National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for factors shown represent

  1. Facility Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-03-01

    This standard, DOE-STD-1063, Facility Representatives, defines the duties, responsibilities and qualifications for Department of Energy (DOE) Facility Representatives, based on facility hazard classification; risks to workers, the public, and the environment; and the operational activity level. This standard provides the guidance necessary to ensure that DOE’s hazardous nuclear and non-nuclear facilities have sufficient staffing of technically qualified facility representatives (FRs) to provide day-to-day oversight of contractor operations.

  2. Facility Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-04-06

    REPLACED BY DOE-STD-1063 | SUPERSEDING DOE-STD-1063-2000 (MARCH 2000) The purpose of the DOE Facility Representative Program is to ensure that competent DOE staff personnel are assigned to oversee the day-to-day contractor operations at DOE’s hazardous nuclear and non-nuclear facilities.

  3. Effects of differential compaction fracturing shown in four reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, G.E. )

    1992-02-03

    With the advent of horizontal drilling in the U.S., fractured reservoirs have become a major target in the ongoing search for hydrocarbons. This paper will examine four fractured-reservoir fields in the U.S.: Silo (Niobrara), Wyoming; Elkhorn Ranch (Bakken), North Dakota; Pearsal (Austin chalk), Texas; and the Syndicated Options Ltd. 9372 Ferguson Brothers well (Ordovician carbonates), Kentucky. The paper will show that differential compaction fracturing is more of a major factor in long-term, sustainable production in a fractured reservoir than is tectonic fracturing. In this paper, a general discussion of the two types of fracturing and how they affect reservoir production is provided.

  4. Property Representatives Lists- HQ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Authorized Property Pass Signers List and Accountable Property Representatives List, Effective April 1, 2016

  5. Final Rulemaking, 10 CFR Part 1021, with Amendments Shown In Tracked Changes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document presents the final rule as issued September 27, 2011, amendments shown with changes tracked (additions in blue, deletions in red). Categorical exclusions are listed in Appendices A...

  6. Residential Energy-Efficiency Equipment Shown to be a Good Investment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Printed with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste. Residential Energy-Efficiency Equipment Shown to be a Good ...

  7. DOE Takes Action to Stop the Sales of Air-Con Air Conditioner Models Shown

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Violate Federal Energy Efficiency Appliance Standards | Department of Energy Action to Stop the Sales of Air-Con Air Conditioner Models Shown to Violate Federal Energy Efficiency Appliance Standards DOE Takes Action to Stop the Sales of Air-Con Air Conditioner Models Shown to Violate Federal Energy Efficiency Appliance Standards September 23, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy announced today that it has taken action against Air-Con, International, requiring

  8. UESC Training for Utility Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides utility representatives with additional training to meet their responsibilities with respect to Utility Energy Savings Contracts (UESC).

  9. CRAD, NNSA- Facility Representatives (FR)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    CRAD for Facility Representatives (FR). Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used to conduct a well-organized and thorough assessment of elements of safety and health programs.

  10. TEC Working Group Member Organizations Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Member Organizations Representatives TEC Working Group Member Organizations Representatives PDF icon TEC MEMBER ORGANIZATION REPRESENTATIVES TOPIC GROUP PARTICIPATION February 2006...

  11. 499px-Aquatint_of_a_Doctor_in_divinity_at_the_University_of_Oxford,_shown_wearing_convocation_dress.jpg

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information 499px-Aquatint_of_a_Doctor_in_divinity_at_the_University_of_Oxford,_shown_wearing_convocation_dress

  12. Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience The referenced ...

  13. General Engineer/Physical Scientist (Facility Representative)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as an on-site senior technical representative, and Facility Representative, with responsibility for evaluating contractor environmental, nuclear...

  14. Authorizing Official Designated Representative (AODR) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Individual(s) in the AO Representative role must possess a working knowledge of: system function security policies technical security safeguards AODR Core Competency Training ...

  15. FAQS Reference Guide – Facility Representative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the October 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1151-2010, Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  16. Facility Representative of the Year Award

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program.

  17. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) welcomed two new student representatives at its May meeting. Gracie Hall and Julia Riley will serve on the board through April 2014.

  18. Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

  19. Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    12/17/1998 | Department of Energy Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly

  20. Data structures and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E; Thomson, Judi R; Harvey, William J; Paulson, Patrick R; Whiting, Mark A; Tratz, Stephen C; Chappell, Alan R; Butner, Robert S

    2014-02-18

    Data structures and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  1. Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Saxon E

    2007-10-23

    The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, “Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative,” was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

  2. PWR representative behavior during a LOCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    To date, there has been substantial analytical and experimental effort to define the margins between design basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) behavior and regulatory limits on maximum fuel rod cladding temperature and deformation. As a result, there is extensive documentation on the modeling of fuel rod behavior in test reactors and design basis LOCA's. However, modeling of that behavior using representative, non-conservative, operating histories is not nearly as well documented in the public literature. Therefore, the objective of this paper is (a) to present calculations of LOCA induced behavior for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core representative fuel rods, and (b) to discuss the variability in those calculations given the variability in fuel rod condition at the initiation of the LOCA. This analysis was limited to the study of changes in fuel rod behavior due to different power operating histories. The other two important parameters which affect that behavior, initial fuel rod design and LOCA coolant conditions were held invarient for all of the representative rods analyzed.

  3. Representing the vacuum polarization on de Sitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Katie E.; Woodard, Richard P.; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2013-03-15

    Previous studies of the vacuum polarization on de Sitter have demonstrated that there is a simple, noncovariant representation of it in which the physics is transparent. There is also a cumbersome, covariant representation in which the physics is obscure. Despite being unwieldy, the latter form has a powerful appeal for those who are concerned about de Sitter invariance. We show that nothing is lost by employing the simple, noncovariant representation because there is a closed form procedure for converting its structure functions to those of the covariant representation. We also present a vastly improved technique for reading off the noncovariant structure functions from the primitive diagrams. And we discuss the issue of representing the vacuum polarization for a general metric background.

  4. Single-point representative sampling with shrouded probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1993-08-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribed methodologies for sampling radionuclides in air effluents from stacks and ducts at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Requirements include use of EPA Method 1 for the location of sampling sites and use of American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N13.1 for guidance in design of sampling probes and the number of probes at a given site. Application of ANSI N13.1 results in sampling being performed with multiprobe rakes that have as many as 20 probes. There can be substantial losses of aerosol particles in such sampling that will degrade the quality of emission estimates from a nuclear facility. Three alternate methods, technically justified herein, are proposed for effluent sampling. First, a shrouded aerosol sampling probe should replace the sharp-edged elbowed-nozzle recommended by ANSI. This would reduce the losses of aerosol particles in probes and result in the acquisition of more representative aerosol samples. Second, the rakes of multiple probes that are intended to acquire representative samples through spatial coverage should be replaced by a single probe located where contaminant mass and fluid momentum are both well mixed. A representative sample can be obtained from a well-mixed flow. Some effluent flows will need to be engineered to achieve acceptable mixing. Third, sample extraction should be performed at a constant flow rate through a suitable designed shrouded probe rather than at a variable flow rate through isokinetic probes. A shrouded probe is shown to have constant sampling characteristics over a broad range of stack velocities when operated at a fixed flow rate.

  5. 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees (82.87 KB) More Documents & Publications 1999 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees FTCP Members DOE Integrated Safety Management Champions List

  6. W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum V Gray ...

  7. 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report ...

  8. Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State...

  9. Representativeness-Based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Representativeness-Based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Representativeness-Based Sampling Network...

  10. 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report...

  11. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seats New Student Representative Advisory Board Seats New Student Representative May 26, 2016 - 8:19am Addthis New student representative Lara Manning joins ORSSAB for 2016-2017. New student representative Lara Manning joins ORSSAB for 2016-2017. The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) welcomed a new student representative at its monthly meeting. Lara Manning will serve on the board for a one-year term through April 2017. ORSSAB is a federally chartered citizens' panel that provides

  12. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department’s corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical...

  13. 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 – 25, 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and...

  14. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Mexico Represented...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Represented by the Price (Percent) Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Mexico Represented by the Price (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct ...

  15. 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quarterly Report | Department of Energy Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1

  16. Office of Departmental Representative to DNFSB | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Departmental Representative to DNFSB Office of Departmental Representative to DNFSB Mission The Department Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) provides effective cross-organizational leadership in resolving DNFSB-related technical and management issues necessary to ensure public health and safety. Functions Represents the Secretary and the Associate Deputy Secretary in regular and continuing interactions with the DNFSB(and/or also referred to as Board). Advises

  17. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and

  18. Facility Representative, Technical Area (TA-55) Plutonium Facility, Los

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Alamos Site Office | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Facility Representative, Technical Area (TA-55) Plutonium Facility, Los Alamos Site Office John Krepps John Krepps June 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Facility Representative of the Year John Krepps, a facility representative for the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Los Alamos Site Office, received the Department of Energy's top award for oversight of nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. Krepps, a Los

  19. Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DNFSB) | Department of Energy Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) The Office of the Departmental Representative ensures effective cross-organizational leadership and coordination to resolve DNFSB-identified technical and management issues as we work to ensure the health, safety, and security of the workers, public, and environment. This web site is an important

  20. CNS represented at inaugural Energetics Consortium | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex represented at ... CNS represented at inaugural Energetics Consortium Posted: February 16, 2016 - 6:53pm CNS was well represented at the first National Energetic Materials Consortium. About 70 university researchers and government and industry experts from across the country, including Consolidated Nuclear Security employees, joined forces at the first ever National Energetic Materials Consortium hosted by Texas Tech University. Pantex's Christopher Young said, "There are a

  1. DOE-STD-1063-2000 - Facility Representatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Safety Analysis Reports * DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation * DOE-EM-STD-5505-96, Operations Assessments * DOE Facility Representative Functional Area ...

  2. Dr. Kelli Joseph, NYISO Representing the ISO-RTO Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kelli Joseph, NYISO Representing the ISO-RTO Council July 28, 2014 DOE Quadrennial Energy Review Gas Electric Interdependencies: Coordination Efforts, Regional Issues, and...

  3. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-21

    The Order established procedures governing the selection, appointment and termination of Department of Energy contracting officers and contracting officer representatives. Supersedes DOE O 541.1A.

  4. Chapter 1: Energy Challenges | Representative DOE Energy and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy and Science Program Workshops ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Representative DOE Energy and Science Program ...

  5. Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on ...

  6. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-04-30

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE Order 4200.4A. Canceled by DOE O 541.1A.

  7. Utility Energy Service Contracts Training for Utility Representatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar targets Federal staff, as well as utility representatives, and provides an understanding of the legal parameters, contracting requirements, financing options, and other aspects of utility energy service contracts (UESC).

  8. Changes to the Facility Representative Program, 10/26/1999

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Effective October 1, 1999, the Deputy Secretary tasked this office to manage the Facility Representative Program. We look forward to working with you in continuing and improving this very important...

  9. U.S. Representative Frank Lucas and Oklahoma State Senator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 U.S. Representative Frank Lucas and Oklahoma State Senator David Myers recently voiced ... Though the SGP central facility and activity hub near Lamont, Oklahoma, has 31 employees ...

  10. Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

  11. DOE Representative to World Institute of Nuclear Safety (WINS) | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) DOE Representative to World Institute of Nuclear Safety (WINS) Lisa G. Hilliard Lisa Hilliard August 2009 NNSA Administrator's Silver Award Lisa G. Hilliard has received the NNSA Administrator's Silver Award for her sustained distinguished accomplishments as the Office Director of the DOE office to the U.S. Mission to International Organizations in Vienna from May 1993 to April 2009, serving four Ambassadors, two interim Representatives, and six

  12. Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the

  13. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    2014-08-01

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  14. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  15. Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Memorandum is to provide guidance, Attachment 1, to Qualifying Officials (QO) on how to use the cross-walk, Attachment 2, in granting equivalencies to Facility Representative (FR) candidates using the most current FR Functional Area Qualification Standards, DOE-STD-1151-2010.

  16. WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state agencies, local governments, tribes, communities, business, academia and other groups will gather in Washington, D.C. for the 2012 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program.

  17. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer's Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-27

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer's representatives. To ensure that only trained and qualified procurement and financial assistance professionals, within the scope of this Order, serve as contracting officers. Cancels DOE O 541.1. Canceled by DOE O 541.1B.

  18. Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E.; Thomson, Judi R.; Harvey, William J.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Whiting, Mark A.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Chappell, Alan R.; Butner, R. Scott

    2011-09-20

    Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  19. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  20. Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook. (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Power factor is a way of measuring the percentage of reactive power in an electrical system. Reactive power represents wasted energy--electricity that does no useful work because ...

  1. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

    2011-03-04

    This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed

  2. Wave propagation in equivalent continuums representing truss lattice materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Messner, Mark C.; Barham, Matthew I.; Kumar, Mukul; Barton, Nathan R.

    2015-07-29

    Stiffness scales linearly with density in stretch-dominated lattice meta-materials offering the possibility of very light yet very stiff structures. Current additive manufacturing techniques can assemble structures consisting of these lattice materials, but the design of such structures will require accurate, efficient simulation techniques. Equivalent continuum models have several advantages over discrete truss models of stretch dominated lattices, including computational efficiency and ease of model construction. However, the development an equivalent model suitable for representing the dynamic response of a periodic truss is complicated by microinertial effects. This paper derives a dynamic equivalent continuum model for periodic truss structures and verifiesmore » it against detailed finite element simulations. The model must incorporate microinertial effects to accurately reproduce long-wavelength characteristics of the response such as anisotropic elastic soundspeeds. The formulation presented here also improves upon previous work by preserving equilibrium at truss joints for affine lattice deformation and by improving numerical stability by eliminating vertices in the effective yield surface.« less

  3. Douglas Factors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as “Douglas Factors” and have been incorporated into the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Personnel Management System and various FAA Labor Agreements.

  4. Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201) Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201) Better Buildings ...

  5. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas

  6. An analysis of representative heating load lines for residential HSPF ratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, C. Keith; Shen, Bo; Shrestha, Som S.

    2015-07-01

    This report describes an analysis to investigate representative heating loads for single-family detached homes using current EnergyPlus simulations (DOE 2014a). Hourly delivered load results are used to determine binned load lines using US Department of Energy (DOE) residential prototype building models (DOE 2014b) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The selected residential single-family prototype buildings are based on the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC 2006) in the DOE climate regions. The resulting load lines are compared with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) Standard 210/240 (AHRI 2008) minimum and maximum design heating requirement (DHR) load lines of the heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF) ratings procedure for each region. The results indicate that a heating load line closer to the maximum DHR load line, and with a lower zero load ambient temperature, is more representative of heating loads predicted for EnergyPlus prototype residential buildings than the minimum DHR load line presently used to determine HSPF ratings. An alternative heating load line equation was developed and compared to binned load lines obtained from the EnergyPlus simulation results. The effect on HSPF of the alternative heating load line was evaluated for single-speed and two-capacity heat pumps, and an average HSPF reduction of 16% was found. The alternative heating load line relationship is tied to the rated cooling capacity of the heat pump based on EnergyPlus autosizing, which is more representative of the house load characteristics than the rated heating capacity. The alternative heating load line equation was found to be independent of climate for the six DOE climate regions investigated, provided an adjustable zero load ambient temperature is used. For Region IV, the default DOE climate region used for HSPF ratings, the higher load line results in an ~28

  7. Facility Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Guidance for Hazard Analysis-Emergency Planning for Extremely Hazardous Substances; or ... DOE-STD-1063-2011 13 f. Minor events or problems are frequently clues that indicate ...

  8. Facility Representatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Guidance for Hazard Analysis-Emergency Planning for Extremely Hazardous Substances"; ... deficiencies. f. Minor e vents or problems are frequently clues that indicate ...

  9. Josh Allen of Richland Operations Office Named 2014 Facility Representative of the Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Congratulations to Josh Allen, Richland Operations Office, the winner of the 2014 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award!

  10. Increases in electric rates in rural areas. Hearing before the Committee on Agriculture, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session, June 4, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Seven witnesses representing rural electric utilities and cooperatives spoke at a June 4, 1980 hearing to discuss which inflationary factors are increasing rural electric rates. The Committee recognized that the problem is not unique to rural systems. In their testimony, the witnesses noted increasing urbanization of rural areas; the cost of generating plant construction, fuel, and operating expenses; general economic factors of inflation and high interest rates; and regulations as major contributing factors to utility requests for rate increases. The hearing record includes their testimony, additional material submitted for the record, and responses to questions from the subcommittee. (DCK)

  11. A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A.

    2013-07-01

    The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

  12. Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Accelerator Laboratory | Department of Energy Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory August 13, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Monday, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will visit the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Secretary Chu will join Representatives Zoe Lofgren and Mike Honda and Stanford

  13. Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization | Department of Energy The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization April 5 2005 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the

  14. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 1, 2003 Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman,

  15. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations February 26, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman,

  16. Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations March 4, 2004 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and

  17. 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  18. 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

  19. 3Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Facility Representative Program Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report attached, covering the period from July to September 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements...

  20. 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  1. 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  2. 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  3. 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  4. 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these...

  5. 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements...

  6. 1Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  7. 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these...

  8. 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were...

  9. 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  10. 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  11. 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  12. 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  13. 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  14. 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  15. 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July  through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  16. 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per...

  17. 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  18. 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  19. Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Tailored Marketing for Low-Income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201), call slides and discussion summary.

  20. DOE Orders Self-Study Program- DOE-STD-1063-2011, Facility Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Orders Self-Study Program DOE-STD-1063-2011, Facility Representatives Familiar Level - August 2011

  1. Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government ... Organization Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of ...

  2. 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  3. 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field elements...

  4. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on ...

  5. Acquisition Career Management Program Handbook, Partial Revision of Chapter 11, Contracting Officer's Representative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this flash is to provide interim guidance for certifying and appointing Contracting Officer's Representatives. This guidance complies with the Office of Federal Procurement Policy memorandum, Revisions to the Federal Acquisition Certification for Contracting Officer's Representatives (FAC-COR), dated September 6, 2011 with an effective date of January 1, 2012.

  6. Sensitivity and representativity analysis of past experiments with respect to ABTR system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2007-08-29

    A comprehensive validation analysis has been performed that incorporates representativity of multiple parameters, experiments, reference designs, and adjustment of the nuclear data. The work involves a new representativity study among selected reactor designs and several experiments. Application, using existing experiments, to reference design like the ABTR and the SFR has demonstrated that it is possible to achieve a significant reduction of uncertainty on the main integral parameters of interest for their neutronic design. This is possible when the set of available experiments are relevant (i.e. representative of the reference designs), of good quality (i.e. of reduced uncertainty on experimental results), and consistent (i.e. not providing conflictive information).

  7. 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from April to June  2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  8. 2Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from April 2000 to June 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

  9. 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  10. 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  11. 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January  to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  12. Cravens Named Co-Facility Representative of the Year for the Department of

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Energy | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Cravens Named Co-Facility Representative of the Year for the Department of Energy June 07, 2005 PDF icon NR05-05.pdf

  13. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact 734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports Even though Saudi Arabia is the world's largest producer of petroleum, and OPEC countries ...

  14. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. Representative Joe Courtney WHAT: Tour of United Technologies Research Center WHEN: 9:45 AM EST **Media availability to follow Media are requested to park in the lot ...

  15. 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  16. 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  17. 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  18. 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December   2008. Data for these indicators are  gathered by Field...

  19. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee ... Statement of Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General, U.S. Department of Energy Request to ...

  20. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and ... Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify on ...

  1. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and ... Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to ...

  2. 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  3. 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  4. 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  5. 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  6. 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September   2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  7. 3Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  8. 4Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  9. August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the remand of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the DOE Direct Final Rule as it relates to efficiency standards for non-weatherized gas furnaces | Department of Energy August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the remand of the DOE Direct Final Rule as it relates to efficiency standards for non-weatherized gas furnaces August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the remand of the DOE Direct Final Rule as it relates to efficiency standards for non-weatherized gas furnaces This memorandum provides an overview

  10. W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Student Forum | Jefferson Lab W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum V Gray Valerie Gray, a graduate student at The College of William and Mary and a researcher at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, was chosen this year by American Physical Society members as chair-elect for the APS Forum on Graduate Student Affairs.

  11. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations April 5, 2005 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of

  12. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Government Reform | Department of Energy Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Statement of Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General, U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the Department of Energy's (Department) contract administration activities. The Department is one of the most contractor dependent agencies in the Federal

  13. Reducing Power Factor Cost

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low power factor is expensive and inefficient. Many utility companies charge an additional fee if your power factor is less than 0.95. Low power factor also reduces your electrical system’s distribution capacity by increasing current flow and causing voltage drops. This fact sheet describes power factor and explains how you can improve your power factor to reduce electric bills and enhance your electrical system’s capacity.

  14. Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narlesky, Joshua E.; Stroud, Mary Ann; Smith, Paul Herrick; Wayne, David M.; Mason, Richard E.; Worl, Laura A.

    2013-02-15

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

  15. Characterization of representative materials in support of safe, long term storage of surplus plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Paul H; Narlesky, Joshua E; Worl, Laura A; Gillispie, Obie W

    2010-01-01

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program (SMP) is a joint LANL/SRS effort funded by DOE/EM to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. The chlorides (NaCl, KCl, CaCl{sub 2}, and MgCl{sub 2}) range from less than half of the impurities present to nearly all the impurities. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on over 60 samples of plutonium chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper will summarize the characterization data, including the origin and process history, particle size, surface area, density, calorimetry, chemical analysis, moisture analysis, prompt gamma, gas generation and corrosion behavior.

  16. Edlund Named DOE Facility Representative of the Year | Y-12 National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Complex Edlund Named DOE Facility ... Edlund Named DOE Facility Representative of the Year Posted: May 10, 2016 - 10:24am Jeff Edlund of the National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office was recently named Facility Representative of the Year by the U.S. Department of Energy. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. -- Jeff Edlund, who conducts day-to-day federal oversight of enriched uranium facility operations at the Y-12 National Security Complex, has been named the U.S. Department of Energy

  17. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is charged under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) with modernizing the nation's electricity grid to improve its reliability and efficiency. As part of this effort, DOE is also responsible for increasing awareness of our nation's Smart Grid. Building upon The Smart Grid: An Introduction, a

  18. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Visit Research Center in East Hartford | Department of Energy Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received

  19. DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – A representative of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., on Tuesday received the Secretary of Energy’s Appreciation Award for her efforts to improve sustainability and reduce travel costs and the number of fleet vehicles.

  20. Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

  1. Chapter 1: Energy Challenges | Representative DOE Energy and Science Program Worshops

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Science Program Workshops ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Representative DOE Energy and Science Program Workshops Chapter 1: Supplemental Information The Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR) found very extensive outreach by the DOE Energy and Science Programs to the broad energy research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) community- including industry, academia, civil society, national laboratories,

  2. Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Representative Average Unit Costs of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Representative Average Unit Costs of Energy, is a notice issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document."

  3. On April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organiz

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff and members of the Compressed Air and Gas Institute (CAGI) along with some compressed air experts at the offices of the Alliance to Save Energy to explore and discuss a consensus approach to advancing energy efficiency of compressed air systems within the context of the DOE's potential rulemaking on compressors. The group discussed the need to assemble the relevant data and technical content that

  4. On October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, an

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe met with DOE to discuss the proposed rules EERE-2010 BT-TP-0036 RIN 1904-AC38 Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Commercial Ice Makers. The meeting was held at the request of Howe Corporation at the DOE offices in Washington DC. In attendance: Ari Altman, DOE Ashley Armstrong, DOE Robert Bittner, Beecon ProfServe John Cymbalsky, DOE Mary

  5. Stan Watkins Named Department of Energy Facility Representative of the Year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stan Calvert About Us Stan Calvert - Wind Systems Integration Team Lead, Wind & Water Power Program Stan Calvert is the Wind Systems Integration Team Lead for the Wind and Water Power Program. Most Recent Today's Forecast: Improved Wind Predictions July 20 | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    Stan Watkins Named Department of Energy Facility Representative of the Year May 15, 2009 Microsoft Office document icon R-09-02

  6. Uniprocessor Performance Analysis of a Representative Workload of Sandia National Laboratories' Scientific Applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Laverty

    2005-10-01

    UNIPROCESSOR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A REPRESENTATIVE WORKLOAD OF SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES' SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS Master of Science in Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2005 Dr. Jeanine Cook, Chair Throughout the last decade computer performance analysis has become absolutely necessary to maximum performance of some workloads. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) located in Albuquerque, New Mexico is no different in that to achieve maximum performance of large scientific, parallel workloads performance analysis is needed at the uni-processor level. A representative workload has been chosen as the basis of a computer performance study to determine optimal processor characteristics in order to better specify the next generation of supercomputers. Cube3, a finite element test problem developed at SNL is a representative workload of their scientific workloads. This workload has been studied at the uni-processor level to understand characteristics in the microarchitecture that will lead to the overall performance improvement at the multi-processor level. The goal of studying vthis workload at the uni-processor level is to build a performance prediction model that will be integrated into a multi-processor performance model which is currently being developed at SNL. Through the use of performance counters on the Itanium 2 microarchitecture, performance statistics are studied to determine bottlenecks in the microarchitecture and/or changes in the application code that will maximize performance. From source code analysis a performance degrading loop kernel was identified and through the use of compiler optimizations a performance gain of around 20% was achieved.

  7. 100% MOX BWR experimental program design using multi-parameter representative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise, P.; Fougeras, P.; Cathalau, S.

    2012-07-01

    A new multiparameter representative approach for the design of Advanced full MOX BWR core physics experimental programs is developed. The approach is based on sensitivity analysis of integral parameters to nuclear data, and correlations among different integral parameters. The representativeness method is here used to extract a quantitative relationship between a particular integral response of an experimental mock-up and the same response in a reference project to be designed. The study is applied to the design of the 100% MOX BASALA ABWR experimental program in the EOLE facility. The adopted scheme proposes an original approach to the problem, going from the initial 'microscopic' pin-cells integral parameters to the whole 'macroscopic' assembly integral parameters. This approach enables to collect complementary information necessary to optimize the initial design and to meet target accuracy on the integral parameters to be measured. The study has demonstrated the necessity of new fuel pins fabrication, fulfilling minimal costs requirements, to meet acceptable representativeness on local power distribution. (authors)

  8. Expression of transforming growth factor alpha in plutonium-239-induced lung neoplasms in dogs: investigations of autocrine mechanisms of growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillett, N.A.; Stegelmeier, B.L.; Chang, I.Y.; Kelly, G. )

    1991-06-01

    We have previously shown that 47% of radiation-induced lung neoplasms in dogs exhibit increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this study, we investigated the expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), a ligand for EGFR, to determine if an autocrine mechanism for growth stimulation was present in these tumors. As determined by immunohistochemistry, 59% (26/44) of the lung neoplasms examined had increased expression of TGF-alpha. Expression of TGF-alpha was not related to the etiology of the tumor, e.g., spontaneous or plutonium-induced; however, it was related to the phenotype of the tumor. Statistical analysis of the correlation of EGFR and TGF-alpha expression within the same tumor did not show a positive association; however, specific phenotypes did have statistically significant expression of EGFR or TGF-alpha, suggesting that overexpression of either the ligand or its receptor conferred a growth advantage to the neoplasm. Twenty-seven percent (32/117) of radiation-induced proliferative epithelial foci expressed TGF-alpha, and a portion of those foci (8/32) expressed both EGFR and TGF-alpha. This supports the hypothesis that these foci represent preneoplastic lesions, and suggests that those foci exhibiting increased expression of the growth factor or its receptor are at greater risk for progressing to neoplasia.

  9. Recommended U-factors for swinging, overhead, and revolving doors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, S.C.; Hogan, J.

    1996-11-01

    Doors are often an overlooked component in the thermal integrity of the building envelope. Although swinging doors represent a small portion of the shell in residential buildings, their U-factor is usually many times higher than those of walls or ceilings. In some commercial buildings, loading (overhead) doors represent a significant area of high heat loss. Contrary to common perception, there is a wide range in the design, type, and therefore thermal performance of doors. The 1997 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals will contain expanded tables of door U-factors to account for these product variations. This paper presents the results of detailed computer simulations of door U-factors. Recommended U-factors for glazed and unglazed residential and commercial swinging doors and commercial/industrial overhead and revolving doors are presented.

  10. Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change – Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A recent review of the January 2009 issue of the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program (ACMP) Handbook identified many areas that require an update. Although the ACMP Handbook revisions are underway, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) issued OFPP Memorandum, “Revisions to the Federal Acquisition Certification for Contracting Officer’s Representatives (FAC-COR),” dated September 6, 2011. This OFPP Memorandum requires that agencies implement the revised FAC-COR certifications effective January 1, 2012.

  11. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apley, Walter J. (Pasco, WA); Cliff, William C. (Richland, WA); Creer, James M. (Richland, WA)

    1984-01-01

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  12. Reducing Power Factor Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The presence of both in the same circuit results in the continuous alternating transfer of ... In the diagram below, the power triangle shows an initial 0.70 power factor for a 100-kW ...

  13. Strain rate, temperature and representative length scale influence on plasticity and yield stress in copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, Virginie; Germann, Timothy C

    2011-01-18

    Shock compression of materials constitutes a complex process involving high strain rates, elevated temperatures and compression of the lattice. Materials properties are greatly affected by temperature, the representative length scale and the strain rate of the deformation. Experimentally, it is difficult to study the dynamic microscopic mechanisms that affect materials properties following high intensity shock loading, but they can be investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Moreover, MD allows a better control over some parameters. We are using MD simulations to study the effect of the strain rate, representative length scale and temperature on the properties of metals during compression. A half-million-atom Cu sample is subjected to strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} at different temperatures ranging from 50K to 1500K. Single crystals as well as polycrystals are investigated. Plasticity mechanisms as well as the evolution of the micro- and macro-yield stress are observed. Our results show that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. We also show that the strain rate at which the transition between constant and increasing yield stress as a function of the temperature occurs increases with increasing temperature. Calculations at different grain sizes will give an insight into the grain size effect on the plasticity mechanisms and the yield stress.

  14. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-11-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed.

  15. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Takahashi, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  16. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff

  17. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state by a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wavefunctions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. We work to address this puzzle by (A) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (B) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble.

  18. Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-02-28

    This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

  19. Multi-factor authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  20. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  1. Ex Parte Memo on ULE Policy Statement and Conversion Factor Rulemaking |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Memo on ULE Policy Statement and Conversion Factor Rulemaking Ex Parte Memo on ULE Policy Statement and Conversion Factor Rulemaking On December 1, 2015, AHRI staff and water heater manufacturer representatives met with representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) to discuss the enforcement policy statement issued on October 2, 2015, regarding consumer water heaters and certain commercial water heating equipment, (Enforcement Guidance),1 as well as the proposed

  2. Radiation View Factor With Shadowing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-24

    FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors as input data to finite element heat transfer analysis codes.

  3. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state bymore » a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wave functions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. Two key questions involve (1) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (2) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble. In Section II, we will address these questions by first demonstrating that thermodynamic

  4. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state by a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wave functions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. Two key questions involve (1) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (2) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble. In Section II, we will address these questions by first demonstrating that thermodynamic expectations

  5. Inelastic Scattering Form Factors

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-01-01

    ATHENA-IV computes form factors for inelastic scattering calculations, using single-particle wave functions that are eigenstates of motion in either a Woods-Saxon potential well or a harmonic oscillator well. Two-body forces of Gauss, Coulomb, Yukawa, and a sum of cut-off Yukawa radial dependences are available.

  6. ERYTHROPOIETIC FACTOR PURIFICATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, W.F.; Schlueter, R.J.

    1962-05-01

    A method is given for purifying and concentrating the blood plasma erythropoietic factor. Anemic sheep plasma is contacted three times successively with ion exchange resins: an anion exchange resin, a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 5, and a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 6. (AEC)

  7. Two-Factor Authentication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) (also known as 2-Step Verification) is a system that employs two methods to identify an individual. More secure than reusable passwords, when a token's random number...

  8. Derivation of dose conversion factors for tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killough, G. G.

    1982-03-01

    For a given intake mode (ingestion, inhalation, absorption through the skin), a dose conversion factor (DCF) is the committed dose equivalent to a specified organ of an individual per unit intake of a radionuclide. One also may consider the effective dose commitment per unit intake, which is a weighted average of organ-specific DCFs, with weights proportional to risks associated with stochastic radiation-induced fatal health effects, as defined by Publication 26 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This report derives and tabulates organ-specific dose conversion factors and the effective dose commitment per unit intake of tritium. These factors are based on a steady-state model of hydrogen in the tissues of ICRP's Reference Man (ICRP Publication 23) and equilibrium of specific activities between body water and other tissues. The results differ by 27 to 33% from the estimate on which ICRP Publication 30 recommendations are based. The report also examines a dynamic model of tritium retention in body water, mineral bone, and two compartments representing organically-bound hydrogen. This model is compared with data from human subjects who were observed for extended periods. The manner of combining the dose conversion factors with measured or model-predicted levels of contamination in man's exposure media (air, drinking water, soil moisture) to estimate dose rate to an individual is briefly discussed.

  9. A Control Chart Approach for Representing and Mining Data Streams with Shape Based Similarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2014-01-01

    The mining of data streams for online condition monitoring is a challenging task in several domains including (electric) power grid system, intelligent manufacturing, and consumer science. Considering a power grid application in which thousands of sensors, called the phasor measurement units, are deployed on the power grid network to continuously collect streams of digital data for real-time situational awareness and system management. Depending on design, each sensor could stream between ten and sixty data samples per second. The myriad of sensory data captured could convey deeper insights about sequence of events in real-time and before major damages are done. However, the timely processing and analysis of these high-velocity and high-volume data streams is a challenge. Hence, a new data processing and transformation approach, based on the concept of control charts, for representing sequence of data streams from sensors is proposed. In addition, an application of the proposed approach for enhancing data mining tasks such as clustering using real-world power grid data streams is presented. The results indicate that the proposed approach is very efficient for data streams storage and manipulation.

  10. Clustering method and representative feeder selection for the California solar initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Williams, Joseph R.; Munoz-Ramos, Karina

    2014-02-01

    The screening process for DG interconnection procedures needs to be improved in order to increase the PV deployment level on the distribution grid. A significant improvement in the current screening process could be achieved by finding a method to classify the feeders in a utility service territory and determine the sensitivity of particular groups of distribution feeders to the impacts of high PV deployment levels. This report describes the utility distribution feeder characteristics in California for a large dataset of 8,163 feeders and summarizes the California feeder population including the range of characteristics identified and most important to hosting capacity. The report describes the set of feeders that are identified for modeling and analysis as well as feeders identified for the control group. The report presents a method for separating a utilitys distribution feeders into unique clusters using the k-means clustering algorithm. An approach for determining the feeder variables of interest for use in a clustering algorithm is also described. The report presents an approach for choosing the feeder variables to be utilized in the clustering process and a method is identified for determining the optimal number of representative clusters.

  11. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hubertus J. J. van Dam

    2016-05-23

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractionalmore » occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Lastly, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.« less

  12. Sustainable development: Background an represent policy views for governmental agencies, industry, and other specialty groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerman, J.A.; Silverman, G.S.

    1995-12-01

    Sustainable development is a phrase that has come into common usage without benefit of clear definition or meaning. Usage very much reflects individual and group perspectives: foresters might consider sustainability in terms of maintaining ecological integrity as part of managing forests for wood harvesting, industry might emphasize pollution control, while government agencies may be looking for new ways to exploit resources on a more continuous basis. Perhaps the greatest commonality among groups considering these issues is that {open_quotes}sustainability{close_quotes} has not been attained but that it needs to occur. The National Association of Environmental Professionals (NAEP) agrees that it is critical to the health of the planet that sustainable development be actively pursued and implemented in international, national, regional, and local policies and practices. To contribute to this effort a {open_quotes}white paper{close_quotes} is being prepared. Its purpose is twofold: (1) to review the existing information from the NAEP Sustainable Development Working Group and the literature and through examination of these policies, to clarify the thinking, what is being done, and what is still needed; and (2) to develop a position and action plan. This action plan should direct NAEP`s actions in making a significant contribution to the national dialog. This paper presents the background and results of the review phase of this white paper development. Representative views on sustainable development policy and practice are presented from three perspectives: governmental agencies, industry, and other specialty groups.

  13. Anthrax Lethal Factor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington The Burnham Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037. Anthrax Toxin is a major virulence factor in the infectious disease, Anthrax1. This toxin is produced by Bacillus anthracis, which is an encapsulated, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium. Inhalation anthrax, the most deadly form, is contracted through breathing spores. Once spores germinate within cells of the immune system called macrophages2, bacterial

  14. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Hanson, P. J.; Mao, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Griffiths, N. A.; Bisht, G.

    2015-02-20

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to represent the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts significant hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. The new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics

  15. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter E.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Hanson, Paul J.; Mao, Jiafu; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Griffiths, Natalie A.; Bisht, Gautam

    2015-11-12

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to represent the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. Furthermore, the new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics

  16. The MX Factor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MX Factor Test films played a strategic-planning role in the debates of the late 1970s and early 1980s about where and how to deploy the MX intercontinental ballistic missile (LGM-118 Peacekeeper). The deployment would have to ensure that the missiles could survive a first strike by an adversary. Military planners were considering placing the missiles in clusters of hardened concrete shelters in the hot, dry Great Basin Desert of Nevada and Utah. Films of atmospheric tests at the Nevada Test

  17. Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-29

    The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

  18. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of

  19. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  20. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 1993 Family Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factor: Less than 5,000 5,000...

  1. Using partial safety factors in wind turbine design and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.D.; Butterfield, C.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the relationship between wind turbine design and testing in terms of the certification process. An overview of the current status of international certification is given along with a description of limit-state design basics. Wind turbine rotor blades are used to illustrate the principles discussed. These concepts are related to both International Electrotechnical Commission and Germanischer Lloyd design standards, and are covered using schematic representations of statistical load and material strength distributions. Wherever possible, interpretations of the partial safety factors are given with descriptions of their intended meaning. Under some circumstances, the authors` interpretations may be subjective. Next, the test-load factors are described in concept and then related to the design factors. Using technical arguments, it is shown that some of the design factors for both load and materials must be used in the test loading, but some should not be used. In addition, some test factors not used in the design may be necessary for an accurate test of the design. The results show that if the design assumptions do not clearly state the effects and uncertainties that are covered by the design`s partial safety factors, outside parties such as test labs or certification agencies could impose their own meaning on these factors.

  2. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

  3. Frequency dependence of mass flow gain factor and cavitation compliance of cavitating inducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, S.; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu [Osaka Univ. (Japan); Kamijo, Kenjiro [National Aerospace Lab., Kakuda, Miyagi (Japan). Kakuda Research Center; Furuya, O. [AMP Technologies, Osaka (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Unsteady cavitation characteristics are analyzed based on a closed cavity model in which the length of the cavity is allowed to oscillate. It is shown that the present model blends smoothly into quasisteady calculations in the low frequency limit, unlike fixed cavity length models. Effects of incidence angle and cavitation number on cavitation compliance and mass flow gain factor are shown as functions of reduce frequency. The cavity volume is evaluated by three methods and the results were used to confirm the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical calculation. By comparison with experimental data on inducers, it was shown that the present model can simulate the characteristics of unsteady cavitation qualitatively.

  4. Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... information to improve the modeling, forecasting and controls of the grid Standards ... Department of Energy |September 2014 Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs | Page 3 ...

  5. Selection of powder factor in large diameter blastholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eloranta, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper documents the relationship between material handling and processing costs compared to blasting cost. The old adage, The cheapest crushing is done in the pit, appears accurate in this case study. Comparison of the accumulated cost of: powder, selected wear materials and electricity; indicate a strong, inverse correlation with powder factor (lbs powder/long ton of rock). In this case, the increased powder cost is more than offset by electrical savings alone. Measurable, overall costs decline while shovel and crusher productivity rise by about 5% when powder factor rises by 15%. These trends were previously masked by the effects of: weather, ore grade fluctuations and accounting practices. Attempts to correlate increased powder factor to: wear materials in the crushing plant and to shovel hoist rope life have not shown the same benefit.

  6. Construction Control Representative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Engineering and Construction Field Engineering, (J5600) 5555...

  7. An advanced algorithm for construction of Integral Transport Matrix Method operators using accumulation of single cell coupling factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, B. P.; Azmy, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    The Integral Transport Matrix Method (ITMM) has been shown to be an effective method for solving the neutron transport equation in large domains on massively parallel architectures. In the limit of very large number of processors, the speed of the algorithm, and its suitability for unstructured meshes, i.e. other than an ordered Cartesian grid, is limited by the construction of four matrix operators required for obtaining the solution in each sub-domain. The existing algorithm used for construction of these matrix operators, termed the differential mesh sweep, is computationally expensive and was developed for a structured grid. This work proposes the use of a new algorithm for construction of these operators based on the construction of a single, fundamental matrix representing the transport of a particle along every possible path throughout the sub-domain mesh. Each of the operators is constructed by multiplying an element of this fundamental matrix by two factors dependent only upon the operator being constructed and on properties of the emitting and incident cells. The ITMM matrix operator construction time for the new algorithm is demonstrated to be shorter than the existing algorithm in all tested cases with both isotropic and anisotropic scattering considered. While also being a more efficient algorithm on a structured Cartesian grid, the new algorithm is promising in its geometric robustness and potential for being applied to an unstructured mesh, with the ultimate goal of application to an unstructured tetrahedral mesh on a massively parallel architecture. (authors)

  8. Factor CO2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Factor CO2 Jump to: navigation, search Name: Factor CO2 Place: Bilbao, Spain Zip: 48008 Product: Spain-based consultancy specializing in climate change projects. References: Factor...

  9. Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-03-04

    HFE-AT is a human factors engineering (HFE) software analysis tool (AT) for human-system interface design of process control systems, and is based primarily on NUREG-0700 guidance.

  10. Evaluation of the Use of Existing RELAP5-3D Models to Represent the Actinide Burner Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. B. Davis

    2007-02-01

    The RELAP5-3D code is being considered as a thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the sodium-cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor as part of Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. An evaluation was performed to determine whether the control system could be used to simulate the effects of non-convective mechanisms of heat transport in the fluid that are not currently represented with internal code models, including axial and radial heat conduction in the fluid and subchannel mixing. The evaluation also determined the relative importance of axial and radial heat conduction and fluid mixing on peak cladding temperature for a wide range of steady conditions and during a representative loss-of-flow transient. The evaluation was performed using a RELAP5-3D model of a subassembly in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which was used as a surrogate for the Actinide Burner Test Reactor. An evaluation was also performed to determine if the existing centrifugal pump model could be used to simulate the performance of electromagnetic pumps.

  11. Factorization, power corrections, and the pion form factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2004-09-01

    This paper is an investigation of the pion form factor utilizing recently developed effective field theory techniques. The primary results reported are both the transition and electromagnetic form factors are corrected at order {lambda}/Q due to time ordered products which account for deviations of the pion from being a state composed purely of highly energetic collinear quarks in the lab frame. The usual higher twist wave function corrections contribute only at order {lambda}{sup 2}/Q{sup 2}, when the quark mass vanishes. In the case of the electromagnetic form factor the {lambda}/Q power correction is enhanced by a power of 1/{alpha}{sub s}(Q) relative to the leading order result of Brodsky and Lepage, if the scale {radical}({lambda}Q) is nonperturbative. This enhanced correction could explain the discrepancy with the data.

  12. On time-optimal NMR control of states of qutrits represented by quadrupole nuclei with the spin I = 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zobov, V. E. Shauro, V. P.

    2011-08-15

    Elementary logical operators (selective rotation, Fourier transform, controllable phase shift, and SUM gate) are considered for a quantum computer based on three-level systems (qutrits) represented by nuclear spins I = 1 under nuclear magnetic resonance conditions. The computer simulation of the realization of these operators by means of simple and composite selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses and optimized RF pulses is performed. The time dependence of the amplitude of last pulses is found by numerical optimization at different durations. Two variants are proposed for realization of a two-qutrit SUM gate by using one-qutrit or two-qutrit optimized RF pulses. The calculated time dependences of realization errors were used to study the time optimality of different methods for obtaining gates, proposed earlier and in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the methods are evaluated for different values of physical parameters.

  13. Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

    1990-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

  14. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  15. Human factors in software development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents an overview of ergonomics/human factors in software development, recent research, and classic papers. Articles are drawn from the following areas of psychological research on programming: cognitive ergonomics, cognitive psychology, and psycholinguistics. Topics examined include: theoretical models of how programmers solve technical problems, the characteristics of programming languages, specification formats in behavioral research and psychological aspects of fault diagnosis.

  16. Systems configured to distribute a telephone call, communication systems, communication methods and methods of routing a telephone call to a service representative

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Scott H.; Johnson, Joel A.; Neiswanger, Jeffery R.; Twitchell, Kevin E.

    2004-03-09

    The present invention includes systems configured to distribute a telephone call, communication systems, communication methods and methods of routing a telephone call to a customer service representative. In one embodiment of the invention, a system configured to distribute a telephone call within a network includes a distributor adapted to connect with a telephone system, the distributor being configured to connect a telephone call using the telephone system and output the telephone call and associated data of the telephone call; and a plurality of customer service representative terminals connected with the distributor and a selected customer service representative terminal being configured to receive the telephone call and the associated data, the distributor and the selected customer service representative terminal being configured to synchronize, application of the telephone call and associated data from the distributor to the selected customer service representative terminal.

  17. Genome analysis of Elusimicrobium minutum, the first cultivated representative of the Elusimicrobia phylum (formerly Termite Group 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herlemann, D. P. R.; Geissinger, O.; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, W.; Kunin, V.; Sun, H.; Lapidus, A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Brune, A.

    2009-02-01

    The candidate phylum Termite group 1 (TG1), is regularly 1 encountered in termite hindguts but is present also in many other habitats. Here we report the complete genome sequence (1.64 Mbp) of Elusimicrobium minutum strain Pei191{sup T}, the first cultured representative of the TG1 phylum. We reconstructed the metabolism of this strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from a beetle larva gut and discuss the findings in light of physiological data. E. minutum has all genes required for uptake and fermentation of sugars via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway, including several hydrogenases, and an unusual peptide degradation pathway comprising transamination reactions and leading to the formation of alanine, which is excreted in substantial amounts. The presence of genes encoding lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the presence of a pathway for peptidoglycan formation are consistent with ultrastructural evidence of a Gram-negative cell envelope. Even though electron micrographs showed no cell appendages, the genome encodes many genes putatively involved in pilus assembly. We assigned some to a type II secretion system, but the function of 60 pilE-like genes remains unknown. Numerous genes with hypothetical functions, e.g., polyketide synthesis, non-ribosomal peptide synthesis, antibiotic transport, and oxygen stress protection, indicate the presence of hitherto undiscovered physiological traits. Comparative analysis of 22 concatenated single-copy marker genes corroborated the status of Elusimicrobia (formerly TG1) as a separate phylum in the bacterial domain, which was so far based only on 16S rRNA sequence analysis.

  18. THE SPITZER EXTRAGALACTIC REPRESENTATIVE VOLUME SURVEY: THE ENVIRONMENTS OF HIGH-z SDSS QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falder, J. T.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Lacy, M.; Farrah, D.; Oliver, S.; Surace, J.; Mauduit, J.-C.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Afonso, J.; Cava, A.; Seymour, N.

    2011-07-10

    This paper presents a study of the environments of SDSS quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) in the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We concentrate on the high-redshift QSOs as these have not been studied in large numbers with data of this depth before. We use the IRAC 3.6-4.5 {mu}m color of objects and ancillary r-band data to filter out as much foreground contamination as possible. This technique allows us to find a significant (>4{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 2.0 and an (>2{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 3.3. We compare our findings to the predictions of a semi-analytic galaxy formation model, based on the {Lambda}CDM MILLENNIUM simulation, and find for both redshift bins that the model predictions match well the source density we have measured from the SERVS data.

  19. Long term out-of-pile thermocouple tests in conditions representative for nuclear gas-cooled high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurie, M.; Fourrez, S.; Fuetterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    During irradiation tests at high temperature, failure of commercial Inconel 600 sheathed thermocouples is commonly encountered. To understand and remedy this problem, out-of-pile tests were performed with thermocouples in carburizing atmospheres which can be assumed to be at least locally representative for High Temperature Reactors. The objective was to screen those thermocouples which would consecutively be used under irradiation. Two such screening tests have been performed with a set of thermocouples embedded in graphite (mainly conventional Type N thermocouples and thermocouples with innovative sheaths) in a dedicated furnace with helium flushing. Performance indicators such as thermal drift, insulation and loop resistance were monitored and compared to those from conventional Type N thermocouples. Several parameters were investigated: niobium sleeves, bending, thickness, sheath composition, temperature as well as the chemical environment. After the tests, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examinations were performed to analyze possible local damage in wires and in the sheath. The present paper describes the two experiments, summarizes results and outlines further work, in particular to further analyze the findings and to select suitable thermocouples for qualification under irradiation. (authors)

  20. IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database AgencyCompany Organization: World Meteorological Organization,...

  1. Tetrahydroquinoline Derivatives as Potent and Selective Factor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    as Potent and Selective Factor XIa Inhibitors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tetrahydroquinoline Derivatives as Potent and Selective Factor XIa Inhibitors Authors: ...

  2. Structural basis for Tetrahymena telomerase processivity factor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    factor Teb1 binding to single-stranded telomeric-repeat DNA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural basis for Tetrahymena telomerase processivity factor Teb1 ...

  3. Orderings for incomplete factorization preconditioning of nonsymmetric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It is shown that certain reorderings for direct methods, such as reverse Cuthill-McKee, ... Dept. of Mathematics Leiden Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Computer Science Leiden Univ. ...

  4. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  5. Human factors in waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moray, N.

    1994-10-01

    This article examines the role of human factors in radioactive waste management. Although few problems and ergonomics are special to radioactive waste management, some problems are unique especially with long term storage. The entire sociotechnical system must be looked at in order to see where improvement can take place because operator errors, as seen in Chernobyl and Bhopal, are ultimately the result of management errors.

  6. The Impact of Emission and Climate Change on Ozone in the United States under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Drake, John B.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liu, Yang

    2013-09-27

    Dynamical downscaling was applied in this study to link the global climate-chemistry model Community Atmosphere Model (CAM-Chem) with the regional models: Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ). Two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) were used to evaluate the climate impact on ozone concentrations in 2050s. Ozone concentrations in the lower-mid troposphere (surface to ~300 hPa), from mid- to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), show decreasing trends in RCP 4.5 between 2000s and 2050s, with the largest decrease of 4-10 ppbv occurring in the summer and the fall; and increasing trends (2-12 ppbv) in RCP 8.5 resulting from the increased methane emissions. In RCP 8.5, methane emissions increase by ~60% by the end of 2050s, accounting for more than 90% of ozone increases in summer and fall, and 60-80% in spring and winter. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, in the summer when photochemical reactions are the most active, the large ozone precursor emissions reduction leads to the greatest decrease of downscaled surface ozone concentrations, ranging from 6 to 10 ppbv. However, a few major cities show ozone increases of 3 to 7 ppbv due to weakened NO titration. Under the RCP 8.5 scenario, in winter, downscaled ozone concentrations increase across nearly the entire continental US in winter, ranging from 3 to 10 ppbv due to increased methane emissions and enhanced stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). More intense heat waves are projected to occur by the end of 2050s in RCP 8.5, leading to more than 8 ppbv of the maximum daily 8-hour daily average (MDA8) ozone during the heat wave days than other days; this indicates the dramatic impact heat waves exert on high frequency ozone events.

  7. Fatigue life improvement factors obtained by weld reinforcement and toe grinding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, C.L.; Merwin, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of weld reinforcement and toe grinding techniques for improving the fatigue life of welded joints protected from seawater corrosion is quantified based on tests performed in air on welded plate specimens. Results are presented in terms of median fatigue life improvement factors and prediction intervals obtained by linear regression analysis. The significant improvements possible with weld reinforcement are shown to be caused partly by a slight alleviation of the stress concentration imposed by sharp angles at the weld toe. Variable improvements observed for toe ground welds are shown to be associated with the variable surface modifications which different tools impose on weld toes. Load and weld geometry are shown to be particulary important when bending stresses are applied to the weld toe, since reinforcement affects the bending moment at the toe section and toe grinding affects the conditions at the highly stressed outer fibers. 14 references.

  8. Ultrastructural Study on Ultra-Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Transfer Factor Effects on Skin Ulcers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadena, M. S. Reyes; Chapul, L. Sanchez; Perez, Javier; Garcia, M. N. Jimenez; Lopez, M. A. Jimenez; Espindola, M. E. Sanchez; Perez, R. Paniagua; Hernandez, N. A.; Paniagua, G.; Uribe, F.; Nava, J. J. Godina; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez

    2008-08-11

    We determined the effect of 120Hz ultra low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF) on the healing process of skin in 20 Wistar rats distributed in four groups in which chronic dermal ulcers had been produced. The first two groups received a dose of the transfer factor and interferon-beta (IFN-{beta}) every 24 h during 12 days. The third group (positive control) received only electromagnetic field (ELF) sessions, and in the fourth group (negative control), no treatment was applied. The electromagnetic field was applied through a Helmholtz coils; 30 Gauss of intensity. Results shown histological changes that improve the healing process in animals subjected to ELF together with the transfer factor.

  9. Factorization method and new potentials from the inverted oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bermudez, David Fernndez C, David J.

    2013-06-15

    In this article we will apply the first- and second-order supersymmetric quantum mechanics to obtain new exactly-solvable real potentials departing from the inverted oscillator potential. This system has some special properties; in particular, only very specific second-order transformations produce non-singular real potentials. It will be shown that these transformations turn out to be the so-called complex ones. Moreover, we will study the factorization method applied to the inverted oscillator and the algebraic structure of the new Hamiltonians. -- Highlights: We apply supersymmetric quantum mechanics to the inverted oscillator potential. The complex second-order transformations allow us to build new non-singular potentials. The algebraic structure of the initial and final potentials is analyzed. The initial potential is described by a complex-deformed HeisenbergWeyl algebra. The final potentials are described by polynomial Heisenberg algebras.

  10. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  11. Safety culture management: The importance of organizational factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.; Jacobs, R.; Hofmann, D.

    1995-05-01

    The concept of safety culture has been used extensively to explain the underlying causes of performance based events, both positive and negative, across the nuclear industry. The work described in this paper represents several years of effort to identify, define and assess the organizational factors important to safe performance in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The research discussed in this paper is primarily conducted in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) efforts in understanding the impact of organizational performance on safety. As a result of a series of research activities undertaken by numerous NRC contractors, a collection of organizational dimensions has been identified and defined. These dimensions represent what is believed to be a comprehensive taxonomy of organizational elements that relate to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Techniques were also developed by which to measure these organizational dimensions, and include structured interview protocols, behavioral checklists, and behavioral anchored rating scales (BARS). Recent efforts have focused on devising a methodology for the extraction of information related to the identified organizational dimensions from existing NRC documentation. This type of effort would assess the applicability of the organizational dimensions to existing NRC inspection and evaluation reports, refine the organizational dimensions previously developed so they are more relevant to the task of retrospective analysis, and attempt to rate plants based on the review of existing NRC documentation using the techniques previously developed for the assessment of organizational dimensions.

  12. Clothes Washer Test Cloth Correction Factor Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page contains the information used to determine the test cloth correction factors for each test cloth lot.

  13. Human factors: a necessary tool for industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starcher, K.O.

    1984-03-09

    The need for human factors (ergonomics) input in the layout of a ferroelectric ceramics laboratory is presented as an example of the overall need for human factors professionals in industry. However, even in the absence of one trained in human factors, knowledge of a few principles in ergonomics will provide many possibilities for improving performance in the industrial environment.

  14. Antenna factorization in strongly ordered limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosower, David A.

    2005-02-15

    When energies or angles of gluons emitted in a gauge-theory process are small and strongly ordered, the emission factorizes in a simple way to all orders in perturbation theory. I show how to unify the various strongly ordered soft, mixed soft-collinear, and collinear limits using antenna factorization amplitudes, which are generalizations of the Catani-Seymour dipole factorization function.

  15. Factors fragmenting the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.

    1993-10-06

    This paper examines the factors that threaten the future of the Russian Federation (RF). The observations are based on a study that focused on eight republics: Mordova, Udmurtia, Tatarstan, Mari El, Bashkortostan, Kabardino-Balkaria, Buryatia, and Altay Republic. These republics were selected for their geographic and economic significance to the RF. Tatarstan, Bashkortostan, Udmurtia, and Mari El are located on important supply routes, such as the Volga River and the trans-Siberian railroad. Some of these republics are relatively wealthy, with natural resources such as oil (e.g., Tatarstan and Bashkortostan), and all eight republics play significant roles in the military-industrial complex. The importance of these republics to the RF contrasts to the relative insignificance of the independence-minded Northern Caucasus area. The author chose not to examine the Northern Caucasus region (except Kabardino-Balkaria) because these republics may have only a minor impact on the rest of the RF if they secede. Their impact would be minimized because they lie on the frontiers of the RF. Many Russians believe that {open_quotes}it might be best to let such a troublesome area secede.{close_quotes}

  16. Fundamental continuity equation for material transport in fractured media and retention factor for a system of joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.; Hadermann, J.

    1982-01-01

    Transport of radioactive nuclides through a system of joints is discussed including a linear sorption isotherm. The expression for the effective retention factor is derived for (a) a single joint, (b) a system of identical joints separated by a given distance, and (c) a system of joints with arbitrary apertures and sorption characteristics. It is shown that the retention factors for cases a and b are the same. In the limit of dense fractures, the retention factor for the porous medium is recovered. Relevance to the one-dimensional geosphere transport problem in the heterogeneous geology is pointed out. An arbitrary number of joint sets can now be included in such a problem.

  17. Factorization using the quadratic sieve algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.A.; Holdridge, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    Since the cryptosecurity of the RSA two key cryptoalgorithm is no greater than the difficulty of factoring the modulus (product of two secret primes), a code that implements the Quadratic Sieve factorization algorithm on the CRAY I computer has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories to determine as sharply as possible the current state-of-the-art in factoring. Because all viable attacks on RSA thus far proposed are equivalent to factorization of the modulus, sharper bounds on the computational difficulty of factoring permit improved estimates for the size of RSA parameters needed for given levels of cryptosecurity. Analysis of the Quadratic Sieve indicates that it may be faster than any previously published general purpose algorithm for factoring large integers. The high speed of the CRAY I coupled with the capability of the CRAY to pipeline certain vectorized operations make this algorithm (and code) the front runner in current factoring techniques.

  18. Factorization using the quadratic sieve algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.A.; Holdridge, D.B.

    1983-12-01

    Since the cryptosecurity of the RSA two key cryptoalgorithm is no greater than the difficulty of factoring the modulus (product of two secret primes), a code that implements the Quadratic Sieve factorization algorithm on the CRAY I computer has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories to determine as sharply as possible the current state-of-the-art in factoring. Because all viable attacks on RSA thus far proposed are equivalent to factorization of the modulus, sharper bounds on the computational difficulty of factoring permit improved estimates for the size of RSA parameters needed for given levels of cryptosecurity. Analysis of the Quadratic Sieve indicates that it may be faster than any previously published general purpose algorithm for factoring large integers. The high speed of the CRAY I coupled with the capability of the CRAY to pipeline certain vectorized operations make this algorithm (and code) the front runner in current factoring techniques.

  19. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada); Siemann, Stefan, E-mail: ssiemann@laurentian.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  20. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  1. Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN Why DOE-EM Did...

  2. CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS AFFECTING FUSION. Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F Abstract not provided. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque,...

  3. EcoFactor Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: EcoFactor Inc Place: Millbrae, California Zip: 94030 Product: California-based home energy management service provider. Coordinates: 37.60276, -122.395444 Show Map...

  4. CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Article: CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS AFFECTING FUSION. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED...

  5. Soliton form factors from lattice simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajantie, Arttu; Weir, David J.

    2010-12-01

    The form factor provides a convenient way to describe properties of topological solitons in the full quantum theory, when semiclassical concepts are not applicable. It is demonstrated that the form factor can be calculated numerically using lattice Monte Carlo simulations. The approach is very general and can be applied to essentially any type of soliton. The technique is illustrated by calculating the kink form factor near the critical point in 1+1-dimensional scalar field theory. As expected from universality arguments, the result agrees with the exactly calculable scaling form factor of the two-dimensional Ising model.

  6. Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model is used to calculate emission rates from all motor vehicles, such as passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks, operating on highways, freeways...

  7. Nonrelativistic QCD factorization and the velocity dependence...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CONFIGURATION; FACTORIZATION; MATRIX ELEMENTS; QUANTUM CHROMODYNAMICS; QUARKONIUM; SINGULARITY; T QUARKS; VELOCITY Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal Articles DOI: ...

  8. Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook. Electrotek Concepts...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    low power factors, increased conductor and transformer losses, and lower voltages. Utilities must supply both active and reactive power and compensate for these losses. Power...

  9. Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge Full Document and Summary Versions are available for ...

  10. Experimental study of the relationship between formation factor, porosity, and cementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harig, M.D.; Chaney, R.C.

    1999-07-01

    Cemented granular soils are classified based on the size and distribution of the individual grains and qualitatively on the basis of cementation. To uniquely classify these types of soils, information about the fabric (pore geometry and/or level of cementation) of the specimen needs to be quantified. Electrical resistivity, or its reciprocal, conductivity, methods have been extensively used both in situ and in the laboratory to provide a means for determining a variety of soil index, structural, erosional, and cyclic properties. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between formation factor (F), porosity (n), and cementation factor (m) of remolded sand-cement specimens. This relationship is shown to provide a mechanism for estimating the level of cementation in undisturbed specimens. The formation factor is the ratio of the electrical resistivity of the sand-water-cement mixture to that of the interstitial water.

  11. Building-related risk factors and work-related lower respiratory symptoms in 80 office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Naco, G.M.; Wilcox, T.G.; Sieber, W.K.

    2002-01-01

    We assessed building-related risk factors for lower respiratory symptoms in office workers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in 1993 collected data during indoor environmental health investigations of workplaces. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess relationships between lower respiratory symptoms in office workers and risk factors plausibly related to microbiologic contamination. Among 2,435 occupants in 80 office buildings, frequent, work-related multiple lower respiratory symptoms were strongly associated, in multivariate models, with two risk factors for microbiologic contamination: poor pan drainage under cooling coils and debris in outside air intake. Associations tended to be stronger among those with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. These findings suggest that adverse lower respiratory health effects from indoor work environments, although unusual, may occur in relation to poorly designed or maintained ventilation systems, particularly among previously diagnosed asthmatics. These findings require confirmation in more representative buildings.

  12. UESC Training for Utility Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar covers utility energy service contracts (UESC), which allow utilities to provide their Federal agencies with comprehensive energy and water efficiency improvements and demand-reduction services.

  13. PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2013-08-01

    Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

  14. UESCs Training for Utility Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covers utility energy service contracts (UESC), which allow utilities to provide their Federal agencies with comprehensive energy and water efficiency improvements and demand-reduction services.

  15. Program Analyst (Contracting Officer Representative)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position reports directly to the Office Director for PBPE. The incumbent of this position analyzes, evaluates and/or advises management on the effectiveness of complex and overarching EIA...

  16. Gauss Sum Factorization with Cold Atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilowski, M.; Wendrich, T.; Mueller, T.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M. [Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Jentsch, Ch. [Astrium GmbH-Satellites, 88039 Friedrichshafen (Germany); Schleich, W. P. [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2008-01-25

    We report the first implementation of a Gauss sum factorization algorithm by an internal state Ramsey interferometer using cold atoms. A sequence of appropriately designed light pulses interacts with an ensemble of cold rubidium atoms. The final population in the involved atomic levels determines a Gauss sum. With this technique we factor the number N=263193.

  17. Residential Energy-Efficiency Equipment Shown to be a Good Investment for U.S. Navy (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    A two-year project between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Navy's Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) to demonstrate energy efficiency technologies at bases in Hawaii and Guam resulted in the identification of several promising options for reducing energy use and costs, including whole-house energy efficiency retrofits.

  18. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  19. Comparison of AB2588 multipathway risk factors for California fossil-fuel power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gratt, L.B.; Levin, L.

    1997-12-31

    Substances released from power plants may travel through various exposure pathways resulting in human health and environmental risks. The stack air emission`s primary pathway is inhalation from the ambient air. Multipathway factors (adjustment factors to the inhalation risk) are used to evaluate the importance of non-inhalation pathways (such as ingestion and dermal contact). The multipathway factor for a specific substance is the health risk by all pathways divided by the inhalation health risk for that substance. These factors are compared for fossil fuel power stations that submitted regulatory risk assessments in compliance with California Toxic Hot Spots Act (AB2588). Substances representing the largest contributions to the cancer risk are of primary concern: arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium (+6), formaldehyde, nickel, lead, selenium, and PAHs. Comparisons of the chemical-specific multipathway factors show the impacts of regulatory policy decisions on the estimated health risk for trace substances. As an example, point estimates of the soil mixing depth, varying from 1 cm to 15 cm, relate to the relative importance of the pathway. For the deeper mixing depths, the root-zone uptake by homegrown tomato plants (for assumed consumption rate of 15% for San Diego) may result in high multipathway factors for several trace metals. For shallower mixing depths, soil ingestion may become the dominant non-inhalation pathway. These differences may lead to significantly different risk estimates for similar facilities located at different California locations such as to be under local regulatory authorities. The overall multipathway factor for the total cancer risk is about 2, much smaller than some of the chemical-specific factors. Science-based multipathway analysis should reduce much of the concern that may be due to policy-based decisions on pathway selection and high-value point-estimates of the parameters.

  20. Relativistic Thomson Scatter from Factor Calculation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this program is calculate the fully relativistic Thomson scatter from factor in unmagnetized plasmas. Such calculations are compared to experimental diagnoses of plasmas at such facilities as the Jupiter laser facility here a LLNL.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

  2. Structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09410 (DUF2006) reveals a structural signature of the calycin superfamily that suggests a role in lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Skerra, Arne; Lomize, Andrei; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-10-15

    The first structural representative of the domain of unknown function DUF2006 family, also known as Pfam family PF09410, comprises a lipocalin-like fold with domain duplication. The finding of the calycin signature in the N-terminal domain, combined with remote sequence similarity to two other protein families (PF07143 and PF08622) implicated in isoprenoid metabolism and the oxidative stress response, support an involvement in lipid metabolism. Clusters of conserved residues that interact with ligand mimetics suggest that the binding and regulation sites map to the N-terminal domain and to the interdomain interface, respectively.

  3. Proton form factor effects in hydrogenic atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daza, F. Garcia; Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2011-10-21

    The proton structure corrections to the hyperfine splittings in electronic and muonic hydrogen are evaluated using the Breit potential with electromagnetic form factors. In contrast to other methods, the Breit equation with q{sup 2} dependent form factors is just an extension of the standard Breit equation which gives the hyperfine splitting Hamiltonian. Precise QED corrections are comparable to the structure corrections which therefore need to be evaluated ab initio.

  4. Factors affecting robust retail energy markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelman, T.S.

    1999-04-01

    This paper briefly defines an active retail market, details the factors that influence market activity and their relative importance, compares activity in various retail energy markets to date, and predicts future retail energy market activity. Three primary factors translate into high market activity: supplier margins, translated into potential savings for actively shopping customers; market size; and market barriers. The author surveys activity nationwide and predicts hot spots for the coming year.

  5. On Boolean matrices with full factor rank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shitov, Ya

    2013-11-30

    It is demonstrated that every (0,1)-matrix of size nm having Boolean rank n contains acolumn with at least ?n/2?1 zero entries. This bound is shown to be asymptotically optimal. As acorollary, it is established that the size of afull-rank Boolean matrix is bounded from above by afunction of its tropical and determinantal ranks. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  6. Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-04-01

    Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

  7. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-4: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.; Winberg, M.; Williams, K.

    1994-09-01

    This report estimates packaging factors for several waste types that are potential greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a GTCC LLW disposal container divided by the as-generated or ``unpackaged`` volume of the waste loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors reflect any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of GTCC LLW, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. Three values are developed that represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated disposal volume of waste, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. GTCC LLW is placed in three categories for evaluation in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other waste.

  8. High-precision calculation of the strange nucleon electromagnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Jeremy; Meinel, Stefan; Engelhardt, Michael G.; Krieg, Stefan; Laeuchli, Jesse; Negele, John W.; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Syritsyn, Sergey

    2015-08-26

    We report a direct lattice QCD calculation of the strange nucleon electromagnetic form factors GsE and GsM in the kinematic range 0 ≤ Q2 ≤ 1.2GeV2. For the first time, both GsE and GsM are shown to be nonzero with high significance. This work uses closer-to-physical lattice parameters than previous calculations, and achieves an unprecented statistical precision by implementing a recently proposed variance reduction technique called hierarchical probing. We perform model-independent fits of the form factor shapes using the z-expansion and determine the strange electric and magnetic radii and magnetic moment. As a result, we compare our results to parity-violating electron-proton scattering data and to other theoretical studies.

  9. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore » the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  10. Hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syukurilla, L. Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We have revisited the effect of hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction process by utilizing an isobaric model developed for kaon photoproduction off the proton. The model is able to reproduce the available experimental data nicely as well as to reveal the origin of the second peak in the total cross section, which was the main source of confusion for decades. Different from our previous study, in the present work we explore the possibility of using different hadronic form factors in each of the K?N vertices. The use of different hadronic form factors, e.g. dipole, Gaussian, and generalized dipole, has been found to produce a more flexible isobar model, which can provide a significant improvement in the model.

  11. Power-factor metering gains new interest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womack, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    The combined effect of increased energy costs, advances in digital metering techniques, and regulatory pressures is stimulating utility interest in charging smaller customers the full cost of their burden on the electric system, by metering reactive power and billing for poor power factor. Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. adopted the Q-meter method, made practical with the advent of magnetic-tape metering. Digital metering and new techniques now being developed will add more options for utilities interested in metering power factor. There are three commonly used methods of determining power factor, all of which require the use of the standard induction watthour meter, plus at least one other meter, to obtain a second value in the power triangle. In all cases, the third value, if required, is obtained by calculation.

  12. Measurement of the Helium Factors at Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elena Khrosinkova

    2007-06-11

    An experiment to measure elastic electron scattering off 3He and 4He at large momentum transfers is presented. The experiment was carried out in the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. Elastic electron scattering off 3He was measured at forward and backward electron scattering angles to extract the isotope's charge and magnetic form factors. The charge form factor of 4He will be extracted from forward-angle electron scattering angle measurements. The data are expected to significantly extend and improve the existing measurements of the three-and four-body form factors. The results will be crucial for the establishment of a canonical standard model for the few- body nuclear systems and for testing predictions of quark dimensional scaling and hybrid nucleon- quark models.

  13. Human factors in nuclear technology - a history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Human factors, human factors engineering (HFE), or ergonomics did not receive much formal attention in nuclear technology prior to the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) incident. Three principal reasons exist for this lack of concern. First, emerging technologies show little concern with how people will use a new system. Making the new technology work is considered more important than the people who will use it. Second, the culture of the users of nuclear power did not recognize a need for human factors. Traditional utilities had well established and effective engineering designs for control of electric power generation, while medicine considered the use of nuclear isotopes another useful tool, not requiring special ergonomics. Finally, the nuclear industry owed much to Admiral Rickover. He was definitely opposed.

  14. Chiral extrapolation of nucleon magnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Wang; D. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; R.Young

    2007-04-01

    The extrapolation of nucleon magnetic form factors calculated within lattice QCD is investigated within a framework based upon heavy baryon chiral effective-field theory. All one-loop graphs are considered at arbitrary momentum transfer and all octet and decuplet baryons are included in the intermediate states. Finite range regularization is applied to improve the convergence in the quark-mass expansion. At each value of the momentum transfer (Q{sup 2}), a separate extrapolation to the physical pion mass is carried out as a function of m{sub {pi}} alone. Because of the large values of Q{sup 2} involved, the role of the pion form factor in the standard pion-loop integrals is also investigated. The resulting values of the form factors at the physical pion mass are compared with experimental data as a function of Q{sup 2} and demonstrate the utility and accuracy of the chiral extrapolation methods presented herein.

  15. Communication-avoiding symmetric-indefinite factorization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ballard, Grey Malone; Becker, Dulcenia; Demmel, James; Dongarra, Jack; Druinsky, Alex; Peled, Inon; Schwartz, Oded; Toledo, Sivan; Yamazaki, Ichitaro

    2014-11-13

    We describe and analyze a novel symmetric triangular factorization algorithm. The algorithm is essentially a block version of Aasen's triangular tridiagonalization. It factors a dense symmetric matrix A as the product A=PLTLTPT where P is a permutation matrix, L is lower triangular, and T is block tridiagonal and banded. The algorithm is the first symmetric-indefinite communication-avoiding factorization: it performs an asymptotically optimal amount of communication in a two-level memory hierarchy for almost any cache-line size. Adaptations of the algorithm to parallel computers are likely to be communication efficient as well; one such adaptation has been recently published. As a result,more » the current paper describes the algorithm, proves that it is numerically stable, and proves that it is communication optimal.« less

  16. Communication-avoiding symmetric-indefinite factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, Grey Malone; Becker, Dulcenia; Demmel, James; Dongarra, Jack; Druinsky, Alex; Peled, Inon; Schwartz, Oded; Toledo, Sivan; Yamazaki, Ichitaro

    2014-11-13

    We describe and analyze a novel symmetric triangular factorization algorithm. The algorithm is essentially a block version of Aasen's triangular tridiagonalization. It factors a dense symmetric matrix A as the product A=PLTLTPT where P is a permutation matrix, L is lower triangular, and T is block tridiagonal and banded. The algorithm is the first symmetric-indefinite communication-avoiding factorization: it performs an asymptotically optimal amount of communication in a two-level memory hierarchy for almost any cache-line size. Adaptations of the algorithm to parallel computers are likely to be communication efficient as well; one such adaptation has been recently published. As a result, the current paper describes the algorithm, proves that it is numerically stable, and proves that it is communication optimal.

  17. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  18. H. R. 4805: Internal Revenue Code of 1990. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, May 10, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives on May 10, 1990 to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. This bill reduces emissions of carbon dioxide by imposing a tax on certain fuels based on their carbon content. Separate sections are included which impose tax on coal, tax on petroleum, and tax on natural gas. The tax rate on coal will be $3.00 per ton for 1991, $6.00 per ton for 1992, $9.00 per ton for 1993, and $12 per ton for 1994. The tax rate on petroleum will be $.65 per barrel for 1991, $1.30 per barrel for 1992, $1.95 per barrel for 1993, and $2.60 per barrel for 1994. The tax rate on natural gas will be $.08 per MCF for 1991, $.16 per MCF for 1992, $.24 per MCF for 1993, and $.32 per MCF for 1994.

  19. Findings and recommendations of the advisory panel on synthetic fuels. Advisory panel on synthetic fuels. Report for the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    In a report to the US House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology, the Advisory Panel defines the most critical energy problem facing the US: obtaining a sufficient supply of liquid hydrocarbons for transportation fuel and for other applications where substitution would be difficult, costly, and time-consuming. Any substantial contribution from synthetic fuels must involve the use of coal, oil shale, and biomass, with the raw materials coming from as many different regions of the country as possible. The panel makes recommendations regarding (1) the emphasis of the Department of Energy's synthetic-fuel demonstration program, (2) implementation of a synthetic-fuel production program, and (3) mitigation of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of synthetic-fuel production. The panel specifically maintains that federal assistance to commercial-scale projects should be available on a competitive basis to those organizations willing to take substantial marketing risks.

  20. Requiring an Office of Investigations within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, September 29, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This bill amends the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 to add a new section 205A that establishes within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) a statutory Office of Investigation (OI) and establishes a director of this office who reports directly to the five NRC Commissioners. The new section also sets out the responsibility of the office for initiating and conducting investigations into violations of laws the NRC implements that relate to violations involving wrongdoing. The OI is charged with reporting violations of federal criminal law to the Department of Justice. The Committee on Energy and Commerce considered the bill, report favorably on it without amendment, and recommend its passage by the whole House of Representatives.

  1. Mobil/Marathon takeover. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, November 19, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The exercise of corporate power and money as well as the effect on energy policy were the underlying issues in a hearing on the proposed merger of Mobil and Marathon oil companies. The use of capital in this way would deny funds for economic recovery and energy development at a time when the oil companies complain that they need more financial incentives. The companies' response in the direction of mergers suggest that deregulation and tax incentives are not developing solutions to energy supply, but are creating new problems. The witnesses included representatives of Ohio, DOE's Office of Competition, and independent oil jobbers and distributors, who argued against the merger. Additional letters and statement from the witnesses follow their testimony. (DCK)

  2. Human factors challenges for advanced process control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubler, W.F.; O`Hara, J..M.

    1996-08-01

    New human-system interface technologies provide opportunities for improving operator and plant performance. However, if these technologies are not properly implemented, they may introduce new challenges to performance and safety. This paper reports the results from a survey of human factors considerations that arise in the implementation of advanced human-system interface technologies in process control and other complex systems. General trends were identified for several areas based on a review of technical literature and a combination of interviews and site visits with process control organizations. Human factors considerations are discussed for two of these areas, automation and controls.

  3. Annotated bibliography of human factors applications literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCafferty, D.B.

    1984-09-30

    This bibliography was prepared as part of the Human Factors Technology Project, FY 1984, sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Safety, US Department of Energy. The project was conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with Essex Corporation as a subcontractor. The material presented here is a revision and expansion of the bibliographic material developed in FY 1982 as part of a previous Human Factors Technology Project. The previous bibliography was published September 30, 1982, as Attachment 1 to the FY 1982 Project Status Report.

  4. Written Statement of David Huizenga Senior Advisor for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States House of Representatives (May 9, 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Senior Advisor David Huizenga represented the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States...

  5. Meson-photon transition form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakireva, Irina; Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri

    2012-10-23

    We present the results of our recent analysis of the meson-photon transition form factors F{sub P{gamma}}(Q{sup 2}) for the pseudoscalar mesons P {pi}{sup 0},{eta},{eta} Prime ,{eta}{sub c}, using the local-duality version of QCD sum rules.

  6. Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy investigated the major cost factors that affected PMU installation costs for the synchrophasor projects funded through the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs. The data was compiled through interviews with the nine projects that deployed production grade synchrophasor systems.

  7. Investigating Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific Biomass Recalcitrance Factors Using Reference Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Xiaohui; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Xiao

    2014-04-01

    Three commercial cellulase preparations, Novozymes Cellic® Ctec2, Dupont Accellerase® 1500, and DSM Cytolase CL, were evaluated for their hydrolytic activity using a set of reference biomass substrates with controlled substrate characteristics. It was found that lignin remains a significant recalcitrance factor to all the preparations, although different enzyme preparations respond to the inhibitory effect of lignin differently. Also, different types of biomass lignin can inhibit cellulose enzymes in different manners. Enhancing enzyme activity toward biomass fiber swelling is an area significantly contributing to potential improvement in cellulose performance. While the degree of polymerization of cellulose in the reference substrates did not present a major recalcitrance factor to Novozymes Cellic® Ctec2, cellulose crystallite has been shown to have a significant lower reactivity toward all enzyme mixtures. The presence of polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) in Novozymes Ctec2 appears to enhance enzyme activity toward decrystallization of cellulose. This study demonstrated that reference substrates with controlled chemical and physical characteristics of structural features can be applied as an effective and practical strategy to identify cellulosic enzyme activities toward specific biomass recalcitrance factor(s) and provide specific targets for enzyme improvement.

  8. Emission factors for leaks in refinery components in heavy liquid service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taback, H.; Godec, M.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this program was to provide sufficient screening data so that EPA can develop an official set of emission factors (expressed in lb/hr/component) for refinery components (valves, flanged connectors, non-flanged connectors, pumps, open-ended lines, and other) in heavy liquid (BL) service. To accomplish this, 211,000 existing HL screening values from Southern California refineries were compiled and compared with 2,500 new HL screening measurements taken at two refineries in the state of Washington. Since Southern California is an area in extreme non-attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and therefore has tight emission control regulations, it was felt that its screening data may not be representative of refineries without tight emission controls. Thus, the Southern California screening data were compared to screening measurements at refineries in an area that is in attainment of the NAAQS and without emissions control, which is the case for those refineries in Washington. It was found that statistically there was no significant difference in emission factors between the two areas and, therefore, there appears to be no difference in emissions from heavy liquid components in areas with and without leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs. The new emission factors range from 1/7 to 1/3 times the current EPA emission factors. This program was sponsored by the American Petroleum Institute (API) and an API report will soon be released providing complete details.

  9. Module: Emission Factors for Deforestation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.leafasia.orgtoolstechnical-guidance-series-emission-factors-defo Cost: Free Language: English Module: Emission Factors for Deforestation Screenshot Logo: Module: Emission...

  10. Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ...

  11. Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Test of factorization in diffractive deep ...

  12. Dense LU Factorization on Multicore Supercomputer Nodes (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    factorization's memory hierarchy contention on now-ubiquitous multi-core architectures. ... During active panel factorization, rank-1 updates stream through memory with minimal ...

  13. Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell...

  14. Neutrino mass, dark energy, and the linear growth factor (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dark energy, and the linear growth factor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutrino mass, dark energy, and the linear growth factor We study the degeneracies between ...

  15. Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Is the proton electromagnetic form factor modified in nuclei? You are ...

  16. Method for determining formation quality factor from well log...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    factor from well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Method for determining formation quality factor ...

  17. Initiation factor 2 crystal structure reveals a different domain...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Initiation factor 2 crystal structure reveals a different domain organization from eukaryotic initiation factor 5B and mechanism among translational GTPases Citation Details ...

  18. Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of warm acceleratin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of warm accelerating structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of ...

  19. Crystal structure of elongation factor 4 bound to a clockwise...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Crystal structure of elongation factor 4 bound to a clockwise ratcheted ribosome Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Crystal structure of elongation factor 4 bound to a ...

  20. First Climate formerly Factor Consulting | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    First Climate formerly Factor Consulting Jump to: navigation, search Name: First Climate (formerly Factor Consulting) Place: Germany Sector: Carbon Product: Former Swiss-based...

  1. Research on Factors Relating to Density and Climate Change |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Factors Relating to Density and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Research on Factors Relating to Density and Climate Change Agency...

  2. Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool Software tool that enables easy and quick selection of applicable regulatory guidelines as starting point for human factors engineering ...

  3. Assessment of G3(MP2)//B3 theory including a pseudopotential for molecules containing first-, second-, and third-row representative elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha, Carlos Murilo Romero; Morgon, Nelson Henrique; Custodio, Rogrio; Pereira, Douglas Henrique; Departamento de Cincias Exatas e Biotecnolgicas, Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Campus de Gurupi, 77410-530 Gurupi, Tocantins

    2013-11-14

    G3(MP2)//B3 theory was modified to incorporate compact effective potential (CEP) pseudopotentials, providing a theoretical alternative referred to as G3(MP2)//B3-CEP for calculations involving first-, second-, and third-row representative elements. The G3/05 test set was used as a standard to evaluate the accuracy of the calculated properties. G3(MP2)//B3-CEP theory was applied to the study of 247 standard enthalpies of formation, 104 ionization energies, 63 electron affinities, 10 proton affinities, and 22 atomization energies, comprising 446 experimental energies. The mean absolute deviations compared with the experimental data for all thermochemical results presented an accuracy of 1.4 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and 1.6 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3-CEP. Approximately 75% and 70% of the calculated properties are found with accuracy between 2 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and G3(MP2)//B3-CEP, respectively. Considering a confidence interval of 95%, the results may oscillate between 4.2 kcal mol{sup ?1} and 4.6 kcal mol{sup ?1}, respectively. The overall statistical behavior indicates that the calculations using pseudopotential present similar behavior with the all-electron theory. Of equal importance to the accuracy is the CPU time, which was reduced by between 10% and 40%.

  4. Crack stability in a representative piping system under combined inertial and seismic/dynamic displacement-controlled stresses. Subtask 1.3 final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, P.; Olson, R.; Wilkowski, O.G.; Marschall, C.; Schmidt, R.

    1997-06-01

    This report presents the results from Subtask 1.3 of the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The objective of Subtask 1.3 is to develop data to assess analysis methodologies for characterizing the fracture behavior of circumferentially cracked pipe in a representative piping system under combined inertial and displacement-controlled stresses. A unique experimental facility was designed and constructed. The piping system evaluated is an expansion loop with over 30 meters of 16-inch diameter Schedule 100 pipe. The experimental facility is equipped with special hardware to ensure system boundary conditions could be appropriately modeled. The test matrix involved one uncracked and five cracked dynamic pipe-system experiments. The uncracked experiment was conducted to evaluate piping system damping and natural frequency characteristics. The cracked-pipe experiments evaluated the fracture behavior, pipe system response, and stability characteristics of five different materials. All cracked-pipe experiments were conducted at PWR conditions. Material characterization efforts provided tensile and fracture toughness properties of the different pipe materials at various strain rates and temperatures. Results from all pipe-system experiments and material characterization efforts are presented. Results of fracture mechanics analyses, dynamic finite element stress analyses, and stability analyses are presented and compared with experimental results.

  5. HUMAN FACTORS GUIDANCE FOR CONTROL ROOM EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHARA,J.; BROWN,W.; STUBLER,W.; HIGGINS,J.; WACHTEL,J.; PERSENSKY,J.J.

    2000-07-30

    The Human-System Interface Design Review Guideline (NUREG-0700, Revision 1) was developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide human factors guidance as a basis for the review of advanced human-system interface technologies. The guidance consists of three components: design review procedures, human factors engineering guidelines, and a software application to provide design review support called the ``Design Review Guideline.'' Since it was published in June 1996, Rev. 1 to NUREG-0700 has been used successfully by NRC staff, contractors and nuclear industry organizations, as well as by interested organizations outside the nuclear industry. The NRC has committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool in the face of emerging and rapidly changing technology. This paper addresses the current research to update of NUREG-0700 based on the substantial work that has taken place since the publication of Revision 1.

  6. Understanding Hazardous Combustion Byproducts Reduces Factors Impacting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Hazardous Combustion Byproducts Reduces Factors Impacting Climate Change - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery

  7. Development of a Short-Duration Drive Cycle to Represent Long-Term Measured Drive Cycle Data: Evaluation of Truck Efficiency Technologies in Class 8 Tractor Trailers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LaClair, Tim; Gao, Zhiming; Fu, Joshua; Calcagno, Jimmy; Yun, Jeongran

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the fuel savings and emissions reductions that can be achieved from truck fuel efficiency technologies for a fleet's specific usage allows the fleet to select a combination of technologies that will yield the greatest operational efficiency and profitability. An accurate characterization of usage for the fleet is critical for such an evaluation; however, short-term measured drive cycle data do not generally reflect overall usage very effectively. This study presents a detailed analysis of vehicle usage in a commercial vehicle fleet and demonstrates the development of a short-duration synthetic drive cycle with measured drive cycle data collected over an extendedmore » period of time. The approach matched statistical measures of the vehicle speed with acceleration history and integrated measured grade data to develop a compressed drive cycle that accurately represents total usage. Drive cycle measurements obtained during a full year from six tractor trailers in normal operations in a less-than-truckload carrier were analyzed to develop a synthetic drive cycle. The vehicle mass was also estimated to account for the variation of loads that the fleet experienced. These drive cycle and mass data were analyzed with a tractive energy analysis to quantify the benefits in terms of fuel efficiency and reduced carbon dioxide emissions that can be achieved on Class 8 tractor trailers by using advanced efficiency technologies, either individually or in combination. Although differences exist between Class 8 tractor trailer fleets, this study provides valuable insight into the energy and emissions reduction potential that various technologies can bring in this important trucking application. Finally, the methodology employed for generating the synthetic drive cycle serves as a rigorous approach to develop an accurate usage characterization that can be used to effectively compress large quantities of drive cycle data.« less

  8. Spatially resolved estimation of ozone-related mortality in the United States under two representative concentration pathways (RCPs) and their uncertainty

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent A.; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2014-11-16

    We report that the spatial pattern of the uncertainty in air pollution-related health impacts due to climate change has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs), the latest greenhouse gas emission pathways. We estimated future tropospheric ozone (O3) and related excess mortality and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States under RCPs. Based on dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 level at 12 km resolution between the future (2057 and 2059) and base years (2001–2004) under a low-to-medium emission scenario (RCP4.5) and amore » fossil fuel intensive emission scenario (RCP8.5). We then estimated the excess mortality attributable to changes in O3. Finally, we analyzed the sensitivity of the excess mortality estimates to the input variables and the uncertainty in the excess mortality estimation using Monte Carlo simulations. O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1312 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 427 to 2198) and ₋2118 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (95 % CI: ₋3021 to ₋1216), when allowing for climate change and emissions reduction. The uncertainty of O3-related excess mortality estimates was mainly caused by RCP emissions pathways. Finally, excess mortality estimates attributable to the combined effect of climate and emission changes on O3 as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space and so do the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective community level mitigation and adaptation policy.« less

  9. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Volume III (of 4): Characterization and simulation of representative resources. Final report, February 14, 1995--October 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1997-01-13

    Significant innovations have been made in seismic processing and reservoir simulation. In addition, significant advances have been made in deviated and horizontal drilling technologies. Effective application of these technologies along with improved integrated resource management methods offer opportunities to significantly increase Gulf of Mexico production, delay platform abandonments, and preserve access to a substantial remaining oil target for both exploratory drilling and advanced recovery processes. In an effort to illustrate the impact that these new technologies and sources of information can have upon the estimates of recoverable oil in the Gulf of Mexico, additional and detailed data was collected for two previously studied reservoirs: a South March Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil, whose exact location has been blind-coded at their request, and an additional third representative reservoir in the Gulf of Mexico, the KEKF-1 reservoir in West Delta Block 84 Field. The new data includes reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data was used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation also provided additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressures, and water compatibility. Geologic investigations were also conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. These results were also used, in part, to assist in the recharacterization of these reservoirs.

  10. Kallotenue papyrolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., a cellulolytic and filamentous thermophile that represents a novel lineage (Kallotenuales ord. nov., Kallotenuaceae fam. nov.) within the class Chloroflexia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Jesse; Gieler, Brandon; Heisler, Devon; Palisoc, Maryknoll; Williams, Amanda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ming, Hong; Yu, Tian T.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Li, Wen J.; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2013-08-15

    Several closely-related, thermophilic, and cellulolytic bacterial strains, designated JKG1T, JKG2, JKG3, JKG4, and JKG5, were isolated from a cellulolytic enrichment (corn stover) incubated in the water column of Great Boiling Spring, NV. Strain JKG1T had cells of a diameter of 0.7 - 0.9 ?m and length of ~2.0 ?m that formed non-branched multicellular filaments reaching >300 ?m. Spores were not formed and dense liquid cultures were red. The temperature range for growth was 45-65 C, with an optimum of 55 C. The pH range for growth was 5.6-9.0, with an optimum of 7.5. JKG1T grew as an aerobic heterotroph, utilizing glucose, sucrose, xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, carboxymethylcellulose, filter paper, microcrystalline cellulose, xylan, starch, casamino acids, tryptone, peptone, yeast extract, acetate, citrate, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol as sole carbon sources, and was not observed to photosynthesize. The cells stained Gram-negative. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the new isolates in the class Chloroflexia, but distant from other cultivated members, with the highest sequence identity of 82.5% to Roseiflexus castenholzii. The major quinone was menaquinone-9; no ubiquinones were detected. The major cellular fatty acids (>5%) were C18:0, anteiso-C17:0, iso-C18:0, and iso-C17:0. C16:0, iso-C16:0, and C17:0. The peptidoglycan amino acids were alanine, ornithine, glutamic acid, serine, and asparagine. Whole-cell sugars included mannose, rhamnose, glucose, galactose, ribose, arabinose, and xylose. Morphological, phylogenetic, and chemotaxonomic results suggest that JKG1T is representative of a new lineage within the class Chloroflexia, which we propose to designate Kallotenue papyrolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., Kallotenuaceae fam. nov., Kallotenuales ord. nov.

  11. Spatially Resolved Estimation of Ozone-related Mortality in the United States under Two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spatial pattern of the uncertainty in climate air pollution health impact has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the latest Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). OBJECTIVES: We estimated county-level ozone (O3) and PM2.5 related excess mortality (EM) and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States in the 2050s under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. METHODS: Using dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 and PM2.5 levels at 12 km resolution between the future (2057-2059) and present (2001-2004) under two RCP scenarios. Using concentration-response relationships in the literature and projected future populations, we estimated EM attributable to the changes in O3 and PM2.5. We finally analyzed the contribution of input variables to the uncertainty in the county-level EM estimation using Monte Carlo simulation. RESULTS: O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1,082 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): -288 to 2,453), and -5,229 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (-7,212 to -3,246). Simulated PM2.5 changes resulted in a significant decrease in EM under the two RCPs. The uncertainty of O3-related EM estimates was mainly caused by RCP scenarios, whereas that of PM2.5-related EMs was mainly from concentration-response functions. CONCLUSION: EM estimates attributable to climate change-induced air pollution change as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space, and so are the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective mitigation and adaptation policy.

  12. Transcription factor-based biosensors for detecting dicarboxylic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Jeffrey; Keasling, Jay

    2014-02-18

    The invention provides methods and compositions for detecting dicarboxylic acids using a transcription factor biosensor.

  13. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  14. Human Factors for Situation Assessment in Grid Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttromson, Ross T.; Schur, Anne; Greitzer, Frank L.; Paget, Mia L.

    2007-08-08

    Executive Summary Despite advances in technology, power system operators must assimilate overwhelming amounts of data to keep the grid operating. Analyses of recent blackouts have clearly demonstrated the need to enhance the operators situation awareness (SA). The long-term objective of this research is to integrate valuable technologies into the grid operator environment that support decision making under normal and abnormal operating conditions and remove non-technical barriers to enable the optimum use of these technologies by individuals working alone and as a team. More specifically, the research aims to identify methods and principles to increase SA of grid operators in the context of system conditions that are representative or common across many operating entities and develop operationally relevant experimental methods for studying technologies and operational practices which contribute to SA. With increasing complexity and interconnectivity of the grid, the scope and complexity of situation awareness have grown. New paradigms are needed to guide research and tool development aimed to enhance and improve operations. In reviewing related research, operating practices, systems, and tools, the present study established a taxonomy that provides a perspective on research and development surrounding power grid situation awareness and clarifies the field of human factors/SA for grid operations. Information sources that we used to identify critical factors underlying SA included interviews with experienced operational personnel, available historical summaries and transcripts of abnormal conditions and outages (e.g., the August 14, 2003 blackout), scientific literature, and operational policies/procedures and other documentation. Our analysis of August 2003 blackout transcripts and interviews adopted a different perspective than previous analyses of this material, and we complemented this analysis with additional interviews. Based on our analysis and a broad

  15. High quality factor nanocrystalline diamond micromechanical resonators limited by thermoelastic damping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najar, Hadi; Chan, Mei-Lin; Yang, Hsueh-An; Lin, Liwei; Cahill, David G.; Horsley, David A.

    2014-04-14

    We demonstrate high quality factor thin-film nanocrystalline diamond micromechanical resonators with quality factors limited by thermoelastic damping. Cantilevers, single-anchored and double-anchored double-ended tuning forks, were fabricated from 2.5??m thick in-situ boron doped nanocrystalline diamond films deposited using hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Thermal conductivity measured by time-domain thermoreflectance resulted in 24??3?W m{sup ?1} K{sup ?1} for heat transport through the thickness of the diamond film. The resonant frequencies of the fabricated resonators were 46?kHz8?MHz and showed a maximum measured Q???86?000 at f{sub n}?=?46.849?kHz. The measured Q-factors are shown to be in good agreement with the limit imposed by thermoelastic dissipation calculated using the measured thermal conductivity. The mechanical properties extracted from resonant frequency measurements indicate a Young's elastic modulus of ?788?GPa, close to that of microcrystalline diamond.

  16. Hamilton study: distribution of factors confounding the relationship between air quality and respiratory health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pengelly, L.D.; Kerigan, A.T.; Goldsmith, C.H.; Inman, E.M.

    1984-10-01

    Hamilton, Ontario is an industrial city with a population of 300,000 which is situated at the western end of Lake Ontario. Canada's two largest iron and steel mills are located here; the city historically has had relatively poor air quality, which has improved markedly in the last 25 years. Concern about the health effects of current air quality recently led us to carry out an epidemiological study of the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of over 3500 school children. Respiratory health was measured by pulmonary function testing of each child, and by an assessment of each child's respiratory symptoms via a questionnaire administered to the parents. Previous studies had shown that other environmental factors (e.g. parental smoking, parental cough, socioeconomic level, housing, and gas cooking) might also affect respiratory health, and thus confound any potential relationships between health and air pollution. The questionnaire also collected information on many of these confounding factors. For the purposes of initial analysis, the city was divided into five areas in which differences in air quality were expected. In general, factors which have been associated with poor respiratory health were observed to be more prevalent in areas of poorer air quality.

  17. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry's practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  18. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, B.

    1991-12-31

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry`s practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  19. Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives (February 11 2016)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives February 11, 2016.

  20. Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Committee on Appropriations United States House of Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Committee on Appropriations United States House of Representatives (March 18, 2015)

  1. Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives (March 24, 2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives March 24, 2015

  2. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before the US House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power, May 9, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power,...

  3. Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) Demonstration Using a Representative Savannah River Site Sludge Simulant On the Large-Size Pilot Platform at the CEA-Marcoule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girold, C.; Delaunay, M.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Lacombe, J. [CEA Marcoule, CEA/DEN/DTCD/SCDV, 30 (France); Marra, S.; Peeler, D.; Herman, C.; Smith, M.; Edwards, R.; Barnes, A.; Stone, M. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Washington Savannah River Company, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States); Iverson, D. [Liquid Waste Operations, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), Aiken, SC (United States); Do Quang, R. [AREVA NC, Tour AREVA, 92 - Paris La Defense (France); Tchemitcheff, E. [AREVA Federal Services LLC, Richland Office, Richland, WA (United States); Veyer, C. [Consultant, 59 - Saint Waast la Vallee (France)

    2008-07-01

    The cold-crucible induction melter technology (CCIM) is considered worldwide for industrial implementation to overcome the current limits of high level waste vitrification technologies and to answer future challenges such as: new or difficult sludge compositions, need for improving waste loading, need for high temperatures, and corrosive effluents. More particularly, this technology is being considered for implementation at the US DOE Savannah River site to increase the rate of waste processing while reducing the number of HLW canisters to be produced through increased waste loading and improved waste throughput. A collaborative program involving AREVA, CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission), SRNL (Savannah River National Laboratory) and WSRC (Washington Savannah River Company) has thus been initiated in 2007 to demonstrate vitrification with waste loadings on the order of 50% (versus the current DWPF waste loading of about 35%) with a PUREX-type waste composition (high Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composition), and to perform two pilot-scale runs on the large size platform equipped with a 650 mm diameter CCIM at the CEA Marcoule. The objectives of the demonstrations were 1) to show the feasibility of processing a representative SRS sludge surrogate using continuous slurry feeding, 2) to produce a glass that would meet the acceptance specifications with an increased waste loading when compared to what is presently achieved at the DWPF, and 3) achieve improved waste throughputs. This presentation describes the platform and the very encouraging results obtained from the demonstration performed at temperatures, specific throughputs and waste loadings that overcome current DWPF limits. Results from the initial exploratory run and second demonstration run include 1) production of a glass product that achieved the targeted glass composition that was more durable than the standard Environmental Assessment (EA) glass, 2) successful slurry feeding of the CCIM, and 3) promising waste

  4. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish; Minniti, Ronaldo; Parry, Marie I.; Skopec, Marlene

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 m

  5. Poster — Thur Eve — 03: Application of the non-negative matrix factorization technique to [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ dynamic PET data for the early detection of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Dong-Chang; Jans, Hans; McEwan, Sandy; Riauka, Terence; Martin, Wayne; Wieler, Marguerite

    2014-08-15

    In this work, a class of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) technique known as alternating non-negative least squares, combined with the projected gradient method, is used to analyze twenty-five [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ dynamic PET/CT brain data. For each subject, a two-factor model is assumed and two factors representing the striatum (factor 1) and the non-striatum (factor 2) tissues are extracted using the proposed NMF technique and commercially available factor analysis software “Pixies”. The extracted factor 1 and 2 curves represent the binding site of the radiotracer and describe the uptake and clearance of the radiotracer by soft tissues in the brain, respectively. The proposed NMF technique uses prior information about the dynamic data to obtain sample time-activity curves representing the striatum and the non-striatum tissues. These curves are then used for “warm” starting the optimization. Factor solutions from the two methods are compared graphically and quantitatively. In healthy subjects, radiotracer uptake by factors 1 and 2 are approximately 35–40% and 60–65%, respectively. The solutions are also used to develop a factor-based metric for the detection of early, untreated Parkinson's disease. The metric stratifies healthy subjects from suspected Parkinson's patients (based on the graphical method). The analysis shows that both techniques produce comparable results with similar computational time. The “semi-automatic” approach used by the NMF technique allows clinicians to manually set a starting condition for “warm” starting the optimization in order to facilitate control and efficient interaction with the data.

  6. Various factors affect coiled tubing limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-01-15

    Safety and reliability remain the primary concerns in coiled tubing operations. Factors affecting safety and reliability include corrosion, flexural bending, internal (or external) pressure and tension (or compression), and mechanical damage due to improper use. Such limits as coiled tubing fatigue, collapse, and buckling need to be understood to avoid disaster. With increased use of coiled tubing, operators will gain more experience. But at the same time, with further research and development of coiled tubing, the manufacturing quality will be improved and fatigue, collapse, and buckling models will become more mature, and eventually standard specifications will be available. This paper reviews the uses of coiled tubing and current research on mechanical behavior of said tubing. It also discusses several models used to help predict fatigue and failure levels.

  7. Chiral corrections to hyperon axial form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Fujiun; Tiburzi, B. C.

    2008-05-01

    We study the complete set of flavor-changing hyperon axial-current matrix elements at small momentum transfer. Using partially quenched heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, we derive the chiral and momentum behavior of the axial and induced pseudoscalar form factors. The meson pole contributions to the latter posses a striking signal for chiral physics. We argue that the study of hyperon axial matrix elements enables a systematic lattice investigation of the efficacy of three-flavor chiral expansions in the baryon sector. This can be achieved by considering chiral corrections to SU(3) symmetry predictions, and their partially quenched generalizations. In particular, despite the presence of eight unknown low-energy constants, we are able to make next-to-leading order symmetry breaking predictions for two linear combinations of axial charges.

  8. Form factors and complete spectrum of XXX antiperiodic higher spin chains by quantum separation of variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niccoli, G.

    2013-05-15

    The antiperiodic transfer matrices associated to higher spin representations of the rational 6-vertex Yang-Baxter algebra are analyzed by generalizing the approach introduced recently in the framework of Sklyanin's quantum separation of variables (SOV) for cyclic representations, spin-1/2 highest weight representations, and also for spin-1/2 representations of the 6-vertex reflection algebra. Such SOV approach allow us to derive exactly results which represent complicate tasks for more traditional methods based on Bethe ansatz and Baxter Q-operator. In particular, we both prove the completeness of the SOV characterization of the transfer matrix spectrum and its simplicity. Then, the derived characterization of local operators by Sklyanin's quantum separate variables and the expression of the scalar products of separate states by determinant formulae allow us to compute the form factors of the local spin operators by one determinant formulae similar to those of the scalar products.

  9. Identification and Control of Factors that Affect EGR Cooler Fouling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Key factors that cause exhaust gas recirculation cooler fouling were identified through extensive literature search and controlled experiment was devised to study the impact of a few key factors on deposition.

  10. A new friction factor correlation for laminar, single-phase flows through rock fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazridoust, K. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY); Ahmadi, G. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY); Smith, D.H.

    2006-09-30

    Single-phase flow through fractured media occurs in various situations, such as transport of dissolved contaminants through geological strata, sequestration of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs, and in primary oil recovery. In the present study, fluid flows through a rock fracture were simulated. The fracture geometry was obtained from the CT scans of a rock fracture produced by the Brazilian method in a sandstone sample. A post-processing code using a CAD package was developed and used to generate the three-dimensional fracture from the CT scan data. Several sections along the fracture were considered and the GambitTM code was used to generate unstructured grids for flow simulations. FLUENTTM was used to analyze the flow conditions through the fracture section for different flow rates. Because of the small aperture of the fractures, the gravitational effects could be neglected. It was confirmed that the pressure drop was dominated by the smallest aperture passages of the fracture. The accuracy of parallel plate models for estimating the pressure drops through fractures was studied. It was shown that the parallel plate flow model with the use of an appropriate effective fracture aperture and inclusion of the tortuosity factor could provide reasonable estimates for pressure drops in the fracture. On the basis of the CFD simulation data, a new expression for the friction factor for flows through fractures was developed. The new model predictions were compared with the simulation results and favorable agreement was found. It was shown that when the length of the fracture and the mean and standard deviation of the fracture are known, the pressure loss as a function of the flow rate could be estimated. These findings may prove useful for design of lab experiments, computational studied of flows through real rock fractures, or inclusions in simulators for large-scale flows in highly fractured rocks.

  11. Confinement and the safety factor profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; Scott, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    The conjecture that the safety factor profile, q(r), controls the improvement in tokamak plasmas from poor confinement in the Low (L-) mode regime to improved confinement in the supershot regime has been tested in two experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First, helium was puffed into the beam-heated phase of a supershot discharge which induced a degradation from supershot to L-mode confinement in about 100 msec, far less than the current relaxation time. The q and shear profiles measured by a motional Stark effect polarimeter showed little change during the confinement degradation. Second, rapid current ramps in supershot plasmas altered the q profile, but were observed not to change significantly the energy confinement. Thus, enhanced confinement in supershot plasmas is not due to a particular q profile which has enhanced stability or transport properties. The discharges making a continuous transition between supershot and L-mode confinement were also used to test the critical-electron-temperature-gradient transport model. It was found that this model could not reproduce the large changes in electron and ion temperature caused by the change in confinement.

  12. Human Factors Aspects of Operating Small Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Deem, R.; Xing, J.; DAgostino, A.

    2010-11-07

    The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. They are considering small modular reactors (SMRs) as one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants, and so may require a concept of operations (ConOps) that also is different. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has begun examining the human factors engineering- (HFE) and ConOps- aspects of SMRs; if needed, they will formulate guidance to support SMR licensing reviews. We developed a ConOps model, consisting of the following dimensions: Plant mission; roles and responsibilities of all agents; staffing, qualifications, and training; management of normal operations; management of off-normal conditions and emergencies; and, management of maintenance and modifications. We are reviewing information on SMR design to obtain data about each of these dimensions, and have identified several preliminary issues. In addition, we are obtaining operations-related information from other types of multi-module systems, such as refineries, to identify lessons learned from their experience. Here, we describe the project's methodology and our preliminary findings.

  13. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  14. Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasiolek, Maryla A.

    2000-12-21

    The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to development of the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postclosure nominal performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations concerned twenty-four radionuclides. This selection included sixteen radionuclides that may be significant nominal performance dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, five additional radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure, and three relatively short-lived radionuclides important for the human intrusion scenario. Consideration of radionuclide buildup in soil caused by previous irrigation with contaminated groundwater was taken into account in the BDCF development. The effect of climate evolution, from the current arid conditions to a wetter and cooler climate, on the BDCF values was evaluated. The analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. Calculations of nominal performance BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. BDCFs for the nominal performance, when combined with the concentrations of radionuclides in groundwater allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculated estimates of radionuclide concentration in groundwater result from the saturated zone modeling. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) to calculate doses to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

  15. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W.; Adhikari, K.; Afanasev, A.; Amaryan, M.; Anderson, M.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W.; Burkert, V.; Carman, D.; Careccia, S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Gilfoyle, G.; Giovanetti, K.; Girod, F.; Goetz, J.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.; Griffioen, K.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D.; Ishkhanov, B.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Kalantarians, N.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacGregor, I.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M.; Meyer, C.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, E.; Smith, G.; Sober, D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Wood, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z.; Zonta, I.

    2015-02-10

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GpE, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GpE from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentum transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ε at Q2=1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2≈1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.

  16. Astrophysical S factors for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2011-03-15

    Within the potential cluster model where orbital states are classified according to Young diagrams and isospin, astrophysical S factors are considered for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei at energies of up to 1 and 10 keV, respectively. It is shown that the approach used, which takes into account only the E1 transition for the p{sup 3}H capture process, makes it possible to describe well the most recent experimental data at c.m. energies in the range from 50 keV to 5MeV. In the case of proton capture by {sup 7}Li nuclei, an M1 processwas taken into account in addition to the E1 transition, and a general behavior and the magnitude of the experimental S factor could be correctly reproduced owing to this at astrophysical energies, including the region around the resonance at 0.441 MeV (in the laboratory frame).

  17. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W.; Adhikari, K.; Afanasev, A.; et al

    2015-02-10

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GpE, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GpE from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentummore » transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ε at Q2=1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2≈1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.« less

  18. Factors influencing the transport of actinides in the groundwater environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Kittrick, J.A.

    1983-07-31

    This report summarizes investigations of factors that significantly influence the transport of actinide cations in the groundwater environment. Briefly, measurements of diffusion coefficients for Am(III), Cm(III), and Np(V) in moist US soils indicated that diffusion is negligible compared to mass transport in flowing groundwater. Diffusion coefficients do, however, indicate that, in the absence of flowing water, actinide elements will migrate only a few centimeters in a thousand years. The remaining investigations were devoted to the determination of distribution ratios (K/sub d/s) for representative US soils, factors influencing them, and chemical and physical processes related to transport of actinides in groundwaters. The computer code GARD was modified to include complex formation to test the importance of humic acid complexing on the rate of transport of actinides in groundwaters. Use of the formation constant and a range of humic acid, even at rather low concentrations of 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -6/ molar, significantly increases the actinide transport rate in a flowing aquifer. These computer calculations show that any strong complexing agent will have a similar effect on actinide transport in the groundwater environment. 32 references, 9 figures.

  19. H. R. 5904: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide tax relief to utilities installing acid rain reduction equipment, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, October 23, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on October 23, 1990 to control acid rain. This legislation focuses on tax credit for equipment to meet acid rain reduction standards, as well as tax-exempt financing of acid rain control property. In addition, a tax credit is issued for minerals used to reduce the sulfur in coal.

  20. Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014, to discuss the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 budget for the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

  1. Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 17, 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 17, 2015, to discuss the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 budget for the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

  2. Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Cook, Jeremy L.

    1999-01-01

    A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

  3. Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project The scope of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) needs to comprehensively address a wide range of environmental management risks at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORO). Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (227.35 KB) More Documents & Publications Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge

  4. Fragmentation, NRQCD and Factorization in Heavy Quarkonium Production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    However, we show that gauge invariance and factorization require that conventional NRQCD production matrix elements be modified to include Wilson lines or non-abelian gauge links. ...

  5. Electromagnetic form factors and the hypercentral constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanctis, M. De; Giannini, M. M.; Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A.

    2007-12-15

    We present new results concerning the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon using a relativistic version of the hypercentral constituent quark model and a relativistic current.

  6. A Compendium of Transfer Factors for Agricultural and Animal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tables of transfer factors are listed by element and information source for beef, eggs, fish, fruit, grain, leafy vegetation, milk, poultry, and root vegetables. Authors: Staven, ...

  7. Analytical evaluation of atomic form factors: Application to Rayleigh scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safari, L.; Santos, J. P.; Amaro, P.; Jnkl, K.; Fratini, F.

    2015-05-15

    Atomic form factors are widely used for the characterization of targets and specimens, from crystallography to biology. By using recent mathematical results, here we derive an analytical expression for the atomic form factor within the independent particle model constructed from nonrelativistic screened hydrogenic wave functions. The range of validity of this analytical expression is checked by comparing the analytically obtained form factors with the ones obtained within the Hartee-Fock method. As an example, we apply our analytical expression for the atomic form factor to evaluate the differential cross section for Rayleigh scattering off neutral atoms.

  8. Factors Affecting Power Output by Photovoltaic Cells Lesson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors Affecting Power Output by Photovoltaic Cells Grade Level(s): IB 2 (Senior - 3 ... C.8 Photovoltaic cells and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) Understandings: * Solar ...

  9. Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Russia Jump to: navigation, search Name Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia AgencyCompany Organization European Bank for Reconstruction and...

  10. EPA Rainfall Erosivity Factor Calculator Website | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Calculator Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Rainfall Erosivity Factor Calculator Website Abstract This website allows...

  11. EPA - Rainfall Erosivity Factor Calculator webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for EPA - Rainfall Erosivity Factor Calculator webpage Citation Environmental...

  12. Critical Factors Driving the High Volumetric Uptake of Methane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Factors Driving the High Volumetric Uptake of Methane in Cu-3(btc)(2) Previous Next List Hulvey, Zeric; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Mason, Jarad A.; Tsivion, Ehud; Dougherty,...

  13. Factors Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions Factors Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions Presentation given at the 16th Directions in ...

  14. Identification and Control of Factors that Affect EGR Cooler...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Key factors that cause exhaust gas recirculation cooler fouling were identified through extensive literature search and controlled experiment was devised to study the impact of a ...

  15. SU-F-BRE-01: A Rapid Method to Determine An Upper Limit On a Radiation Detector's Correction Factor During the QA of IMRT Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamio, Y; Bouchard, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Discrepancies in the verification of the absorbed dose to water from an IMRT plan using a radiation dosimeter can be wither caused by 1) detector specific nonstandard field correction factors as described by the formalism of Alfonso et al. 2) inaccurate delivery of the DQA plan. The aim of this work is to develop a simple/fast method to determine an upper limit on the contribution of composite field correction factors to these discrepancies. Methods: Indices that characterize the non-flatness of the symmetrised collapsed delivery (VSC) of IMRT fields over detector-specific regions of interest were shown to be correlated with IMRT field correction factors. The indices introduced are the uniformity index (UI) and the mean fluctuation index (MF). Each one of these correlation plots have 10 000 fields generated with a stochastic model. A total of eight radiation detectors were investigated in the radial orientation. An upper bound on the correction factors was evaluated by fitting values of high correction factors for a given index value. Results: These fitted curves can be used to compare the performance of radiation dosimeters in composite IMRT fields. Highly water-equivalent dosimeters like the scintillating detector (Exradin W1) and a generic alanine detector have been found to have corrections under 1% over a broad range of field modulations (0 – 0.12 for MF and 0 – 0.5 for UI). Other detectors have been shown to have corrections of a few percent over this range. Finally, a full Monte Carlo simulations of 18 clinical and nonclinical IMRT field showed good agreement with the fitted curve for the A12 ionization chamber. Conclusion: This work proposes a rapid method to evaluate an upper bound on the contribution of correction factors to discrepancies found in the verification of DQA plans.

  16. Nuclear factor-?B is a common upstream signal for growth differentiation factor-5 expression in brown adipocytes exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines and palmitate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Iezaki, Takashi; Ozaki, Kakeru; Yoneda, Yukio

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: GDF5 expression is up-regulated by IL-1?, TNF-? and palmitate in brown pre-adipocytes. NF-?B stimulates promoter activity and expression of GDF5 in brown pre-adipocytes. Recruitment of NF-?B to the GDF5 promoter is facilitated in BAT from ob/ob mice. An NF-?B inhibitor prevents upregulation of GDF5 expression in brown pre-adipocytes. - Abstract: We have previously demonstrated that genetic and acquired obesity similarly led to drastic upregulation in brown adipose tissue (BAT), rather than white adipose tissue, of expression of both mRNA and corresponding protein for the bone morphogenic protein/growth differentiation factor (GDF) member GDF5 capable of promoting brown adipogenesis. In this study, we evaluated expression profiles of GDF5 in cultured murine brown pre-adipocytes exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines and free fatty acids (FFAs), which are all shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of obesity. Both interleukin-1? (IL-1?) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) were effective in up-regulating GDF5 expression in a concentration-dependent manner, while similar upregulation was seen in cells exposed to the saturated FFA palmitate, but not to the unsaturated FFA oleate. In silico analysis revealed existence of the putative nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) binding site in the 5?-flanking region of mouse GDF5, whereas introduction of NF-?B subunits drastically facilitated both promoter activity and expression of GDF5 in brown pre-adipocytes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed significant facilitation of the recruitment of NF-?B to the GDF5 promoter in lysed extracts of BAT from leptin-deficient ob/ob obese mice. Upregulation o GDF5 expression was invariably inhibited by an NF-?B inhibitor in cultured brown pre-adipocytes exposed to IL-1?, TNF-? and palmitate. These results suggest that obesity leads to upregulation of GDF5 expression responsible for the promotion of brown adipogenesis through a mechanism relevant to activation of the

  17. Multi-factor Authentication Update | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multi-factor Authentication Update There is a delay in the purchase of the multi-factor authentication software solution that will cause a lag in the planned implementation. The Laboratory is currently in negotiations to complete the purchase. Once complete, the implementation can begin.

  18. Consideration of Factors Affecting Strip Effluent PH and Sodium Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  19. Scaling factor inconsistencies in neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowell, S. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half-life can be suppressed by 15%-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, is overestimated.

  20. View Factor Calculation for Three-Dimensional Geometries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-06-20

    Version 00 MCVIEW calculates the radiation geometric view factor between surfaces for three dimensional geometries with and without interposed third surface obstructions. It was developed to calculate view factors for input data to heat transfer analysis programs such as SCA-03/TRUMP, SCA-01/HEATING-5 and PSR-199/HEATING-6.

  1. FAQS Job Task Analyses- Facility Representative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

  2. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Spencer D.; Morton, Dana K.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  3. The Representative Concentration Pathways: An Overview (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): PNNL-SA-79134 Journal ID: ISSN 0165-0009; CLCHDX; KP1703030; TRN: US201122%%706 DOE Contract Number: AC05-76RL01830 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource ...

  4. Arkansas Converter Station Alternative Siting Area Representative...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... LOWER HATCHIE NWR HATCHIE NWR CHICKASAW NWR Creek WMA Eagle Lake Refuge WMA Lucias E. John Tully WMA Wolf River WMA Eagle Lake Refuge WMA St. Francis Sunken Lands WMA HENNING ...

  5. DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CH2M HILL PLATEAU REMEDIATION COMPANY, LIMTED TO NUCLEAR FACILITY D&D PBS RL-040, FFTF RL-042 AND WASTE & FUELS RL-013 FRENCH, MARK DE-AC06-08RL14788 CPRC DE-AC06-08RL14788, ...

  6. 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...resa.robbins@rfets.gov Robin Ron AL LAAO (505) 667-4548 (505) 665-9230 rrobin@doeal.gov Ross Bill AL AAO (806) 477-7239 (806) 477-6987 wross@pantex.com Schierman Kerry RL SNF (509) ...

  7. 1997 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (925) 423-7567 henry.rio@oak.doe.gov Rose Grady AL AAO (505) 477-3162 grose@pantex.com Ross Bill AL AAO (806) 477-7239 wross@pantex.com Seaborg Don RL PFP (509) 372-2889 ...

  8. DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carosino 02102010 BNI DE-AC2701RV14136 Bill Hamel 02052013 BNI DE-AC2701RV14136 Ben Harp 07272012 BNI DE-AC2701RV14136 Delmar Noyes 07272012 BNI DE-AC2701RV14136 Gary Olsen...

  9. FAQS Qualification Card – Facility Representative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A key element for the Department’s Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA).

  10. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Hardin Valley varsity tennis team the past three years. Sophia is interested in medicine and health sciences and is thinking about a career in medicine. She is currently the...

  11. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data Research Org: Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Rdige,...

  12. house of representatives | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Congressmen tour Y-12 facilities During a recent visit to the Y-12 National Security Complex, Rep. Mike Simpson (R-Idaho), chairman of the House Energy and Water Appropriations ...

  13. Understanding and representing natural language meaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, D.L.; Maran, L.R.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dinitz, R.; Farwell, D.

    1982-12-01

    During this contract period the authors have: (a) continued investigation of events and actions by means of representation schemes called 'event shape diagrams'; (b) written a parsing program which selects appropriate word and sentence meanings by a parallel process known as activation and inhibition; (c) begun investigation of the point of a story or event by modeling the motivations and emotional behaviors of story characters; (d) started work on combining and translating two machine-readable dictionaries into a lexicon and knowledge base which will form an integral part of our natural language understanding programs; (e) made substantial progress toward a general model for the representation of cognitive relations by comparing English scene and event descriptions with similar descriptions in other languages; (f) constructed a general model for the representation of tense and aspect of verbs; (g) made progress toward the design of an integrated robotics system which accepts English requests, and uses visual and tactile inputs in making decisions and learning new tasks.

  14. Facility Representative Program Outstanding at ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Having basic knowledge and meeting technical competencies related to Nuclear Fundamentals, ... competencies related to specific engineering principles, such as: steam system ...

  15. Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... knowledge of chemistry fundamentals in the areas of ... water prior to use in nuclear and non-nuclear systems. e. ... working level knowledge of engineering prints and drawings. ...

  16. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Honor Society, and she is involved with Project U, a club that stands against bullying. She is on the girls' powderpuff football team, and in her free time, she enjoys...

  17. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  18. Hazardous-waste cleanup and enforcement problems: Indiana. Hearing before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session, June 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Thirteen witnesses representing the private and public sectors testified at a Seymour, Indiana hearing on hazardous materials at the Seymour Recycling facility and efforts to clean up the site. The facility began operations in 1968, and was closed down in February of 1980; the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had discovered during 1978 that the company was not disposing of its chemical wastes properly. Local concerns focused on why the EPA efforts slowed noticeably in the spring of 1981 and whether the site qualifies for superfund financing. Spokesmen from EPA argued that the slowdown was due to inaction at the state level, but state representatives countered that the problem was a lack of state funds to match federal funding. Other witnesses pursued health and safety issues and the efforts Seymour citizens have made to gain relief. (DCK)

  19. Applying Human Factors Evaluation and Design Guidance to a Nuclear Power Plant Digital Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Ulrich; Ronald Boring; William Phoenix; Emily Dehority; Tim Whiting; Jonathan Morrell; Rhett Backstrom

    2012-08-01

    The United States (U.S.) nuclear industry, like similar process control industries, has moved toward upgrading its control rooms. The upgraded control rooms typically feature digital control system (DCS) displays embedded in the panels. These displays gather information from the system and represent that information on a single display surface. In this manner, the DCS combines many previously separate analog indicators and controls into a single digital display, whereby the operators can toggle between multiple windows to monitor and control different aspects of the plant. The design of the DCS depends on the function of the system it monitors, but revolves around presenting the information most germane to an operator at any point in time. DCSs require a carefully designed human system interface. This report centers on redesigning existing DCS displays for an example chemical volume control system (CVCS) at a U.S. nuclear power plant. The crucial nature of the CVCS, which controls coolant levels and boration in the primary system, requires a thorough human factors evaluation of its supporting DCS. The initial digital controls being developed for the DCSs tend to directly mimic the former analog controls. There are, however, unique operator interactions with a digital vs. analog interface, and the differences have not always been carefully factored in the translation of an analog interface to a replacement DCS. To ensure safety, efficiency, and usability of the emerging DCSs, a human factors usability evaluation was conducted on a CVCS DCS currently being used and refined at an existing U.S. nuclear power plant. Subject matter experts from process control engineering, software development, and human factors evaluated the DCS displays to document potential usability issues and propose design recommendations. The evaluation yielded 167 potential usability issues with the DCS. These issues should not be considered operator performance problems but rather opportunities

  20. Model-independent plotting of the cosmological scale factor as a function of lookback time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ringermacher, H. I.; Mead, L. R., E-mail: ringerha@gmail.com, E-mail: Lawrence.mead@usm.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    In this work we describe a model-independent method of developing a plot of scale factor a(t) versus lookback time t{sub L} from the usual Hubble diagram of modulus data against redshift. This is the first plot of this type. We follow the model-independent methodology of Daly and Djorgovski used for their radio-galaxy data. Once the a(t)data plot is completed, any model can be applied and will display as described in the standard literature. We then compile an extensive data set to z = 1.8 by combining Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) data from SNLS3 of Conley et al., high-z SNe data of Riess et al., and radio-galaxy data of Daly and Djorgovski to validate the new plot. We first display these data on a standard Hubble diagram to confirm the best fit for ?CDM cosmology, and thus validate the joined data set. The scale factor plot is then developed from the data and the ?CDM model is again displayed from a least-squares fit. The fit parameters are in agreement with the Hubble diagram fit confirming the validity of the new plot. Of special interest is the transition time of the universe, which in the scale factor plot will appear as an inflection point in the data set. Noise is more visible in this presentation, which is particularly sensitive to inflection points of any model displayed in the plot, unlike on a modulus-z diagram, where there are no inflection points and the transition-z is not at all obvious by inspection. We obtain a lower limit of z ? 0.6. It is evident from this presentation that there is a dearth of SNe data in the range z = 1-2, exactly the range necessary to confirm a ?CDM transition-z around z = 0.76. We then compare a 'toy model' wherein dark matter is represented as a perfect fluid with an equation of state p = (1/3) ? to demonstrate the plot sensitivity to model choice. Its density varies as 1/t {sup 2} and it enters the Friedmann equations as ?{sub dark}/t {sup 2}, replacing only the ?{sub dark}/a {sup 3} term. The toy model is a close match to

  1. Lifestyle Factors in U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanquist, Thomas F.; Orr, Heather M.; Shui, Bin; Bittner, Alvah C.

    2012-03-30

    A multivariate statistical approach to lifestyle analysis of residential electricity consumption is described and illustrated. Factor analysis of selected variables from the 2005 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) identified five lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices associated with air conditioning, laundry usage, personal computer usage, climate zone of residence, and TV use. These factors were also estimated for 2001 RECS data. Multiple regression analysis using the lifestyle factors yields solutions accounting for approximately 40% of the variance in electricity consumption for both years. By adding the associated household and market characteristics of income, local electricity price and access to natural gas, variance accounted for is increased to approximately 54%. Income contributed only {approx}1% unique variance to the 2005 and 2001 models, indicating that lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices better account for consumption differences than income. This was not surprising given the 4-fold range of energy use at differing income levels. Geographic segmentation of factor scores is illustrated, and shows distinct clusters of consumption and lifestyle factors, particularly in suburban locations. The implications for tailored policy and planning interventions are discussed in relation to lifestyle issues.

  2. Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard "Barney" Carlson; Matthew G. Shirk; Benjamin M. Geller

    2001-11-01

    Primary Factors that Impact the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles RICHARD ‘BARNEY’ CARLSON, MATTHEW G. SHIRK Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption as compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICE) by utilizing electrical energy for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEV’s, analysis has shown that the fuel consumption of PHEV’s is more significantly affected than conventional vehicles by either the driver’s input or by the environmental inputs around the vehicle. Six primary factors have been identified that significantly affect the fuel consumption of PHEV’s. In this paper, these primary factors are analyzed from on-road driving and charging data from over 200 PHEV’s throughout North America that include Hymotion Prius conversions and Hybrids Plus Escape conversions. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) tests plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) vehicles as part of its conduct of DOE’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). In collaboration with its 75 testing partners located in 23 states and Canada, INL has collected data on 191 PHEVs, comprised of 12 different PHEV models (by battery manufacturer). With more than 1 million PHEV test miles accumulated to date, the PHEVs are fleet, track, and dynamometer tested. Six Primary Factors The six primary factors that significantly impact PHEV fuel consumption are listed below. Some of the factors are unique to plug-in vehicles while others are common for all types of vehicles. 1. Usable Electrical Energy is dictated by battery capacity, rate of depletion as well as when the vehicle was last plugged-in. With less electrical energy available the powertrain must use more petroleum to generate the required power output. 2. Driver Aggressiveness impacts the fuel consumption of nearly all vehicles but

  3. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  4. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  5. The structure of the nucleon: Elastic electromagnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punjabi, V.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Jones, M. K.; Brash, E. J.; Carlson, C. E.

    2015-07-10

    Precise proton and neutron form factor measurements at Jefferson Lab, using spin observables, have recently made a significant contribution to the unraveling of the internal structure of the nucleon. Accurate experimental measurements of the nucleon form factors are a test-bed for understanding how the nucleon's static properties and dynamical behavior emerge from QCD, the theory of the strong interactions between quarks. There has been enormous theoretical progress, since the publication of the Jefferson Lab proton form factor ratio data, aiming at reevaluating the picture of the nucleon. We will review the experimental and theoretical developments in this field and discuss the outlook for the future.

  6. CDPHE Construction Storm Water Forms R-Factor Waiver Application...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CDPHE Construction Storm Water Forms R-Factor Waiver Application Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Permit ApplicationPermit...

  7. Hadronic Form Factors in Asymptotically Free Field Theories

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Gross, D. J.; Treiman, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    The breakdown of Bjorken scaling in asymptotically free gauge theories of the strong interactions is explored for its implications on the large q{sup 2} behavior of nucleon form factors. Duality arguments of Bloom and Gilman suggest a connection between the form factors and the threshold properties of the deep inelastic structure functions. The latter are addressed directly in an analysis of asymptotically free theories; and through the duality connection we are then led to statements about the form factors. For very large q{sup 2} the form factors are predicted to fall faster than any inverse power of q{sup 2}. For the more modest range of q{sup 2} reached in existing experiments the agreement with data is fairly good, though this may well be fortuitous. Extrapolations beyond this range are presented.

  8. Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from the U.S. EPA BASE Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings from the U.S. EPA BASE Study You ...

  9. Phenomenology of semileptonic B -meson decays with form factors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of semileptonic B -meson decays with form factors from lattice QCD Authors: Du, Daping ; El-Khadra, A. X. ; Gottlieb, Steven ; Kronfeld, A. S. ; Laiho, J. ; Lunghi, E. ; Van de...

  10. Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model explains a large proportion (low of 74% for Ni to high of 99% for Si) of the individual element data variance. Although the primary...

  11. Property:Geothermal/LoadFactor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "GeothermalLoadFactor" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR...

  12. Proton Form Factors Measurements in the Time-Like Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anulli, F.; /Frascati

    2007-10-22

    I present an overview of the measurement of the proton form factors in the time-like region. BABAR has recently measured with great accuracy the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} reaction from production threshold up to an energy of {approx} 4.5 GeV, finding evidence for a ratio of the electric to magnetic form factor greater than unity, contrary to expectation. In agreement with previous measurements, BABAR confirmed the steep rise of the magnetic form factor close to the p{bar p} mass threshold, suggesting the possible presence of an under-threshold N{bar N} vector state. These and other open questions related to the nucleon form factors both in the time-like and space-like region, wait for more data with different experimental techniques to be possibly solved.

  13. Dissipation factor as a predictor of anodic coating performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, Janda K. G.

    1995-01-01

    A dissipation factor measurement is used to predict as-anodized fixture performance prior to actual use of the fixture in an etching environment. A dissipation factor measurement of the anodic coating determines its dielectric characteristics and correlates to the performance of the anodic coating in actual use. The ability to predict the performance of the fixture and its anodized coating permits the fixture to be repaired or replaced prior to complete failure.

  14. Classical strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. V. Structure factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Sungtae; Zahed, Ismail

    2010-10-15

    We show that the classical and strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma is characterized by a multiple of structure factors that obey generalized Orstein-Zernicke equations. We use the canonical partition function and its associated density functional to derive analytical equations for the density and charge monopole structure factors for arbitrary values of {Gamma}=V/K, the ratio of the mean potential to the Coulomb energy. The results are compared with SU(2) molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Charm and bottom hadronic form factors with QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracco, M. E.; Rodrigues, B. O.; Cerqueira, A. Jr.

    2013-03-25

    We present a brief review of some calculations of form factors and coupling constants in vertices with charm and bottom mesons in the framework of QCD sum rules. We first discuss the motivation for this work, describing possible applications of these form factors to charm and bottom decays processes. We first make a summarize of the QCD sum rules method. We give special attention to the uncertainties of the method introducing by the intrinsic variation of the parameters. Finally we conclude.

  16. Article Published on LED Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An article has been published in LEUKOS: The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) that may be of interest to the solid-state lighting community. Entitled "Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors: Consequences of Current Design Practices for LEDs," the article was written by Michael Royer of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and discusses complications related to the lamp lumen depreciation (LLD) light loss factor and LEDs.

  17. Constructing the S-matrix With Complex Factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Philip C.; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., ITP

    2009-06-19

    A remarkable connection between BCFW recursion relations and constraints on the S-matrix was made by Benincasa and Cachazo in 0705.4305, who noted that mutual consistency of different BCFW constructions of four-particle amplitudes generates nontrivial (but familiar) constraints on three-particle coupling constants - these include gauge invariance, the equivalence principle, and the lack of non-trivial couplings for spins > 2. These constraints can also be derived with weaker assumptions, by demanding the existence of four-point amplitudes that factorize properly in all unitarity limits with complex momenta. From this starting point, we show that the BCFW prescription can be interpreted as an algorithm for fully constructing a tree-level S-matrix, and that complex factorization of general BCFW amplitudes follows from the factorization of four-particle amplitudes. The allowed set of BCFW deformations is identified, formulated entirely as a statement on the three-particle sector, and using only complex factorization as a guide. Consequently, our analysis based on the physical consistency of the S-matrix is entirely independent of field theory. We analyze the case of pure Yang-Mills, and outline a proof for gravity. For Yang-Mills, we also show that the well-known scaling behavior of BCFW-deformed amplitudes at large z is a simple consequence of factorization. For gravity, factorization in certain channels requires asymptotic behavior {approx} 1/z{sup 2}.

  18. Ocean dumping of dredged material in the New York Bight Apex. Hearing before the Committee on Public Works and Transportation, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, April 11, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    New York City's proposal to dump contaminated dredge spoil six miles out in the Atlantic Ocean prompted a hearing on the possible environmental and economic effects. Test samples taken in 1981 showed unacceptable levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), while samples taken in 1983 were approved by the Army Corps of Engineers for dumping. Questions about the sampling procedures, siltation, and contamination of fish and beaches were raised. The 21 witnesses included local and state officials of the affected areas and representatives of the Corps, environmental groups, and the fishing industry. (DCK)

  19. Issues relating to overlapping Federal and state responsibilities for the oversight of the Surface Mining Law. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, October 26, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The hearing was called regarding the responsibilities of the state and Federal government in administering the Federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. With mining taking place in 27 states under a variety of conditions and practices, the Act encourages the states to assume primacy responsibility for regulating coal mining. Once a state's plan is approved, the Federal role becomes one of oversight. This hearing examines Pennsylvania's programs and what happens when there is a disagreement between state and Federal authorities. Testimony is presented from 12 witnesses, representing coal companies, electric power companies, Sierra Club, National Wildlife Federation, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, and West Virginia.

  20. Tenth anniversary of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Testimony was heard from representatives from the Society of American Archeology, the Office of Surface Mining and Reclamation Enforcement, the Office of Environmental Energy Management of Pennsylvania, National Wildlife Federation, Sierra Club, Western Organizations of Resource Councils, Southwest Research and Information Center, West Virginia Highlands Conservancy, Illinois South Project, Concern About Water Loss Due to Mining, Mountain Stream Monitors, Citizens Organized Against Longwalling, Environmental Policy Institute, Kentucky Fair Tax Coalition, Save Our Cumberland Mountains, Navajo Nation, several coal mining companies, the National Coal Association, and Small Coal Operator Advisory Council. Prepared statements from all witnesses plus additional materials are included.

  1. H. R. 3052: This Act may be cited as the Coal Field Water Protection and Replacement Act, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to provide for the protection of water resources during coal mining operations. Sections of the bill describe probable hydrologic consequences; surface and ground water monitoring plan; performance bonds; protection of water resources for permit approval; effect of underground coal mining operations; inspection and monitoring; penalty for failure of representative of Secretary or state regulatory authority to carry out certain duties; release of performance bond; water rights and replacement; regulations; and state programs.

  2. H. R. 2670: A bill to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to regulate ash from municipal solid waste incinerators as a hazardous waste, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, June 18, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on June 18, 1991 to amend the Solid Waste disposal Act to regulate ash from municipal solid waste incinerators as a hazardous waste. When garbage is burned, toxic materials are concentrated in the ash. If the ash is disposed of in a landfill, these toxic materials can contaminate the ground water or surface water by leaching toxic materials from the ash. In addition, disposing of contaminated ash improperly can pose a health hazard. New authority is provided for regulating incinerator ash as a hazardous waste.

  3. High-speed rail transportation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Transportation and Hazardous Materials of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, October 16, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    H.R. 1087 would authorize a high speed rail transportation development and commercialization program, establish a national high speed rail transportation policy, and promote development and commercialization of high speed rail transportation by providing Federal guarantees of certain investments in high speed rail transportation facilities. Testimony was heard from representatives of MAGLEV USA, Federal Railroad Administration, National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak), the Office of Technology Assessment, MAGLEV, Inc., National Maglev Initiative, High Speed Rail Association, and the Texas High-Speed Rail Association. Additional information was supplied by the Coalition of Northeastern Governors, Republic Locomotive, Washington State High Speed Ground Transportation, and the Texas High Speed Authority.

  4. Akirin1 (Mighty), a novel promyogenic factor regulates muscle regeneration and cell chemotaxis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salerno, Monica Senna; Dyer, Kelly; Bracegirdle, Jeremy; Platt, Leanne; Thomas, Mark; Siriett, Victoria; Kambadur, Ravi; School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore ; Sharma, Mridula

    2009-07-15

    Akirin1 (Mighty) is a downstream target gene of myostatin and has been shown to be a promyogenic factor. Although expressed in many tissues, akirin1 is negatively regulated by myostatin specifically in skeletal muscle tissue. In this manuscript we have characterized the possible function of akirin1 in postnatal muscle growth. Molecular and immunohistological analyses indicated that while low levels of akirin1 are associated with quiescent satellite cells (SC), higher levels of akirin1 are detected in activated proliferating SC indicating that akirin1 could be associated with satellite cell activation. In addition to SC, macrophages also express akirin1, and increased expression of akirin1 resulted in more efficient chemotaxis of both macrophages and myoblasts. Akirin1 appears to regulate chemotaxis of both macrophages and myoblasts by reorganising actin cytoskeleton, leading to more efficient lamellipodia formation via a PI3 kinase dependent pathway. Expression analysis during muscle regeneration also indicated that akirin1 expression is detected very early (day 2) in regenerating muscle, and expression gradually peaks to coincide the nascent myotube formation stage of muscle regeneration. Based on these results we propose that akirin1 could be acting as a transducer of early signals of muscle regeneration. Thus, we speculate that myostatin regulates key steps of muscle regeneration including chemotaxis of inflammatory cells, SC activation and migration through akirin1.

  5. Crystal structure of enterococcus faecalis sly A-like transcriptional factor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, R.; Zhang, R.; Zagnitko, O.; Dementieva, I.; Maltsev, N.; Watson, J. D.; Laskowski, R.; Gornicki, P.; Joachimiak, A.; Univ. of Chicago; European Bioinformatics Inst.

    2003-05-30

    The crystal structure of a SlyA transcriptional regulator at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution is presented, and structural relationships between members of the MarR/SlyA family are discussed. The SlyA family, which includes SlyA, Rap, Hor, and RovA proteins, is widely distributed in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Current evidence suggests that SlyA-like factors act as repressors, activators, and modulators of gene transcription. These proteins have been shown to up-regulate the expression of molecular chaperones, acid-resistance proteins, and cytolysin, and down-regulate several biosynthetic enzymes. The structure of SlyA from Enterococcus faecalis, determined as a part of an ongoing structural genomics initiative (www.mcsg.anl.gov), revealed the same winged helix DNA-binding motif that was recently found in the MarR repressor from Escherichia coli and the MexR repressor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a sequence homologue of MarR. Phylogenetic analysis of the MarR/SlyA family suggests that Sly is placed between the SlyA and MarR subfamilies and shows significant sequence similarity to members of both subfamilies.

  6. Critical factors in transitioning from fuel cell to cold fusion technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcgraw, T.F.; Davis, R.R.

    1998-07-01

    The fuel cell industry possesses much of the required manufacturing equipment and knowledge-base (e.g., proton conduction and hydrogen safety) necessary to develop cold fusion systems. Key factors in making a transition to cold fusion technology are discussed. Loading of reaction material can be provided by electrolytic charging and high gas over-pressure. Effective pressures over 10,000 atmospheres are required in cold fusion systems, giving a loading of H/M = 1; and a combination of loading methods is highly desirable. Systems must be designed to provide continuous flow of hydrogen ions ({much{underscore}gt}10{sup 17}/sec for ten kilowatts), with an input power source of 50 watts (est.). Cold fusion experiments have shown that helium is formed during the reaction, and physical changes occur in the reaction material. These revelations impact design and operation of cold fusion systems, as the reaction material must be replaced periodically, while the systems must maintain integrity during operation. Safety and cost are also highly important considerations.

  7. The dynamic shape factor of sodium chloride nanoparticles as regulated by drying rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z.; Lewis, E.; King, S. M.; Freney, E.; Rosenoern, T.; Smith, M.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Poschl, U.; Wang, W.; Buseck, P. R.; Martin, S. T.

    2010-09-01

    The influence of drying rate on the dynamic shape factor {chi} of NaCl particles was investigated. The drying rate at the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of 45% was controlled in a laminar flow tube and varied from 5.5 {+-} 0.9 to 101 {+-} 3 RH s{sup -1} at ERH, where RH represents one percent unit of relative humidity. Dry particles having mobility diameters of 23-84 nm were studied, corresponding to aqueous particles of 37-129 nm at the RH (57%) prior to drying. At each mobility diameter and drying rate, the critical supersaturation of cloud-condensation activation was also measured. The mobility diameter and the critical supersaturation were combined in an analysis to determine the value of {chi}. The measured values varied from 1.02 to 1.26. For fixed particle diameter the {chi} value decreased with increasing drying rate. For fixed drying rate, a maximum occurred in {chi} between 35- and 40-nm dry mobility diameter, with a lower {chi} for both smaller and larger particles. The results of this study, in conjunction with the introduced apparatus for obtaining quantified drying rates, can allow the continued development of a more detailed understanding of the morphology of submicron salt particles, with the potential for the follow-on development of quantitative modeling of evaporation and crystal growth at these dimensions.

  8. Identification and Evaluation of Human Factors Issues Associated with Emerging Nuclear Plant Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hara,J.M.; Higgins,J.; Brown, William S.

    2009-04-01

    This study has identified human performance research issues associated with the implementation of new technology in nuclear power plants (NPPs). To identify the research issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were prioritized into four categories based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts representing vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. The study also identifies the priority of each issue and the rationale for those in the top priority category. The top priority issues were then organized into research program areas of: New Concepts of Operation using Multi-agent Teams, Human-system Interface Design, Complexity Issues in Advanced Systems, Operating Experience of New and Modernized Plants, and HFE Methods and Tools. The results can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas to support the safe operation of new NPPs.

  9. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics: combat performance-shaping factors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawton, Craig R.; Miller, Dwight Peter

    2006-01-01

    The US military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives. To support this goal, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has undertaken a program of HPM as an integral augmentation to its system-of-system (SoS) analytics capabilities. The previous effort, reported in SAND2005-6569, evaluated the effects of soldier cognitive fatigue on SoS performance. The current effort began with a very broad survey of any performance-shaping factors (PSFs) that also might affect soldiers performance in combat situations. The work included consideration of three different approaches to cognition modeling and how appropriate they would be for application to SoS analytics. This bulk of this report categorizes 47 PSFs into three groups (internal, external, and task-related) and provides brief descriptions of how each affects combat performance, according to the literature. The PSFs were then assembled into a matrix with 22 representative military tasks and assigned one of four levels of estimated negative impact on task performance, based on the literature. Blank versions of the matrix were then sent to two ex-military subject-matter experts to be filled out based on their personal experiences. Data analysis was performed to identify the consensus most influential PSFs. Results indicate that combat-related injury, cognitive fatigue, inadequate training, physical fatigue, thirst, stress, poor perceptual processing, and presence of chemical agents are among the PSFs with the most negative impact on combat performance.

  10. Human factors design, verification, and validation for two types of control room upgrades at a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Laurids Ronald

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the NUREG-0711 based human factors engineering (HFE) phases and associated elements required to support design, verification and validation (V&V), and implementation of a new plant process computer (PPC) and turbine control system (TCS) at a representative nuclear power plant. This paper reviews ways to take a human-system interface (HSI) specification and use it when migrating legacy PPC displays or designing displays with new functionality. These displays undergo iterative usability testing during the design phase and then undergo an integrated system validation (ISV) in a full scope control room training simulator. Following the successful demonstration of operator performance with the systems during the ISV, the new system is implemented at the plant, first in the training simulator and then in the main control room.

  11. Observation of the fundamental Nyquist noise limit in an ultra-high Q-factor cryogenic bulk acoustic wave cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goryachev, Maxim Ivanov, Eugene N.; Tobar, Michael E.; Kann, Frank van; Galliou, Serge

    2014-10-13

    Thermal Nyquist noise fluctuations of high-Q bulk acoustic wave cavities have been observed at cryogenic temperatures with a DC superconducting quantum interference device amplifier. High Q modes with bandwidths of few tens of milliHz produce thermal fluctuations with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 23 dB. The estimated effective temperature from the Nyquist noise is in good agreement with the physical temperature of the device, confirming the validity of the equivalent circuit model and the non-existence of any excess resonator self-noise. The measurements also confirm that the quality factor remains extremely high (Q > 10{sup 8} at low order overtones) for very weak (thermal) system motion at low temperatures, when compared to values measured with relatively strong external excitation. This result represents an enabling step towards operating such a high-Q acoustic device at the standard quantum limit.

  12. Factors controlling physico-chemical characteristics in the coastal waters off Mangalore-A multivariate approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirodkar, P.V. Mesquita, A.; Pradhan, U.K.; Verlekar, X.N.; Babu, M.T.; Vethamony, P.

    2009-04-15

    Water quality parameters (temperature, pH, salinity, DO, BOD, suspended solids, nutrients, PHc, phenols, trace metals-Pb, Cd and Hg, chlorophyll-a (chl-a) and phaeopigments) and the sediment quality parameters (total phosphorous, total nitrogen, organic carbon and trace metals) were analysed from samples collected at 15 stations along 3 transects off Karnataka coast (Mangalore harbour in the south to Suratkal in the north), west coast of India during 2007. The analyses showed high ammonia off Suratkal, high nitrite (NO{sub 2}-N) and nitrate (NO{sub 3}-N) in the nearshore waters off Kulai and high nitrite (NO{sub 2}-N) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}-N) in the harbour area. Similarly, high petroleum hydrocarbon (PHc) values were observed near the harbour, while phenols remained high in the nearshore waters of Kulai and Suratkal. Significantly, high concentrations of cadmium and mercury with respect to the earlier studies were observed off Kulai and harbour regions, respectively. R-mode varimax factor analyses were applied separately to surface and bottom water data sets due to existing stratification in the water column caused by riverine inflow and to sediment data. This helped to understand the interrelationships between the variables and to identify probable source components for explaining the environmental status of the area. Six factors (each for surface and bottom waters) were found responsible for variance (86.9% in surface and 82.4% in bottom) in the coastal waters between Mangalore and Suratkal. In sediments, 4 factors explained 86.8% of the observed total variance. The variances indicated addition of nutrients and suspended solids to the coastal waters due to weathering and riverine transport and are categorized as natural sources. The observed contamination of coastal waters indicated anthropogenic inputs of Cd and phenol from industrial effluent sources at Kulai and Suratkal, ammonia from wastewater discharges off Kulai and harbour, PHc and Hg from boat traffic

  13. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R.; Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L.

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

  14. Astrophysical S-factor for the radiative-capture reaction p{sup 13}C {yields} {sup 14}N{gamma}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2012-02-15

    The possibility of describing experimental data on the astrophysical S factor for radiative proton capture on a {sup 13}C nucleus at energies in the range 0.03-0.8 MeV is considered within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states. It is shown that the energy dependence of this astrophysical S factor can be reasonably explained on the basis of the E1 transition to the {sup 3}P{sub 1}-wave bound state of the {sup 14}N nucleus in the p{sup 13}C channel from the {sup 3}S{sub 1} wave of p{sup 13}C scattering in the resonance energy region around 0.55 MeV in the laboratory frame.

  15. OPERATIONAL AND COMPOSITIONAL FACTORS THAT AFFECT THE PERFORMANCE PROPERTIES OF ARP/MCU SALTSTONE GROUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Edwards, T.; Pickenheim, B.

    2012-02-15

    that of the sample cured at room temperature. The hydration reactions initiated during the mixing of the premix and salt solution continue during the curing period in the vaults to produce the hardened waste form product. The heat generated from exothermic hydration reactions results in a temperature increase in the vaults that depends on the composition of the decontaminated salt solution being dispositioned, the grout formulation (mix design) and the pour frequency and volume. This heat generation is a contributing factor to the temperature increase in the vaults that leads to an increased cure temperature for the grout. This report will further investigate the impact of curing temperature on saltstone performance properties (hydraulic conductivity, Young's modulus, porosity, etc.) over a range of aluminate concentration, water to premix (w/p) ratio and weight percent fly ash in the premix processed at the SPF. The three curing temperatures selected for this study were chosen to provide data at fixed cure temperatures that represent measured temperatures in the SDF vaults. This does not represent the conditions in the vault where the temperature of the saltstone is continually changing with time. For example, it may take several days for the saltstone to reach 60 C at a given elevation. Previous results demonstrated that the rates at which a selected curing temperature is reached affect the performance properties. The approach taken in this task, a rapid increase to the curing temperature, may be conservative with respect to decreased performance. Nevertheless, the data will provide a basis from which to determine the impact of curing temperature on saltstone performance as a function of key variables. A statistical evaluation of the results for these mixes will be performed to provide the range, and associated uncertainties, of hydraulic conductivity and other properties over this factor space.

  16. The structure of the nucleon: Elastic electromagnetic form factors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Punjabi, V.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Jones, M. K.; Brash, E. J.; Carlson, C. E.

    2015-07-10

    Precise proton and neutron form factor measurements at Jefferson Lab, using spin observables, have recently made a significant contribution to the unraveling of the internal structure of the nucleon. Accurate experimental measurements of the nucleon form factors are a test-bed for understanding how the nucleon's static properties and dynamical behavior emerge from QCD, the theory of the strong interactions between quarks. There has been enormous theoretical progress, since the publication of the Jefferson Lab proton form factor ratio data, aiming at reevaluating the picture of the nucleon. We will review the experimental and theoretical developments in this field and discussmore » the outlook for the future.« less

  17. Measurements of the Helium Form Factors at JLab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khrosinkova, Elena

    2007-10-26

    An experiment to measure elastic electron scattering off {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He at large momentum transfers is presented. The experiment was carried out in the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. Elastic electron scattering off {sup 3}He was measured at forward and backward electron scattering angles to extract the isotope's charge and magnetic form factors. The charge form factor of {sup 4}He will be extracted from forward-angle electron scattering angle measurements. The data are expected to significantly extend and improve the existing measurements of the three- and four-body form factors. The results will be crucial for the establishment of a canonical standard model for the few-body nuclear systems and for testing predictions of quark dimensional scaling and hybrid nucleon-quark models.

  18. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ionmore » dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.« less

  19. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ion dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.

  20. Cosmic Reionization On Computers III. The Clumping Factor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2015-09-09

    We use fully self-consistent numerical simulations of cosmic reionization, completed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project, to explore how well the recombinations in the ionized intergalactic medium (IGM) can be quantified by the effective "clumping factor." The density distribution in the simulations (and, presumably, in a real universe) is highly inhomogeneous and more-or-less smoothly varying in space. However, even in highly complex and dynamic environments, the concept of the IGM remains reasonably well-defined; the largest ambiguity comes from the unvirialized regions around galaxies that are over-ionized by the local enhancement in the radiation field ("proximity zones"). This ambiguity precludesmore » computing the IGM clumping factor to better than about 20%. Furthermore, we discuss a "local clumping factor," defined over a particular spatial scale, and quantify its scatter on a given scale and its variation as a function of scale.« less

  1. Greybody factors for Myers–Perry black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Chatrabhuti, Auttakit Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2014-11-15

    The Myers–Perry black holes are higher-dimensional generalizations of the usual (3+1)-dimensional rotating Kerr black hole. They are of considerable interest in Kaluza–Klein models, specifically within the context of brane-world versions thereof. In the present article, we shall consider the greybody factors associated with scalar field excitations of the Myers–Perry spacetimes, and develop some rigorous bounds on these greybody factors. These bounds are of relevance for characterizing both the higher-dimensional Hawking radiation, and the super-radiance, that is expected for these spacetimes.

  2. Structure factors for tunneling ionization rates of diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Morishita, Toru

    2015-05-15

    Within the leading-order, single-active-electron, and frozen-nuclei approximation of the weak-field asymptotic theory, the rate of tunneling ionization of a molecule in an external static uniform electric field is determined by the structure factor for the highest occupied molecular orbital. We present the results of systematic calculations of structure factors for 40 homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules by the Hartree–Fock method using a numerical grid-based approach implemented in the program X2DHF.

  3. Dominant factors of the laser gettering of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokhan, Yu. I. E-mail: yuibokhan@gmail.com; Kamenkov, V. S.; Tolochko, N. K.

    2015-02-15

    The laser gettering of silicon wafers is experimentally investigated. The typical gettering parameters are considered. The surfaces of laser-treated silicon wafers are investigated by microscopy. When studying the effect of laser radiation on silicon wafers during gettering, a group of factors determining the conditions of interaction between the laser beam and silicon-wafer surface and affecting the final result of treatment are selected. The main factors determining the gettering efficiency are revealed. Limitations on the desired value of the getter-layer capacity on surfaces with insufficiently high cleanness (for example, ground or matte) are established.

  4. Performance analysis of parallel supernodal sparse LU factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigori, Laura; Li, Xiaoye S.

    2004-02-05

    We investigate performance characteristics for the LU factorization of large matrices with various sparsity patterns. We consider supernodal right-looking parallel factorization on a bi-dimensional grid of processors, making use of static pivoting. We develop a performance model and we validate it using the implementation in SuperLU-DIST, the real matrices and the IBM Power3 machine at NERSC. We use this model to obtain performance bounds on parallel computers, to perform scalability analysis and to identify performance bottlenecks. We also discuss the role of load balance and data distribution in this approach.

  5. Mobil-Marathon and similar oil company mergers. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Fossil and Synthetic Fuels of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on H. R. 4930

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Subcommittee chairman Phillip R. Sharp's opening statement notes that a wave of large horizontal and vertical mergers are the result of rising oil prices and oil-reserve values, price decontrol, and a relaxation of anti-merger enforcement by the Reagan administration. US merger activity in 1981 had a $20 billion value, half of which involved oil, gas, mining, and mineral companies. Chairman Sharp further notes that the mergers will raise customer costs and eliminate many small companies, which indirectly retards new exploration. H.R. 4930 requires a study of these effects and provides for a moratorium on larger mergers until the study is completed. The testimony of eight witnesses representing oil companies and related groups follows the text of H.R. 4930. Additional material submitted for the record includes a resolution by the Illinois Petroleum Marketers Association expressing their concern about the impact of mergers. (DCK)

  6. Hazardous waste and the stringfellow acid pits. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, April 22, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    California residents and state and federal officials testified at a field hearing in Glen Avon, California on the cleanup operations at the Stringfellow acid pits, an abandoned site, under the Superfund law. Sally Tanner, Chairwoman of the State Assembly Committee on Consumer Protection and Toxic Chemicals, expressed disappointment that the federal program did not match state readiness to solve the problem. The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) failure to use available funds and to listen to public concerns has been frustrating to Californians concerned about health hazards. Other witnesses spoke of the improbability of a complete cleanup because of groundwater migration and flooding in the area. EPA representatives described cleanup procedures at the site. An appendix with additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony of 11 witnesses.

  7. Experimental investigation of factors limiting slow axis beam quality in 9xx nm high power broad area diode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterfeldt, M. Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Trnkle, G.

    2014-08-14

    GaAs-based broad-area diode lasers are needed with improved lateral beam parameter product (BPP{sub lat}) at high power. An experimental study of the factors limiting BPP{sub lat} is therefore presented, using extreme double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structures emitting at 910?nm. Continuous wave, pulsed and polarization-resolved measurements are presented and compared to thermal simulation. The importance of thermal and packaging-induced effects is determined by comparing junction -up and -down devices. Process factors are clarified by comparing diodes with and without index-guiding trenches. We show that in all cases studied, BPP{sub lat} is limited by a non-thermal BPP ground-level and a thermal BPP, which depends linearly on self-heating. Measurements as a function of pulse width confirm that self-heating rather than bias-level dominates. Diodes without trenches show low BPP ground-level, and a thermal BPP which depends strongly on mounting, due to changes in the temperature profile. The additional lateral guiding in diodes with trenches strongly increases the BPP ground-level, but optically isolates the stripe from the device edges, suppressing the influence of the thermal profile, leading to a BPP-slope that is low and independent of mounting. Trenches are also shown to initiate strain fields that cause parasitic TM-polarized emission with large BPP{sub lat}, whose influence on total BPP{sub lat} remains small, provided the overall polarization purity is >95%.

  8. Nucleon form factors program with SBS at JLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-12-01

    The physics of the nucleon form factors is the basic part of the Jefferson Laboratory program. We review the achievements of the 6-GeV era and the program with the 12- GeV beam with the SBS spectrometer in Hall A, with a focus on the nucleon ground state properties.

  9. UPDATING THE NRC GUIDANCE FOR HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING REVIEWS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O HARA,J.M.; BROWN,W.S.; HIGGINS,J.C.; PERSENSKY,J.J.; LEWIS,P.M.; BONGARRA,J.

    2002-09-15

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of nuclear plants. NUREG-0800 (Standard Review Plan), Chapter 18, ''Human Factors Engineering,'' is the principal NRC staff guidance document. Two main documents provide the review criteria to support the evaluations. The HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711) addresses the design process from planning to verification and validation to design implementation. The Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700) provides the guidelines for the review of the HFE aspects of human-system interface technology, such as alarms, information systems, controls, and control room design. Since these documents were published in 1994 and 1996 respectively, they have been used by NRC staff, contractors, nuclear industry organizations, as well as by numerous organizations outside the nuclear industry. Using feedback from users and NRC research conducted in recent years, both documents have been revised and updated. This was done to ensure that they remain state-of-the-art evaluation tools for changing nuclear industry issues and emerging technologies. This paper describes the methodology used to revise and update the documents and summarizes the changes made to each and their current contents. Index Terms for this report are: Control system human factors, Ergonomics, Human factors, Nuclear power generation safety.

  10. The Modern description of semileptonic meson form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Richard J.

    2006-06-01

    I describe recent advances in our understanding of the hadronic form factors governing semileptonic meson transitions. The resulting framework provides a systematic approach to the experimental data, as a means of extracting precision observables, testing nonperturbative field theory methods, and probing a poorly understood limit of QCD.

  11. Human Factors Evaluation of Advanced Electric Power Grid Visualization Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Dauenhauer, Peter M.; Wierks, Tamara G.; Podmore, Robin

    2009-04-01

    This report describes initial human factors evaluation of four visualization tools (Graphical Contingency Analysis, Force Directed Graphs, Phasor State Estimator and Mode Meter/ Mode Shapes) developed by PNNL, and proposed test plans that may be implemented to evaluate their utility in scenario-based experiments.

  12. Effect of Environmental Factors on Sulfur Gas Emissions from Drywall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy

    2011-08-20

    Problem drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) investigation of problem drywall incorporates three parallel tracks: (1) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and reported health symptoms; (2) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and electrical and fire safety issues in affected homes; and (3) tracing the origin and the distribution of the drywall. To assess the potential impact on human health and to support testing for electrical and fire safety, the CPSC has initiated a series of laboratory tests that provide elemental characterization of drywall, characterization of chemical emissions, and in-home air sampling. The chemical emission testing was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The LBNL study consisted of two phases. In Phase 1 of this study, LBNL tested thirty drywall samples provided by CPSC and reported standard emission factors for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aldehydes, reactive sulfur gases (RSGs) and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). The standard emission factors were determined using small (10.75 liter) dynamic test chambers housed in a constant temperature environmental chamber. The tests were all run at 25 C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and with an area-specific ventilation rate of {approx}1.5 cubic meters per square meter of emitting surface per hour [m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}/h]. The thirty samples that were tested in Phase 1 included seventeen that were manufactured in China in 2005, 2006 and 2009, and thirteen that were manufactured in North America in 2009. The measured emission factors for VOCs and aldehydes were generally low and did not differ significantly between the Chinese and North American drywall. Eight of the samples tested had elevated emissions of volatile sulfur-containing compounds with total RSG emission factors between 32 and 258 micrograms per square meter

  13. Photoautotrophic symbiont and geography are major factors affecting highly structured and diverse bacterial communities in the lichen microbiome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodkinson, Brendan P; Gottel, Neil R; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Lutzoni, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Although common knowledge dictates that the lichen thallus is formed solely by a fungus (mycobiont) that develops a symbiotic relationship with an alga and/or cyanobacterium (photobiont), the non-photoautotrophic bacteria found in lichen microbiomes are increasingly regarded as integral components of lichen thalli. For this study, comparative analyses were conducted on lichen-associated bacterial communities to test for effects of photobiont-types (i.e. green algal vs. cyanobacterial), mycobiont-types and large-scale spatial distances (from tropical to arctic latitudes). Amplicons of the 16S (SSU) rRNA gene were examined using both Sanger sequencing of cloned fragments and barcoded pyrosequencing. Rhizobiales is typically the most abundant and taxonomically diverse order in lichen microbiomes; however, overall bacterial diversity in lichens is shown to be much higher than previously reported. Members of Acidobacteriaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Brucellaceae and sequence group LAR1 are the most commonly found groups across the phylogenetically and geographically broad array of lichens examined here. Major bacterial community trends are significantly correlated with differences in large-scale geography, photobiont-type and mycobiont-type. The lichen as a microcosm represents a structured, unique microbial habitat with greater ecological complexity and bacterial diversity than previously appreciated and can serve as a model system for studying larger ecological and evolutionary principles.

  14. Small fields output factors measurements and correction factors determination for several detectors for a CyberKnife{sup Registered-Sign} and linear accelerators equipped with microMLC and circular cones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bassinet, C.; Huet, C.; Derreumaux, S.; Baumann, M.; Trompier, F.; Roch, P.; Clairand, I.; Brunet, G.; Gaudaire-Josset, S.; Chea, M.; Boisserie, G.

    2013-07-15

    for all OF measurements. Moreover, it has been shown that these passive dosimeters do not require correction factors and can then be used as reference dosimeters. Correction factors for the active detectors have then been determined from the mean experimental OF measured by the passive dosimeters.Conclusions: Four sets of correction factors needed to apply the new small field dosimetry formalism are provided for several active detectors. A protocol for small photon beams OF determination based on passive dosimeters measurements has been recently proposed to French radiotherapy treatment centers.

  15. Contaminants in Buildings and Occupied Spaces as Risk Factors forOccupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: Findings from the U.S. EPABASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Mirer, A.; Lei-Gomez, Q.

    2007-08-01

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Most reported research into environmental risk factors for these symptoms has focused on ventilation system-related factors, dampness, and particle removal through filtration and cleaning, with relatively few studies of other potential sources of indoor contaminants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and a diverse set of potential indoor and outdoor sources for indoor pollutants. Although most of the investigated risk factors showed no apparent association with building-related symptoms, some interesting associations resulted. Increased prevalence of symptoms was associated with carpets older than one year (lower respiratory symptoms), non-carpeted floors (upper and lower respiratory symptoms), older furniture (eye and skin symptoms), infrequent vacuuming (upper respiratory, eye, and skin symptoms and headache), and masonry exterior walls (cough, eye symptoms, and fatigue/concentration difficulty). For the many potential risk factors assessed, almost none had been investigated previously, and many associations found here may have been by chance. Additional confirmatory research focused on risk factors initially identified here is needed, using more objective measures of health outcomes and risk factors or exposures.

  16. Discovery of Novel P1 Groups for Coagulation Factor VIIa Inhibition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Coagulation Factor VIIa Inhibition Using Fragment-Based Screening Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovery of Novel P1 Groups for Coagulation Factor VIIa Inhibition ...

  17. Tuning g factors of core-shell nanoparticles by controlled positioning...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tuning g factors of core-shell nanoparticles by controlled positioning of magnetic ... 22, 2017 Prev Next Title: Tuning g factors of core-shell nanoparticles by ...

  18. DOE Order 458.1 Property Clearance Requirements and Factors Considered...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    58.1 Property Clearance Requirements and Factors Considered to Update Its Clearance Limits DOE Order 458.1 Property Clearance Requirements and Factors Considered to Update Its ...

  19. A decision support system prototype including human factors based on the TOGA meta-theory approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappelli, M.; Memmi, F.; Gadomski, A. M.; Sepielli, M.

    2012-07-01

    The human contribution to the risk of operation of complex technological systems is often not negligible and sometimes tends to become significant, as shown by many reports on incidents and accidents occurred in the past inside Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). An error of a human operator of a NPP can derive by both omission and commission. For instance, complex commission errors can also lead to significant catastrophic technological accidents, as for the case of the Three Mile Island accident. Typically, the problem is analyzed by focusing on the single event chain that has provoked the incident or accident. What is needed is a general framework able to include as many parameters as possible, i.e. both technological and human factors. Such a general model could allow to envisage an omission or commission error before it can happen or, alternatively, suggest preferred actions to do in order to take countermeasures to neutralize the effect of the error before it becomes critical. In this paper, a preliminary Decision Support System (DSS) based on the so-called (-) TOGA meta-theory approach is presented. The application of such a theory to the management of nuclear power plants has been presented in the previous ICAPP 2011. Here, a human factor simulator prototype is proposed in order to include the effect of human errors in the decision path. The DSS has been developed using a TRIGA research reactor as reference plant, and implemented using the LabVIEW programming environment and the Finite State Machine (FSM) model The proposed DSS shows how to apply the Universal Reasoning Paradigm (URP) and the Universal Management Paradigm (UMP) to a real plant context. The DSS receives inputs from instrumentation data and gives as output a suggested decision. It is obtained as the result of an internal elaborating process based on a performance function. The latter, describes the degree of satisfaction and efficiency, which are dependent on the level of responsibility related to

  20. Factors driving wind power development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-05-15

    In the United States, there has been substantial recent growth in wind energy generating capacity, with growth averaging 24 percent annually during the past five years. About 1,700 MW of wind energy capacity was installed in 2001, while another 410 MW became operational in 2002. This year (2003) shows promise of significant growth with more than 1,500 MW planned. With this growth, an increasing number of states are experiencing investment in wind energy projects. Wind installations currently exist in about half of all U.S. states. This paper explores the key factors at play in the states that have achieved a substantial amount of wind energy investment. Some of the factors that are examined include policy drivers, such as renewable portfolio standards (RPS), federal and state financial incentives, and integrated resource planning; as well as market drivers, such as consumer demand for green power, natural gas price volatility, and wholesale market rules.

  1. Precision Measurements of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2010-08-01

    New high precision polarization measurements of the proton elastic form factor ratio in the Q^2 from 0.3 to 0.7 [GeV/c]^2 have been made. These elastic H(e,e'p) measurementswere done in Jefferson Lab's Hall A using 80% longitudinally polarized electrons and recoil polarimetry. For Q^2 greater than 1 [GeV/c]^2, previous polarization data indicated a strong deviation of the form factor ratio from unity which sparked renewed theoretical and experimental interest in how two-photon diagrams have been taken into account. The new high precision data indicate that the deviation from unity, while small, persists even at Q^2 less than 1 [GeV/c]^2.

  2. Measurement of the gamma gamma* -> pi0 transition form factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.

    2009-06-02

    We study the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in the single tag mode and measure the differential cross section d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2} and the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {pi}{sup 0} transition form factor in the mometum transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV{sup 2}. At Q{sup 2} > 10 GeV{sup 2} the measured form factor exceeds the asymptotic limit predicted by perturbative QCD. The analysis is based on 442 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  3. Performance of non-conventional factorization approaches for neutron kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulla, S.; Nervo, M.

    2013-07-01

    The use of factorization techniques provides a interesting option for the simulation of the time-dependent behavior of nuclear systems with a reduced computational effort. While point kinetics neglects all spatial and spectral effects, quasi-statics and multipoint kinetics allow to produce results with a higher accuracy for transients involving relevant modifications of the neutron distribution. However, in some conditions these methods can not work efficiently. In this paper, we discuss some possible alternative formulations for the factorization process for neutron kinetics, leading to mathematical models of reduced complications that can allow an accurate simulation of transients involving spatial and spectral effects. The performance of these innovative approaches are compared to standard techniques for some test cases, showing the benefits and shortcomings of the method proposed. (authors)

  4. Surface engineering of the quality factor of metal coated microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergincan, O.; Kooi, B. J.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-12-14

    We performed noise measurements to obtain the quality factor (Q) and frequency shift of gold coated microcantilevers before and after surface modification using focused ion beam. As a result of our studies, it is demonstrated that surface engineering offers a promising method to control and increase the Q factor up to 50% for operation in vacuum. Surface modification could also lead to deviations from the known Q ∼ P{sup −1} behavior at low vacuum pressures P within the molecular regime. Finally, at higher pressures within the continuum regime, where Q is less sensitive to surface changes, a power scaling Q ∼ P{sup c} with c ≈ 0.3 was found instead of c = 0.5. The latter is explained via a semi-empirical formulation to account for continuum dissipation mechanisms at significant Reynolds numbers Re ∼ 1.

  5. Factorization of large integers on a massively parallel computer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.A.; Holdridge, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Our interest in integer factorization at Sandia National Laboratories is motivated by cryptographic applications and in particular the security of the RSA encryption-decryption algorithm. We have implemented our version of the quadratic sieve procedure on the NCUBE computer with 1024 processors (nodes). The new code is significantly different in all important aspects from the program used to factor number of order 10/sup 70/ on a single processor CRAY computer. Capabilities of parallel processing and limitation of small local memory necessitated this entirely new implementation. This effort involved several restarts as realizations of program structures that seemed appealing bogged down due to inter-processor communications. We are presently working with integers of magnitude about 10/sup 70/ in tuning this code to the novel hardware. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Factors that affect electric-utility stranded commitments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.; Baxter, L.

    1996-07-01

    Estimates of stranded commitments for U.S. investor-owned utilities range widely, with many falling in the range of $100 to $200 billion. These potential losses exist because some utility-owned power plants, long-term power-purchase contracts and fuel-supply contracts, regulatory assets, and expenses for public-policy programs have book values that exceed their expected market values under full competition. This report quantifies the sensitivity of stranded- commitment estimates to the various factors that lead to these above- market-value estimates. The purpose of these sensitivity analyses is to improve understanding on the part of state and federal regulators, utilities, customers, and other electric-industry participants about the relative importance of the factors that affect stranded- commitment amounts.

  7. Model-Based Analysis of the Role of Biological, Hydrological and Geochemical Factors Affecting Uranium Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jiao; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2011-01-24

    Uranium contamination is a serious concern at several sites motivating the development of novel treatment strategies such as the Geobacter-mediated reductive immobilization of uranium. However, this bioremediation strategy has not yet been optimized for the sustained uranium removal. While several reactive-transport models have been developed to represent Geobacter-mediated bioremediation of uranium, these models often lack the detailed quantitative description of the microbial process (e.g., biomass build-up in both groundwater and sediments, electron transport system, etc.) and the interaction between biogeochemical and hydrological process. In this study, a novel multi-scale model was developed by integrating our recent model on electron capacitance of Geobacter (Zhao et al., 2010) with a comprehensive simulator of coupled fluid flow, hydrologic transport, heat transfer, and biogeochemical reactions. This mechanistic reactive-transport model accurately reproduces the experimental data for the bioremediation of uranium with acetate amendment. We subsequently performed global sensitivity analysis with the reactive-transport model in order to identify the main sources of prediction uncertainty caused by synergistic effects of biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes. The proposed approach successfully captured significant contributing factors across time and space, thereby improving the structure and parameterization of the comprehensive reactive-transport model. The global sensitivity analysis also provides a potentially useful tool to evaluate uranium bioremediation strategy. The simulations suggest that under difficult environments (e.g., highly contaminated with U(VI) at a high migration rate of solutes), the efficiency of uranium removal can be improved by adding Geobacter species to the contaminated site (bioaugmentation) in conjunction with the addition of electron donor (biostimulation). The simulations also highlight the interactive effect of

  8. Olive oil compounds inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamy, Sylvie Ouanouki, Amira; Béliveau, Richard; Desrosiers, Richard R.

    2014-03-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) triggers crucial signaling processes that regulate tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, represents an attractive target for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. Several epidemiological studies have confirmed that abundant consumption of foods from plant origin is associated with reduced risk of developing cancers. In the Mediterranean basin, the consumption of extra virgin olive oil is an important constituent of the diet. Compared to other vegetable oils, the presence of several phenolic antioxidants in olive oil is believed to prevent the occurrence of a variety of pathological processes, such as cancer. While the strong antioxidant potential of these molecules is well characterized, their antiangiogenic activities remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (HT), taxifolin (Tax), oleuropein (OL) and oleic acid (OA), five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil, can affect in vitro angiogenesis. We found that HT, Tax and OA were the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors through their inhibitory effect on specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2 (Tyr951, Tyr1059, Tyr1175 and Tyr1214) leading to the inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) signaling. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 by these olive oil compounds significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC proliferation and migration as well as their morphogenic differentiation into capillary-like tubular structures in Matrigel. Our study demonstrates that HT, Tax and OA are novel and potent inhibitors of the VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. These findings emphasize the chemopreventive properties of olive oil and highlight the importance of nutrition in cancer prevention. - Highlights: • We investigated five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil on angiogenesis. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid are the best angiogenesis inhibitors. • Olive oil compounds affect endothelial cell functions essential for

  9. Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solar cells: interfacial energetics and blend microstructure | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: interfacial energetics and blend microstructure April 29, 2009 at 3pm/36-428 Jenny Nelson Department of Physics Imperial College London jenny-nelson_000 abstract: The efficiency of photocurrent generation in conjugated polymer:small molecule blend solar is strongly influenced both by the energy level alignment

  10. Transcription factors for modification of lignin content in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Huanzhong; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2015-06-02

    The invention provides methods for modifying lignin, cellulose, xylan, and hemicellulose content in plants, and for achieving ectopic lignification and, for instance, secondary cell wall synthesis in pith cells, by altered regulation of a WRKY transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for altered WRKY-TF expression are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise modified pith cell walls, and lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops.

  11. Method for determining formation quality factor from seismic data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taner, M. Turhan; Treitel, Sven

    2005-08-16

    A method is disclosed for calculating the quality factor Q from a seismic data trace. The method includes calculating a first and a second minimum phase inverse wavelet at a first and a second time interval along the seismic data trace, synthetically dividing the first wavelet by the second wavelet, Fourier transforming the result of the synthetic division, calculating the logarithm of this quotient of Fourier transforms and determining the slope of a best fit line to the logarithm of the quotient.

  12. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, William J.; Smith, Craig D.; Senkovich, Olga; Holder, Anthony A.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2011-09-26

    Vesicular trafficking may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the malaria parasite. ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are among the major components of vesicular trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of ARF1 GTPase from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined in the GDP-bound conformation at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and is compared with the structures of mammalian ARF1s.

  13. Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics M. P. Jensen and A. D. Del Genio National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York, New York Introduction Populations of tropical convective clouds are mainly comprised of three types: shallow trade cumulus, mid-level cumulus congestus and deep convective clouds (Johnson et al. 1999). Each of these cloud types has different impacts on the local radiation and water budgets.

  14. Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dual-Stage Chemistry | Department of Energy Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Sandia National Laboratories 2004_deer_dec.pdf (185.71 KB) More Documents & Publications Microsoft PowerPoint - DEER03-P.ppt HCCI and Stratified-Charge CI Engine Combustion Research Improving Efficiency

  15. Tuning the thermoelectric power factor in carbon nanotube films

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Tuning the thermoelectric power factor in carbon nanotube films Ben Zhou 1 , Azure Avery 2 , Andrew Ferguson 2 , Jeff Blackburn 2 Schematic of a thermoelectric device. (wikipedia) Heat Thermoelectric Device Electricity Thermoelectrics Carbon Nanotubes Introduction * Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are promising thermoelectrics because of their good conductivity and one dimensional density of states. Materials and Methods * Ink Preparation: (7,5) nanotubes were dispersed by

  16. Simulation: Moving from Technology Challenge to Human Factors Success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gould, Derek A.; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J.; Kilkenny, Caroline; White, Mark D.; Bech, Bo; Lonn, Lars; Bello, Fernando

    2012-06-15

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used.

  17. Method for factor analysis of GC/MS data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Benthem, Mark H; Kotula, Paul G; Keenan, Michael R

    2012-09-11

    The method of the present invention provides a fast, robust, and automated multivariate statistical analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) data sets. The method can involve systematic elimination of undesired, saturated peak masses to yield data that follow a linear, additive model. The cleaned data can then be subjected to a combination of PCA and orthogonal factor rotation followed by refinement with MCR-ALS to yield highly interpretable results.

  18. Energy Factor Analysis for Gas Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gluesenkamp, Kyle R

    2016-01-01

    Gas heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) can improve water heating efficiency with zero GWP and zero ODP working fluids. The energy factor (EF) of a gas HPWH is sensitive to several factors. In this work, expressions are derived for EF of gas HPWHs, as a function of heat pump cycle COP, tank heat losses, burner efficiency, electrical draw, and effectiveness of supplemental heat exchangers. The expressions are used to investigate the sensitivity of EF to each parameter. EF is evaluated on a site energy basis (as used by the US DOE for rating water heater EF), and a primary energy-basis energy factor (PEF) is also defined and included. Typical ranges of values for the six parameters are given. For gas HPWHs, using typical ranges for component performance, EF will be 59 80% of the heat pump cycle thermal COP (for example, a COP of 1.60 may result in an EF of 0.94 1.28). Most of the reduction in COP is due to burner efficiency and tank heat losses. Gas-fired HPWHs are theoretically be capable of an EF of up to 1.7 (PEF of 1.6); while an EF of 1.1 1.3 (PEF of 1.0 1.1) is expected from an early market entry.

  19. Dirac equation in low dimensions: The factorization method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snchez-Monroy, J.A.; Quimbay, C.J.

    2014-11-15

    We present a general approach to solve the (1+1) and (2+1)-dimensional Dirac equations in the presence of static scalar, pseudoscalar and gauge potentials, for the case in which the potentials have the same functional form and thus the factorization method can be applied. We show that the presence of electric potentials in the Dirac equation leads to two KleinGordon equations including an energy-dependent potential. We then generalize the factorization method for the case of energy-dependent Hamiltonians. Additionally, the shape invariance is generalized for a specific class of energy-dependent Hamiltonians. We also present a condition for the absence of the Klein paradox (stability of the Dirac sea), showing how Dirac particles in low dimensions can be confined for a wide family of potentials. - Highlights: The low-dimensional Dirac equation in the presence of static potentials is solved. The factorization method is generalized for energy-dependent Hamiltonians. The shape invariance is generalized for energy-dependent Hamiltonians. The stability of the Dirac sea is related to the existence of supersymmetric partner Hamiltonians.

  20. Human factors engineering report for the cold vacuum drying facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IMKER, F.W.

    1999-06-30

    The purpose of this report is to present the results and findings of the final Human Factors Engineering (HFE) technical analysis and evaluation of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). Ergonomics issues are also addressed in this report, as appropriate. This report follows up and completes the preliminary work accomplished and reported by the Preliminary HFE Analysis report (SNF-2825, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Human Factors Engineering Analysis: Results and Findings). This analysis avoids redundancy of effort except for ensuring that previously recommended HFE design changes have not affected other parts of the system. Changes in one part of the system may affect other parts of the system where those changes were not applied. The final HFE analysis and evaluation of the CVDF human-machine interactions (HMI) was expanded to include: the physical work environment, human-computer interface (HCI) including workstation and software, operator tasks, tools, maintainability, communications, staffing, training, and the overall ability of humans to accomplish their responsibilities, as appropriate. Key focal areas for this report are the process bay operations, process water conditioning (PWC) skid, tank room, and Central Control Room operations. These key areas contain the system safety-class components and are the foundation for the human factors design basis of the CVDF.

  1. Critical success factors in implementing process safety management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.J. [Chevron USA, Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This paper focuses on several {open_quotes}Critical Success Factors {close_quotes} which will determine how well employees will embrace and utilize the changes being asked of them to implement Process Safety Management (PSM). These success factors are applicable to any change which involves asking employees to perform activities differently than they are currently performing them. This includes changes in work processes (the way we arrange and conduct a set of tasks) or changes in work activities (how we perform individual tasks). Simply developing new work processes and explaining them to employees is not enough to ensure that employees will actually utilize them -- no matter how good these processes are. To ensure successful, complete implementation of Process Safety Management, we must manage the transition from how we perform our work now to how we will perform it after PSM is implemented. Environmental and safety performance improvements, facility reliability and operability increases, and employee effectiveness and productivity gains CAN NOT be achieved until Process Safety Management processes are fully implemented. To successfully implement management of change, mechanical integrity, or any of the other processes in PSM, each of the following critical success factors must be carefully considered and utilized as appropriate. They are: (1) Vision of a Future State, Current State Assessment, and a Detailed Plan to Achieve the Future State, (2) Management Commitment, (3) Ownership by Key Individuals, (4) Justification for Actions, (5) Autonomy to Customize the Process, (6) Feedback Mechanism to Adjust Activities, and (7) Process to Refocus & Redirect Efforts.

  2. Automatic Blocking Of QR and LU Factorizations for Locality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Q; Kennedy, K; You, H; Seymour, K; Dongarra, J

    2004-03-26

    QR and LU factorizations for dense matrices are important linear algebra computations that are widely used in scientific applications. To efficiently perform these computations on modern computers, the factorization algorithms need to be blocked when operating on large matrices to effectively exploit the deep cache hierarchy prevalent in today's computer memory systems. Because both QR (based on Householder transformations) and LU factorization algorithms contain complex loop structures, few compilers can fully automate the blocking of these algorithms. Though linear algebra libraries such as LAPACK provides manually blocked implementations of these algorithms, by automatically generating blocked versions of the computations, more benefit can be gained such as automatic adaptation of different blocking strategies. This paper demonstrates how to apply an aggressive loop transformation technique, dependence hoisting, to produce efficient blockings for both QR and LU with partial pivoting. We present different blocking strategies that can be generated by our optimizer and compare the performance of auto-blocked versions with manually tuned versions in LAPACK, both using reference BLAS, ATLAS BLAS and native BLAS specially tuned for the underlying machine architectures.

  3. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Minc, Leah D.

    2013-11-20

    Transfer of radionuclides from soils into plants is one of the key mechanisms for long-term contamination of the human food chain. Nearly all computer models that address soil-to-plant uptake of radionuclides use empirically-derived transfer factors to address this process. Essentially all available soil-to-plant transfer factors are based on measurements in annual crops. Because very few measurements are available for tree fruits, samples were taken of alfalfa and oats and the stems, leaves, and fruits and nuts of almond, apple, apricot, carob, fig, grape, nectarine, pecan, pistachio (natural and grafted), and pomegranate, along with local surface soil. The samples were dried, ground, weighed, and analyzed for trace constituents through a combination of induction-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for a wide range of naturally-occurring elements. Analysis results are presented and converted to soil-to-plant transfer factors. These are compared to commonly used and internationally recommended values. Those determined for annual crops are very similar to commonly-used values; those determined for tree fruits show interesting differences. Most macro- and micronutrients are slightly reduced in fruits; non-essential elements are reduced further. These findings may be used in existing computer models and may allow development of tree-fruit-specific transfer models.

  4. Patient-based radiographic exposure factor selection: a systematic review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ching, William; Robinson, John; McEntee, Mark

    2014-09-15

    Digital technology has wider exposure latitude and post-processing algorithms which can mask the evidence of underexposure and overexposure. Underexposure produces noisy, grainy images which can impede diagnosis and overexposure results in a greater radiation dose to the patient. These exposure errors can result from inaccurate adjustment of exposure factors in response to changes in patient thickness. This study aims to identify all published radiographic exposure adaptation systems which have been, or are being, used in general radiography and discuss their applicability to digital systems. Studies in EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS were systematically reviewed. Some of the search terms used were exposure adaptation, exposure selection, exposure technique, 25% rule, 15% rule, DuPont™ Bit System and radiography. A manual journal-specific search was also conducted in The Radiographer and Radiologic Technology. Studies were included if they demonstrated a system of altering exposure factors to compensate for variations in patients for general radiography. Studies were excluded if they focused on finding optimal exposures for an ‘average’ patient or focused on the relationship between exposure factors and dose. The database search uncovered 11 articles and the journal-specific search uncovered 13 articles discussing systems of exposure adaptation. They can be categorised as simple one-step guidelines, comprehensive charts and computer programs. Only two papers assessed the efficacy of exposure adjustment systems. No literature compares the efficacy of exposure adaptations system for film/screen radiography with digital radiography technology nor is there literature on a digital specific exposure adaptation system.

  5. PHASER 2.10 methodology for dependence, importance, and sensitivity: The role of scale factors, confidence factors, and extremes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, J.A.

    1996-09-01

    PHASER (Probabilistic Hybrid Analytical System Evaluation Routine) is a software tool that has the capability of incorporating subjective expert judgment into probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) along with conventional data inputs. An earlier report described the PHASER methodology, but only gave a cursory explanation about how dependence was incorporated in Version 1.10 and about how ``Importance`` and ``Sensitivity`` measures were to be incorporated in Version 2.00. A more detailed description is given in this report. The basic concepts involve scale factors and confidence factors that are associated with the stochastic variability and subjective uncertainty (which are common adjuncts used in PSA), and the safety risk extremes that are crucial to safety assessment. These are all utilized to illustrate methodology for incorporating dependence among analysis variables in generating PSA results, and for Importance and Sensitivity measures associated with the results that help point out where any major sources of safety concern arise and where any major sources of uncertainty reside, respectively.

  6. Thermoflexus hugenholtzii gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, microaerophilic, filamentous bacterium representing a novel class in the Chloroflexi, Thermoflexia classis nov., and description of Thermoflexaceae fam. nov. and Thermoflexales ord. nov.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Gevorkian, Jonathan; Despujos, Fairuz; Cole, Jesse; Murugapiran, Senthil K.; Ming, Hong; Li, Wen J.; Zhang, Gengxin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2014-06-06

    A thermophilic, filamentous, heterotrophic bacterium designated strain JAD2T was isolated from sediment of Great Boiling Spring in Nevada, USA. Cells had an average diameter of 0.3 m and length of 4.0 m, and formed filaments typically ranging in length from 20 m to 200 m. Filaments were negative for the Gram stain reaction, spores were not formed, and motility was not observed. The optimum temperature for growth was 75 C with a range from 67.5-75 C, and the optimum pH for growth was 6.75 with a range from 6.5-7.75. Peptone, tryptone or yeast extract were able to support growth when supplemented with a vitamin solution, but no growth was observed using a variety of defined organic substrates. Strain JAD2T was a facultative microaerophile, with optimal growth at 1% v/v O2 and an upper limit of 8% O2, and anaerobic growth was stimulated by fumarate but inhibited by sulfite and elemental sulfur. The major cellular fatty acids (>5%) were C16:0, C19:0, C18:0, C20:0, and C19:1. The genomic DNA G+C content was 69.3%. Phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses using 16S rRNA gene sequences and other conserved genes placed JAD2T and other members of the yet-uncultivated GAL35 group within the phylum Chloroflexi, but not within any existing class in this phylum. These results indicate that strain JAD2T is the first cultivated representative of a new lineage within the phylum Chloroflexi, for which we propose the name Thermoflexus hugenholtzii gen. nov., sp. nov., type strain JAD2T, within Thermoflexia classis nov., Thermoflexales ord. nov., and Thermoflexaceae fam. nov.

  7. Factors affecting expanded electricity trade in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The authors explore factors that affect electricity trade between enterprises in the US and Canada and the US and Mexico. They look to those underlying policy and institutional factors that affect the relative costs of producing electricity in the three countries. In particular, they consider six factors that appear to have a significant impact on electricity trade in North America: differences in the types of economic regulation of power leading to differences in cost recovery for wholesale and retail power and wheeling charges; changing regulatory attitudes, placing more emphasis on demand-side management and environmental concerns; differences in energy and economic policies; differences in national and subnational environmental policies; changing organization of electric power industries which may foster uncertainty, change historical relationships, and provide other potentially important sources of power for distribution utilities; and differences in the ability of enterprises to gain access to electric power markets because of restrictions placed on transmission access. In Section 2, the authors discuss the regulation of electricity trade in North America and provide an overview of the recent trading experience for electricity between Canada and the US and between Mexico and the US, including the volume of that trade over the past decade and existing transmission capacity between regions of the three countries. In Section 3, they look at the benefits that accrue to trading counties and what those benefits are likely to be for the three countries. The discussion in Section 4 centers on the relevant provisions of the Canada Free Trade Agreement and the proposed North American Free Trade Agreement. In Section 5, they set the stage for the discussion of policy and institutional differences presented in Section 6 by outlining differences in the organization of the electric power sectors of Canada, the US, and Mexico. The study is synthesized in Section 7.

  8. Pion Form Factor in Improved Holographic QCD Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwee, Herry J.

    2010-08-05

    We extend our recent numerical calculation of the pion electromagnetic form factor F{sub {pi}}(Q{sup 2}) in holographic QCD with a background field that interpolates between 'hard-wall' and 'soft-wall' models to obtain an improved model that reproduces the desirable phenomenological features of both. In all cases, F{sub {pi}}for large Q{sup 2} is shallower than data, an effect that can be cured by relaxing the fit to one of the static observables, particularly the decay constant f{sub {pi}}.

  9. Greybody factors and charges in Kerr/CFT

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Larsen, Finn

    2009-09-01

    We compute greybody factors for near extreme Kerr black holes in D = 4 and D = 5. In D = 4 we include four charges so that our solutions can be continuously deformed to the BPS limit. In D = 5 we include two independent angular momenta so Left-Right symmetry is incorporated. We discuss the CFT interpretation of our emission amplitudes, including the overall frequency dependence and the dependence on all black hole parameters. We find that all additional parameters can be incorporated Kerr/CFT, with central charge independent of U(1) charges.

  10. On the relationship between formation resistivity factor and porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Rosales, C.

    1982-08-01

    A theory on the relationship between formation resistivity factor and porosity is presented. This theory considers that, from the standpoint of the flow of electric current within a porous medium saturated with a conducting fluid, the pore space can be divided into flowing and stagnant regions. This assumption leads to a general expression, and formulas currently used in practice are special cases of this expression. The validity of the new expression is established by the use of data corresponding to sandstones and packings and suspensions of particles. For the case of natural rocks, the theory confirms Darcy's equation and gives an interpretation of the physical significance of the so-called cementation exponent.

  11. Kaon semileptonic vector form factor and determination of |Vus| using

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    staggered fermions | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Kaon semileptonic vector form factor and determination of |Vus| using staggered fermions Authors: A. Bazavov, C. Bernard, C. M. Bouchard, C. DeTar, Daping Du, A. X. El-Khadra, J. Foley, E. D. Freeland6, E. Gámiz, Steven Gottlieb, U. M. Heller, Jongjeong Kim, A. S. Kronfeld, J. Laiho, L. Levkova, P. B. Mackenzie, E. T. Neil, M. B. Oktay, Si-Wei Qiu, J. N. Simone, R. Sugar, D. Toussaint, R. S. Van de Water, Ran Zhou Using staggered

  12. Gyromagnetic factors in {sup 144-150}Nd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giannatiempo, A.

    2011-09-15

    The U(5) to SU(3) evolution of the nuclear structure in the even {sup 144-156}Nd isotopes has been investigated in the framework of the interacting boson approximation (IBA-2) model, taking into account the effect of the partial Z=64 subshell closure on the structure of the states of a collective nature. The analysis, which led to a satisfactory description of excitation energy patterns, quadrupole moments, and decay properties of the states (even when important M1 components were present in the transitions), is extended to the available data on g factors, in {sup 144-150}Nd. Their values are reasonably reproduced by the calculations.

  13. Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neill, Peter; Anderson, Jennifer

    2014-10-02

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGFβ pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGFβ signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGFβ and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental

  14. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    Ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. In this article, we provide evidence that ERF96 ismore » a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96’s transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed

  15. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    We report that ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ERF96more » is a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96’s transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed

  16. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    We report that ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ERF96 is a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96’s transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed that

  17. Human factors issues in qualitative and quantitative safety analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, H.A.

    1993-10-01

    Humans are a critical and integral part of any operational system, be it a nuclear reactor, a facility for assembly or disassembling hazardous components, or a transportation network. In our concern over the safety of these systems, we often focus our attention on the hardware engineering components of such systems. However, experience has repeatedly demonstrated that it is often the human component that is the primary determinant of overall system safety. Both the nuclear reactor accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island and shipping disasters such as the Exxon Valdez and the Herald of Free Enterprise accidents are attributable to human error. Concern over human contributions to system safety prompts us to include reviews of human factors issues in our safety analyses. In the conduct of Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs), human factors issues are addressed using a quantitative method called Human Reliability Analysis (HRA). HRAs typically begin with the identification of potential sources of human error in accident sequences of interest. Human error analysis often employs plant and/or procedures walk-downs in which the analyst considers the ``goodness`` of procedures, training, and human-machine interfaces concerning their potential contribution to human error. Interviews with expert task performers may also be conducted. In the application of HRA, once candidate sources of human error have been identified, error probabilities are developed.

  18. Asymptotic, multigroup flux reconstruction and consistent discontinuity factors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Trahan, Travis J.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2015-05-12

    Recent theoretical work has led to an asymptotically derived expression for reconstructing the neutron flux from lattice functions and multigroup diffusion solutions. The leading-order asymptotic term is the standard expression for flux reconstruction, i.e., it is the product of a shape function, obtained through a lattice calculation, and the multigroup diffusion solution. The first-order asymptotic correction term is significant only where the gradient of the diffusion solution is not small. Inclusion of this first-order correction term can significantly improve the accuracy of the reconstructed flux. One may define discontinuity factors (DFs) to make certain angular moments of the reconstructed fluxmore » continuous across interfaces between assemblies in 1-D. Indeed, the standard assembly discontinuity factors make the zeroth moment (scalar flux) of the reconstructed flux continuous. The inclusion of the correction term in the flux reconstruction provides an additional degree of freedom that can be used to make two angular moments of the reconstructed flux continuous across interfaces by using current DFs in addition to flux DFs. Thus, numerical results demonstrate that using flux and current DFs together can be more accurate than using only flux DFs, and that making the second angular moment continuous can be more accurate than making the zeroth moment continuous.« less

  19. Effectiveness factors for hydroprocessing of coal and coal liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massoth, F.E.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-03-29

    The aim of this project is to develop a methodology to predict, from a knowledge of feed and catalyst properties, effectiveness factors for catalytic hydroprocessing of coal and coal liquids. To achieve this aim, it is necessary to account for restrictive diffusion, which has not hitherto been done from a fundamental approach under reaction conditions. The research entails a study of hydrodenitrogenation of model compounds and coal-derived liquids using three NiMo/alumina catalysts of different pore size to develop, for restrictive diffusion, a relationship that can be used for estimating reliable effectiveness factors. The research program includes: Task A - measurement of pertinent properties of the catalysts and of several coal liquids; Task B - determination of effective diffusivities and turtuosities of the catalysts; Task C - development of restrictive diffusion correlations from data on model N-compound reactions; Task D - testing of correlations with coal-liquid cuts and whole coal-liquid feed. Results are presented and discussed from Tasks B and D. 9 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Effectiveness factors for hydroprocessing of coal and coal liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massoth, F.E.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this research project is to develop a methodology to predict, from a knowledge of feed and catalyst properties, effectiveness factors for catalytic hydroprocessing of coal and coal liquids. To achieve this aim, it is necessary to account for restrictive diffusion, which has not hitherto been done from a fundamental approach under reaction conditions. The research proposed here entails a study of hydrodenitrogenation of model compounds and coal-derived liquids using three NiMo/alumina catalysts of different pore size to develop, for restrictive diffusion, a relationship that can be used for estimating reliable effectiveness factors. The program is divided into four parts: measurements of pertinent properties of the catalysts and of a coal liquid and its derived boiling-point cuts; determination of effective diffusivities and tortuosities of the catalysts; development of restrictive diffusion correlations from data on model N-compounds at reaction conditions; and testing of correlations with coal-liquid cuts and whole coal-liquid feed, modifying correlations as necessary.

  1. Franck-Condon factors perturbed by damped harmonic oscillators: Solvent enhanced X {sup 1}A{sub g} ↔ A{sup 1}B{sub 1u} absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chen-Wen; Zhu, Chaoyuan Lin, Sheng-Hsien; Yang, Ling; Yu, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-28

    Damped harmonic oscillators are utilized to calculate Franck-Condon factors within displaced harmonic oscillator approximation. This is practically done by scaling unperturbed Hessian matrix that represents local modes of force constants for molecule in gaseous phase, and then by diagonalizing perturbed Hessian matrix it results in direct modification of Huang–Rhys factors which represent normal modes of solute molecule perturbed by solvent environment. Scaling parameters are empirically introduced for simulating absorption and fluorescence spectra of an isolated solute molecule in solution. The present method is especially useful for simulating vibronic spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in which hydrogen atom vibrations in solution can be scaled equally, namely the same scaling factor being applied to all hydrogen atoms in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present method is demonstrated in simulating solvent enhanced X {sup 1}A{sub g} ↔ A{sup 1}B{sub 1u} absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene (medium-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) in benzene solution. It is found that one of six active normal modes v{sub 10} is actually responsible to the solvent enhancement of spectra observed in experiment. Simulations from all functionals (TD) B3LYP, (TD) B3LYP35, (TD) B3LYP50, and (TD) B3LYP100 draw the same conclusion. Hence, the present method is able to adequately reproduce experimental absorption and fluorescence spectra in both gas and solution phases.

  2. Factors relevant to utility integration of intermittent renewable technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Yih-huei; Parsons, B.K.

    1993-08-01

    This study assesses factors that utilities must address when they integrate intermittent renewable technologies into their power-supply systems; it also reviews the literature in this area and has a bibliography containing more than 350 listings. Three topics are covered: (1) interface (hardware and design-related interconnection), (2) operability/stability, and (3) planning. This study finds that several commonly held perceptions regarding integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies are not valid. Among findings of the study are the following: (1) hardware and system design advances have eliminated most concerns about interface; (2) cost penalties have not occurred at low to moderate penetration levels (and high levels are feasible); and (3) intermittent renewable energy technologies can have capacity values. Obstacles still interfering with intermittent renewable technologies are also identified.

  3. Making tensor factorizations robust to non-gaussian noise.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi, Eric C.; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2011-03-01

    Tensors are multi-way arrays, and the CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP) tensor factorization has found application in many different domains. The CP model is typically fit using a least squares objective function, which is a maximum likelihood estimate under the assumption of independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) Gaussian noise. We demonstrate that this loss function can be highly sensitive to non-Gaussian noise. Therefore, we propose a loss function based on the 1-norm because it can accommodate both Gaussian and grossly non-Gaussian perturbations. We also present an alternating majorization-minimization (MM) algorithm for fitting a CP model using our proposed loss function (CPAL1) and compare its performance to the workhorse algorithm for fitting CP models, CP alternating least squares (CPALS).

  4. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the size of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.

  5. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the sizemore » of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.« less

  6. Meson Transition Form Factors in Light-Front Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Cao, Fu-Guang; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2011-06-22

    We study the photon-to-meson transition form factors (TFFs) F{sub M{gamma}}(Q{sup 2}) for {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} M using light-front holographic methods. The Chern-Simons action, which is a natural form in 5-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, leads directly to an expression for the photon-to-pion TFF for a class of confining models. Remarkably, the predicted pion TFF is identical to the leading order QCD result where the distribution amplitude has asymptotic form. The Chern-Simons form is local in AdS space and is thus somewhat limited in its predictability. It only retains the q{bar q} component of the pion wavefunction, and further, it projects out only the asymptotic form of the meson distribution amplitude. It is found that in order to describe simultaneously the decay process {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} and the pion TFF at the asymptotic limit, a probability for the q{bar q} component of the pion wavefunction P{sub q{bar q}} = 0.5 is required; thus giving indication that the contributions from higher Fock states in the pion light-front wavefunction need to be included in the analysis. The probability for the Fock state containing four quarks (anti-quarks) which follows from analyzing the hadron matrix elements, P{sub q{bar q}q{bar q}} {approx} 10%, agrees with the analysis of the pion elastic form factor using light-front holography including higher Fock components in the pion wavefunction. The results for the TFFs for the {eta} and {eta}{prime} mesons are also presented. The rapid growth of the pion TFF exhibited by the BABAR data at high Q{sup 2} is not compatible with the models discussed in this article, whereas the theoretical calculations are in agreement with the experimental data for the {eta} and {eta}{prime} TFFs.

  7. The role of amenities and other factors in influencing the location of nonmanufacturing industry in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, T.; Calzonetti, F.J.

    1990-07-01

    Consumer and producer services, the latter in particular, are expected to become an important means of diversification and employment growth to the economy of Nevada. It has been suggested that the siting of the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will lead to a significant reduction in the amenity value of the state and, consequently, the ability of the state to attract these nonmanufacturing industries. This report reviews the literature dealing with factors important to the location of services, with an emphasis on producer services, to determine whether amenities, which have been shown to be an important locational consideration for some manufacturing firms, similarly affect the location of services. The report finds little substantive evidence to link amenities with the location of service firms, although the process by which these firms` locations are chosen is not well understood. Research in this area is comparatively recent, and although a number of theories of service location have been developed, the majority of research is exploratory in scope.

  8. Use of green fluorescent fusion protein to track activation of the transcription factor osterix during early osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tai Guangping; Christodoulou, Ioannis; Bishop, Anne E.; Polak, Julia M. . E-mail: julia.polak@imperial.ac.uk

    2005-08-12

    Osterix (Osx) is a transcription factor required for the differentiation of preosteoblasts into fully functioning osteoblasts. However, the pattern of Osx activation during preosteoblast differentiation and maturation has not been clearly defined. Our aim was to study Osx activation during these processes in osteoblasts differentiating from murine and human embryonic stem cells (ESC). To do this, we constructed an Osx-GFP fusion protein reporter system to track Osx translocation within the cells. The distribution of Osx-GFP at representative stages of differentiation was also investigated by screening primary osteoblasts, mesenchymal stem cells, synoviocytes, and pre-adipocytes. Our experiments revealed that Osx-GFP protein was detectable in the cytoplasm of cultured, differentiated ESC 4 days after plating of enzymatically dispersed embryoid bodies. Osterix-GFP protein became translocated into the nucleus on day 7 following transfer of differentiated ESC to osteogenic medium. After 14 days of differentiation, cells showing nuclear translocation of Osx-GFP formed rudimentary bone nodules that continued to increase in number over the following weeks (through day 21). We also found that Osx translocated into the nuclei of mesenchymal stem cells (C3H10T1/2) and pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) and showed partial activation in pre-adipocytes (MC3T3-L1). These data suggest that Osx activation occurs at a very early point in the differentiation of the mesenchymal-osteoblastic lineage.

  9. Bioorganometallic chemistry: biocatalytic oxidation reactions with biomimetic nad+/nadh co-factors and [cp*rh(bpy)h]+ for selective organic synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Jochen; Hollman, Frank; Ho, The Vinh; Schnyder, Adrian; Fish, Richard H.; Schmid, Andreas

    2004-03-09

    The biocatalytic, regioselective hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl to the corresponding catechol was accomplished utilizing the monooxygenase 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA). The necessary natural nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) co-factor for this biocatalytic process was replaced by a biomimetic co-factor, N-benzylnicotinamide bromide, 1a. The interaction between the flavin (FAD) containing HbpA enzyme and the corresponding biomimetic NADH compound, N-benzyl-1,4-dihdronicotinamide, 1b, for hydride transfers, was shown to readily occur. The in situ recycling of the reduced NADH biomimic 1b from 1a was accomplished with [Cp*Rh(bpy)H](Cl); however, productive coupling of this regeneration reaction to the enzymatic hydroxylation reaction was not totally successful, due to a deactivation process concerning the HbpA enzyme peripheral groups; i.e., -SH or -NH{sub 2} possibly reacting with the precatalyst, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)](Cl){sub 2}, and thus inhibiting the co-factor regeneration process. The deactivation mechanism was studied, and a promising strategy of derivatizing these peripheral -SH or -NH{sub 2} groups with a polymer containing epoxide was successful in circumventing the undesired interaction between HbpA and the precatalyst. This latter strategy allowed tandem co-factor regeneration using 1a or 2a, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H2O)](Cl){sub 2}, and formate ion, in conjunction with the polymer bound, FAD containing HbpA enzyme to provide the catechol product.

  10. Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2015 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2015 Handbook describes the annual ...

  11. LATTICE WITH SMALLER MOMENTUM COMPACTION FACTOR FOR PEP-II HIGH...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LATTICE WITH SMALLER MOMENTUM COMPACTION FACTOR FOR PEP-II HIGH ENERGY RING Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LATTICE WITH SMALLER MOMENTUM COMPACTION FACTOR FOR PEP-II ...

  12. Neutron and Gamma-Ray Kerma Factors Based on LLNL Nuclear Data Files.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-07-08

    Version 00 Kerma factors are used extensively in biomedical applications. Specifically, neutron kerma factors are used in determining heating in materials of interest from neutron-induced reactions in fission or fusion power applications.

  13. Central safety factor and β N control on NSTX-U via beam power...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Central safety factor and N control on NSTX-U via beam power and plasma boundary shape ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Central safety factor and N control on ...

  14. Global Agricultural Supply and Demand: Factors Contributing to the Recent Increase in Food Commodity Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-05-01

    This report discusses the factors that have led to global food commodity price inflaction and addresses the resulting implications.

  15. Meson transition form factors in light-front holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Cao Fuguang; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2011-10-01

    We study the photon-to-meson transition form factors (TFFs) F{sub M}{gamma}(Q{sup 2}) for {gamma}{gamma}{sup *}{yields}M using light-front holographic methods. The Chern-Simons action, which is a natural form in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, is required to describe the anomalous coupling of mesons to photons using holographic methods and leads directly to an expression for the photon-to-pion TFF for a class of confining models. Remarkably, the predicted pion TFF is identical to the leading order QCD result where the distribution amplitude has asymptotic form. The Chern-Simons form is local in AdS space and is thus somewhat limited in its predictability. It only retains the qq component of the pion wave function, and further, it projects out only the asymptotic form of the meson distribution amplitude. It is found that in order to describe simultaneously the decay process {pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} and the pion TFF at the asymptotic limit, a probability for the qq component of the pion wave function P{sub qq}=0.5 is required, thus giving indication that the contributions from higher Fock states in the pion light-front wave function need to be included in the analysis. The probability for the Fock state containing four quarks P{sub qqqq}{approx}10%, which follows from analyzing the hadron matrix elements for a dressed current model, agrees with the analysis of the pion elastic form factor using light-front holography including higher Fock components in the pion wave function. The results for the TFFs for the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} mesons are also presented. The rapid growth of the pion TFF exhibited by the BABAR data at high Q{sup 2} is not compatible with the models discussed in this article, whereas the theoretical calculations are in agreement with the experimental data for the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} TFFs.

  16. Decommissioning Cost Estimating Factors And Earned Value Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P.C.; Cimmarron, E.

    2008-07-01

    The Rocky Flats 771 Project progressed from the planning stage of decommissioning a plutonium facility, through the strip-out of highly-contaminated equipment, removal of utilities and structural decontamination, and building demolition. Actual cost data was collected from the strip-out activities and compared to original estimates, allowing the development of cost by equipment groupings and types and over time. Separate data was developed from the project control earned value reporting and compared with the equipment data. The paper discusses the analysis to develop the detailed factors for the different equipment types, and the items that need to be considered during characterization of a similar facility when preparing an estimate. The factors are presented based on direct labor requirements by equipment type. The paper also includes actual support costs, and examples of fixed or one-time start-up costs. The integration of the estimate and the earned value system used for the 771 Project is also discussed. The paper covers the development of the earned value system as well as its application to a facility to be decommissioned and an existing work breakdown structure. Lessons learned are provided, including integration with scheduling and craft supervision, measurement approaches, and verification of scope completion. In summary: The work of decommissioning the Rocky Flats 771 Project process equipment was completed in 2003. Early in the planning process, we had difficulty in identifying credible data and implementing processes for estimating and controlling this work. As the project progressed, we were able to collect actual data on the costs of removing plutonium contaminated equipment from various areas over the life of this work and associate those costs with individual pieces of equipment. We also were able to develop and test out a system for measuring the earned value of a decommissioning project based on an evolving estimate. These were elements that

  17. State-level Greenhouse Gas Emission Factors for Electricity Generation, Updated 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This report documents the preparation of updated state-level electricity coefficients for carbon dioxide (CO ), methane (CH ), and nitrous oxide (NO), which represent a three-year weighted average for 1998-2000.

  18. A Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, Jordan; Newmark, Robin; Heath, Garvin; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The presented water factors may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

  19. Extracellular nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor and method of isolation thereof from wound fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banda, M.J.; Werb, Z.; Knighton, D.R.; Hunt, T.K.

    1985-03-05

    A nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor is isolated from wound fluid by dialysis to include materials in the molecular size range of 2,000 to 14,000, lyophilization, and chromatography. The nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor is identified by activity by corneal implant assay and by cell migration assay. The angiogenesis factor is also characterized by inactivity by mitogenesis assay. 3 figs.

  20. Extracellular nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor and method of isolation thereof from wound fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banda, Michael J.; Werb, Zena; Knighton, David R.; Hunt, Thomas K.

    1985-01-01

    A nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor is isolated from wound fluid by dialysis to include materials in the molecular size range of 2,000 to 14,000, lyophilization, and chromatography. The nonmitogenic angiogenesis factor is identified by activity by corneal implant assay and by cell migration assay. The angiogenesis factor is also characterized by inactivity by mitogenesis assay.

  1. Sugarcane transgenics expressing MYB transcription factors show improved glucose release

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Bewg, William P.; Lan, Wu; Ralph, John; Coleman, Heather D.

    2016-07-15

    In this study, sugarcane, a tropical C4 perennial crop, is capable of producing 30-100 tons or more of biomass per hectare annually. The lignocellulosic residue remaining after sugar extraction is currently underutilized and can provide a significant source of biomass for the production of second-generation bioethanol. As a result, MYB31 and MYB42 were cloned from maize and expressed in sugarcane with and without the UTR sequences. The cloned sequences were 98 and 99 % identical to the published nucleotide sequences. The inclusion of the UTR sequences did not affect any of the parameters tested. There was little difference in plantmore » height and the number of internodes of the MYB-overexpressing sugarcane plants when compared with controls. MYB transgene expression determined by qPCR exhibited continued expression in young and maturing internodes. MYB31 downregulated more genes within the lignin biosynthetic pathway than MYB42. MYB31 and MYB42 expression resulted in decreased lignin content in some lines. All MYB42 plants further analyzed showed significant increases in glucose release by enzymatic hydrolysis in 72 h, whereas only two MYB31 plants released more glucose than control plants. This correlated directly with a significant decrease in acid-insoluble lignin. Soluble sucrose content of the MYB42 transgenic plants did not vary compared to control plants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of MYB transcription factors to improve the production of bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse remaining after sugar extraction.« less

  2. Hyperdynamics boost factor achievable with an ideal bias potential

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Chen; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur F.

    2015-08-20

    Hyperdynamics is a powerful method to significantly extend the time scales amenable to molecular dynamics simulation of infrequent events. One outstanding challenge, however, is the development of the so-called bias potential required by the method. In this work, we design a bias potential using information about all minimum energy pathways (MEPs) out of the current state. While this approach is not suitable for use in an actual hyperdynamics simulation, because the pathways are generally not known in advance, it allows us to show that it is possible to come very close to the theoretical boost limit of hyperdynamics while maintainingmore » high accuracy. We demonstrate this by applying this MEP-based hyperdynamics (MEP-HD) to metallic surface diffusion systems. In most cases, MEP-HD gives boost factors that are orders of magnitude larger than the best existing bias potential, indicating that further development of hyperdynamics bias potentials could have a significant payoff. Lastly, we discuss potential practical uses of MEP-HD, including the possibility of developing MEP-HD into a true hyperdynamics.« less

  3. Factors controlling pathogen destruction during anaerobic digestion of biowastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.R. . E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk; Lang, N.L.; Cheung, K.H.M.; Spanoudaki, K.

    2005-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the principal method of stabilising biosolids from urban wastewater treatment in the UK, and it also has application for the treatment of other types of biowaste. Increasing awareness of the potential risks to human and animal health from environmental sources of pathogens has focused attention on the efficacy of waste treatment processes at destroying pathogenic microorganisms in biowastes recycled to agricultural land. The degree of disinfection achieved by a particular anaerobic digester is influenced by a variety of interacting operational variables and conditions, which can often deviate from the ideal. Experimental investigations demonstrate that Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. are not damaged by mesophilic temperatures, whereas rapid inactivation occurs by thermophilic digestion. A hydraulic, biokinetic and thermodynamic model of pathogen inactivation during anaerobic digestion showed that a 2 log{sub 10} reduction in E. coli (the minimum removal required for agricultural use of conventionally treated biosolids) is likely to challenge most conventional mesophilic digesters, unless strict maintenance and management practices are adopted to minimise dead zones and by-pass flow. Efficient mixing and organic matter stabilisation are the main factors controlling the rate of inactivation under mesophilic conditions and not a direct effect of temperature per se on pathogenic organisms.

  4. Highly Efficient Small Form Factor LED Retrofit Lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Allen; Fred Palmer; Ming Li

    2011-09-11

    This report summarizes work to develop a high efficiency LED-based MR16 lamp downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0000611. A new multichip LED package, electronic driver, and reflector optic were developed for these lamps. At steady-state, the lamp luminous flux was 409 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy of 87 lumens per watt (LPW), CRI (Ra) of 87, and R9 of 85 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3285K. The LED alone achieved 120 lumens per watt efficacy and 600 lumen flux output at 25 C. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.90 at a power of only 5 watts. Compared to similar existing MR16 lamps using LED sources, these lamps had much higher efficacy and color quality. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a LED-based MR16 retrofit lamp for replacement of 35W halogen MR16 lamps having (1) luminous flux of 500 lumens, (2) luminous efficacy of 100 lumens per watt, (3) beam angle less than 40{sup o} and center beam candlepower of at least 1000 candelas, and (4) excellent color quality.

  5. Factors influencing radiation therapy student clinical placement satisfaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridge, Pete; Carmichael, Mary-Ann

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Radiation therapy students at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) attend clinical placements at five different clinical departments with varying resources and support strategies. This study aimed to determine the relative availability and perceived importance of different factors affecting student support while on clinical placement. The purpose of the research was to inform development of future support mechanisms to enhance radiation therapy students experience on clinical placement. Methods: This study used anonymous Likert-style surveys to gather data from years 1 and 2 radiation therapy students from QUT and clinical educators from Queensland relating to availability and importance of support mechanisms during clinical placements in a semester. Results: The study findings demonstrated student satisfaction with clinical support and suggested that level of support on placement influenced student employment choices. Staff support was perceived as more important than physical resources; particularly access to a named mentor, a clinical educator and weekly formative feedback. Both students and educators highlighted the impact of time pressures. Conclusions: The support offered to radiation therapy students by clinical staff is more highly valued than physical resources or models of placement support. Protected time and acknowledgement of the importance of clinical education roles are both invaluable. Joint investment in mentor support by both universities and clinical departments is crucial for facilitation of effective clinical learning.

  6. Factors affecting coking pressures in tall coke ovens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimley, J.J.; Radley, C.E.

    1995-12-01

    The detrimental effects of excessive coking pressures, resulting in the permanent deformation of coke oven walls, have been recognized for many years. Considerable research has been undertaken worldwide in attempts to define the limits within which a plant may safely operate and to quantify the factors which influence these pressures. Few full scale techniques are available for assessing the potential of a coal blend for causing wall damage. Inference of dangerous swelling pressures may be made however by the measurement of the peak gas pressure which is generated as the plastic layers meet and coalesce at the center of the oven. This pressure is referred to in this report as the carbonizing pressure. At the Dawes Lane cokemaking plant of British Steel`s Scunthorpe Works, a large database has been compiled over several years from the regulator measurement of this pressure. This data has been statistically analyzed to provide a mathematical model for predicting the carbonizing pressure from the properties of the component coals, the results of this analysis are presented in this report.

  7. Factors governing sustainable groundwater pumping near a river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Hubbard, S.S.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this paper is to provide new insights into processes affecting riverbank filtration (RBF). We consider a system with an inflatable dam installed for enhancing water production from downstream collector wells. Using a numerical model, we investigate the impact of groundwater pumping and dam operation on the hydrodynamics in the aquifer and water production. We focus our study on two processes that potentially limit water production of an RBF system: the development of an unsaturated zone and riverbed clogging. We quantify river clogging by calibrating a time-dependent riverbed permeability function based on knowledge of pumping rate, river stage, and temperature. The dynamics of the estimated riverbed permeability reflects clogging and scouring mechanisms. Our results indicate that (1) riverbed permeability is the dominant factor affecting infiltration needed for sustainable RBF production; (2) dam operation can influence pumping efficiency and prevent the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed only under conditions of sufficient riverbed permeability; (3) slow river velocity, caused by dam raising during summer months, may lead to sedimentation and deposition of fine-grained material within the riverbed, which may clog the riverbed, limiting recharge to the collector wells and contributing to the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed; and (4) higher river flow velocities, caused by dam lowering during winter storms, scour the riverbed an thus increase its permeability. These insights can be used as the basis for developing sustainable water management of a RBF system.

  8. Relating transverse-momentum-dependent and collinear factorization theorems in a generalized formalism

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collins, J.; Gamberg, L.; Prokudin, A.; Rogers, T. C.; Sato, N.; Wang, B.

    2016-08-08

    We construct an improved implementation for combining TMD factorization transverse- momentum-dependent (TMD) factorization and collinear factorization. TMD factorization is suit- able for low transverse momentum physics, while collinear factorization is suitable for high transverse momenta and for a cross section integrated over transverse momentum. The result is a modified version of the standard W + Y prescription traditionally used in the Collins-Soper-Sterman (CSS) formalism and related approaches. As a result, we further argue that questions regarding the shape and Q- dependence of the cross sections at lower Q are largely governed by the matching to the Y -term.

  9. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Gilman, Jessica; Warneke, Carsten; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Hosseini, SeyedEhsan; Miller, J. Wayne; Cocker, David R.; Jung, H.; Weise, David

    2013-01-07

    Vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected from five locations in the southeastern and southwestern U.S. and burned in a series of 77 fires at the U.S. Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. An additional 152 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. As phase II of this study, we conducted airborne and ground-based sampling of the emissions from real prescribed fires mostly in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These extensive field measurements of emission factors (EF) for temperate biomass burning are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for smoldering compounds emitted by burning the semi

  10. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Dan

    2013-10-01

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  11. Multifocal Glioblastoma Multiforme: Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Progression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Andrel, Jocelyn; Andrews, David W.; Curran, Walter J.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Werner-Wasik, Maria

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the progression patterns in patients with multifocal glioblastoma multiforme who had undergone whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), the historical standard, versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and to identify predictive treatment and pretreatment factors. Methods and Materials: The records of 50 patients with multifocal glioblastoma multiforme treated with RT were reviewed. Univariate analyses were performed using survival methods and the Cox proportional hazards regression method. Multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazards regression method. Results: The mean age was 61 years, and 71% had a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score of {>=}70. Of the 50 patients, 32% underwent WBRT and 68%, three-dimensional conformal RT. Progression was local in all evaluable patients, as determined by imaging in 38 patients and early neurologic progression in 12. The median time to progression (TTP) was 3.1 months, and the median survival time (MST) was 8.1 months. The significant independent predictors of TTP on multivariate analysis were a KPS score <70 (p = 0.001), the extent of surgery (p = 0.040), a radiation dose <60 Gy (p = 0.027), and the lack of chemotherapy (p = 0.001). The significant independent predictors of a reduced MST were a KPS score <70 (p = 0.022) and the absence of salvage surgery (p = 0.011) and salvage chemotherapy (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Local progression was observed in all patients. On multivariate analysis, no significant difference was found in the TTP or MST between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and WBRT. The KPS was a consistent independent predictor of both TTP and MST. On the basis of the progression pattern, we do not recommend WBRT as a mandatory component of the treatment of multifocal glioblastoma multi0011for.

  12. Experimental analysis of elemental factors controlling the life of PAFCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    1996-12-31

    Since 1991, 5MW-class and 1MW-class PAFC power plants have been demonstrated with the objective of accelerating development and commercialization by the Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Research Association (PAFC-TRA) jointly with NEDO as one of MITI`s fuel cell programs. As a complimentary research project to the demonstration project, the mechanism and rate of deterioration of the cells and stacks have been studied from 1995 FY, with the objective of establishing an estimation method for the service life-time of the cell stacks. Our work has been performed in the Basic Research Project, as part of that project on PAFCs, with the cooperation of Yamanashi University supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, PAFC-TRA supported by NEDO and three PAFC makers. We have selected the following four subjects as the essential factors relating to the life-time, after a year-long study of the literature and the accumulation of a large number of data as to the practical operations of the cells, cell stacks and plants of PAFCs; i.e., (1) Mechanism of the degradation of electrocatalysts and the effect of the degradation on the electrode performances. (2) Effect of the electrolyte fill-level on the electrode performances. (3) Corrosion of cell constructing materials and the effect of the corrosion on the electrode performances. (4) The rate and mechanism of electrolyte loss under various operating conditions of a model cell. The paper briefly introduces the interim results which have been found on the above subjects at this time.

  13. Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

    2008-02-14

    This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

  14. Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, K.

    2010-05-05

    Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

  15. Quantitative x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Quadrupole effects, shake-up, Shirley background, and relative sensitivity factors from a database of true x-ray photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seah, M. P.; Gilmore, I. S.

    2006-05-01

    An analysis is provided of the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) intensities measured in the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) XPS database for 46 solid elements. This present analysis does not change our previous conclusions concerning the excellent correlation between experimental intensities, following deconvolving the spectra with angle-averaged reflection electron energy loss data, and the theoretical intensities involving the dipole approximation using Scofield's cross sections. Here, more recent calculations for cross sections by Trzhaskovskaya et al. involving quadrupole terms are evaluated and it is shown that their cross sections diverge from the experimental database results by up to a factor of 5. The quadrupole angular terms lead to small corrections that are close to our measurement limit but do appear to be supported in the present analysis. Measurements of the extent of shake-up for the 46 elements broadly agree with the calculations of Yarzhemsky et al. but not in detail. The predicted constancy in the shake-up contribution by Yarzhemsky et al. implies that the use of the Shirley background will lead to a peak area that is a constant fraction of the true peak area including the shake-up intensities. However, the measured variability of the shake-up contribution makes the Shirley background invalid for quantification except for situations where the sensitivity factors are from reference samples similar to those being analyzed.

  16. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions and those key factors that may impact the deployment of AdvSMRs or any other new nuclear power plants. Thus, this report serves as a reference document for DOE as it moves forward with its plans to develop advanced reactors, including AdvSMRs. For the purpose of this analysis, information on electricity markets and nuclear power plant operating costs will be combined to examine the current state of the nuclear industry and the process required to successfully move forward with new nuclear power in general and AdvSMRs in particular. The current electricity market is generally unfavorable to new nuclear construction, especially in deregulated markets with heavy competition from natural gas and subsidized renewables. The successful and profitable operation of a nuclear power plant (or any power plant) requires the rate at which the electricity is sold to be sufficiently greater than the cost to operate. The wholesale rates in most US markets have settled into values that provide profits for most operating nuclear power plants but are too low to support the added cost of capital recovery for new nuclear construction. There is a strong geographic dependence on the wholesale rate, with some markets currently able to support new nuclear construction. However, there is also a strong geographic dependence on pronuclear public opinion; the areas where power prices are high tend to have unfavorable views on the construction of new nuclear power plants. The use of government-backed incentives, such as subsidies, can help provide a margin to help justify construction projects that otherwise may not seem viable. Similarly, low interest rates for the project will also add a positive margin to the economic

  17. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21

    Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by

  18. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 strongly potentiates growth factor-induced proliferation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montesano, Roberto Sarkoezi, Rita; Schramek, Herbert

    2008-09-12

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional cytokines that elicit pleiotropic effects on biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. With respect to cell proliferation, BMPs can exert either mitogenic or anti-mitogenic activities, depending on the target cells and their context. Here, we report that in low-density cultures of immortalized mammary epithelial cells, BMP-4 did not stimulate cell proliferation by itself. However, when added in combination with suboptimal concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FGF-7, FGF-10, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), BMP-4 potently enhanced growth factor-induced cell proliferation. These results reveal a hitherto unsuspected interplay between BMP-4 and growth factors in the regulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation. We suggest that the ability of BMP-4 to potentiate the mitogenic activity of multiple growth factors may contribute to mammary gland ductal morphogenesis as well as to breast cancer progression.

  19. H.R. 577: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide a tax credit for the production of oil and gas from existing marginal oil and gas wells and from new oil and gas wells. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This document contains H.R. 577, A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide a tax credit for the production of oil and gas from existing marginal oil and gas wells and from new oil and gas wells. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 19, 1995.

  20. H. R. 4299: A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 in order to provide an incentive for business to invest in pollution abatement property and related assets, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, February 25, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on February 25, 1992 to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 in order to provide an incentive for business to invest in pollution abatement property and related assets. This relates to a plant or other property in operation before January 1, 1991, to prevent, abate or control pollution.