and organizational aspects, WebKit, open source software I. INTRODUCTION Many software development research has found that organizational structure can influence software quality. Nagappan et al

Godfrey, Michael W.

443

Full Core, Heterogeneous, Time Dependent Neutron Transport Calculations with the 3D Code DeCART  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for multi- dimensional reactor calculation." Atomkernenergiein Light Water Reactor calculations, which are processedlight water reactor diffusion calculations." Nuclear Science

Hursin, Mathieu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Calculation of molecular free energies in classical potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free energy calculations in molecular simulations are used to predict the strength of molecular processes such as binding and solvation. We present an accurate and complete calculation of molecular free energies in standard classical potentials. In this method we transform the molecule by relaxing potential terms that depend on the coordinates of a group of atoms in that molecule and calculate the free energy difference associated with the transformation. Then, since the transformed molecule can be treated as non interacting systems, the free energy associated with these atoms is analytically or numerically calculated. We suggest the potential application of free energy calculation of chemical reactions in classical molecular simulations.

Farhi, Asaf

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

Ronen, Y.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Multilevel cascade voltage source inverter with seperate DC sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multilevel cascade voltage source inverter having separate DC sources is described herein. This inverter is applicable to high voltage, high power applications such as flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) including static VAR generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting and voltage balancing and fuel cell and photovoltaic utility interface systems. The M-level inverter consists of at least one phase wherein each phase has a plurality of full bridge inverters equipped with an independent DC source. This inverter develops a near sinusoidal approximation voltage waveform with only one switching per cycle as the number of levels, M, is increased. The inverter may have either single-phase or multi-phase embodiments connected in either wye or delta configurations.

Peng, Fang Zheng (Oak Ridge, TN); Lai, Jih-Sheng (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Multilevel cascade voltage source inverter with separate DC sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multilevel cascade voltage source inverter having separate DC sources is described herein. This inverter is applicable to high voltage, high power applications such as flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) including static VAR generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting and voltage balancing and fuel cell and photovoltaic utility interface systems. The M-level inverter consists of at least one phase wherein each phase has a plurality of full bridge inverters equipped with an independent DC source. This inverter develops a near sinusoidal approximation voltage waveform with only one switching per cycle as the number of levels, M, is increased. The inverter may have either single-phase or multi-phase embodiments connected in either wye or delta configurations. 15 figs.

Peng, F.Z.; Lai, J.S.

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

448

Multilevel cascade voltage source inverter with seperate DC sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multilevel cascade voltage source inverter having separate DC sources is described herein. This inverter is applicable to high voltage, high power applications such as flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) including static VAR generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting and voltage balancing and fuel cell and photovoltaic utility interface systems. The M-level inverter consists of at least one phase wherein each phase has a plurality of full bridge inverters equipped with an independent DC source. This inverter develops a near sinusoidal approximation voltage waveform with only one switching per cycle as the number of levels, M, is increased. The inverter may have either single-phase or multi-phase embodiments connected in either wye or delta configurations.

Peng, Fang Zheng (Knoxville, TN); Lai, Jih-Sheng (Blacksburg, VA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H{sup -} ion source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H{sup {minus}} beam with a peak current of 35mA at a 6.2 percent duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H{sup {minus}} beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H{sup {minus}} beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson`s equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail.

Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Leung, K.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Results from One- and Two- Phase Fluid Flow Calculations within the Preliminary Safety Analysis of the Gorleben Site - 13310  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rock salt is one of the possible host rock formations for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in Germany. The Preliminary Safety Analysis of the Gorleben Site (Vorlaeufige Sicherheitsanalyse Gorleben, VSG) evaluates the long-term safety of a hypothetical repository in the salt dome of Gorleben, Germany. A mature repository concept and detailed knowledge of the site allowed a detailed process analysis within the project by numerical modeling of single-phase and two-phase flow. The possibility of liquid transport from the shafts to the emplacement drifts is one objective of the present study. Also, the implications of brine inflow on radionuclide transport and gas generation are investigated. Pressure build-up due to rock convergence and gas generation, release of volatile radionuclides from the waste and pressure-driven contaminant transport were considered, too. The study confirms that the compaction behavior of salt grit backfill is one of the most relevant factors for the hydrodynamic evolution of the repository and the transport of contaminants. Due to the interaction between compaction, saturation and pore pressure, complex flow patterns evolve. Emplacement drifts serve as gas sinks or sources at different times. In most calculation cases, the backfill reaches its final porosity after a few hundred years. The repository is then sealed and radionuclides can only be transported by diffusion in the liquid phase. Estimates for the final porosity of compacted backfill range between 0 % and 2 %. The exact properties of the backfill regarding single- and two-phase flow are not well known for this porosity range. The study highlights that this uncertainty has a profound impact on flow and transport processes over long time-scales. Therefore, more research is needed to characterize the properties of crushed salt grit at low porosities or to reduce the adverse effects of possible higher porosities by repository optimization. (authors)

Kock, Ingo; Larue, Juergen; Fischer, Heidi; Frieling, Gerd; Navarro, Martin; Seher, Holger [Department of Final Disposal, GRS mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Cologne (Germany)] [Department of Final Disposal, GRS mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Cologne (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Application analysis of ground source heat pumps in building space conditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adoption of geothermal energy in space conditioning of buildings through utilizing ground source heat pump (GSHP, also known as geothermal heat pump) has increased rapidly during the past several decades. However, the impacts of the GSHP utilization on the efficiency of heat pumps and soil temperature distribution remained unclear and needs further investigation. This paper presents a novel model to calculate the soil temperature distribution and the coefficient of performance (COP) of GSHP. Different scenarios were simulated to quantify the impact of different factors on the GSHP performance, including heat balance, daily running mode, and spacing between boreholes. Our results show that GSHP is suitable for buildings with balanced cooling and heating loads. It can keep soil temperature at a relatively constant level for more than 10 years. Long boreholes, additional space between boreholes, intermittent running mode will improve the performance of GSHP, but large initial investment is required. The improper design will make the COP of GSHP even lower than traditional heat pumps. Professional design and maintenance technologies are greatly needed in order to promote this promising technology in the developing world.

Qian, Hua; Wang, Yungang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Sub-Rayleigh quantum imaging using single-photon sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a technique capable of imaging a distinct physical object with sub-Rayleigh resolution in an ordinary far-field imaging setup using single-photon sources and linear optical tools only. We exemplify our method for the case of a rectangular aperture and two or four single-photon emitters obtaining a resolution enhanced by a factor of 2 or 4, respectively.

Thiel, C.; Zanthier, J. von [Institut fuer Optik, Information und Photonik, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Bastin, T. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Atomique et de Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Agarwal, G. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Inverter for interfacing advanced energy sources to a utility grid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transistor is operated in the PWM mode such that a hlaf sine wave of current is delivered first to one-half of a distribution transformer and then the other as determined by steering thyristors operated at the fundamental sinusoidal frequency. Power to the transistor is supplied by a dc source such as a solar array and the power is converted such that a sinusoidal current is injected into a utility at near unity power factor.

Steigerwald, Robert L. (Scotia, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Research on fusion neutron sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of fusion devices as powerful neutron sources has been discussed for decades. Whereas the successful route to a commercial fusion power reactor demands steady state stable operation combined with the high efficiency required to make electricity production economic, the alternative approach to advancing the use of fusion is free of many of complications connected with the requirements for economic power generation and uses the already achieved knowledge of Fusion physics and developed Fusion technologies. 'Fusion for Neutrons' (F4N), has now been re-visited, inspired by recent progress achieved on comparably compact fusion devices, based on the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept. Freed from the requirement to produce much more electricity than used to drive it, a fusion neutron source could be efficiently used for many commercial applications, and also to support the goal of producing energy by nuclear power. The possibility to use a small or medium size ST as a powerful or intense steady-state fusion neutron source (FNS) is discussed in this paper in comparison with the use of traditional high aspect ratio tokamaks. An overview of various conceptual designs of compact fusion neutron sources based on the ST concept is given and they are compared with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS), with major radius as low as 0.5 metres but still able to produce several MW of neutrons in a steady-state regime.

Gryaznevich, M. P. [Tokamak Solutions UK, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OXON, OX133DB (United Kingdom)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Seasonal variation of carbon monoxide in northern Japan: Fourier transform IR measurements and source-labeled model calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

doi:10.1029/2002JD003093. Stricker, N. C. M. , A. Hahne, D.satellite measurements [ Stricker et al . , 1995] are shown

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Seasonal variation of carbon monoxide in northern Japan: Fourier transform IR measurements and source-labeled model calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions, fossil and bio- fuel burning and biomass burningof contributions from fossil and bio- fuel burning (FF) and

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A comparison of material balance calculations based on equilibrium ratios with Schilthuis balance calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Liquid Phases for Assumed Initial Volume of 3, 900, 000, 000 Barrels. 31 ABSTRACT The theory of the material balance based on equihbrium ratios is described. The Kelley-Snyder field is described and a calculation of oil in place by the Schilthuis...& noglectbag the pres?ace of a water drive might ~ the high value of 4x 000, 000?000 barrels, and would if included, briag this value mox's into line with the others, Any water drive that would cause such effects would have to be from a limited aquifer...

Clanton, John L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

458

Transition-phase calculation of a large, heterogeneous-core LMFBR. [SIMMER-II calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mechanistic calculation of a complete transition-phase sequence for a large heterogeneous core LMFBR has been performed using SIMMER-II. Recriticalities occurred as the disruption progressed through a series of different subphases. The number and severity of recriticalities was directly related to the timing and scale of fuel removal and coherence of material motion. The energetics associated with transition-phase are not yet resolved but the understanding of the characteristics of disruption and the effects of uncertainties has been extended significantly.

Luck, L.B.; Bell, C.R.; Asprey, M.W.; DeVault, G.P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Comparing the accuracy of four-dimensional photon dose calculations with three-dimensional calculations using moving and deforming phantoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculation algorithms, which explicitly incorporate respiratory motion in the calculation of doses, have the potential to improve the accuracy of dose calculations in thoracic treatment planning; however, they generally require greater computing power and resources than currently used for three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations. The purpose of this work was to quantify the increase in accuracy of 4D dose calculations versus 3D dose calculations. Methods: The accuracy of each dose calculation algorithm was assessed using measurements made with two phantoms. Specifically, the authors used a rigid moving anthropomorphic thoracic phantom and an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom with a deformable lung insert. To incorporate a clinically relevant range of scenarios, they programed the phantoms to move and deform with two motion patterns: A sinusoidal motion pattern and an irregular motion pattern that was extracted from an actual patient's breathing profile. For each combination of phantom and motion pattern, three plans were created: A single-beam plan, a multiple-beam plan, and an intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan. Doses were calculated using 4D dose calculation methods as well as conventional 3D dose calculation methods. The rigid moving and deforming phantoms were irradiated according to the three treatment plans and doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and radiochromic film. The accuracy of each dose calculation algorithm was assessed using measured-to-calculated TLD doses and a {gamma} analysis. Results: No significant differences were observed between the measured-to-calculated TLD ratios among 4D and 3D dose calculations. The {gamma} results revealed that 4D dose calculations had significantly greater percentage of pixels passing the 5%/3 mm criteria than 3D dose calculations. Conclusions: These results indicate no significant differences in the accuracy between the 4D and the 3D dose calculation methods inside the gross tumor volume. On the other hand, the film results demonstrated that the 4D dose calculations provided greater accuracy than 3D dose calculations in heterogeneous dose regions. The increase in accuracy of the 4D dose calculations was evident throughout the planning target volume.

Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Balter, Peter; Followill, David S.; Alvarez, Paola E.; White, R. Allen; Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

Chandler, William P. (Tracy, CA); Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L. (San Ramon, CA); Rathkopf, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Title I operator dose calculations. Final report, LATA report No. 90  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation exposure dose was estimated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) operating personnel who do the unloading and transporting of the transuranic contact-handled waste. Estimates of the radiation source terms for typical TRU contact-handled waste were based on known composition and properties of the waste. The operations sequence for waste movement and storage in the repository was based upon the WIPP Title I data package. Previous calculations had been based on Conceptual Design Report data. A time and motion sequence was developed for personnel performing the waste handling operations both above and below ground. Radiation exposure calculations were then performed in several fixed geometries and folded with the time and motion studies for individual workers in order to determine worker exposure on an annual basis.

Hughes, P.S.; Rigdon, L.D.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

463

Ab-initio calculations on two-electron ions in strongly coupled plasma environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the controversy between the interpretations of recent measurements on dense aluminum plasma created with Linac coherent light sources (LCLS) X-ray free electron laser (FEL) and Orion laser has been addressed. In both kind of experiments, helium-like and hydrogen-like spectral lines are used for plasma diagnostics . However, there exist no precise theoretical calculations for He-like ions within dense plasma environment. The strong need for an accurate theoretical estimates for spectral properties of He-like ions in strongly coupled plasma environment leads us to perform ab initio calculations in the framework of Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle in Hylleraas coordinates where ion-sphere potential is used. An approach to resolve the long-drawn problem of numerical instability for evaluating two-electron integrals with extended basis inside a finite domain is presented here. The present values of electron densities corresponding to disappearance of different spectral lines obtained within the fram...

Bhattacharyya, S; Mukherjee, T K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z