National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for factors shown represent

  1. Wiebe, E. N. (1994). Evaluation of alternative methods of representing three-dimensional 1 objects on computer displays. In, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1994-01-01

    Wiebe, E. N. (1994). Evaluation of alternative methods of representing three-dimensional 1 objects on computer displays. In, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 38th Annual Meeting, October 24-28, 1994. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF REPRESENTING THREE- DIMENSIONAL OBJECTS ON COMPUTER

  2. Facility Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-04-06

    REPLACED BY DOE-STD-1063 | SUPERSEDING DOE-STD-1063-2000 (MARCH 2000) The purpose of the DOE Facility Representative Program is to ensure that competent DOE staff personnel are assigned to oversee the day-to-day contractor operations at DOE’s hazardous nuclear and non-nuclear facilities.

  3. Chapter 3 Representing Geography 32 Representing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Chapter 3 Representing Geography 32 Representing Geography OVERVIEW This chapter introduces;Chapter 3 Representing Geography 33 KEY WORDS AND CONCEPTS Digital, binary, representation, Tobler`s First Law of Geography, attributes, the fundamental problem (the world is infinitely complex), discrete

  4. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-03-03

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression for the non-decaying tracer. If the power-law equation for the median dilution factor, Df, based on a non-decaying tracer has the general form Df=a?×t?^(-b) for time t after the release event, then the equation has the form Df=e^(-?t)×a×t^(-b) for a radioactive isotope, where ? is the decay constant for the isotope.

  5. Representative Control Gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Representative Staffing & Management Reviews & Control Gates The NASA Program/Project Life Cycle Concept C Concept/Design Evaluation Criteria ° Feasibility Assessment ° Life Cycle Cost Estimates ° Trade Requirements Establish Optimum System Design Analyze Mission Requirements Establish Optimum Architecture

  6. The picture represents how motions of distal enzyme loops (shown as thick colored tubes) in the enzyme cyclophilin A can impact the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    discovery casts enzymes in new light Similarly, scientists have known for decades that certain structural energy applications, specifically in the area of cellulosic ethanol. Highly efficient enzymes could bring," Agarwal said. "For example, regardless of which company makes a car, they all have wheels and brakes

  7. Representative Albert R. Public Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    District. During the last 12 years, he served on the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee, most of the Subcommittee on Energy and Air Quality. While on Energy and Commerce, Representative Wynn also served OF CONCENTRATION Energy Representative Wynn helped craft the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. He added

  8. Nonlinear Susceptibility In the case of linear polarizability, we have shown that the electron may be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    Chapter 21 Nonlinear Susceptibility In the case of linear polarizability, we have shown that the electron may be thought of as being bound by a simple harmonic potential U = 1 2 k1x2 . ( Re- call , and solid is In case of non-linear response, the potential is anharmonic; that is, there are correction

  9. VARIABILITY OF NEARSURFACE ZOOPLANKTON OFF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, AS SHOWN BY TOWED-PUMP SAMPLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VARIABILITY OF NEAR·SURFACE ZOOPLANKTON OFF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, AS SHOWN BY TOWED-PUMP SAMPLING Cl of 1962. Samples were collected with a towed pump at a depth of 5 m. Allproximately 162 samples, each repl pump surveys re- llorted here were undertaken to obtain informa- tion on variability and trends

  10. Matrix Inverses Consider the ordinary algebraic equation and its solution shown below

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    Matrix Inverses Consider the ordinary algebraic equation and its solution shown below: Since the linear system can be written as where , , and , (A = coefficient matrix, x = variable vector, b = constant vector) it is reasonable to ask if the matrix equation corresponding to above system of n linear

  11. Reservoir depletion at The Geysers geothermal area, California, shown by four-dimensional seismic tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Reservoir depletion at The Geysers geothermal area, California, shown by four-dimensional seismic geothermal exploitation at The Geysers geothermal area, California, induces myriads of small of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs is an effective geothermal reservoir depletion monitoring tool and can potentially

  12. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio. The Sound Waves simulation becomes the source of an analogical mapping to Radio Waves. Concepts Radio Waves 1 - Sound Waves references water waves 2 - Water is analogy for Sound Waves 3 - Radio

  13. Does the Poynting vector always represent electromagnetic power flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2015-07-07

    Poynting vector as electromagnetic power flow has prevailed over one hundred years in the community. However in this paper, it is shown from Maxwell equations that the Poynting vector may not represent the electromagnetic power flow for a plane wave in a non-dispersive, lossless, non-conducting, anisotropic uniform medium; this important conclusion revises the conventional understanding of Poynting vector. It is also shown that this conclusion is clearly supported by Fermat's principle and special theory of relativity.

  14. Does the Poynting vector always represent electromagnetic power flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changbiao

    2015-01-01

    Poynting vector as electromagnetic power flow has prevailed over one hundred years in the community. However in this paper, it is shown from Maxwell equations that the Poynting vector may not represent the electromagnetic power flow for a plane wave in a non-dispersive, lossless, non-conducting, anisotropic uniform medium; this important conclusion revises the conventional understanding of Poynting vector. It is also shown that this conclusion is clearly supported by Fermat's principle and special theory of relativity.

  15. Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier Series 23.2 Introduction In this Section we show how, then the Fourier series expansion takes the form: f(t) = a0 2 + n=1 (an cos nt + bn sin nt) Our main purpose here Fourier coefficients of a function of period 2 calculate Fourier coefficients of a function of general

  16. Constructs have shown success in replacement of large-diameter vessels (e.g. thoracic and abdominal aortas,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    medium exchange · Develop alterna@ve so\\ware environment to simplify· Constructs have shown success in replacement of large- diameter vessels (e) constructs have shown more failure rates, resul@ng in aneurysm forma

  17. Askin cream developed and tested by UAB Professor Mohammad Athar, Ph.D., has shown it can hyper-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    . The cream could one day be added to sunscreen as a cancer-fighting ingredient if it is shown to have

  18. Employment in Quebec's forest industry has shown considerable variation during the last few decades. Different factors have been suggested to explain the latest crisis in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asselin, Hugo

    price for newsprint, increased fuel and electricity costs, the high cost of acquisition, the low more emphasis on innovation. Consequently, emerging countries, rather than being perceived as competitors, would have instead been major markets for Quebec industry's innovative products. The widespread

  19. Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part of the total energy consumed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    consumption and for about 50% of the total electricity consumption [1]. Therefore it is important to explore one of them. The interviewees preferred receiving electricity consumption feedback from a bill, a web1 Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part

  20. Abstract --Research on silicon carbide (SiC) power electronics has shown their advantages in high temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    in switching applications such as AC motor control, motion/servo control, uninterruptible power suppliesAbstract -- Research on silicon carbide (SiC) power electronics has shown their advantages in high is verified to have low power loss, fast switching characteristics at 650 V dc bus voltage, 60 A drain current

  1. A close-up of the Sun (shown in ultraviolet light) reveals a mottled surface, bright flares,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    #12;#12;A close-up of the Sun (shown in ultraviolet light) reveals a mottled surface, bright flares, and tongues of hot gas leaping into space. Though they look like burns in the face of the Sun, sunspots circle in the center of the photo--allows scientists to see the solar wind streaming away from the Sun

  2. Name (as shown on your income tax return) Business name/disregarded entity name, if different from above

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    codes at usfweb2.usf.edu/supplierdiversity/how_to_do_business_with_usf.htm) Taxpayer Identification of perjury, I certify that: 1. The number shown on this form is my correct taxpayer identification number (or a TIN on Page 3. University of South Florida Request for Taxpayer Identification Number

  3. Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

  4. REPRESENTATIVE COURSE SEQUENCE SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (SE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    REPRESENTATIVE COURSE SEQUENCE SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (SE) Freshman Year First Semester Second Semester Second Semester CSE 3310 ­ Fundamentals of Software CSE 3302 ­ Programming Languages Engineering CSE 3320 ­ Operating Systems CSE 3315 ­ Theoretical Concepts in CSE CSE 4310 ­ Software Engineering

  5. A Capital Market Test of Representativeness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safdar, Mohammad

    2012-07-16

    While some prior studies document that investors overreact to information in sales growth as consistent with representativeness bias, other studies find no evidence of investor overreaction to either sales or earnings growth. Other recent studies...

  6. Representing Information Collections for Visual Cognition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Eunyee

    2009-05-15

    The importance of digital information collections is growing. Collections are typically represented with text-only, in a linear list format, which turns out to be a weak representation for cognition. We learned this from empirical research...

  7. Machine Design -2 Consider a machined bar made of cold-drawn 1045 steel shown below. A notch with radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battaglia, Francine

    dx dx = = = - Area moment of inertia (Solid rectangular area) 3 12 bh I = Normal stress My I b uta aSk = Surface Finish Factor a (Sut, MPa) Exponent b Ground 1.25 -0.085 Machined/Cold-Drawn 4.51.79mm 51mm 1.51 51mm 254mm e e e b e e d d d k d d - - - = =

  8. An iconic approach to representing climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

  9. Relationship between different channel light curves of gamma-ray burst pulses shown in aspects other than the pulse width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Ping Qin

    2004-11-13

    In this paper, we employ the peak count rate{\\bf \\}$C_p$ and the total count $C_{total}$ of light curves to study in the corresponding aspects the relationship between different channel light curves. To make a direct comparison between count rates of different channel light curves we introduce a plot of $C(\\tau)$ versus $C_H(\\tau)$, where $C(\\tau)$ is the count rate of a channel and $C_H(\\tau)$ is the count rate of a definite cannel, channel H (see the text). According to the plot we define $\\Delta C_{\\max}$ as the maximum deviation of the two count rate values of $C(\\tau)$ associated with a same count rate value of $% C_H(\\tau)$ and define $\\Delta S$ as the area confined by the close curve of $C(\\tau)$ in the plot to measure the difference of the rising and decaying portions of a light curve relative to the count rate of channel H. Under the assumption that some GRBs observed are in the stage of fireballs which expand relativistically, predictions on the relationships between the four quantities{\\bf (}$C_p$, $C_{total}$, $\\Delta C_{\\max}$, and $\\Delta S$) and energy within a wide band, calculated with different rest frame radiation forms and two typical Lorentz factors ($\\Gamma =20$ and 200), are made and presented, which would make the test of our model with the coming Swift data easier. Interpretations to the relationships within the mechanism of fireballs are also presented.

  10. Data structures and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E; Thomson, Judi R; Harvey, William J; Paulson, Patrick R; Whiting, Mark A; Tratz, Stephen C; Chappell, Alan R; Butner, Robert S

    2014-02-18

    Data structures and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  11. PWR representative behavior during a LOCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    To date, there has been substantial analytical and experimental effort to define the margins between design basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) behavior and regulatory limits on maximum fuel rod cladding temperature and deformation. As a result, there is extensive documentation on the modeling of fuel rod behavior in test reactors and design basis LOCA's. However, modeling of that behavior using representative, non-conservative, operating histories is not nearly as well documented in the public literature. Therefore, the objective of this paper is (a) to present calculations of LOCA induced behavior for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core representative fuel rods, and (b) to discuss the variability in those calculations given the variability in fuel rod condition at the initiation of the LOCA. This analysis was limited to the study of changes in fuel rod behavior due to different power operating histories. The other two important parameters which affect that behavior, initial fuel rod design and LOCA coolant conditions were held invarient for all of the representative rods analyzed.

  12. Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Saxon E

    2007-10-23

    The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, “Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative,” was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

  13. 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report...

  14. Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State...

  15. Representativeness based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Representativeness based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Title: Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Authors: Forrest M. Hoffman...

  16. Representativeness-Based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Representativeness-Based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Representativeness-Based Sampling Network...

  17. Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America November...

  18. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New...

  19. DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 -...

  20. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

  1. Greening the U.S. House of Representatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, Rick; Diamond, Rick; Payne, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    The Greening the Capitol initiative was launched in March, 2007 with the threefold goals of making the U.S. House of Representatives: 1) carbon neutral within 18 months, 2) reducing energy use by 50percent in ten years, and 3) becoming a model of sustainable operations. We report on the recommendations to meet these goals, looking at the targets of opportunity at the Capitol Power Plant, the existing buildings, and the overall operations of the complex. Our findings have shown that these goals are achievable, and that through an integrated approach the savings in carbon and energy can be met. Specific examples include the lighting retrofits in the House offices, parking areas, and the Capitol dome; the retrofits to the HVAC systems and controls, including duct sealing, improving the efficiency of the energy and water use in the food service areas; and improved operations of the steam and chilled water distribution system. A key aspect has been better tracking and feedback to the building operators of the actual energy consumption. We report on the technical opportunities presented by these historic and symbolic buildings in becoming models of sustainability.

  2. Knowledge Media Institute Representing Scholarly Claims in Internet Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowledge Media Institute Representing Scholarly Claims in Internet Digital Libraries: A Knowledge in Computer Science (Eds.) Serge Abiteboul and Anne-Marie Vercoustre. Representing Scholarly Claims with tracking and interpreting scholarly documents in distributed research communities. We argue that current

  3. Tailored Marketing for Under-represented Population Segments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tailored Marketing for Under-represented Population Segments (201) Tailored Marketing for Under-represented Population Segments (201) August 13, 2015 3:00PM to 4:3...

  4. What does motor efference copy represent? evidence from speech production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niziolek, CA; Nagarajan, SS; Houde, JF

    2013-01-01

    What does motor efference copy represent? Evidence fromAbbreviated title: What does motor efference copy represent?SJ, Wang X (2003) Sensory-Motor Interaction in the Primate

  5. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department’s corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical...

  6. 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 – 25, 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and...

  7. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona In addition to the ZIP file for each...

  8. Rabies Requirements for NH 4-H Animals Upon the recommendation of the New Hampshire State Veterinarian, all mammals shown or exhibited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Rabies Requirements for NH 4-H Animals Upon the recommendation of the New Hampshire State Veterinarian, all mammals shown or exhibited at New Hampshire 4-H events including fairs, shows, clinics, 4-H and fairs may have additional vaccination and health requirements as recommended by the New Hampshire State

  9. 1 Nash Equilibrium for mixed strategies Nash shown that every noncooperative game with finite sets of pure strategies has at least one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaValle, Steven M.

    1 Nash Equilibrium for mixed strategies Nash shown that every non­cooperative game with finite sets of pure strategies has at least one mixed strategy equilibrium pair. We define such pair as a Nash respectively, the strategy (y # , z # ) is a Nash equilibrium if: y # T Az # # y T Az # #y # Y y # T Bz # # y

  10. How To Order Complete part numbers for BD Series are shown on pages D-8 thru D-9. All switches supplied in "OFF" position.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    How To Order Complete part numbers for BD Series are shown on pages D-8 thru D-9. All switches supplied in "OFF" position. Specifications SWITCH FUNCTION: SPST - 1 thru 12 position available (except 11 position). CONTACT RATING: Carry: 100 mA max. @ 50 V DC. Switch: 100 mA max. @ 5 V DC or 25 mA max. @ 25 V

  11. Figure 1. An artist's impression of the Australian SKA pathfinder telescope, due to be completed in 2012. Shown are a few of the 36 12-metre dishes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Ray

    to the enormous sensitivity of the Square Kilometre Array, which is still a decade away, but due to its of galaxies. Keywords: astronomy; data; radio-astronomy I. INTRODUCTION The Square Kilometre Array (SKA in 2012. Shown are a few of the 36 12-metre dishes, each equipped with a 100-pixel Phased Array Feed

  12. A 32x32 optical packet switch design using only four packets of variable delay is shown 95% as efficient as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touch, Joe

    as a "parking lot", where packets from different "roads" are parked and separately retrieved. Current electronicAbstract A 32x32 optical packet switch design using only four packets of variable delay is shown 95 packet multiplexing. Our design shows that only four packets of optical switched-delay line can multiplex

  13. Air-Breathing Propulsion Qualifier Question -2012 A gas turbine jet engine, shown schematically in Figure 1, is operated on a stationary test stand.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Air-Breathing Propulsion Qualifier Question - 2012 A gas turbine jet engine, shown schematically compressor, a combustion chamber (combustor), a single stage turbine, and an ideally expanded nozzle (nozzle ratio ( C = Tt2 /Tt1 ), what is the turbine stagnation temperature ratio T = Tt4 /Tt3 ? (Suggestion

  14. Spots and stripes: Pleomorphic patterning of stem cells via p-ERK-dependent cell chemotaxis shown by feather morphogenesis and mathematical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maini, Philip K.

    Spots and stripes: Pleomorphic patterning of stem cells via p-ERK-dependent cell chemotaxis shown cells Placode ERK Mathematical modeling Chemotaxis A key issue in stem cell biology patterns, ranging from stripes to spots, can be obtained when the level of p-ERK activity is adjusted

  15. THE `TEST STATISTICS REPORT' provides a synopsis of the test attributes and some important statistics. A sample is shown here to the right.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    #12;THE `TEST STATISTICS REPORT' provides a synopsis of the test attributes and some important statistics. A sample is shown here to the right. The Test reliability indicators are measures of how well: Are formulae for testing reliability as a measure of internal consistency. Higher values indicate a stronger

  16. ElectroMechanical Systems A transducer used to measure translational motion is shown in Figure 1.1. The permanent magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landers, Robert G.

    Electro­Mechanical Systems QUESTION 1 A transducer used to measure translational motion is shown variables and inputs. #12;Electro­Mechanical Systems 2 L R ei(t) + - M K B N S I(t) Figure 2.1 QUESTION 3 of state equations describing the system dynamics. d. Determine the state variables and inputs. #12;Electro­Mechanical

  17. Name______________________________________Drug-like Properties all answers must fit in space provided Imagine that a drug discovery program generated the two lead compounds shown below. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    Name______________________________________Drug-like Properties all answers must fit in space provided 1 Imagine that a drug discovery program generated the two lead compounds shown below designed to facilitate drug discovery. We'll be using a free, web-based application that calculates drug

  18. Several groups of fishes have been shown to use or are suspected of using water jets from the opercular valves to aid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Frank

    Several groups of fishes have been shown to use or are suspected of using water jets from, 1987; Pietsch and Grobecker, 1987). Most studies of jet propulsion in fishes have been concerned with multiple jets that produce continuous, if somewhat staccato, locomotion. Some sources, however, have

  19. High freestream turbulence levels have been shown to greatly augment the heat transfer along a gas turbine airfoil, particularly for the first stage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    along a gas turbine airfoil, particularly for the first stage nozzle guide vane. For this study of the variables affecting boundary layer development on gas turbine airfoils, studies need to be performed of a variety of gas turbine combustors have shown that the levels can range between 8% and 40% (Kuotmos and Mc

  20. 1 Nash Equilibrium for mixed strategies Nash shown that every non-cooperative game with finite sets of pure strategies has at least one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaValle, Steven M.

    1 Nash Equilibrium for mixed strategies Nash shown that every non-cooperative game with finite sets of pure strategies has at least one mixed strategy equilibrium pair. We define such pair as a Nash respectively, the strategy (y, z) is a Nash equilibrium if: yT Az y T Az y Y yT Bz yT Bz z Z in which Y

  1. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-21

    The Order established procedures governing the selection, appointment and termination of Department of Energy contracting officers and contracting officer representatives. Supersedes DOE O 541.1A.

  2. Name Representing Alam, Mansoor WSA Information Technology Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    Name Representing Alam, Mansoor WSA Information Technology Committee Baird, Dave Chair and Chief Information Officer Beveridge, Dave Faculty, Division III Cope, Miriam Academic Computing Manager, Division

  3. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    akfairbanksnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  4. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    atxhoustonnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  5. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    mdbaltimorenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate...

  6. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    agaatlantanew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  7. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    usaflmiaminew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  8. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    samthelenanew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  9. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    acobouldernew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate...

  10. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    awaseattlenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate...

  11. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nvlasvegasnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate...

  12. Polytechnic Institute of New York University Researchers Represented...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polytechnic Institute of New York University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network ResearcherResearch Institution Web page Aronov, Boris - Department of Computer Science...

  13. Photon impact factor in the NLO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balitsky, Ian [JLAB

    2013-04-01

    The photon impact factor for the BFKL pomeron is calculated in the next-to-leading order (NLO) approximation using the operator expansion in Wilson lines. The result is represented as a NLO k{sub T}-factorization formula for the structure functions of small-x deep inelastic scattering.

  14. Notes on representing grain size distributions obtained by electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, Laszlo S., E-mail: laszlo.metz@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Biswas, Somjeet, E-mail: somjeetbiswas@gmail.com [Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Gu, Chengfan, E-mail: chengfan.gu@unsw.edu.au [School of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Beausir, Benoit, E-mail: benoit.beausir@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France)

    2013-10-15

    Grain size distributions measured by electron backscatter diffraction are commonly represented by histograms using either number or area fraction definitions. It is shown here that they should be presented in forms of density distribution functions for direct quantitative comparisons between different measurements. Here we make an interpretation of the frequently seen parabolic tales of the area distributions of bimodal grain structures and a transformation formula between the two distributions are given in this paper. - Highlights: • Grain size distributions are represented by density functions. • The parabolic tales corresponds to equal number of grains in a bin of the histogram. • A simple transformation formula is given to number and area weighed distributions. • The particularities of uniform and lognormal distributions are examined.

  15. Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

    1983-02-01

    Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

  16. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix H: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report develops and presents estimates for a set of three values that represent a reasonable range for the packaging factors for several waste streams that are potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste. The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level waste disposal container divided by the original, as-generated or ``unpackaged,`` volume of the wastes loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors take into account any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. The three values developed represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated volume of waste for disposal, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. Three categories of greater-than-Class C low-level waste are evaluated in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other wastes. Estimates of reasonable packaging factors for the low, base, and high cases for the specific waste streams in each category are shown in Table H-1.

  17. Changes to the Facility Representative Program, 10/26/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effective October 1, 1999, the Deputy Secretary tasked this office to manage the Facility Representative Program. We look forward to working with you in continuing and improving this very important...

  18. Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

  19. A representative individual from Arrovian aggregation of parametric individual utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A representative individual from Arrovian aggregation of parametric individual utilities social choice theory Assumptions Assumption on decisive coalitions Assumptions on individual utility functions Assumptions on the social welfare function Results The socially acceptable utility function

  20. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hicago-oharenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate...

  1. REPRESENTING AEROSOLS IN GLOBAL MODELS: FROM MICROMETERS TO MEGAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    mainly from gas-to- particle conversion of low-volatility gaseous species, mainly sulfuric acid to represent aerosol processes and forcing "on-line" in climate models in order to capture the feedbacks

  2. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-04-30

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE Order 4200.4A. Canceled by DOE O 541.1A.

  3. Representing and Reasoning about Changing Spatial Extensions of Geographic Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Brandon

    . Campelo and Brandon Bennett School of Computing, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK, sccec,b.bennett@leeds For a comprehensive review of issues and challenges for representing geographic processes see [10]. #12;Foundational

  4. Tiled QR factorization algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouwmeester, Henricus; Langou, Julien; Robert, Yves

    2011-01-01

    This work revisits existing algorithms for the QR factorization of rectangular matrices composed of p-by-q tiles, where p >= q. Within this framework, we study the critical paths and performance of algorithms such as Sameh and Kuck, Modi and Clarke, Greedy, and those found within PLASMA. Although neither Modi and Clarke nor Greedy is optimal, both are shown to be asymptotically optimal for all matrices of size p = q^2 f(q), where f is any function such that \\lim_{+\\infty} f= 0. This novel and important complexity result applies to all matrices where p and q are proportional, p = \\lambda q, with \\lambda >= 1, thereby encompassing many important situations in practice (least squares). We provide an extensive set of experiments that show the superiority of the new algorithms for tall matrices.

  5. Photon impact factor and k{sub T} factorization in the next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Balitsky

    2012-12-01

    The photon impact factor for the BFKL pomeron is calculated in the next-to-leading order (NLO) approximation using the operator expansion in Wilson lines. The result is represented as a NLO k{sub T}-factorization formula for the structure functions of small-x deep inelastic scattering.

  6. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  7. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    2014-08-01

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  8. UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE on SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE on SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT 2318 Rayburn House Office Building The Next Generation of Fusion Energy Research October 29, 2009 fusion energy has been a scientific quest since the 1950s. Inertial and magnetic confinement fusion

  9. REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Brandon

    1 REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric Penn State Geography and Geological Survey of Canada brodaric@NRCan.gc.ca 1. Introduction The geo-sciences, including geology, ecology, soil accumulate and change, and (3) are characterized by degrees of uncertainty and granularity. This suggests

  10. The Computational Complexity of Nash Equilibria in Concisely Represented Games #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadhan, Salil

    The Computational Complexity of Nash Equilibria in Concisely Represented Games # Grant R#erent representations of games a#ect the complexity of problems associated with games, such as finding a Nash. For these two models, we study the complexity of four questions: determining if a given strategy is a Nash

  11. The Computational Complexity of Nash Equilibria in Concisely Represented Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadhan, Salil

    The Computational Complexity of Nash Equilibria in Concisely Represented Games Grant R. Schoenebeck representations of games affect the complexity of problems associated with games, such as finding a Nash. For these two models, we study the complexity of four questions: determining if a given strategy is a Nash

  12. Capturing Post-Silicon Variations using a Representative Critical Path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    1 Capturing Post-Silicon Variations using a Representative Critical Path Qunzeng Liu and Sachin S on measurements on a replica of the nominal critical path, whose variations are intended to reflect those of the entire circuit after manufacturing. For realistic circuits, where the number of critical paths can

  13. Representing Thermal Vibrations and Uncertainty in Molecular Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varshney, Amitabh

    in a molecule is fuzzy because of its uncertainty in protein structure determination and thermal energy because of its thermal energy. Therefore, the smooth molecular surface will also vibrate. Also in proteinRepresenting Thermal Vibrations and Uncertainty in Molecular Surfaces Chang Ha Lee and Amitabh

  14. AN ALTERNATIVE NOTATION FOR REPRESENTING DENSE LINEAR ALGEBRA ALGORITHMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van de Geijn, Robert A.

    AN ALTERNATIVE NOTATION FOR REPRESENTING DENSE LINEAR ALGEBRA ALGORITHMS PAOLO BIENTINESI AND ROBERT A. VAN DE GEIJN Abstract. We present a notation that allows a dense linear algebra algorithm subvectors and submatrices allowing the details of the algorithm to be the focus while hiding the intricate

  15. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer's Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-27

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer's representatives. To ensure that only trained and qualified procurement and financial assistance professionals, within the scope of this Order, serve as contracting officers. Cancels DOE O 541.1. Canceled by DOE O 541.1B.

  16. Representing Temporal Knowledge for Case-Based Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    well drilling. 1 Introduction Most current CBR systems represent episodes as distinct snap. Our focus is on prediction problems for avoiding faulty situations. Based on a well-established theory-intensive CBR system Creek. The paper presents the theoretical foundation of the method, the representation

  17. US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005 Fusion Energy Sciences The Committee recommendation for fusion energy sciences is $295,155,000, an increase of $5,605,000 over that two-thirds of the proposed increase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER

  18. State DOT Representative Report Questions National Concrete Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Texas April 2, 2009 Theme: Ride Quality for Bridges Please provide your state DOT's perspective regarding the following theme questions. Each NCC state DOT representative will be asked to present requirements set forth in the Caltrans Standard Specification 51-1.17 and which are tested for conformance

  19. Toward Representative Internet Measurements Aditya Akella, Srinivasan Seshan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akella, Aditya

    and understand the structure and behavior of the Internet have a long history in the network research communityToward Representative Internet Measurements Aditya Akella, Srinivasan Seshan Dept. of Computer, and failure modes still is far from complete. Characterizing the operation of the current Internet

  20. Wave Energy Resources Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Energy Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Prepared by: Luis A Foreword This report provides wave energy resource information required to select coastal segments for specific wave-energy-conversion (WEC) technology and to initiate engineering design incorporating

  1. Acoustic inverse scattering via Helmholtz operator factorization and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen Wang

    2010-09-01

    Aug 2, 2010 ... requirements through compression, to yield a complexity for ... 3, representing Earth's subsurface, while accounting for the broad bandwidth of the avail- ..... of dense block matrix operations in factorizing sparse problems, and ...

  2. Variable Frequency Motor Drives: Harmonics, Power Factor, and Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, G. W.

    1997-01-01

    harmonics and power factor. NOTE: The views expressed in this paper do not necessarily represent the views of the United States of America, the U.S. Department of Justice, or the Federal Bureau of Prisons....

  3. Human Factors @ UB Fall 2010 Human Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    . Outsourcing aviation maintenance: Hu- man factors implications, specifically for communications. C. Drury, K. Guy, C. Wenner. International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 2010, 20, 124 ­ 143. #12;2 Human Factors

  4. On Factorization of Molecular Wavefunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Jecko; Brian T. Sutcliffe; R. Guy Woolley

    2015-07-18

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in the chemical physics literature of factorization of the position representation eigenfunctions \\{$\\Phi$\\} of the molecular Schr\\"odinger equation as originally proposed by Hunter in the 1970s. The idea is to represent $\\Phi$ in the form $\\varphi\\chi$ where $\\chi$ is \\textit{purely} a function of the nuclear coordinates, while $\\varphi$ must depend on both electron and nuclear position variables in the problem. This is a generalization of the approximate factorization originally proposed by Born and Oppenheimer, the hope being that an `exact' representation of $\\Phi$ can be achieved in this form with $\\varphi$ and $\\chi$ interpretable as `electronic' and `nuclear' wavefunctions respectively. We offer a mathematical analysis of these proposals that identifies ambiguities stemming mainly from the singularities in the Coulomb potential energy.

  5. On Factorization of Molecular Wavefunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Jecko; Brian T. Sutcliffe; R. Guy Woolley

    2015-09-05

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in the chemical physics literature of factorization of the position representation eigenfunctions \\{$\\Phi$\\} of the molecular Schr\\"odinger equation as originally proposed by Hunter in the 1970s. The idea is to represent $\\Phi$ in the form $\\varphi\\chi$ where $\\chi$ is \\textit{purely} a function of the nuclear coordinates, while $\\varphi$ must depend on both electron and nuclear position variables in the problem. This is a generalization of the approximate factorization originally proposed by Born and Oppenheimer, the hope being that an `exact' representation of $\\Phi$ can be achieved in this form with $\\varphi$ and $\\chi$ interpretable as `electronic' and `nuclear' wavefunctions respectively. We offer a mathematical analysis of these proposals that identifies ambiguities stemming mainly from the singularities in the Coulomb potential energy.

  6. On Factorization of Molecular Wavefunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Jecko; Brian T. Sutcliffe; R. Guy Woolley

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in the chemical physics literature of factorization of the position representation eigenfunctions \\{$\\Phi$\\} of the molecular Schr\\"odinger equation as originally proposed by Hunter in the 1970s. The idea is to represent $\\Phi$ in the form $\\varphi\\chi$ where $\\chi$ is \\textit{purely} a function of the nuclear coordinates, while $\\varphi$ must depend on both electron and nuclear position variables in the problem. This is a generalization of the approximate factorization originally proposed by Born and Oppenheimer, the hope being that an `exact' representation of $\\Phi$ can be achieved in this form with $\\varphi$ and $\\chi$ interpretable as `electronic' and `nuclear' wavefunctions respectively. We offer a mathematical analysis of these proposals that identifies ambiguities stemming mainly from the singularities in the Coulomb potential energy.

  7. An evaluation of gender-based weighting factors for internal dosimetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiars, Joanna Hamilton

    1994-01-01

    This study assesses gender effects on radiation dose weighting factors used in internal dosimetry. A weighting factor represents the relative contribution of a particular organ or tissue to the total detriment due to the effects from uniform whole...

  8. Representing Uncertainty in Decision Support Harvey J. Greenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Harvey J.

    overlapping factors. · Source of uncertainty. Is it a future event, such as product demand? Is it ignorance defines a proven reserve? · Time scale. Is the decision a strategic one, to cover a planning horizon? Is it a major setback, such as the loss of a company? Is it catastrophic, such as the loss of a city? · Decision

  9. Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report to Congress MoreHyd rog enOffice of NuclearRepresentative

  10. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Transcription Factor Encyclopedia. Genome Biology 2012 13:Factor Encyclopedia. Gen- ome Biology 2012, 13:000. where ‘Biology 2012, 13:R24 http://genomebiology.com/2012/13/3/R24 SOFTWARE Open Access The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

  11. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  12. Photon impact factor and k{sub T}-factorization for DIS in the next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Balitsky, Giovanni Chirilli

    2013-01-01

    The photon impact factor for the BFKL pomeron is calculated in the next-to-leading order (NLO) approximation using the operator expansion in Wilson lines. The result is represented as an NLO k{sub T}-factorization formula for structure functions of small-x deep inelastic scattering.

  13. 1 Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7 I Representing an Inequality ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2010-10-04

    1. Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7. I. Representing an Inequality. There are 3 ways to represent an inequality. (1) Using the inequality symbol (sometime.

  14. 1 Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7 I Representing an Inequality ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2011-02-22

    1. Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7. I. Representing an Inequality. There are 3 ways to represent an inequality. (1) Using the inequality symbol (sometime.

  15. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

    2011-03-04

    This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed that EnergyPlus did not capture the heating-side behavior of heat pumps particularly accurately, and that our simple oil furnace and boiler models needed significant recalibration to fit with RECS. Simulating the full RECS sample on a single computer would take many hours, so we used the 'cloud computing' services provided by Amazon.com to simulate dozens of homes at once. This enabled us to simulate the full RECS sample, including multiple versions of each home to evaluate the impact of marginal changes, in less than 3 hours. Once the tool was calibrated, we were able to address several policy questions. We made a simple measurement of the heat replacement effect and showed that the net effect of heat replacement on primary energy use is likely to be less than 5%, relative to appliance-only measures of energy savings. Fuel switching could be significant, however. We also evaluated the national and regional impacts of a variety of 'overnight' changes in building characteristics or occupant behavior, including lighting, home insulation and sealing, HVAC system efficiency, and thermostat settings. For example, our model shows that the combination of increased home insulation and better sealed building shells could reduce residential natural gas use by 34.5% and electricity use by 6.5%, and a 1 degree rise in summer thermostat settings could save 2.1% of home electricity use. These results vary by region, and we present results for each U.S. Census division. We conclude by offering proposals for future work to improve the tool. Some proposed future work includes: comparing the simulated energy use data with the monthly RECS bill data; better capturing the variation in behavior between households, especially as it relates to occupancy and schedules; improving the characterization of recent construction and its regional variation; and extending the general framework of this simulation tool to capture multifamily housing units, such as apartment buildings.

  16. Increases in electric rates in rural areas. Hearing before the Committee on Agriculture, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session, June 4, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Seven witnesses representing rural electric utilities and cooperatives spoke at a June 4, 1980 hearing to discuss which inflationary factors are increasing rural electric rates. The Committee recognized that the problem is not unique to rural systems. In their testimony, the witnesses noted increasing urbanization of rural areas; the cost of generating plant construction, fuel, and operating expenses; general economic factors of inflation and high interest rates; and regulations as major contributing factors to utility requests for rate increases. The hearing record includes their testimony, additional material submitted for the record, and responses to questions from the subcommittee. (DCK)

  17. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

  18. Role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in granulosa cell function: involvement of heterotrimeric G-protein signalling pathways. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Lynsey Kerr

    2009-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) has been shown to be an absolute requirement for ovarian follicle development. Although VEGF is commonly regarded primarily as an angiogenic factor, granulosa cells are a major ...

  19. Particle observations in space plasma have shown that high energy particles have some degree of gyrophase organization. Namely, the velocity distributions of the particle populations in the plane perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field depend on the g

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Particle observations in space plasma have shown that high energy particles have some = = ='( ) 2[1 ( )]Z Z = - + Nongyrotropic Anisotropy instability Isotropic Beam-Plasma instability Gyrotropic dispersion Anisotropic Beam-Plasma instability Plasma Parameters 1.0C0.00013vti 4.0Ab0.0058vte 1.0Ai0.0005i

  20. National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis Measuring and Representing Accessibility in the Information Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis Measuring and Representing Accessibility in the Information Age A Specialist Meeting of Project Varenius' Geographies of the Information Society 19 ........................................................................................................11 Visualizing and Representing Information Space Within Geographic Information Science (GIS) Michael

  1. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on...

  2. Representing aquifer architecture in macrodispersivity models with an analytical solution of the transition probability matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    Representing aquifer architecture in macrodispersivity models with an analytical solution] The multi-dimensional transition probability model represents hydrofacies architecture in modeling aquifer heterogeneity. The structure of the aquifer architecture is mathematically characterized by a canonical

  3. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney...

  4. A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A.

    2013-07-01

    The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

  5. Expression of transforming growth factor alpha in plutonium-239-induced lung neoplasms in dogs: investigations of autocrine mechanisms of growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillett, N.A.; Stegelmeier, B.L.; Chang, I.Y.; Kelly, G. )

    1991-06-01

    We have previously shown that 47% of radiation-induced lung neoplasms in dogs exhibit increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this study, we investigated the expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), a ligand for EGFR, to determine if an autocrine mechanism for growth stimulation was present in these tumors. As determined by immunohistochemistry, 59% (26/44) of the lung neoplasms examined had increased expression of TGF-alpha. Expression of TGF-alpha was not related to the etiology of the tumor, e.g., spontaneous or plutonium-induced; however, it was related to the phenotype of the tumor. Statistical analysis of the correlation of EGFR and TGF-alpha expression within the same tumor did not show a positive association; however, specific phenotypes did have statistically significant expression of EGFR or TGF-alpha, suggesting that overexpression of either the ligand or its receptor conferred a growth advantage to the neoplasm. Twenty-seven percent (32/117) of radiation-induced proliferative epithelial foci expressed TGF-alpha, and a portion of those foci (8/32) expressed both EGFR and TGF-alpha. This supports the hypothesis that these foci represent preneoplastic lesions, and suggests that those foci exhibiting increased expression of the growth factor or its receptor are at greater risk for progressing to neoplasia.

  6. What every designated representative should know about Title IV and Title V enforcement provisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, C.A. [Gallagher and Kennedy, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Dayal, P. [Tucson Electric Power Co., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act not only created a regulatory program unlike any other under the Clean Air Act, but also established a unique position--the designated representative--as an integral part of the program. The designated representative is required to meet certain basic obligations under Title IV, and a panoply of enforcement mechanisms are available to EPA in the event of noncompliance with these obligations. Also, because a designated representative may take on responsibilities under the permit provisions of Title V of the Clean Air Act, the designated representative can also be subject to an enforcement action for failure to comply with certain Title V permit requirements. This paper considers the basic definition of the designated representative under EPA`s Title IV and Title V regulations, identifies the responsibilities assigned to the designated representative, and then analyzes the enforcement mechanisms that may be applied to the designated representative if a regulatory responsibility has not been satisfied.

  7. The MX Factor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MX Factor Test films played a strategic-planning role in the debates of the late 1970s and early 1980s about where and how to deploy the MX intercontinental ballistic missile...

  8. Power Factor Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    and disadvantages of various locations in the electrical network are described including the cost of installation and network capacity improvement. Sizing of capacitors is also covered. Finally, some case studies involving power factor improvement are presented...

  9. Reducing Power Factor Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Before PF 100142 0.70 or 70% After PF 100105 0.95 or 95% PB References: B.C. Hydro. Power Factor. The GEM Series. October 1989. Commonwealth Sprague Capacitor, Inc....

  10. Facility Representatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FY 2007 FeeFederalFirst2 DOEMeetingExperience |

  11. Facility Representatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FY 2007 FeeFederalFirst2 DOEMeetingExperience

  12. Electromagetic proton form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Y Hussein

    2006-10-31

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial to our understanding of the proton internal structure, and thus provide a strong constraint of the distributions of the charge and magnetization current within the proton. We adopted the quark-parton model for calculating and understanding the charge structure of the proton interms of the electromagnetic form factors. A remarkable agreement with the available experimental evidence is found.

  13. Optimizing Power Factor Correction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    FACTOR CORRECTION Robert K. Phillips and Louis C. Burmeister, Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers... consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 k\\~ and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results...

  14. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  15. Human Factors Related to a Virtual Reality Surgical Simulator: The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowden, Richard

    and therefore, reductions in patient intervention costs (Banta, 1993). #12; Human Factors Related to a Virtual Training System in the light of feedback from surgeons. Initial work to produce finite element models are displayed. The training system has been well received by the surgeons and represents a new and potentially

  16. A PM10 emission factor for free stall dairies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodrich, Lee Barry

    2006-08-16

    was determined using the Coulter Counter Multisizer. The results of this process was a representative dairy PM PSD with 28% of TSP emissions being PM10. The reported PM10 24-hour emission factors were 4.7 kg/1000hd/day for the free-stall areas of the facility...

  17. Speaker and Expression Factorization for Audiobook Data: Expressiveness and Transplantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Langzhou; Braunschweiler, Norbert; Gales, Mark J. F.

    2014-12-23

    the problem mentioned above, the factorization techniques were adopted to factorize a complex acoustic condition into several independent factors, i.e. ?(s,e) =?(s)S ? ?(e)E (2) where ?(s)S and ? (e) E are the independent transforms for speaker... was created representing the expressive infor- mation in an utterance. The feature vector includes various expression related features, e.g. mean of F0, voicing probabil- ity (pv), local jitter and shimmer, logarithmic HNR, standard deviation of F0 and mean...

  18. 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December   2008. Data for these indicators are  gathered by Field...

  19. 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  20. 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  1. 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  2. 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September   2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  3. 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from April to June  2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  4. 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field elements...

  5. 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  6. 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  7. 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  8. 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January  to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  9. 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements...

  10. 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  11. 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  12. 3Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  13. 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per...

  14. 3Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Facility Representative Program Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report attached, covering the period from July to September 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements...

  15. 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  16. 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  17. 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were...

  18. 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these...

  19. 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these...

  20. 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  1. 4Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  2. 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July  through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  3. 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  4. 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  5. Academic Council Representatives 2009-2010 Title/Committee 2009/2010 Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Frank

    Taryn Lenders ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES Management & Professional Staff Council Kathy Drewes General) John Wright (L) Travel Committee Taryn Lenders Shawna Sadler #12;

  6. Lorentz Coherence and the Proton Form Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young S. Kim

    2015-02-28

    The dipole cutoff behavior for the proton form factor has been and still is one of the major issues in high-energy physics. It is shown that this dipole behavior comes from the coherence between the Lorentz contraction of the proton size and the decreasing wavelength of the incoming photon signal. The contraction rates are the same for both cases. This form of coherence is studied also in the momentum-energy space. The coherence effect in this space can be explained in terms of two overlapping wave functions.

  7. Conditioning analysis of incomplete Cholesky factorizations with orthogonal dropping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napov, Artem

    2012-03-16

    The analysis of preconditioners based on incomplete Cholesky factorization in which the neglected (dropped) components are orthogonal to the approximations being kept is presented. General estimate for the condition number of the preconditioned system is given which only depends on the accuracy of individual approximations. The estimate is further improved if, for instance, only the newly computed rows of the factor are modified during each approximation step. In this latter case it is further shown to be sharp. The analysis is illustrated with some existing factorizations in the context of discretized elliptic partial differential equations.

  8. Multi-factor authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  9. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  10. Derivation of dose conversion factors for tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killough, G. G.

    1982-03-01

    For a given intake mode (ingestion, inhalation, absorption through the skin), a dose conversion factor (DCF) is the committed dose equivalent to a specified organ of an individual per unit intake of a radionuclide. One also may consider the effective dose commitment per unit intake, which is a weighted average of organ-specific DCFs, with weights proportional to risks associated with stochastic radiation-induced fatal health effects, as defined by Publication 26 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This report derives and tabulates organ-specific dose conversion factors and the effective dose commitment per unit intake of tritium. These factors are based on a steady-state model of hydrogen in the tissues of ICRP's Reference Man (ICRP Publication 23) and equilibrium of specific activities between body water and other tissues. The results differ by 27 to 33% from the estimate on which ICRP Publication 30 recommendations are based. The report also examines a dynamic model of tritium retention in body water, mineral bone, and two compartments representing organically-bound hydrogen. This model is compared with data from human subjects who were observed for extended periods. The manner of combining the dose conversion factors with measured or model-predicted levels of contamination in man's exposure media (air, drinking water, soil moisture) to estimate dose rate to an individual is briefly discussed.

  11. Detecting and Representing Relevant Web Deltas in Whoweda Sourav S Bhowmick1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhowmick, Sourav S.

    Detecting and Representing Relevant Web Deltas in Whoweda Sourav S Bhowmick1 Sanjay Madria2 Wee given the old and new versions of a set of interlinked Web documents, retrieved in response to a user's query. In particular, we show how to detect and represent web deltas, i.e., changes in the Web documents

  12. Representing and Querying the Evolution of Databases and their Schemas in Fusheng Wang and Carlo Zaniolo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniolo, Carlo

    Representing and Querying the Evolution of Databases and their Schemas in XML Fusheng Wang surprisingly effective solutions to the problem of representing and querying the evolution of databases for evolution [20, 19, 13]. Meanwhile, there is much current interest in publishing and viewing database

  13. Representative Subsets For Big Data Learning using k-NN Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Representative Subsets For Big Data Learning using k-NN Graphs Raghvendra Mall, Vilen Jumutc, Rocco a deterministic method to obtain subsets from big data which are a good representative of the inherent structure a subset for this big data network. The FURS selection technique selects nodes from different dense regions

  14. April 21, 2014 2014-15 NON-REPRESENTED STAFF SALARY PROGRAM/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    April 21, 2014 2014-15 NON-REPRESENTED STAFF SALARY PROGRAM/ CALL FOR PERFORMANCE APPRAISALS JULY 1, 2013-JUNE 30, 2014 Salary Program The 2014-15 salary program is a 3% salary program for non-represented career staff. Individual employee's increases will vary due to the Salary Program Parameters listed below

  15. A SOFTWARE SYSTEM FOR ANALYSING CERAMIC ARTEFACTS REPRESENTED BY 2D DRAWINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    A SOFTWARE SYSTEM FOR ANALYSING CERAMIC ARTEFACTS REPRESENTED BY 2D DRAWINGS Gennady Agre1.hristov@gmail.com Abstract: The paper describes a part of an extensible system for analysing ceramic artefacts represented this function and using it for comparing artefacts are described. Key words: ceramics classification, curvature

  16. Fast Factoring of Integers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2005-09-20

    An algorithm is given to factor an integer with $N$ digits in $\\ln^m N$ steps, with $m$ approximately 4 or 5. Textbook quadratic sieve methods are exponentially slower. An improvement with the aid of an a particular function would provide a further exponential speedup.

  17. Slow-Time Changes in Human EMG Muscle Fatigue States Are Fully Represented in Movement Kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chelidze, David

    from the kinematic data. Nonlinear analysis of kinematic features was shown to be essential nonlinear PSW-based analysis of kinematic data was shown to adequately predict all EMG-based individual-based analysis of strictly kinematic time series data directly predicted all of the local muscle fatigue trends

  18. Matrix Factorization and Matrix Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Lester

    2012-01-01

    PCA 3 Mixed Membership Matrix Factorization 3.15.2 Matrix concentration3.3 Mixed Membership Matrix Factorization . . . 3.4

  19. Factors Affecting Gummy Butter. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leighton, R. E. (Rudolph Elmo); Moore, A. V.

    1952-01-01

    character of butter 1 body may be accounted for by a no more specific reason than "individualitr of the cow," regardless of her feed. On the other hand, it is shown that when grain sorghum silage is 1 fed along with cottonseed meal, the tendency... for the butter to be gummy is completely overcome. This tendency lends further weight to the already existing experimental data on the advantages of silage feeding for dairy cattle. Feeding experiments and butter analyses show that gummy-bodied butter...

  20. Deuteron Form Factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, G.R.; Huleihel, K.; Zhang, H. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 (United States))

    1995-01-30

    We obtain the perturbative QCD (PQCD) prediction for the leading twist deuteron form factor, treated as a pair of nucleons in nonrelativistic bound state. It is [lt]10[sup [minus]3] times experiment at [ital Q][sup 2]=4 GeV[sup 2], suggesting that PQCD is not relevant to the deuteron form factor at present values of [ital Q][sup 2], or that non-nucleon (e.g., hidden color'') degrees of freedom must be included for a correct description of the deuteron. The tree-level amplitude [similar to][ital eg][sup 10] and is the sum of several 10[sup 6] Feynman diagrams, making it an interesting case study in the behavior of perturbation theory.

  1. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index Journal Cited Half-Life 2014 JCR Science Edition Journal: CZECHOSLOVAK MATHEMATICAL JOURNAL Mark Journal Title ISSN Total Cites Impact Factor 5-Year Impact Factor Immediacy Index Citable Items

  2. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index Journal Cited Half-Life 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: CZECHOSLOVAK MATHEMATICAL JOURNAL Mark Journal Title ISSN Total Cites Impact Factor 5-Year Impact Factor Immediacy Index Citable Items

  3. 105TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES2d Session 105796

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollaar, Lee A.

    69­006 105TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES2d Session 105­796 DIGITAL MILLENNIUM the following CONFERENCE REPORT [To accompany H.R. 2281] The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes

  4. 105TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES2d Session 105452

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollaar, Lee A.

    59­006 105TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES2d Session 105­452 COPYRIGHT TERM EXTENSION, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill do

  5. 2Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from April 2000 to June 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

  6. 112TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES1st Session 112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy ................................. 22 84 Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability ............................... 22 93 Nuclear Energy66­387 112TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES1st Session 112­ ENERGY AND WATER

  7. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers' and Worker Representatives' Input to Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Tom McQuiston, Dr. P.H., United Steelworkers - Tony Mazzocchi Center for Health, Safety and Environmental Education. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers’ and Worker Representatives’ Input in Work Planning and Control.

  8. Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of...

  9. Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narlesky, Joshua E.; Stroud, Mary Ann; Smith, Paul Herrick; Wayne, David M.; Mason, Richard E.; Worl, Laura A.

    2013-02-15

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

  10. Neural Network Parameterizations of Electromagnetic Nucleon Form Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzysztof M. Graczyk; Piotr Plonski; Robert Sulej

    2010-08-25

    The electromagnetic nucleon form-factors data are studied with artificial feed forward neural networks. As a result the unbiased model-independent form-factor parametrizations are evaluated together with uncertainties. The Bayesian approach for the neural networks is adapted for chi2 error-like function and applied to the data analysis. The sequence of the feed forward neural networks with one hidden layer of units is considered. The given neural network represents a particular form-factor parametrization. The so-called evidence (the measure of how much the data favor given statistical model) is computed with the Bayesian framework and it is used to determine the best form factor parametrization.

  11. Electrical and Production Load Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, T.; Heffington, W. M.

    2009-01-01

    factors and operating hours of small and medium-sized industrial plants are analyzed to classify shift-work patterns and develop energy conservation diagnostic tools. This paper discusses two types of electric load factors for each shift... The purpose of this paper is to analyze operating hours of small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in the United States and develop ranges of load factors for use as diagnostic tools for effective energy management. Load factor is defined...

  12. 17?-Estradiol and Progesterone Regulate Expression of ?-Amyloid Clearance Factors in Primary Neuron Cultures and Female Rat Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Carroll, Jenna C.; Morgan, Todd E.; Lin, Sharon W.; Zhao, Liqin; Arimoto, Jason M.; Murphy, M. Paul; Beckett, Tina L.; Finch, Caleb E.; Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Pike, Christian J.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of ?-amyloid protein (A?) is a key risk factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The ovarian sex steroid hormones 17?-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) have been shown to regulate A? accumulation, although the underlying...

  13. Astrophysical factors:Zero energy vs. Most effective energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodore E. Liolios

    2001-05-02

    Effective astrophysical factors for non-resonant astrophysical nuclear reaction are invariably calculated with respect to a zero energy limit. In the present work that limit is shown to be very disadvantageous compared to the more natural effective energy limit. The latter is used in order to modify the thermonuclear reaction rate formula so that it takes into account both plasma and laboratory screening effects.

  14. Functions Represent SiPM Response Especially Linear Behavior After Saturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotera, Katsushige; Takeshita, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    We developed functions to represent wide ranges of SiPM responses. The functions model reactivation of pixels of the SiPM during each incident event. Because the number of detected photons by reactivation increases rationally and linearly in our model, the linear behavior of SiPM response after saturation, for which the reason was unknown, can be represented with our functions. From 72 samples of SiPM responses, the functions were tested. They showed their high performance with one additional correction to the simple function.

  15. SiPM Response Functions Representing Wide Range Including Linear Behavior After Saturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsushige Kotera; Weonseok Choi; Tohru Takeshita

    2015-10-13

    We developed functions to represent wide ranges of SiPM responses. The functions model reactivation of pixels of the SiPM during each incident event. Because the number of detected photons by reactivation increases rationally and linearly in our model, the linear behavior of SiPM response after saturation, for which the reason was unknown, can be represented with our functions. From 72 samples of SiPM responses, the functions were tested. They showed their high performance with one additional correction to the simple function.

  16. Farm-level economic impacts of the House of Representatives Farm Bill Proposal, H.R. 2646, and the Senate Farm Bill Proposal, S. 1731, for representative rice farms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Christy Michelle

    2002-01-01

    increased costs of production. The primary objective of this research is to assess the farm level economic implications of the House of Representatives and the Senate farm bill proposals on representative rice farms from six different rice-producing states...

  17. DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENT? By Michael E. Mann I. Introduction The subjects of "global warming" and "climate change" have become parts of both the popular lexicon and the public discourse. Discussions of global warming often evoke passionate

  18. Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends oleosin genes. Microscopy examination of Physcomitrella revealed that oil bodies (OBs) were abundant; and bacteria. Among all these lipid droplets, oil bodies (OBs) in seeds are the most prominent and have been

  19. Curriculum Vitae December 2006 (A brief description of some representative results)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Curriculum Vitae December 2006 Appendix: (A brief description of some representative results) (1 with the sample 1 #12;Curriculum Vitae December 2006 bias changing, but the wavelength is constant. Figure 2 STM-dependent competition between molecule-substrate and the laterally intermolecular interactions. 2 #12;Curriculum Vitae

  20. Representing Genetic Networks as Labeled Hybrid Petri Nets for State Space Exploration and Markov Chain Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Chris J.

    Representing Genetic Networks as Labeled Hybrid Petri Nets for State Space Exploration and Markov is to develop a way to convert genetic networks into logical models. Once this is done, finding the state graph into the reachability of the states in the original network. Therefore, the second goal of this project is to develop

  1. Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne.m.robertson@ed.ac.uk; mark.small@ed.ac.uk} Abstract OWL-S is an ontology for describing web services in a way that includes the semantics (meaning) of the web service, including the semantics of its behaviour and the semantics

  2. Failure Analysis for Composition of Web Services Represented as Labeled Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Robyn R.

    Failure Analysis for Composition of Web Services Represented as Labeled Transition Systems Dinanath, Ames, IA 50011, USA {yogesh, sbasu, honavar, rlutz}@cs.iastate.edu Abstract. The Web service a simple e-Library Web service in the context of the MoSCoE Web service composition framework. 1

  3. Materials Cartography: Representing and Mining Materials Space Using Structural and Electronic Fingerprints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    computational tools to analyze, visualize, model, and design new materials. INTRODUCTION Designing materials and the Harvard Clean Energy Project10,11 that contain thousands of unique materials and their theoreticallyMaterials Cartography: Representing and Mining Materials Space Using Structural and Electronic

  4. The multiple phenylpropene synthases in both Clarkia breweri and Petunia hybrida represent two distinct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pichersky, Eran

    The multiple phenylpropene synthases in both Clarkia breweri and Petunia hybrida represent two pollinators. Clarkia breweri flowers emit a mixture of eugenol and isoeugenol, while Petunia hybrida flowers in secondary metabolism. Here we show that C. breweri flowers have two closely related proteins (96% identity

  5. Solubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ and Mg2+ in H2SO4 solutions representative of upper, it is unclear how these impurities could affect particle freezing. To address these questions, we have particles. Bulk freezing experiments were also carried out on H2SO4 solutions containing amounts

  6. Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei Iliasov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei, Finland {Yuliya.Prokhorova, Elena.Troubitsyna}@abo.fi Abstract -- Failure Modes and Effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used technique for inductive safety analysis. FMEA provides engineers with valuable information

  7. Written Testimony to the United States House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boneh, Dan

    and power-plant solar photovoltaics (PV), concentrated solar power (CSP) plants, solar heat collectors1 Written Testimony to the United States House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce, Renewable Wind, Water, and Solar (WWS) Power for all Purposes by 2050 and 80% by 2030 Synopsis · Researchers

  8. IJCB 2011 Conference Report The International Joint Conference on Biometrics represents the joining of two major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowyer, Kevin W.

    IJCB 2011 Conference Report The International Joint Conference on Biometrics represents the joining of two major conference series in biometrics research, the Biometrics Theory, Applications and Systems (BTAS) tradition and the International Conference on Biometrics (ICB) tradition. Measured by the number

  9. Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a controversial nuclear fusion plan. The technical meeting of experts is intended to pave the way of nuclear fusion say it provides an attractive long-term energy option, because the basic materials needed

  10. Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne, United Kingdom {kristin.stock@nottingham.ac.uk} 2 Allworlds Geothinking, Nottingham, United Kingdom 3). This paper describes an approach to the description of OGC web services using OWL-S that takes advantage

  11. Applying engineering and fleet detail to represent passenger vehicle transport in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    efficiency Alternative fuel vehicles A well-known challenge in computable general equilibrium (CGE) modelsApplying engineering and fleet detail to represent passenger vehicle transport in a computable for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR

  12. Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    take energy and other prices as exogenous and, therefore, may overestimate the potential penetrationRepresenting energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information J.R. Mc 02139, USA c Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, M.I.T., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Available

  13. CP nets: representing and reasoning with preferences of multiple agents F. Rossi and K. B. Venable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Toby

    CP nets: representing and reasoning with preferences of multiple agents F. Rossi and K. B introduce £ CP nets, an extension of the CP net formal- ism to model and handle the qualitative and conditional pref- erences of multiple agents. We give a number of different semantics for reasoning with £ CP

  14. Results on CP Violation from Belle T.E. Browder representing the Belle Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browder, Tom

    Results on CP Violation from Belle T.E. Browder representing the Belle Collaboration Department of Physics, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii Abstract. I describe the recent measurement of the CP In 1973, Kobayashi and Maskawa (KM) first proposed a model where CP violation is incorporated

  15. ACCESSING MUSIC COLLECTIONS VIA REPRESENTATIVE CLUSTER PROTOTYPES IN A HIERARCHICAL ORGANIZATION SCHEME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widmer, Gerhard

    - come increasingly important. The enormous economic suc- cess of high-capacity mobile music players in a hierarchical man- ner and to automatically find representative pieces of music for each cluster on each by the proposed structuring approach. As for evaluation, we first assess the quality of the clustering method

  16. Representing Genomic Knowledge in the UMLS Semantic Network , Carol Friedman, Ph.D.2,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hong

    Representing Genomic Knowledge in the UMLS Semantic Network Hong Yu1 , Carol Friedman, Ph.D.2 2 Department of Computer Science, Queens College CUNY 3 Center for Genomics Research, Columbia University 4 Yeshiva University Genomics research has a significant impact on the understanding and treatment

  17. CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, while the magnitude of CO2 degassing from small streams remains a major was as terrestrially-respired CO2 dissolved within soils, over 90% of which evaded to the atmosphere within headwater

  18. Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

  19. Human factors engineering program review model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

  20. Representing and manipulating spatial data in interoperable systems and its industrial applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zborovskiy, Marat

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The amount of information available nowadays is staggering and increases exponentially. Making sense of this data has become increasingly difficult because of the two factors: · The sheer volume of data · The ...

  1. TMD theory, factorization and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Collins

    2013-07-10

    The concepts and methods of factorization using transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) parton densities and/or fragmentation functions are summarized.

  2. Filling factors and Braid group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington Cruz

    1998-02-25

    We extract the Braid group structure of a recently derived hierarchy scheme for the filling factors proposed by us which related the Hausdorff dimension, $h$, to statistics, $\

  3. Selection of powder factor in large diameter blastholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eloranta, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper documents the relationship between material handling and processing costs compared to blasting cost. The old adage, The cheapest crushing is done in the pit, appears accurate in this case study. Comparison of the accumulated cost of: powder, selected wear materials and electricity; indicate a strong, inverse correlation with powder factor (lbs powder/long ton of rock). In this case, the increased powder cost is more than offset by electrical savings alone. Measurable, overall costs decline while shovel and crusher productivity rise by about 5% when powder factor rises by 15%. These trends were previously masked by the effects of: weather, ore grade fluctuations and accounting practices. Attempts to correlate increased powder factor to: wear materials in the crushing plant and to shovel hoist rope life have not shown the same benefit.

  4. Modeling Frameworks for Representing the Mechanical Behavior of Tissues with a Specific Look at Vasculature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersohn, Alexander

    2013-08-27

    -suited for multiscale modeling, I came across the term representative volume element (or RVE) used commonly in biomaterials. Not finding a definition for the mesoscale well-suited for the aim of multiscale modeling, an alternative definition was provided herein... are similar, there are some clear differences. The differences outlined in this section are evidence that a new definition for the mesoscale, tailored for multiscale modeling, was needed. Some elements of the RVE, which is mostly used in biomaterials...

  5. Family ties: representing the relationships between parents and children in contemporary Irish political poetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Lori L

    2013-02-22

    and content by: Marian Eide (Fellows Advisor) Edward A. Funkhouser (ExecutiveDirector) April 2000 Group: Humanities ABSTRACT Family Ties: Representing the Relationships Between Parents and Children in Contemporary Irish Political Poetry. (April 2000...) Lori L. Lee Department of English Texas A & M University Fellows Advisor: Dr. Marian Eide Department of English The implications of Irish historical occurrences such as the colonization of the Irish by the English, the partial independence...

  6. Three approaches for representing Lindblad dynamics by a matrix-vector notation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morag Am-Shallem; Amikam Levy; Ido Schaefer; Ronnie Kosloff

    2015-12-10

    Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems are described by the L-GKS equation, known also as the Lindblad equation. The equation is expressed by means of left and right matrix multiplications. This formulation hampers numerical implementations. Representing the dynamics by a matrix-vector notation overcomes this problem. We review three approaches to obtain such a representation. The methods are demonstrated for a driven two-level system subject to spontaneous emission.

  7. Introduction Fresh or brackish ground water has been shown to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krantz, David

    gradients occur within a few meters of the sediment surface in most locations stud- ied. The zone4 1U.S. Geological Survey, 384 Woods Hole Rd., Woods Hole, MA 02543; (508) 457­2254; fax (508) 457

  8. Such ion gels have shown superior performance as gate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeebe, Richard E.

    materials currently available. However, a functional gas separation membrane must withstand a substantial molecular architecture also holds promise for gas separation. Ionic liquids strongly prefer to dissolve CO2 for the separation of CO2 from CH4 or N2 (9), with promising results. Applications to other technologies such as fuel

  9. Dimensions are shown in inch (mm ) Dimensions subject to change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    at 40°C, 93% RH SALT MIST RESISTANCE: 96 hours Materials COVER & BASE: Thermoplastic PPS ACTUATOR: PA Thermoplastic KNOB: Thermoplastic MOVABLE CONTACTS: Brass, gold or silver plated. STATIONARY CONTACTS: Brass

  10. Cell matrix remodeling ability shown by image spatial correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, CL; Digman, MA; Gratton, E

    2013-01-01

    and myosin-dependent matrix deformation enables protease-H. Yu, L. Kass et al. , “Matrix crosslinking forces tumorWerb and J. R. Chin, “Extracellular matrix remodeling during

  11. Introduction Prior research has shown that energy savings are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

    detectors, CO2 sensors, etc) make efficient system control difficult. Occupancy prediction can be achieved,Inc., 2004. [5] ASHRAE standard 62.1: Ventilation for acceptable indoor air quality. American Society

  12. Frequency dependence of mass flow gain factor and cavitation compliance of cavitating inducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, S.; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu [Osaka Univ. (Japan); Kamijo, Kenjiro [National Aerospace Lab., Kakuda, Miyagi (Japan). Kakuda Research Center; Furuya, O. [AMP Technologies, Osaka (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Unsteady cavitation characteristics are analyzed based on a closed cavity model in which the length of the cavity is allowed to oscillate. It is shown that the present model blends smoothly into quasisteady calculations in the low frequency limit, unlike fixed cavity length models. Effects of incidence angle and cavitation number on cavitation compliance and mass flow gain factor are shown as functions of reduce frequency. The cavity volume is evaluated by three methods and the results were used to confirm the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical calculation. By comparison with experimental data on inducers, it was shown that the present model can simulate the characteristics of unsteady cavitation qualitatively.

  13. An advanced algorithm for construction of Integral Transport Matrix Method operators using accumulation of single cell coupling factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, B. P.; Azmy, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    The Integral Transport Matrix Method (ITMM) has been shown to be an effective method for solving the neutron transport equation in large domains on massively parallel architectures. In the limit of very large number of processors, the speed of the algorithm, and its suitability for unstructured meshes, i.e. other than an ordered Cartesian grid, is limited by the construction of four matrix operators required for obtaining the solution in each sub-domain. The existing algorithm used for construction of these matrix operators, termed the differential mesh sweep, is computationally expensive and was developed for a structured grid. This work proposes the use of a new algorithm for construction of these operators based on the construction of a single, fundamental matrix representing the transport of a particle along every possible path throughout the sub-domain mesh. Each of the operators is constructed by multiplying an element of this fundamental matrix by two factors dependent only upon the operator being constructed and on properties of the emitting and incident cells. The ITMM matrix operator construction time for the new algorithm is demonstrated to be shorter than the existing algorithm in all tested cases with both isotropic and anisotropic scattering considered. While also being a more efficient algorithm on a structured Cartesian grid, the new algorithm is promising in its geometric robustness and potential for being applied to an unstructured mesh, with the ultimate goal of application to an unstructured tetrahedral mesh on a massively parallel architecture. (authors)

  14. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2014 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 241 0.400 0.430 0.024 42 8.9 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  15. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 240 0.222 0.549 0.054 37 7.3 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  16. Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-02-28

    This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

  17. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented by the

  18. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented by thePrice

  19. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented by

  20. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented byPrice

  1. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented byPricePrice

  2. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented

  3. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0RepresentedPrice

  4. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0RepresentedPricePrice

  5. Electrical and Production Load Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Tapajyoti

    2010-07-14

    Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for the industrial sector...

  6. Efficient Networks for Quantum Factoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Beckman; Amalavoyal N. Chari; Srikrishna Devabhaktuni; John Preskill

    1996-02-21

    We consider how to optimize memory use and computation time in operating a quantum computer. In particular, we estimate the number of memory qubits and the number of operations required to perform factorization, using the algorithm suggested by Shor. A $K$-bit number can be factored in time of order $K^3$ using a machine capable of storing $5K+1$ qubits. Evaluation of the modular exponential function (the bottleneck of Shor's algorithm) could be achieved with about $72 K^3$ elementary quantum gates; implementation using a linear ion trap would require about $396 K^3$ laser pulses. A proof-of-principle demonstration of quantum factoring (factorization of 15) could be performed with only 6 trapped ions and 38 laser pulses. Though the ion trap may never be a useful computer, it will be a powerful device for exploring experimentally the properties of entangled quantum states.

  7. Human Factors of Reporting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.W.

    Johnson,C.W. P. Carayon (ed.), A Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare and Patient Safety, Lawrence Erlbaum, London, UK. pp 715-750 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

  8. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-11-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed.

  9. Comparison of host-, herd-, and environmental-factors associated with serpositivity to neospora caninum among adult beef and dairy cattle in alberta 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Mark Colton

    2009-05-15

    This study represents an analysis of serological and risk factor data collected previously in Alberta, Canada, involving neosporosis in beef and dairy cattle. The causative agent of neosporosis, Neospora caninum (NC), is a single...

  10. The ABC's of Snowmelt: A Topographically Factorized Energy Component Snowmelt Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    the energy balance models, though they are complicated and require large amounts of data, can represent1 The ABC's of Snowmelt: A Topographically Factorized Energy Component Snowmelt Model Kevin S, Vermont. USA. ABSTRACT Because of the crucial role snowmelt plays in many watersheds around the world

  11. Life Cycle Assessment Applied to 95 Representative U.S. Farms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutland, Christopher T.

    2012-10-19

    slightly different approach was proposed by Rossing et al. (1997) to evaluate flower bulb production systems in the Netherlands. They used multi-goal linear programming to optimize ecological objectives subject to a set of environmental, economic... fission, natural gas, coal, woody biomass, herbaceous biomass, hydroelectric, and wind. The CO2 equivalent per million Btu is a weighted average of emission factors, with weights assigned according to the power mix in the area of the farm...

  12. GPR50, a potential factor involved in psychiatric disorders interacts with Alzheimer’s disease-related protein ?- secretase (BACE1) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qian

    2014-11-28

    GPR50, an X-linked orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is a risk factor for bipolar disorder (BD) in female subjects. It has been shown that GPR50 plays a part in neurite outgrowth, glucocorticoid receptor signalling ...

  13. The Transcription Factor WIN1/SHN1 Regulates Cutin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Markus

    influence on its ability to protect the plant against various forms of biotic and abiotic stress. WAX INDUCER1 (WIN1) and related transcription factors have recently been shown to trigger wax production of genes associated with wax biosynthesis, suggesting that the regulation of cutin and wax production

  14. Harmonic mean, the Gamma factor and Speed of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandru Iyer

    2008-11-17

    The relationship between the harmonic mean and special relativity is concisely elucidated. The arguments in favor and against SRT are explored. It is shown that the ratio of the speed of light to the harmonic mean of the onward and return speeds of light in a moving frame under Newtonian mechanics, when equitably distributed between space and time as a correction, leads to the Lorentz transformation. This correction implies an apparent contraction of objects and time dilation. However, the symmetry of the onward and inverse transformations give a different meaning to the gamma factor

  15. Fuzzy-Oil-Drop Hydrophobic Force Field A Model to Represent Late-stage Folding (In Silico) of Lysozyme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skolnick, Jeff

    Fuzzy-Oil-Drop Hydrophobic Force Field ­ A Model to Represent Late-stage Folding (In Silico the external field in the form of a fuzzy-oil-drop assumed to represent the environment. The drop is expressed is the parameter to be mini- mized in the structure optimization procedure. The size of fuzzy-oil-drop is critical

  16. Spatial Data Structures Spatial data structures describe the rules that are used to represent geographic data in geographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Spatial Data Structures Spatial data structures describe the rules that are used to represent are represented in a database management system (for example, as database tables). · Spatial data structures. Spatial data structures are the core of a GIS and fundamentally affect its performance and capabilities

  17. StrucSoftSysDesign.doc 13/09/2010 Page 1 Representing structure in a software system design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    StrucSoftSysDesign.doc 13/09/2010 Page 1 Representing structure in a software system design Michael@acm.org Structure, clearly understood and represented, is a key tool in the design of any complex artifact. Software created and understood by the designer must be intelligibly related to parallel structures perceived

  18. En~lironinentand Planning A 1998, volume 30, pages 1547-1561 Visualizing georeferenced data: representing reliability of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klippel, Alexander

    of oral cancer death rates among white females in the United States prompted a study of occupation: representing reliability of health statistics A M MacEachren, C A Brewer Department of Geography, Penn State in mortality rates. A coincident visually integral depiction (using color characteristics to represent both

  19. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

  20. Human factors in software development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents an overview of ergonomics/human factors in software development, recent research, and classic papers. Articles are drawn from the following areas of psychological research on programming: cognitive ergonomics, cognitive psychology, and psycholinguistics. Topics examined include: theoretical models of how programmers solve technical problems, the characteristics of programming languages, specification formats in behavioral research and psychological aspects of fault diagnosis.

  1. Nonnegative matrix factorization with -divergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cichocki, Andrzej

    Nonnegative matrix factorization with -divergence Andrzej Cichocki a , Hyekyoung Lee b , Yong of Science and Technology San 31 Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784, Korea Abstract Nonnegative matrix reduction, the goal of which is to decompose nonnegative data matrix X into a product of basis matrix

  2. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of supply, upon written request as follows: Address: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission OfficeTransfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees Office of Nuclear Regulatory; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series

  3. Optimization Online - Integer Factorization is in P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuly Shipilevsky

    2012-08-31

    Aug 31, 2012 ... Integer Factorization is in P. Yuly Shipilevsky (yulysh2000 ***at*** yahoo.ca). Abstract: A polynomial-time algorithm for integer factorization, ...

  4. Clustering method and representative feeder selection for the California solar initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Williams, Joseph R.; Munoz-Ramos, Karina

    2014-02-01

    The screening process for DG interconnection procedures needs to be improved in order to increase the PV deployment level on the distribution grid. A significant improvement in the current screening process could be achieved by finding a method to classify the feeders in a utility service territory and determine the sensitivity of particular groups of distribution feeders to the impacts of high PV deployment levels. This report describes the utility distribution feeder characteristics in California for a large dataset of 8,163 feeders and summarizes the California feeder population including the range of characteristics identified and most important to hosting capacity. The report describes the set of feeders that are identified for modeling and analysis as well as feeders identified for the control group. The report presents a method for separating a utilitys distribution feeders into unique clusters using the k-means clustering algorithm. An approach for determining the feeder variables of interest for use in a clustering algorithm is also described. The report presents an approach for choosing the feeder variables to be utilized in the clustering process and a method is identified for determining the optimal number of representative clusters.

  5. A Control Chart Approach for Representing and Mining Data Streams with Shape Based Similarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2014-01-01

    The mining of data streams for online condition monitoring is a challenging task in several domains including (electric) power grid system, intelligent manufacturing, and consumer science. Considering a power grid application in which thousands of sensors, called the phasor measurement units, are deployed on the power grid network to continuously collect streams of digital data for real-time situational awareness and system management. Depending on design, each sensor could stream between ten and sixty data samples per second. The myriad of sensory data captured could convey deeper insights about sequence of events in real-time and before major damages are done. However, the timely processing and analysis of these high-velocity and high-volume data streams is a challenge. Hence, a new data processing and transformation approach, based on the concept of control charts, for representing sequence of data streams from sensors is proposed. In addition, an application of the proposed approach for enhancing data mining tasks such as clustering using real-world power grid data streams is presented. The results indicate that the proposed approach is very efficient for data streams storage and manipulation.

  6. A transferable coarse-grained model for diphenylalanine: How to represent an environment driven conformational transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Sensoy, Ozge; Sayar, Mehmet, E-mail: msayar@ku.edu.tr [College of Engineering, Koç University, 34450 Istanbul (Turkey)] [College of Engineering, Koç University, 34450 Istanbul (Turkey); Peter, Christine [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, 55128 Mainz (Germany) [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Konstanz, 78547 Konstanz (Germany)

    2013-12-21

    One of the major challenges in the development of coarse grained (CG) simulation models that aim at biomolecular structure formation processes is the correct representation of an environment-driven conformational change, for example, a folding/unfolding event upon interaction with an interface or upon aggregation. In the present study, we investigate this transferability challenge for a CG model using the example of diphenylalanine. This dipeptide displays a transition from a trans-like to a cis-like conformation upon aggregation as well as upon transfer from bulk water to the cyclohexane/water interface. Here, we show that one can construct a single CG model that can reproduce both the bulk and interface conformational behavior and the segregation between hydrophobic/hydrophilic medium. While the general strategy to obtain nonbonded interactions in the present CG model is to reproduce solvation free energies of small molecules representing the CG beads in the respective solvents, the success of the model strongly depends on nontrivial decisions one has to make to capture the delicate balance between the bonded and nonbonded interactions. In particular, we found that the peptide's conformational behavior is qualitatively affected by the cyclohexane/water interaction potential, an interaction that does not directly involve the peptide at all but merely influences the properties of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. Furthermore, we show that a small modification to improve the structural/conformational properties of the CG model could dramatically alter the thermodynamic properties.

  7. The urgent demand for energy, environmental sustainability and healthcare represents the world's most paramount challenge for the next 50 years.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    The urgent demand for energy, environmental sustainability and healthcare represents the world breakthroughs from the elementary step of materials deformation/manufacturing, energy/mass transfer design down to the nanoscale in energy, environment, healthcare and manufacture" Baoxing Xu Assistant

  8. Comparing Business and Household Sector Innovation in Consumer Products: Findings from a Representative Study in the United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Hippel, Eric A.

    In a first survey of its type, we measure development and modification of consumer products by product users in a representative sample of 1,173 UK consumers age 18 and older. We estimate this previously unmeasured type ...

  9. Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-29

    The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

  10. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  11. Human factors in waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moray, N.

    1994-10-01

    This article examines the role of human factors in radioactive waste management. Although few problems and ergonomics are special to radioactive waste management, some problems are unique especially with long term storage. The entire sociotechnical system must be looked at in order to see where improvement can take place because operator errors, as seen in Chernobyl and Bhopal, are ultimately the result of management errors.

  12. Hausdorff dimension and filling factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington Cruz

    1998-02-25

    We propose a new hierarchy scheme for the filling factor, a parameter which characterizes the occurrence of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect (FQHE). We consider the Hausdorff dimension, $h$, as a parameter for classifying fractional spin particles, such that, it is written in terms of the statistics of the collective excitations. The number $h$ classifies these excitations with different statistics in terms of its homotopy class.

  13. Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook. (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of reactive power in an electrical system. Reactive power represents wasted energy--electricity that does no useful work because the electrical current is out of phase with...

  14. Master integrals for the four-loop Sudakov form factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boels, Rutger; Yang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The light-like cusp anomalous dimension is a universal function in the analysis of infrared divergences. In maximally ($\\mathcal{N}=4$) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory (SYM) in the planar limit, it is known, in principle, to all loop orders. The non-planar corrections are not known in any theory, with the first appearing at the four-loop order. Probably the simplest quantity which contains this correction is the four-loop two-point form factor of the stress tensor multiplet. This form factor was obtained in integrand form in a previous work for $\\mathcal{N}=4$ SYM, up to a single parameter. In this work, a reduction of the appearing integrals obtained by solving integration-by-parts (IBP) identities using (a tweaked version of) Reduze is reported. The form factor is shown to be independent of the remaining parameter at integrand level due to an intricate pattern of cancellations after IBP reduction. The appearing master integrals are cross-checked using algebraic techniques explored in the Mint package. The ...

  15. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  16. Dissecting Soft Radiation with Factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

    2015-02-10

    An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It includes soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization-violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in $Z$+jet and $H$+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects, and we use a QCD factorization theorem to predict its dependence on the jet radius $R$, jet $p_T$, jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. We prove that the nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of $R$, and the linear $R$ term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event, but this degeneracy is broken by dependence on the jet $p_T$. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for $gg\\to Hg$ and $gq\\to Zq$, but a negative interference contribution for $q\\bar q\\to Z g$. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.

  17. Classification of dwellings into profiles regarding indoor air quality, and identification of indoor air pollution determinant factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of indoor air pollution determinant factors Jean-Baptiste Masson1,2 * , Gérard Govaert2 , Corinne Mandin1 representing different types of indoor air pollution. We restrain to the 20 variables corresponding to indoorClassification of dwellings into profiles regarding indoor air quality, and identification

  18. Exact limiting relation between the structure factors in neutron and x-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. B. Bobrov; S. A. Trigger; S. N. Skovorod'ko

    2010-07-11

    The ratio of the static matter structure factor measured in experiments on coherent X-ray scattering to the static structure factor measured in experiments on neutron scattering is considered. It is shown theoretically that this ratio in the long-wavelength limit is equal to the nucleus charge at arbitrary thermodynamic parameters of a pure substance (the system of nuclei and electrons, where interaction between particles is pure Coulomb) in a disordered equilibrium state. This result is the exact relation of the quantum statistical mechanics. The experimental verification of this relation can be done in the long wavelength X-ray and neutron experiments.

  19. Capacity Factor Risk At Nuclear Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Yangbo

    We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior ...

  20. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  1. Common risk factors in bank stocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viale, Ariel Marcelo

    2007-09-17

    This dissertation provides evidence on the risk factors that are priced in bank equities. Alternative empirical models with precedent in the nonfinancial asset pricing literature are tested, including the single-factor Capital Asset Pricing Model...

  2. Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    1998-01-01

    Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air ...

  3. Guidelines for Power Factor Improvement Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, G. W.

    1999-01-01

    Power factor is an indication of electrical system efficiency. Low power factor, or low system efficiency, may be due to one or more causes, including lightly loaded transformers, oversized electric motors, and harmonic-generating non-linear loads...

  4. Regions of influence for several methods of factoring polynomials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Tommy Joe

    1965-01-01

    (p , p ) = 0 leads to a quadratic factor. If (5) is differentiated wi. th respect to pl and p we find, treating b as one, Bb Bb. Bb +p~+p~=-b, 1&j&n, Bp 1 Bp 2 Bp j-1' 1 1 1 Bb. 3b 1 Bb +p~+p~=-b, l&j&n. Bp 1 Bp 2 3p j 2' 2 2 2... These are represented by the single recurrence relation (&) C + p C + p C. = -b , 0 & j & n-l, 1 j-1 2 j-2 3b where C = ? , and C = 0 if s&0, while C = -1. k-t Bp s 0 As a matter of interest, 3 b 2 if dk =3 3, whereRandm k-R-m Bp Bp f m are either 1 or 2, 1 j-1 2...

  5. Closing a Loophole in Factorization Proofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T. [HEP Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Garcia i Tormo, Xavier [HEP Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Lee, Jungil [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-23

    We address the possibility in factorization proofs that low-energy collinear gluons can couple to soft gluons.

  6. This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship ("CDRS") and [Partner Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research ­ not a participant in the Journal. Master Service Agreement Simple Level of Support for Journals #12;1.11 "Admin and sustain a Simple online journal. This MSA remains valid until superseded by a revised agreement mutually

  7. This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship ("CDRS") and [Journal Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research plug-in or operant extension (see Section 2.4) Master Service Agreement Barebones Level of Support and sustain a Barebones online journal. This MSA remains valid until superseded by a revised agreement

  8. This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship ("CDRS") and [JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research to the web development space in which OJS resides. Master Service Agreement Basic Level of Support a Basic online journal. This MSA remains valid until superseded by a revised agreement mutually endorsed

  9. This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship ("CDRS") and [JOURNAL NAME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research agreement mutually endorsed by the stakeholders. Incremental changes will be recorded in an Amendments section of this Agreement and are effective upon mutual endorsement by the primary stakeholders. Section 1

  10. Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Table of Contents Summary p2 Background: Wave Power Conversion p3 Licensing and Permitting p3 Challenges and Barriers p4 Wave Power Resources: Previous Work p5 Wave

  11. Abstract: A 3D biomechanical finite element model of the face is presented. Muscles are represented by piece-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payan, Yohan

    /lower lip contacts are also modeled. Simulations of smiling and of an Orbicularis Oris activationAbstract: A 3D biomechanical finite element model of the face is presented. Muscles are represented the mesh or the muscle implementation totally independently of each other. Lip/teeth and upper lip

  12. Evaluation of a robust, diimide-based, porous organic polymer (POP) as a high-capacity sorbent for representative chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of a robust, diimide-based, porous organic polymer (POP) as a high-capacity sorbent A previously described porous organic polymer (NU-POP-1) was evaluated against four representative chemical an activated, impregnated carbon. The ability to remove the highly volatile toxic chemicals ammonia

  13. Sulfate adsorption and its relationships with properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    State, Brazil M.E. Alves, A. Lavorenti* Departamento de Cie^ncias Exatas, Escola Superior de Agricultura ``Luiz de Queiroz''--ESALQ/USP, Caixa Postal 09, 13418-900, Piracicaba (SP), Brazil Received 27 August, electrochemical and mineralogical properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil, were

  14. Abstract--Software architecture is considered as a set of architectural design decisions (ADDs). Capturing and representing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    Abstract--Software architecture is considered as a set of architectural design decisions (ADDs). Capturing and representing ADDs during the architecting process is necessary for reducing architectural architecture framework for documenting ADDs. The TVM clarifies the notion of ADDs in three different views

  15. http://erg.sagepub.com/ Factors Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    http://erg.sagepub.com/ Factors Applications Ergonomics in Design: The Quarterly of Human httpErgonomics in Design: The Quarterly of Human Factors Applications Peter A. Hancock, Richard J. Jagacinski: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society can be found at:Ergonomics in Design: The Quarterly of Human

  16. Human factors: a necessary tool for industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starcher, K.O.

    1984-03-09

    The need for human factors (ergonomics) input in the layout of a ferroelectric ceramics laboratory is presented as an example of the overall need for human factors professionals in industry. However, even in the absence of one trained in human factors, knowledge of a few principles in ergonomics will provide many possibilities for improving performance in the industrial environment.

  17. Note on Integer Factoring Algorithms II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Carella

    2007-02-08

    This note introduces a new class of integer factoring algorithms. Two versions of this method will be described, deterministic and probabilistic. These algorithms are practical, and can factor large classes of balanced integers N = pq, p < q < 2p in superpolynomial time. Further, an extension of the Fermat factoring method is proposed.

  18. Journal influence factors6 Massimo Franceschet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franceschet, Massimo

    Journal influence factors6 Massimo Franceschet Department of Mathematics and Computer Science of journal influence, namely 2- year impact factor, 5-year impact factor, eigenfactor and article influence. These indicators have been recently added by Thomson Reuters to the Journal Citation Reports, in both science

  19. Antenna factorization in strongly ordered limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosower, David A.

    2005-02-15

    When energies or angles of gluons emitted in a gauge-theory process are small and strongly ordered, the emission factorizes in a simple way to all orders in perturbation theory. I show how to unify the various strongly ordered soft, mixed soft-collinear, and collinear limits using antenna factorization amplitudes, which are generalizations of the Catani-Seymour dipole factorization function.

  20. Factorization method and new potentials from the inverted oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bermudez, David Fernández C, David J.

    2013-06-15

    In this article we will apply the first- and second-order supersymmetric quantum mechanics to obtain new exactly-solvable real potentials departing from the inverted oscillator potential. This system has some special properties; in particular, only very specific second-order transformations produce non-singular real potentials. It will be shown that these transformations turn out to be the so-called complex ones. Moreover, we will study the factorization method applied to the inverted oscillator and the algebraic structure of the new Hamiltonians. -- Highlights: •We apply supersymmetric quantum mechanics to the inverted oscillator potential. •The complex second-order transformations allow us to build new non-singular potentials. •The algebraic structure of the initial and final potentials is analyzed. •The initial potential is described by a complex-deformed Heisenberg–Weyl algebra. •The final potentials are described by polynomial Heisenberg algebras.

  1. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

  2. Design of a proteus lattice representative of a burnt and fresh fuel interface at power conditions in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hursin, M.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The research program LIFE (Large-scale Irradiated Fuel Experiment) between PSI and Swissnuclear has been started in 2006 to study the interaction between large sets of burnt and fresh fuel pins in conditions representative of power light water reactors. Reactor physics parameters such as flux ratios and reaction rate distributions ({sup 235}U and {sup 238}U fissions and {sup 238}U capture) are calculated to estimate an appropriate arrangement of burnt and fresh fuel pins within the central element of the test zone of the zero-power research reactor PROTEUS. The arrangement should minimize the number of burnt fuel pins to ease fuel handling and reduce costs, whilst guaranteeing that the neutron spectrum in both burnt and fresh fuel regions and at their interface is representative of a large uniform array of burnt and fresh pins in the same moderation conditions. First results are encouraging, showing that the burnt/fresh fuel interface is well represented with a 6 x 6 bundle of burnt pins. The second part of the project involves the use of TSUNAMI, CASMO-4E and DAKOTA to perform parametric and optimization studies on the PROTEUS lattice by varying its pitch (P) and fraction of D{sub 2}O in moderator (F{sub D2O}) to be as representative as possible of a power light water reactor core at hot full power conditions at beginning of cycle (BOC). The parameters P and F{sub D2O} that best represent a PWR at BOC are 1.36 cm and 5% respectively. (authors)

  3. Appears in Proceedings of the 17th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI-2001). Representing Sentence Structure in Hidden Markov Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatkay, Hagit

    are intended to represent data not directly rele- vant to the task at hand. 2 Problem Domain Our work

  4. Factors fragmenting the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.

    1993-10-06

    This paper examines the factors that threaten the future of the Russian Federation (RF). The observations are based on a study that focused on eight republics: Mordova, Udmurtia, Tatarstan, Mari El, Bashkortostan, Kabardino-Balkaria, Buryatia, and Altay Republic. These republics were selected for their geographic and economic significance to the RF. Tatarstan, Bashkortostan, Udmurtia, and Mari El are located on important supply routes, such as the Volga River and the trans-Siberian railroad. Some of these republics are relatively wealthy, with natural resources such as oil (e.g., Tatarstan and Bashkortostan), and all eight republics play significant roles in the military-industrial complex. The importance of these republics to the RF contrasts to the relative insignificance of the independence-minded Northern Caucasus area. The author chose not to examine the Northern Caucasus region (except Kabardino-Balkaria) because these republics may have only a minor impact on the rest of the RF if they secede. Their impact would be minimized because they lie on the frontiers of the RF. Many Russians believe that {open_quotes}it might be best to let such a troublesome area secede.{close_quotes}

  5. Antibiotic Resistance Factors and Alternatives to Antimicrobial Growth Factors within Animal Husbandry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes, Emory

    2014-01-01

    such as tannins and probiotics but more research must beon the environment. The introduction of probiotics has alsobenefited farmers as probiotics have been shown to prevent

  6. The HealthAgents ontology: how to represent the knowledge behind a brain tumour distributed decision system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    project, INTERPRET (Juli`a-Sap´e et al., 2006b), has shown that single voxel MRS data can aid in improving decision system BO HU1,5 , MADALINA CROITORU2 , ROMAN ROSET3 , DAVID DUPPLAW1 , MIGUEL LURGI3 , SRINANDANSAP Research, Belfast BT37 0QB, UK E-mail: bo01.hu@sap.com Abstract In this paper we present our

  7. Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

    2010-10-01

    Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six “limiting factors” are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

  8. Building-related risk factors and work-related lower respiratory symptoms in 80 office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Naco, G.M.; Wilcox, T.G.; Sieber, W.K.

    2002-01-01

    We assessed building-related risk factors for lower respiratory symptoms in office workers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in 1993 collected data during indoor environmental health investigations of workplaces. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess relationships between lower respiratory symptoms in office workers and risk factors plausibly related to microbiologic contamination. Among 2,435 occupants in 80 office buildings, frequent, work-related multiple lower respiratory symptoms were strongly associated, in multivariate models, with two risk factors for microbiologic contamination: poor pan drainage under cooling coils and debris in outside air intake. Associations tended to be stronger among those with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. These findings suggest that adverse lower respiratory health effects from indoor work environments, although unusual, may occur in relation to poorly designed or maintained ventilation systems, particularly among previously diagnosed asthmatics. These findings require confirmation in more representative buildings.

  9. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  10. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada); Siemann, Stefan, E-mail: ssiemann@laurentian.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  11. Lower bounds for approximate factorizations via semidefinite ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT The problem of approximately factoring a real or complex multivariate polynomial f seeks minimal perturbations ? f to the coefficients of the input ...

  12. Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook. Electrotek Concepts...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    low power factors, increased conductor and transformer losses, and lower voltages. Utilities must supply both active and reactive power and compensate for these losses. Power...

  13. Emerging alternatives to the impact factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, Marcus A.; Dellavalle, Robert

    2008-01-01

    abs/0709.0896. 12. Public Library of Science Medicineimpact factor game,” Public Library of Science Medicine Voljournals published by the Public Library of Science, follows

  14. Tetrahydroquinoline Derivatives as Potent and Selective Factor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Derivatives as Potent and Selective Factor XIa Inhibitors Authors: Quan, Mimi L. ; Wong, Pancras C. ; Wang, Cailan ; Woerner, Francis ; Smallheer, Joanne M. ; Barbera, Frank...

  15. CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS AFFECTING FUSION. Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F Abstract not provided. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque,...

  16. Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Wei Qiu

    2006-10-31

    We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

  17. CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS AFFECTING FUSION. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION:...

  18. Experimental study of the relationship between formation factor, porosity, and cementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harig, M.D.; Chaney, R.C.

    1999-07-01

    Cemented granular soils are classified based on the size and distribution of the individual grains and qualitatively on the basis of cementation. To uniquely classify these types of soils, information about the fabric (pore geometry and/or level of cementation) of the specimen needs to be quantified. Electrical resistivity, or its reciprocal, conductivity, methods have been extensively used both in situ and in the laboratory to provide a means for determining a variety of soil index, structural, erosional, and cyclic properties. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between formation factor (F), porosity (n), and cementation factor (m) of remolded sand-cement specimens. This relationship is shown to provide a mechanism for estimating the level of cementation in undisturbed specimens. The formation factor is the ratio of the electrical resistivity of the sand-water-cement mixture to that of the interstitial water.

  19. Timed Nuclear Import of a Transcription Factor During Erythropoiesis Erythroid Krppel-like factor (EKLF) is an erythroid transcription factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Timed Nuclear Import of a Transcription Factor During Erythropoiesis Erythroid Krüppel-like factor. The regulatory mechanisms of the nuclear transport of EKLF during erythroid differentiation have remained unclear provided essential new insights into this process. They show that nuclear import of EKLF in erythroid cells

  20. Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014) The Department of Energy investigated the major cost factors that...

  1. Volunteer Day Countries Represented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    China Colombia Egypt France Italy Japan Korea Kuwait Russia Saudi Arabia Spain Thailand Turkey UAE much and in how many ways this may change, depending on the price of gas! Q: Why do the American people

  2. PI:____________________________ EHS Representative: ____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    : ____________________________ Level I Checklist Environmental: Hazardous Waste: Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAA) Yes No N/A 1. Is all hazardous waste stored in the satellite accumulation area (SAA)? 2. Are the satellite accumulation areas (SAAs) clearly labeled? 3. Are the SAAs located at or near the point of hazardous waste generation

  3. Representing Small Group Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wormald, Nicholas

    2009-03-30

    Understanding the dynamics of network evolution rests in part on the representation chosen to characterize the evolutionary process. We offer a simple, three-parameter representation based on subgraphs that capture three ...

  4. Construction Control Representative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Maintenance, (J5600) Engineering and Construction 5555 E....

  5. house of representatives

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 34460/%2A en NNSA8/%2A en

  6. Psychology 4330, Spring 2011. Human Factors Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Matthew

    with an interest in design should remember that it is not really possible to teach ergonomic design per se without: Guastello, S. J. (2006). Human factors engineering and ergonomics: A systems approach. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence/19 Introduction to human factors (T1) 1/24 Usability evaluation methods (T2) 1/31 Systems that change over time (T

  7. Gauss Sum Factorization with Cold Atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilowski, M.; Wendrich, T.; Mueller, T.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M. [Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Jentsch, Ch. [Astrium GmbH-Satellites, 88039 Friedrichshafen (Germany); Schleich, W. P. [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2008-01-25

    We report the first implementation of a Gauss sum factorization algorithm by an internal state Ramsey interferometer using cold atoms. A sequence of appropriately designed light pulses interacts with an ensemble of cold rubidium atoms. The final population in the involved atomic levels determines a Gauss sum. With this technique we factor the number N=263193.

  8. An economic evaluation of selected tenure arrangements for a representative farm in the northern high plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harwell, R. Lynn

    1970-01-01

    'frixfxttee) ~ ~~yg/J Jeff:axxy 1970 ABSTRACT An Economic Evaluation of Selected Tenure Arrangements For A Representative Farm in the Northern Sigh Plains of Texas. (January 1970) Richard Lynn Sarwell; B. B. S. , The University of Texas Directed by: Dr. J. S... thar three-fourths of the annual noisture falls during the growing season [27]. LLANO M E'yg ~VI P@ I CO HARFvvv EHERSAV tiooRF HolCHINsoN Study Area vs% Figure 1. Distribution of Hardlands Soils, Texas bligh Pla111S Souro: [57 J !!ind !mi...

  9. Platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factor beta synergistically potentiate inflammatory mediator synthesis by fibroblast-like synoviocytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosengren, Sanna; Corr, Maripat; Boyle, David L

    2010-01-01

    et al. , Platelet-derived growth factor and transformingactivated by platelet-derived growth factor. Clin Expmesylate inhibits platelet derived growth factor stimulated

  10. Effects of friction factor and slip factor on the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheth, Ketankumar Kantilal

    1985-01-01

    EFFECTS OF FRICTION FACTOR AND SLIP FACTOR ON THE PERFORMANCE OF A CENTRIFUGAL SLURRY PUMP A Thesis by KETANKUMAR KANTILAL SHETH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Ma]or Sub]ect: Mechanical Engineering EFFECTS OF FRICTION FACTOR AND SLIP FACTOR ON THE PERFORMANCE OF A CENTRIFUGAL SLURRY PUMP A Thesis by KETANKUMAR KANTILAL SHETH Approved as to style and content by...

  11. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Profile of genetic and environmental factors in oncogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.B.

    1984-07-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinomas (NBCCs) are a prototype of a genetic form of basal cell carcinoma. These basal cell cancers, rather than being caused by genetic factors alone, are most likely the product of genetic and environmental factors. The NBCC syndrome provides a model for studying tumors induced by ionizing radiation and for viewing carcinogenesis as a multistage process explainable by a minimum of two steps. The interaction of genetic and environmental factors in producing tumors to which an individual is predisposed can be studied in patients with the NBCC syndrome and childhood medulloblastoma that was treated by radiation therapy. Individuals with the NBCC syndrome represent a special subgroup with a hereditary predisposition to basal cell carcinoma in whom ionizing radiation may supply the subsequent mutation necessary for tumor development. The genetically altered epidermis underlying the palm and sole pits found in patients with the syndrome represents basal cell carcinoma in situ from which basal cell carcinomas develop, albeit infrequently. The restrained biologic behavior of most of these tumors contrasts with the usual destructive behavior of the NBCCs of the head and neck in the same patient.

  12. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  13. Chiral solitons in nuclei: Electromagnetic form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason R. Smith; Gerald A. Miller

    2004-09-08

    We calculate the electromagnetic form factors of a bound proton. The Chiral Quark-Soliton model provides the quark and antiquark substructure of the proton, which is embedded in nuclear matter. This procedure yields significant modifications of the form factors in the nuclear environment. The sea quarks are almost completely unaffected, and serve to mitigate the valence quark effect. In particular, the ratio of the isoscalar electric to the isovector magnetic form factor decreases by 20% at Q^2=1 GeV^2 at nuclear density, and we do not see a strong enhancement of the magnetic moment.

  14. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-4: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.; Winberg, M.; Williams, K.

    1994-09-01

    This report estimates packaging factors for several waste types that are potential greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a GTCC LLW disposal container divided by the as-generated or ``unpackaged`` volume of the waste loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors reflect any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of GTCC LLW, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. Three values are developed that represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated disposal volume of waste, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. GTCC LLW is placed in three categories for evaluation in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other waste.

  15. Factors and Feeds for Supplementing Beef Cows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Stephen P.; Gill, Ronald J.

    2000-05-03

    A beef cow requires energy, protein, minerals and vitamins in its diet. Many factors, including forage quantity and quality and animal body condition, affect the amounts of required nutrients....

  16. Parametrizing Compton form factors with neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kresimir Kumericki; Dieter Mueller; Andreas Schafer

    2011-12-08

    We describe a method, based on neural networks, of revealing Compton form factors in the deeply virtual region. We compare this approach to standard least-squares model fitting both for a simplified toy case and for HERMES data.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

  18. Factors favorable to public participation success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peelle, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Munro, J.; Carnes, S.; Wolfe, A.

    1996-05-01

    Categories of factors linked to successful public participation (PP) program outcomes include PP process, organizational context, sociopolitical context, strategic considerations and unique (special circumstances) factors. We re-order the long list factors according to how essential, important, and unique they are and discuss their significance and interrelationships. It is argued that bureacratic structure and operational modes are basically in conflict with features of successful PP programs (openness, two-way education, communication with nonexpert outsiders). If this is so, then it is not surprising that the factors essential for PP success in bureacracies involve extraordinary management efforts by agencies to bypass, compensate for, or overcome structural constraints. We conclude by speculating about the long-term viability of PP practices in the agency setting as well as the consequences for agencies that attempt the problematic task of introducing PP into their complex, mission-oriented organizations.

  19. Factors Involved in Search Dog Training 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Michael B.

    2010-07-14

    Events of significant impact as recent as hurricane Ike yielded a consistent disturbing truth: we lack sufficient numbers of competent search dog [Canis familiaris] teams. This study was conceived to provide information in identifying factors...

  20. Distributed naming in a factored operating system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckmann, Nathan (Nathan Zachary)

    2010-01-01

    A factored operating system (fos) is a new operating system design for manycore and cloud computers. In fos, OS services are separated from application code and run on distinct cores. Furthermore, each service is split ...

  1. Enabling Factors in Successful Product Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Victor

    2005-08-15

    The research literature and industry best-practices report a vast number of enabling factors that contribute to successful product development (PD). Collectively this body of work also establishes the causal linkages between ...

  2. Human Factors of Healthcare Reporting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.W.

    Johnson,C.W. P. Carayon (ed), A Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare and Patient Safety, Lawrence Erlbaum, London, UK pp 525-560 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

  3. Expressions in occam have values which represent, in the usual way for programming languages, integers, oating-point numbers, Boolean (truth)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Geraint

    . Every expression in occam has a mechanically determinable type. There are no automatic translations explicit. Integers The usual type used for discrete arithmetic is INT, which is a set of integers represented in twos-complement. Numerals like 42, or 0, represent the cor- responding values of type INT

  4. Global and regional evolution of short-lived radiatively-active gases and aerosols in the Representative Concentration Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Kyle, G. Page; Meinshausen, Malte; Riahi, Keywan; Smith, Steven J.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Conley, Andrew; Vitt, Francis

    2011-08-05

    In this paper, we discuss the results of 2000-2100 simulations with a chemistry-climate model, focusing on the changes in atmospheric composition (troposphere and stratosphere) following the emissions associated with the Representative Concentration Pathways. We show that tropospheric ozone is projected to decrease (RCP3PD and RCP4.5) or increase (RCP8.5) between 2000 and 2100. Surface ozone in 2100 is projected to change little compared from 2000 conditions, a much-reduced impact from the projections based on the A2 scenario. Aerosols are projected to strongly decrease in the 21st century, a reflection of their projected decrease in emissions. Similarly, sulfate deposition is projected to strongly decrease. However, nitrogen deposition is projected to increase over certain regions because of the projected increase NH3 emissions.

  5. On time-optimal NMR control of states of qutrits represented by quadrupole nuclei with the spin I = 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zobov, V. E., E-mail: rsa@iph.krasn.ru; Shauro, V. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, L.V. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-15

    Elementary logical operators (selective rotation, Fourier transform, controllable phase shift, and SUM gate) are considered for a quantum computer based on three-level systems (qutrits) represented by nuclear spins I = 1 under nuclear magnetic resonance conditions. The computer simulation of the realization of these operators by means of simple and composite selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses and optimized RF pulses is performed. The time dependence of the amplitude of last pulses is found by numerical optimization at different durations. Two variants are proposed for realization of a two-qutrit SUM gate by using one-qutrit or two-qutrit optimized RF pulses. The calculated time dependences of realization errors were used to study the time optimality of different methods for obtaining gates, proposed earlier and in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the methods are evaluated for different values of physical parameters.

  6. Proton form factor effects in hydrogenic atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daza, F. Garcia; Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2011-10-21

    The proton structure corrections to the hyperfine splittings in electronic and muonic hydrogen are evaluated using the Breit potential with electromagnetic form factors. In contrast to other methods, the Breit equation with q{sup 2} dependent form factors is just an extension of the standard Breit equation which gives the hyperfine splitting Hamiltonian. Precise QED corrections are comparable to the structure corrections which therefore need to be evaluated ab initio.

  7. Rice Quality Factors: Implications For Management Decisions. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Warren R.; Rister, Edward, M.; Brorsen, B. Wade

    1986-01-01

    . Review comments and suggestions from Bill Black, Bart Drees, Arthur Gerlow, Melvin Parker, James Stansel, Mo Way, Bill Webb, and Michael Wohlgenant are also appreciated. A special thanks to Kim Trant for editorial assistance. ... Rice Quality Factors... that grades are intended to measure are red rice, weed seeds, damaged kernels (including peck), off-color, chalk, and off-types of rice kernels. These factors should be negatively related to price, since they are all undesirable characteristics. 1 Graders...

  8. Factors affecting robust retail energy markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelman, T.S.

    1999-04-01

    This paper briefly defines an active retail market, details the factors that influence market activity and their relative importance, compares activity in various retail energy markets to date, and predicts future retail energy market activity. Three primary factors translate into high market activity: supplier margins, translated into potential savings for actively shopping customers; market size; and market barriers. The author surveys activity nationwide and predicts hot spots for the coming year.

  9. The factor 2 in fundamental physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Rowlands

    2001-10-24

    A brief history is given of the factor 2, starting in the most elementary considerations of geometry and kinematics of uniform acceleration, and moving to relativity, quantum mechanics and particle physics. The basic argument is that in all the significant cases in which the factor 2 or 1/2 occurs in fundamental physics, whether classical, quantum or relativistic, the same physical operation is taking place.

  10. Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

    1990-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

  11. Odd orders in Shor's factoring algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Lawson

    2015-01-13

    Shor's factoring algorithm (SFA) finds the prime factors of a number, $N=p_1 p_2$, exponentially faster than the best known classical algorithm. Responsible for the speed-up is a subroutine called the quantum order finding algorithm (QOFA) which calculates the order -- the smallest integer, $r$, satisfying $a^r \\mod N =1$, where $a$ is a randomly chosen integer coprime to $N$ (meaning their greatest common divisor is one, $\\gcd(a, N) =1$). Given $r$, and with probability not less than $1/2$, the factors are given by $p_1 = \\gcd (a^{\\frac{r}{2}} - 1, N)$ and $p_2 = \\gcd (a^{\\frac{r}{2}} + 1, N)$. For odd $r$ it is assumed the factors cannot be found (since $a^{\\frac{r}{2}}$ is not generally integer) and the QOFA is relaunched with a different value of $a$. But a recent paper [E. Martin-Lopez: Nat Photon {\\bf 6}, 773 (2012)] noted that the factors can sometimes be found from odd orders if the coprime is square. This raises the question of improving SFA's success probability by considering odd orders. We show that an improvement is possible, though it is small. We present two techniques for retrieving the order from apparently useless runs of the QOFA: not discarding odd orders; and looking out for new order finding relations in the case of failure. In terms of efficiency, using our techniques is equivalent to avoiding square coprimes and disregarding odd orders, which is simpler in practice. Even still, our techniques may be useful in the near future, while demonstrations are restricted to factoring small numbers. The most convincing demonstrations of the QOFA are those that return a non-power-of-two order, making odd orders that lead to the factors attractive to experimentalists.

  12. Factorization of the dijet cross section in electron-positron annihilation with jet algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junegone Chay; Chul Kim; Inchol Kim

    2015-08-07

    We analyze the effects of jet algorithms on each factorized part of the dijet cross sections in $e^+ e^-$ scattering using the soft-collinear effective theory. The jet function and the soft function with a cone-type jet algorithm and the Sterman-Weinberg jet algorithm are computed to next-to-leading order in $\\alpha_s$, and are shown to be infrared finite using the dimensional regularization. The integrated and unintegrated jet functions are presented, and compared with other types of jet functions.

  13. The role of demagnetization factor in determining the ‘true’ value of the Curie temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zverev, V.I.; Gimaev, R.R.; Tishin, A.M.; Mudryk, Ya; Gschneidner, Jr., K.A.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    2011-05-20

    The Curie temperature, T{sub c}, is the temperature above which a material loses its long-range ferromagnetic order. Considering the equation of state of a ferromagnet in the mean-field approximation it has been shown theoretically that the value of the demagnetization factor N has a significant influence on the perceived location of T{sub c} on the temperature scale. A series of precise measurements of magnetization using two differently shaped single crystals of high-purity gadolinium was carried out to prove this result experimentally and develop a procedure leading to the 'true' value of T{sub c}.

  14. Epidermal growth factor and its receptors in human pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.F.; Pan, G.Z.; Hou, X.; Liu, T.H.; Chen, J.; Yanaihara, C.; Yanaihara, N. (Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China))

    1990-05-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in oncogenesis and progression of malignant tumors is a subject of vast interest. In this study, radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay of EGF were established. EGF contents in malignant and benign pancreatic tumors, in normal pancreas tissue, and in culture media of a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line were determined. EGF receptor binding studies were performed. It was shown that EGF contents in pancreatic carcinomas were significantly higher than those in normal pancreas or benign pancreatic tumors. EGF was also detected in the culture medium of a pancreatic carcinoma cell line. The binding of 125I-EGF to the pancreatic carcinoma cells was time and temperature dependent, reversible, competitive, and specific. Scatchard analysis showed that the dissociation constant of EGF receptor was 2.1 X 10(-9) M, number of binding sites was 1.3 X 10(5) cell. These results indicate that there is an over-expression of EGF/EGF receptors in pancreatic carcinomas, and that an autocrine regulatory mechanism may exist in the growth-promoting effect of EGF on tumor cells.

  15. Developing Process Safety Indicators for Organizational Factors in Petrochemical Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alnashwan, Mohammed

    2015-07-09

    Most major process safety incidents are preventable and can be avoided as shown in several incident investigation reports. Moreover, these reports indicated that these incidents were certain to occur as shown from the related near-misses and safety...

  16. On Boolean matrices with full factor rank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shitov, Ya

    2013-11-30

    It is demonstrated that every (0,1)-matrix of size n×m having Boolean rank n contains a column with at least ?n/2?1 zero entries. This bound is shown to be asymptotically optimal. As a corollary, it is established that the size of a full-rank Boolean matrix is bounded from above by a function of its tropical and determinantal ranks. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  17. Simulating Factorization with a Quantum Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Luis Rosales

    2015-05-12

    Modern cryptography is largely based on complexity assumptions, for example, the ubiquitous RSA is based on the supposed complexity of the prime factorization problem. Thus, it is of fundamental importance to understand how a quantum computer would eventually weaken these algorithms. In this paper, one follows Feynman's prescription for a computer to simulate the physics corresponding to the algorithm of factoring a large number $N$ into primes. Using Dirac-Jordan transformation theory one translates factorization into the language of quantum hermitical operators, acting on the vectors of the Hilbert space. This leads to obtaining the ensemble of factorization of $N$ in terms of the Euler function $\\varphi(N)$, that is quantized. On the other hand, considering $N$ as a parameter of the computer, a Quantum Mechanical Prime Counting Function $\\pi_{QM}(x)$, where $x$ factorizes $N$, is derived. This function converges to $\\pi(x)$ when $N\\gg x$. It has no counterpart in analytic number theory and its derivation relies on semiclassical quantization alone.

  18. The friction factor of two-dimensional rough-boundary turbulent soap film flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Guttenberg; Nigel Goldenfeld

    2009-03-25

    We use momentum transfer arguments to predict the friction factor $f$ in two-dimensional turbulent soap-film flows with rough boundaries (an analogue of three-dimensional pipe flow) as a function of Reynolds number Re and roughness $r$, considering separately the inverse energy cascade and the forward enstrophy cascade. At intermediate Re, we predict a Blasius-like friction factor scaling of $f\\propto\\textrm{Re}^{-1/2}$ in flows dominated by the enstrophy cascade, distinct from the energy cascade scaling of $\\textrm{Re}^{-1/4}$. For large Re, $f \\sim r$ in the enstrophy-dominated case. We use conformal map techniques to perform direct numerical simulations that are in satisfactory agreement with theory, and exhibit data collapse scaling of roughness-induced criticality, previously shown to arise in the 3D pipe data of Nikuradse.

  19. Chiral extrapolation of nucleon magnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Wang; D. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; R.Young

    2007-04-01

    The extrapolation of nucleon magnetic form factors calculated within lattice QCD is investigated within a framework based upon heavy baryon chiral effective-field theory. All one-loop graphs are considered at arbitrary momentum transfer and all octet and decuplet baryons are included in the intermediate states. Finite range regularization is applied to improve the convergence in the quark-mass expansion. At each value of the momentum transfer (Q{sup 2}), a separate extrapolation to the physical pion mass is carried out as a function of m{sub {pi}} alone. Because of the large values of Q{sup 2} involved, the role of the pion form factor in the standard pion-loop integrals is also investigated. The resulting values of the form factors at the physical pion mass are compared with experimental data as a function of Q{sup 2} and demonstrate the utility and accuracy of the chiral extrapolation methods presented herein.

  20. Human factors in nuclear technology - a history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Human factors, human factors engineering (HFE), or ergonomics did not receive much formal attention in nuclear technology prior to the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) incident. Three principal reasons exist for this lack of concern. First, emerging technologies show little concern with how people will use a new system. Making the new technology work is considered more important than the people who will use it. Second, the culture of the users of nuclear power did not recognize a need for human factors. Traditional utilities had well established and effective engineering designs for control of electric power generation, while medicine considered the use of nuclear isotopes another useful tool, not requiring special ergonomics. Finally, the nuclear industry owed much to Admiral Rickover. He was definitely opposed.

  1. Hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syukurilla, L. Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We have revisited the effect of hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction process by utilizing an isobaric model developed for kaon photoproduction off the proton. The model is able to reproduce the available experimental data nicely as well as to reveal the origin of the second peak in the total cross section, which was the main source of confusion for decades. Different from our previous study, in the present work we explore the possibility of using different hadronic form factors in each of the K?N vertices. The use of different hadronic form factors, e.g. dipole, Gaussian, and generalized dipole, has been found to produce a more flexible isobar model, which can provide a significant improvement in the model.

  2. Long term out-of-pile thermocouple tests in conditions representative for nuclear gas-cooled high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurie, M.; Fourrez, S.; Fuetterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    During irradiation tests at high temperature, failure of commercial Inconel 600 sheathed thermocouples is commonly encountered. To understand and remedy this problem, out-of-pile tests were performed with thermocouples in carburizing atmospheres which can be assumed to be at least locally representative for High Temperature Reactors. The objective was to screen those thermocouples which would consecutively be used under irradiation. Two such screening tests have been performed with a set of thermocouples embedded in graphite (mainly conventional Type N thermocouples and thermocouples with innovative sheaths) in a dedicated furnace with helium flushing. Performance indicators such as thermal drift, insulation and loop resistance were monitored and compared to those from conventional Type N thermocouples. Several parameters were investigated: niobium sleeves, bending, thickness, sheath composition, temperature as well as the chemical environment. After the tests, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examinations were performed to analyze possible local damage in wires and in the sheath. The present paper describes the two experiments, summarizes results and outlines further work, in particular to further analyze the findings and to select suitable thermocouples for qualification under irradiation. (authors)

  3. THE SPITZER EXTRAGALACTIC REPRESENTATIVE VOLUME SURVEY: THE ENVIRONMENTS OF HIGH-z SDSS QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falder, J. T.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Lacy, M.; Farrah, D.; Oliver, S.; Surace, J.; Mauduit, J.-C.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Afonso, J.; Cava, A.; Seymour, N.

    2011-07-10

    This paper presents a study of the environments of SDSS quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) in the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We concentrate on the high-redshift QSOs as these have not been studied in large numbers with data of this depth before. We use the IRAC 3.6-4.5 {mu}m color of objects and ancillary r-band data to filter out as much foreground contamination as possible. This technique allows us to find a significant (>4{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 2.0 and an (>2{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 3.3. We compare our findings to the predictions of a semi-analytic galaxy formation model, based on the {Lambda}CDM MILLENNIUM simulation, and find for both redshift bins that the model predictions match well the source density we have measured from the SERVS data.

  4. Human factors challenges for advanced process control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubler, W.F.; O`Hara, J..M.

    1996-08-01

    New human-system interface technologies provide opportunities for improving operator and plant performance. However, if these technologies are not properly implemented, they may introduce new challenges to performance and safety. This paper reports the results from a survey of human factors considerations that arise in the implementation of advanced human-system interface technologies in process control and other complex systems. General trends were identified for several areas based on a review of technical literature and a combination of interviews and site visits with process control organizations. Human factors considerations are discussed for two of these areas, automation and controls.

  5. Unidentified factors in the nutrition of chickens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieckert, Julius Walter

    1951-01-01

    of the factor were described? The factor was found to be stable to heat and acid, Xn fact? ths activity of liver?L" wac increased several?4'oi14 by autoclaving at pH 1 for thirty xdxxutes? RecentIy? Tovs& Lslor+ and RLvsbgem {'%) reported that mink required...~ The idea was expressed explicitly by Hapson ('3&? '33) and hy ByerIy et aI ('33) ~ Hapson in working with rats found that these animals required something associated with animal protein for normal growthI unfortunate+? he did not con~us the study, ByurIy...

  6. Momentum compaction and phase slip factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Section 2.3.11 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is updated. The slip factor and its higher orders are given in terms of the various orders of the momentum compaction. With the aid of a simplified FODO lattice, formulas are given for the alteration of the lower orders of the momentum compaction by various higher multipole magnets. The transition to isochronicity is next demonstrated. Formulas are given for the extraction of the first three orders of the slip factor from the measurement of the synchrotron tune while changing the rf frequency. Finally bunch-length compression experiments in semi-isochronous rings are reported.

  7. Annotated bibliography of human factors applications literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCafferty, D.B.

    1984-09-30

    This bibliography was prepared as part of the Human Factors Technology Project, FY 1984, sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Safety, US Department of Energy. The project was conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with Essex Corporation as a subcontractor. The material presented here is a revision and expansion of the bibliographic material developed in FY 1982 as part of a previous Human Factors Technology Project. The previous bibliography was published September 30, 1982, as Attachment 1 to the FY 1982 Project Status Report.

  8. Emission factors for leaks in refinery components in heavy liquid service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taback, H.; Godec, M.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this program was to provide sufficient screening data so that EPA can develop an official set of emission factors (expressed in lb/hr/component) for refinery components (valves, flanged connectors, non-flanged connectors, pumps, open-ended lines, and other) in heavy liquid (BL) service. To accomplish this, 211,000 existing HL screening values from Southern California refineries were compiled and compared with 2,500 new HL screening measurements taken at two refineries in the state of Washington. Since Southern California is an area in extreme non-attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and therefore has tight emission control regulations, it was felt that its screening data may not be representative of refineries without tight emission controls. Thus, the Southern California screening data were compared to screening measurements at refineries in an area that is in attainment of the NAAQS and without emissions control, which is the case for those refineries in Washington. It was found that statistically there was no significant difference in emission factors between the two areas and, therefore, there appears to be no difference in emissions from heavy liquid components in areas with and without leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs. The new emission factors range from 1/7 to 1/3 times the current EPA emission factors. This program was sponsored by the American Petroleum Institute (API) and an API report will soon be released providing complete details.

  9. QCD Factorization for Quarkonium Production in Hadron Collions at Low Transverse Momentum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, J P

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive production of a quarkonium $\\eta_{c,b}$ in hadron collisions at low transverse momentum can be used to extract various Transverse-Momentum-Dependent(TMD) gluon distributions of hadrons, provided the TMD factorization for the process holds. The factorization involving unpolarized TMD gluon distributions of unpolarized hadrons has been examined with on-shell gluons at one-loop level. In this work we study the factorization at one-loop level with diagram approach in the most general case, where all TMD gluon distributions at leading twist are involved. We find that the factorization holds and the perturbative effects are represented only by one perturbative coefficient. This coefficient is given here with one-loop accuracy. The relativistic correction is also added. Since the initial gluons from hadrons are in general off-shell, there exists the so-called super-leading region found recently. We find that the contributions from this region can come from individual diagrams at one-loop level, but they ar...

  10. Despite the growth of agriculture and the consumption of forestry resources, these activities represent a continually decreasing percentage of production in Latin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key messages · Despite the growth of agriculture and the consumption of forestry resources, these activities represent a continually decreasing percentage of production in Latin American countries. · Forest products account for a larger proportion of Latin America's material extraction than would

  11. The Cornell Center for a Sustainable Future (CCSF) represents a bold commitment to develop and deploy knowledge to address some of society's most complex and press-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    , develop, and deliver high-impact innova- tions through sustainability science. We also convene#12;The Cornell Center for a Sustainable Future (CCSF) represents a bold commitment to develop Compliance and Sustainability; Cornell International Institute for Food, Agriculture, and Development

  12. To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five Platinum Pt-100 sensors, that are cascaded

  13. Domain Assignment to Transcription FactorsDomain Assignment to Transcription Factors 412 Proteins with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    Domain Assignment to Transcription FactorsDomain Assignment to Transcription Factors 412 Proteins with at least one SCOP DBD assignment 412 Proteins with at least one SCOP DBD assignment 7 proteins with PFAM DBD assignment 7 proteins with PFAM DBD assignment 419 proteins with DBD assignment419 proteins

  14. Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to High Momentum Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. R. Puckett

    2015-08-06

    The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon characterize the effect of its internal structure on its response to an electromagnetic probe as studied in elastic electron-nucleon scattering. These form factors are functions of the squared four-momentum transfer $Q^2$ between the electron and the proton. The two main classes of observables of this reaction are the scattering cross section and polarization asymmetries, both of which are sensitive to the form factors in different ways. When considering large momentum transfers, double-polarization observables offer superior sensitivity to the electric form factor. This thesis reports the results of a new measurement of the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton at high momentum transfer using the recoil polarization technique. A polarized electron beam was scattered from a liquid hydrogen target, transferring polarization to the recoiling protons. These protons were detected in a magnetic spectrometer which was used to reconstruct their kinematics, including their scattering angles and momenta, and the position of the interaction vertex. A proton polarimeter measured the polarization of the recoiling protons by measuring the azimuthal asymmetry in the angular distribution of protons scattered in CH$_2$ analyzers. The scattered electron was detected in a large-acceptance electromagnetic calorimeter in order to suppress inelastic backgrounds. The measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the scattered proton is directly proportional to the ratio of form factors $G_E^p/G_M^p$. The measurements reported in this thesis took place at $Q^2=$5.2, 6.7, and 8.5 GeV$^2$, and represent the most accurate measurements of $G_E^p$ in this $Q^2$ region to date.

  15. Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Puckett

    2010-02-01

    The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon characterize the effect of its internal structure on its response to an electromagnetic probe as studied in elastic electronnucleon scattering. These form factors are functions of the squared four-momentum transfer Q2 between the electron and the proton. The two main classes of observables of this reaction are the scattering cross section and polarization asymmetries, both of which are sensitive to the form factors in different ways. When considering large f momentum transfers, double-polarization observables offer superior sensitivity to the electric form factor. This thesis reports the results of a new measurement of the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton at high momentum transfer using the recoil polarization technique. A polarized electron beam was scattered from a liquid hydrogen target, transferring polarization to the recoiling protons. These protons were detected in a magnetic spectrometer which was used to reconstruct their kinematics, including their scattering angles and momenta, and the position of the interaction vertex. A proton polarimeter measured the polarization of the recoiling protons by measuring the azimuthal asymmetry in the angular distribution of protons scattered in CH2 analyzers. The scattered electron was detected in a large acceptance electromagnetic calorimeter in order to suppress inelastic backgrounds. The measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the scattered proton is directly proportional to the ratio of form factors GpE=GpM. The measurements reported in this thesis took place at Q2 =5.2, 6.7, and 8.5 GeV2, and represent the most accurate measurements of GpE in this Q2 region to date.

  16. Investigating Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific Biomass Recalcitrance Factors Using Reference Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Xiaohui; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Xiao

    2014-04-01

    Three commercial cellulase preparations, Novozymes Cellic® Ctec2, Dupont Accellerase® 1500, and DSM Cytolase CL, were evaluated for their hydrolytic activity using a set of reference biomass substrates with controlled substrate characteristics. It was found that lignin remains a significant recalcitrance factor to all the preparations, although different enzyme preparations respond to the inhibitory effect of lignin differently. Also, different types of biomass lignin can inhibit cellulose enzymes in different manners. Enhancing enzyme activity toward biomass fiber swelling is an area significantly contributing to potential improvement in cellulose performance. While the degree of polymerization of cellulose in the reference substrates did not present a major recalcitrance factor to Novozymes Cellic® Ctec2, cellulose crystallite has been shown to have a significant lower reactivity toward all enzyme mixtures. The presence of polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) in Novozymes Ctec2 appears to enhance enzyme activity toward decrystallization of cellulose. This study demonstrated that reference substrates with controlled chemical and physical characteristics of structural features can be applied as an effective and practical strategy to identify cellulosic enzyme activities toward specific biomass recalcitrance factor(s) and provide specific targets for enzyme improvement.

  17. Deep Mixtures of Factor Analysers Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Deep Mixtures of Factor Analysers Introduction Experiments - High dimensional data (avg. log An efficient way to learn deep density models is to greedily learn one layer at a time using one layer latent Graphical Model of Deep MFA Illustration with 2D data Each ellipse is a Gaussian Component Aggregated

  18. Integrating Human Factors with Software Engineering Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the 38th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Nashville, TN, October, 1994. Also to the design, development, and evaluation of usable and useful interactive systems, and presents a rationale Ergonomics and Safety Technology, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA jtr001@delphi.com 1. Introduction The design

  19. Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashurst, W. Robert

    Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values Mass 1 kg = 1000 g = 0.001 metric ton = 2·R 10.73 psia·ft3 lbmol·R 62.36 liter·torr mol·K 0.7302 ft3·atm lbmol·R Temperature Conversions: T

  20. Singular subfactors of II_1 factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiggins, Alan Daniel

    2007-09-17

    II1 factor and G is a countable discrete group acting on P by outer automorphisms, we characterize the elements x of PoG such that x(PoH)x0 PoH for some subgroup H of G. We establish that proper finite index singular subfactors do not have the weak...

  1. Distributed QR Factorization Based on Randomized Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zemen, Thomas

    Distributed QR Factorization Based on Randomized Algorithms Hana Strakov´a1 , Wilfried N. Gansterer of Algorithms Hana.Strakova@univie.ac.at, Wilfried.Gansterer@univie.ac.at 2 Forschungszentrum Telekommunication Wien, Austria Thomas.Zemen@ftw.at Abstract. Most parallel algorithms for matrix computations assume

  2. GRIDONOMICS An Introduction to the Factors Shaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    GRIDONOMICS An Introduction to the Factors Shaping Electric Industry Transformation White Paper industry is at a tipping point where the pace of change and opportunity for disruption is accelerating. Thirty years of energy policy and industry structural changes are combining with accelerating social

  3. Pion form factor with twisted mass QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou M. Abdel-Rehim; Randy Lewis

    2004-09-10

    The pion form factor is calculated using quenched twisted mass QCD with beta=6.0 and maximal twisting angle omega=pi/2. Two pion masses and several values of momentum transfer are considered. The momentum averaging procedure of Frezzotti and Rossi is used to reduce lattice spacing errors, and numerical results are consistent with the expected O(a) improvement.

  4. Factors Influencing Succession: Lessons from Large, Infrequent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    intense disturbances of large and small extent. Key words: disturbance frequency; disturbance intensityFactors Influencing Succession: Lessons from Large, Infrequent Natural Disturbances Monica G ABSTRACT Disturbance events vary in intensity, size, and fre- quency, but few opportunities exist to study

  5. Factored Language Models for Statistical Machine Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehn, Philipp

    Factored Language Models for Statistical Machine Translation Amittai E. Axelrod TH E U N I V E R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.4.3 Log-Linear, Phrase-Based Translation Models . . . . . . . . . 11 3 Statistical Language S ITY OF E D I N B U R G H Master of Science by Research Institute for Communicating and Collaborative

  6. Structure Functions, Form Factors, and Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Wilcox; B. Andersen-Pugh

    1993-12-07

    We present results towards the calculation of the pion electric form factor and structure function on a $16^3\\times 24$ lattice using charge overlap. By sacrificing Fourier transform information in two directions, it is seen that the longitudinal four point function can be extracted with reasonable error bars at low momentum.

  7. Infinite Dimensional VARs and Factor Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chudik, Alexander; Pesaran, M Hashem

    numbers, N is the set of natural numbers, and Z is the set of integers. Convergence in distribution and convergence in probability is denoted by d! and p!, respectively. Symbol q:m:! represents convergence in quadratic mean and L1! stands for convergence... errors to P1 j=0#8; jut#0;j asM ! 1, namely by assuming that the process has been in operation for su¢ ciently long time before its ?rst observed realization, x1. Also for a ?nite N , when all eigenvalues of #8; lie inside the unit circle, the Euclidean...

  8. The Impact of Emission and Climate Change on Ozone in the United States under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Drake, John B.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liu, Yang

    2013-09-27

    Dynamical downscaling was applied in this study to link the global climate-chemistry model Community Atmosphere Model (CAM-Chem) with the regional models: Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ). Two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) were used to evaluate the climate impact on ozone concentrations in 2050s. Ozone concentrations in the lower-mid troposphere (surface to ~300 hPa), from mid- to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), show decreasing trends in RCP 4.5 between 2000s and 2050s, with the largest decrease of 4-10 ppbv occurring in the summer and the fall; and increasing trends (2-12 ppbv) in RCP 8.5 resulting from the increased methane emissions. In RCP 8.5, methane emissions increase by ~60% by the end of 2050s, accounting for more than 90% of ozone increases in summer and fall, and 60-80% in spring and winter. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, in the summer when photochemical reactions are the most active, the large ozone precursor emissions reduction leads to the greatest decrease of downscaled surface ozone concentrations, ranging from 6 to 10 ppbv. However, a few major cities show ozone increases of 3 to 7 ppbv due to weakened NO titration. Under the RCP 8.5 scenario, in winter, downscaled ozone concentrations increase across nearly the entire continental US in winter, ranging from 3 to 10 ppbv due to increased methane emissions and enhanced stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). More intense heat waves are projected to occur by the end of 2050s in RCP 8.5, leading to more than 8 ppbv of the maximum daily 8-hour daily average (MDA8) ozone during the heat wave days than other days; this indicates the dramatic impact heat waves exert on high frequency ozone events.

  9. Nucleon and $?$ elastic and transition form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Segovia; Ian C. Cloet; Craig D. Roberts; Sebastian M. Schmidt

    2014-09-03

    We compute nucleon and Delta elastic and transition form factors, and compare predictions made using a framework built upon a Faddeev equation kernel and interaction vertices that possess QCD-like momentum dependence with results obtained using a vector-vector contact-interaction. The comparison emphasises that experiment is sensitive to the momentum dependence of the running couplings and masses in the strong interaction sector of the Standard Model and highlights that the key to describing hadron properties is a veracious expression of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in the bound-state problem. Amongst the results we describe, the following are of particular interest: $G_E^p(Q^2)/G_M^p(Q^2)$ possesses a zero at $Q^2=9.5GeV^2$; any change in the interaction which shifts a zero in the proton ratio to larger $Q^2$ relocates a zero in $G_E^n(Q^2)/G_M^n(Q^2)$ to smaller $Q^2$; and there is likely a value of momentum transfer above which $G_E^n>G_E^p$. Regarding the $\\Delta(1232)$-baryon, we find that, inter alia: the electric monopole form factor exhibits a zero; the electric quadrupole form factor is negative, large in magnitude, and sensitive to the nature and strength of correlations in the $\\Delta(1232)$ Faddeev amplitude; and the magnetic octupole form factor is negative so long as rest-frame P- and D-wave correlations are included. In connection with the N-to-Delta transition, the momentum-dependence of the magnetic transition form factor, $G_M^\\ast$, matches that of $G_M^n$ once the momentum transfer is high enough to pierce the meson-cloud; and the electric quadrupole ratio is a keen measure of diquark and orbital angular momentum correlations.

  10. Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx Storage: a Factor Controlling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx Storage: a Factor Controlling NH3 and N2O Selectivities over a Commercial LNT Catalyst Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx Storage: a Factor...

  11. High Quality Factor Fano-Resonant All-Dielectric Metamaterials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Quality Factor Fano-Resonant All-Dielectric Metamaterials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Quality Factor Fano-Resonant All-Dielectric Metamaterials Authors:...

  12. Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Test of factorization in diffractive deep...

  13. Multilevel Factor Analysis of Class and Student Achievement Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengt O. Muthén

    2011-01-01

    Multilevel Factor Analysis of Class and Student AchievementMultilevel Factor Analysis of Class and Student Achievementof students observed within classes, classes within schools,

  14. Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project The scope of the Integrated Facility Disposition...

  15. An Integrated Suite of Tools to support Human Factors Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques V Hugo

    2001-08-01

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE) work for the nuclear industry imposes special demands on the practitioner in terms of the scope, complexity and safety requirements for humans in nuclear installations. Unfortunately HFE lags behind other engineering disciplines in the development and use of modern, powerful tools for the full range of analysis and design processes. HFE does not appear to be an attractive market for software and hardware developers and as a result, HFE practitioners usually have to rely on inefficient general-purpose tools like standard office software, or they have to use expensive special-purpose tools that offer only part of the solution they require and which also do not easily integrate with other tools. There have been attempts to develop generic software tools to support the HFE analyst and also to achieve some order and consistency in format and presentation. However, in spite of many years of development, very few tools have emerged that have achieved these goals. This would suggest the need for special tools, but existing commercial products have been found inadequate and to date not a single tool has been developed that adequately supports the special requirements of HFE work for the nuclear industry. This paper describes an integrated suite of generic as well as purpose-built tools that facilitate information solicitation, issues tracking, work domain analysis, functional requirements analysis, function allocation, operational sequence analysis, task analysis and development of HSI design requirements. In combination, this suite of tools supports the analytical as well as the representational aspects of key HFE activities primarily for new NPPs, including capturing information from subject matter experts and various source documents directly into the appropriate tool and then linking, analyzing and extending that information further to represent detailed functional and task information, and ultimately HSI design requirements. The paper also describes a tool developed especially for functional requirements analysis, function allocation, and task analysis.

  16. HUMAN FACTORS GUIDANCE FOR CONTROL ROOM EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHARA,J.; BROWN,W.; STUBLER,W.; HIGGINS,J.; WACHTEL,J.; PERSENSKY,J.J.

    2000-07-30

    The Human-System Interface Design Review Guideline (NUREG-0700, Revision 1) was developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide human factors guidance as a basis for the review of advanced human-system interface technologies. The guidance consists of three components: design review procedures, human factors engineering guidelines, and a software application to provide design review support called the ``Design Review Guideline.'' Since it was published in June 1996, Rev. 1 to NUREG-0700 has been used successfully by NRC staff, contractors and nuclear industry organizations, as well as by interested organizations outside the nuclear industry. The NRC has committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool in the face of emerging and rapidly changing technology. This paper addresses the current research to update of NUREG-0700 based on the substantial work that has taken place since the publication of Revision 1.

  17. Measurement of the ??*?? and ??*??' transition form factors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; et al

    2011-09-06

    We study the reactions e?e??e?e??(') in the single-tag mode and measure the ??*??(') transition form factors in the momentum-transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV². The analysis is based on 469 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e?e? center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  18. Measurement of the ??*?? and ??*??' transition form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu.?G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Botov, A. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu.?I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K.?Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Buenger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.

    2011-09-06

    We study the reactions e?e??e?e??(') in the single-tag mode and measure the ??*??(') transition form factors in the momentum-transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV². The analysis is based on 469 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e?e? center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  19. Factor Analysis for Skewed Data and Skew-Normal Maximum Likelihood Factor Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaucher, Beverly Jane

    2013-04-04

    This research explores factor analysis applied to data from skewed distributions for the general skew model, the selection-elliptical model, the selection-normal model, the skew-elliptical model and the skew-normal model ...

  20. Transcription factor-based biosensors for detecting dicarboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey; Keasling, Jay

    2014-02-18

    The invention provides methods and compositions for detecting dicarboxylic acids using a transcription factor biosensor.

  1. 3.5. EFFICIENCY FACTORS 63 3.5 Efficiency factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, R. A.

    3.5. EFFICIENCY FACTORS 63 3.5 Efficiency factors For comparison we consider a complete) and the variance of the estimator of x is (x L-x)2 CBD, which is equal to r-1x x2 CBD. Definition The efficiency to a complete-block design with variance 2 CBD and the same replication is x x rx L-x 2 CBD 2 and the efficiency

  2. Testing general relativity with compact coalescing binaries: comparing exact and predictive methods to compute the Bayes factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Del Pozzo; Katherine Grover; Ilya Mandel; Alberto Vecchio

    2014-08-11

    The second generation of gravitational-wave detectors is scheduled to start operations in 2015. Gravitational-wave signatures of compact binary coalescences could be used to accurately test the strong-field dynamical predictions of general relativity. Computationally expensive data analysis pipelines, including TIGER, have been developed to carry out such tests. As a means to cheaply assess whether a particular deviation from general relativity can be detected, Cornish et al. and Vallisneri recently proposed an approximate scheme to compute the Bayes factor between a general-relativity gravitational-wave model and a model representing a class of alternative theories of gravity parametrised by one additional parameter. This approximate scheme is based on only two easy-to-compute quantities: the signal-to-noise ratio of the signal and the fitting factor between the signal and the manifold of possible waveforms within general relativity. In this work, we compare the prediction from the approximate formula against an exact numerical calculation of the Bayes factor using the lalinference library. We find that, using frequency-domain waveforms, the approximate scheme predicts exact results with good accuracy, providing the correct scaling with the signal-to-noise ratio at a fitting factor value of 0.992 and the correct scaling with the fitting factor at a signal-to-noise ratio of 20, down to a fitting factor of $\\sim$ 0.9. We extend the framework for the approximate calculation of the Bayes factor which significantly increases its range of validity, at least to fitting factors of $\\sim$ 0.7 or higher.

  3. Determination of photon conversion factors relating exposure and dose for several extremity phantom designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, P.L.; Eichner, F.N.; Reece, W.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Dosimetric measurements were performed to determine the exposure-to-dose conversion factors (Cx) for simple extremity phantoms suitable for extremity dosimeter performance testing. The phantoms studied represented the forearm or lower leg and the finger. Measurements were performed for solid plastic phantoms and for phantoms containing simulated bone material to determine the effect of backscattered radiations from the simulated bone to the phantom surface. Photon beam energies used for the measurements ranged from 16 keV to 1.25 MeV (average). The Cx factors for the finger phantoms did not vary significantly with phantom composition. The Cx factors in the arm/leg phantoms with the bone simulant material differed significantly from those for the solid plastic phantom over the energy range of 40-100 keV. This effect was attributed to the preferential absorption of the lower energy backscattered photons by the higher atomic number material that was contained in the bone-simulant insert. The position of the bone-simulating material below the surface of the phantom was more important than its size or level of bone equivalency. For calibrations and dosimeter testing, Al was found adequate as a bone-simulating material.

  4. The Role of Mesons in the Electromagnetic Form Factors of the Nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Crawford; T. Akdogan; R. Alarcon; W. Bertozzi; E. Booth; T. Botto; J. R. Calarco; B. Clasie; A. DeGrush; T. W. Donnelly; K. Dow; M. Farkhondeh; R. Fatemi; O. Filoti; W. Franklin; H. Gao; E. Geis; S. Gilad; D. Hasell; P. Karpius; M. Kohl; H. Kolster; T. Lee; E. Lomon; A. Maschinot; J. Matthews; K. McIlhany; N. Meitanis; R. Milner; J. Rapaport; R. Redwine; J. Seely; A. Shinozaki; A. Sindile; S. Sirca; E. Six; T. Smith; B. Tonguc; C. Tschalaer; E. Tsentalovich; W. Turchinetz; Y. Xiao; W. Xu; C. Zhang; Z. Zhou; V. Ziskin; T. Zwart

    2010-08-01

    The roles played by mesons in the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon are explored using as a basis a model containing vector mesons with coupling to the continuum together with the asymptotic $Q^2$ behavior of perturbative QCD. Specifically, the vector dominance model (GKex) developed by Lomon is employed, as it is known to be very successful in representing the existing high-quality data published to date. An analysis is made of the experimental uncertainties present when the differences between the GKex model and the data are expanded in orthonormal basis functions. A main motivation for the present study is to provide insight into how the various ingredients in this model yield the measured behavior, including discussions of when dipole form factors are to be expected or not, of which mesons are the major contributors, for instance, at low-$Q^2$ or large distances, and of what effects are predicted from coupling to the continuum. Such insights are first discussed in momentum space, followed by an analysis of how different and potentially useful information emerges when both the experimental and theoretical electric form factors are Fourier transformed to coordinate space. While these Fourier transforms should not be interpreted as "charge distributions", nevertheless the roles played by the various mesons, especially which are dominant at large or small distance scales, can be explored via such experiment--theory comparisons.

  5. Human Factors for Situation Assessment in Grid Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttromson, Ross T.; Schur, Anne; Greitzer, Frank L.; Paget, Mia L.

    2007-08-08

    Executive Summary Despite advances in technology, power system operators must assimilate overwhelming amounts of data to keep the grid operating. Analyses of recent blackouts have clearly demonstrated the need to enhance the operator’s situation awareness (SA). The long-term objective of this research is to integrate valuable technologies into the grid operator environment that support decision making under normal and abnormal operating conditions and remove non-technical barriers to enable the optimum use of these technologies by individuals working alone and as a team. More specifically, the research aims to identify methods and principles to increase SA of grid operators in the context of system conditions that are representative or common across many operating entities and develop operationally relevant experimental methods for studying technologies and operational practices which contribute to SA. With increasing complexity and interconnectivity of the grid, the scope and complexity of situation awareness have grown. New paradigms are needed to guide research and tool development aimed to enhance and improve operations. In reviewing related research, operating practices, systems, and tools, the present study established a taxonomy that provides a perspective on research and development surrounding power grid situation awareness and clarifies the field of human factors/SA for grid operations. Information sources that we used to identify critical factors underlying SA included interviews with experienced operational personnel, available historical summaries and transcripts of abnormal conditions and outages (e.g., the August 14, 2003 blackout), scientific literature, and operational policies/procedures and other documentation. Our analysis of August 2003 blackout transcripts and interviews adopted a different perspective than previous analyses of this material, and we complemented this analysis with additional interviews. Based on our analysis and a broad literature review, we advocate a new perspective on SA in terms of sensemaking, also called situated or ecological decision making, where the focus of the investigation is to understand why the decision maker(s) experienced the situation the way they did, or why what they saw made sense to them at the time. This perspective is distinct from the traditional branch of human factors research in the field which focuses more on ergonomics and the transactional relationship between the human operator and the systems. Consistent with our findings from the literature review, we recognized an over-arching need to focus SA research on issues surrounding the concept of shared knowledge; e.g., awareness of what is happening in adjacent areas as well as one’s own area of responsibility. Major findings were: a) Inadequate communication/information sharing is pervasive, b) Information is available, but not used. Many tools and mechanisms exist for operators to build awareness of the physical grid system, yet the transcripts reveal that they still need to call and exchange information with operators of neighboring areas to improve or validate their SA. The specific types of information that they request are quite predictable and, in most cases, cover information that could be available to both operators and reliability coordinators through readily available displays or other data sources, c) Shared Knowledge is Required on Operations/Actions as Well as Physical Status. In an ideal, technologically and organizationally perfect world, every control room and every reliability coordinator may have access to complete data across all regional control areas and yet, there would still be reason for the operators to call each other to gain and improve their SA of power grid operations, and d) Situation Awareness as sensemaking and shared knowledge.

  6. Factors for design of dips for roadways 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCasland, William Richard

    1957-01-01

    limit is sub]ect to mot1on which may cause considerable discomfort to be experienced by the oocupants. If a dip is particularly critical, the vehicle may even incur damages. The most important consideration, however, 1s the fact that the driver may... lose control of the vehicle momentarily and be involved in a traffic accident. These three factors indicate the need for all dips in roadways to be nrop- erly designed, whether they are to be temporary or oermanent. The use of dips as speed checks...

  7. Prime number generation and factor elimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vineet Kumar

    2014-10-06

    We have presented a multivariate polynomial function termed as factor elimination function,by which, we can generate prime numbers. This function's mapping behavior can explain the irregularities in the occurrence of prime numbers on the number line. Generally the different categories of prime numbers found till date, satisfy the form of this function. We present some absolute and probabilistic conditions for the primality of the number generated by this method. This function is capable of leading to highly efficient algorithms for generating prime numbers.

  8. Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of theClimateElgin, Illinois:JV JumpFactors (EMFAC) Jump to:

  9. Hamilton study: distribution of factors confounding the relationship between air quality and respiratory health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pengelly, L.D.; Kerigan, A.T.; Goldsmith, C.H.; Inman, E.M.

    1984-10-01

    Hamilton, Ontario is an industrial city with a population of 300,000 which is situated at the western end of Lake Ontario. Canada's two largest iron and steel mills are located here; the city historically has had relatively poor air quality, which has improved markedly in the last 25 years. Concern about the health effects of current air quality recently led us to carry out an epidemiological study of the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of over 3500 school children. Respiratory health was measured by pulmonary function testing of each child, and by an assessment of each child's respiratory symptoms via a questionnaire administered to the parents. Previous studies had shown that other environmental factors (e.g. parental smoking, parental cough, socioeconomic level, housing, and gas cooking) might also affect respiratory health, and thus confound any potential relationships between health and air pollution. The questionnaire also collected information on many of these confounding factors. For the purposes of initial analysis, the city was divided into five areas in which differences in air quality were expected. In general, factors which have been associated with poor respiratory health were observed to be more prevalent in areas of poorer air quality.

  10. High quality factor nanocrystalline diamond micromechanical resonators limited by thermoelastic damping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najar, Hadi; Chan, Mei-Lin; Yang, Hsueh-An; Lin, Liwei; Cahill, David G.; Horsley, David A.

    2014-04-14

    We demonstrate high quality factor thin-film nanocrystalline diamond micromechanical resonators with quality factors limited by thermoelastic damping. Cantilevers, single-anchored and double-anchored double-ended tuning forks, were fabricated from 2.5??m thick in-situ boron doped nanocrystalline diamond films deposited using hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Thermal conductivity measured by time-domain thermoreflectance resulted in 24?±?3?W m{sup ?1} K{sup ?1} for heat transport through the thickness of the diamond film. The resonant frequencies of the fabricated resonators were 46?kHz–8?MHz and showed a maximum measured Q???86?000 at f{sub n}?=?46.849?kHz. The measured Q-factors are shown to be in good agreement with the limit imposed by thermoelastic dissipation calculated using the measured thermal conductivity. The mechanical properties extracted from resonant frequency measurements indicate a Young's elastic modulus of ?788?GPa, close to that of microcrystalline diamond.

  11. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in cortical motor learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Von dem Bussche, Mary

    2007-01-01

    T. , and Nakamura, S. , Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-dependent transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor toneurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and

  12. S.2: Supplementary Material Description of Algorithms The gene regulatory network is represented as a directed graph G=(V, E) where each

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    S.2: Supplementary Material ­ Description of Algorithms The gene regulatory network is represented for each line in the algorithm for section S.2.1 is given as a guide. S.2.1: Characterization of the vertices in the network A. Algorithm to identify duplicated genes (regulated genes) that are controlled

  13. Abstract--Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) represent an impor-tant class of networked robotic applications that must be both highly de-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aloul, Fadi

    from ground controllers. Sensing and surveillance applications require that nodes in the UAV network and placement problems for distributed failure diagnosis in such networks where multiple vehicles must agree vehicles (UAVs) represent an important class of robotic applications for distributed sensing and control

  14. Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 3. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, On Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committed on appropriations, House of Representatives. The topics include the Bureau of Reclamation, testimony of the Secretary of the Interior, Appalachian Regional Commission, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The discussion is related to the funding of activities in these areas.

  15. Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 7. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations, House of Representatives. This is part 7 which includes the testimony of members of congress and other interested individuals and organizations. Discussion includes funding of various US DOE programs and projects relating to energy efficiency and other topics.

  16. Sensor networks represent new paradigm for reliable environment monitoring and infor-mation collection. They hold the promise of revolutionizing sensing in a wide range of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    environment and air medium present error prone medium with low bandwidth. Thus, the protocols for sensorAbstract Sensor networks represent new paradigm for reliable environment monitoring and infor. Furthermore, in future smart environments, it is likely that sensor networks will play a key role in sensing

  17. Representing Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium for an Aqueous MEA-CO2 System Using the Electrolyte Nonrandom-Two-Liquid Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Luzheng

    for processing to-be-liquefied natural gas, syn- thesis gas, and hydrogen stream, which require low CO2 leakage processing the natural gas and refinery gas streams. The disadvantages of aqueous MEA include the followingRepresenting Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium for an Aqueous MEA-CO2 System Using the Electrolyte Nonrandom-Two-Liquid

  18. OSU 4-H SUMMER CONFERENCE While at OSU 4-H Summer Conference, you represent not only yourself but also your county and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    OSU 4-H SUMMER CONFERENCE DRESS CODE While at OSU 4-H Summer Conference, you represent not only of Summer Conference, nice casual wear is fine. Most of the buildings don't have air conditioning, so Conference involves lots of walking. Bring shoes that are comfortable and easy to walk in (flip flops

  19. and at Thr185 and Tyr187 for human ERK2. The CB1000 separation revealed six protein bands, representing the non-, mono-and dually

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    and at Thr185 and Tyr187 for human ERK2. The CB1000 separation revealed six protein bands, representing the non-, mono- and dually phosphorylated forms of ERK1 and ERK2. Because human ERK1 and ERK2 are distinct but similar proteins, the isoforms of both proteins are recognized by a single, pan-ERK antibody

  20. ProFIS: A New Paradigm for Higher Education in Brazil1 Public universities represent nowadays a relatively small part of the Brazilian higher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes, Francisco A. M.

    1 ProFIS: A New Paradigm for Higher Education in Brazil1 Public universities represent nowadays and in terms of enrolment. Approximately 3/4 of all undergraduate students in Brazil attend private selective universities in Brazil. ProFIS (Interdisciplinary Higher Education Program) is a two

  1. COMPl:TI:I1 OR.ZPHICS .\\ND IMAOK PlWCI':SSING 10, %9-296 (197!), Linear Transformation of Pictures Represented by Quad Trees'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiglitz, Kenneth

    of Pictures Represented by Quad Trees' G. M. HUNTERS AND K. STEIGLITZ Departmcrtt of Electrical Engineering for a picture into a quad tree for the same picture after application of a general linear operator of the original picture, m is the number of regions, and p is a resolution parameter. 1. INTRODUCTION

  2. Office of Research Facili es and Administra ve (F&A) costs represent the infrastructure and opera ons costs that support the research enterprise at the University of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    Office of Research Facili es and Administra ve (F&A) costs represent the infrastructure and opera ons costs that support the research enterprise at the University of Washington. Similar to the overhead costs of a business, F&A costs are real costs incurred in conduc ng and running the UW's research

  3. RWD domain: a recurring module in kinetochore architecture shown by a Ctf19Mcm21 complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    ancestral modules. Keywords: COMA; mitosis; X-ray crystallography; yeast EMBO reports (2012) 13, 21621 becomes essential for chromosome biorientation in cells with reduced function of Ipl1, the Aurora

  4. Numerous studies have shown that airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    - pended particles (TSP), coefficient of haze (COH), black smoke, British smoke, KM (a measure such as ozone (O3) [Health Effects Institute 2002; National Research Council (NRC) 2004]. Studies have) (Burnett et al. 2000), ammonium nitrate (Fairley 1999), ele- mental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC

  5. Catalysis of PAH Biodegradation by Humic Acid Shown in Synchrotron Infrared Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 2 Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan, UT in the bioremediation of several anthropogenic pollutants, its role in the detoxification of PAHs by microbes remains

  6. INTRODUCTION Members of the Rho family of small GTPases have been shown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkhurst, Susan

    /radixin/moesin (ERM) family of proteins (Takaishi et al., 1995). ERM family proteins are involved in mediating association of the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton. The colocalization of Rho with ERM proteins

  7. GENERAL INFORMATION This guide is for interpreting symbols or codes shown on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with which JHU has a cooperative agreement. Codes for these schools are as follows: BH Baltimore Hebrew of Baltimore MB University of Maryland at Baltimore UM University of Maryland at Baltimore County (UMBC) AF

  8. April 26, 1999 Hydraulics, CIET 3132 Answer Key: Shown in Red

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    ft. Qfull = 8.82 cfs 2. Open Channel Flow in Rectangular Channels (70 pts.) Given: A rectangular concrete (n=0.013) is 10 ft wide and is laid on a slope of 0.1%. The flow in the channel is 50 cfs) for a flow of 50 cfs in this channel? dc = .919 ft. c) What is the critical slope (Sc) for the flow of 50 cfs

  9. Coleridge’s Attitude Toward Various Subjects as Shown in His “Biographia Epistolaris”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven, Effie Louise

    1911-01-01

    , through so many generations, the wit and knowledge, being subtle spirits, have evaporated, 91. To Godwin, Kay 21, 1800. Hartley sends his love to Mary. "TTiat, and not to Jfanny?" "Yes, and to Fanny, but I'll have Mary". He often talks about them...©olnd© the awful sublimity ©f Alpine scenery, yet compensate fer the want of it by beauties, of whioh this very l©wn©ss is a n©e©ssary condition. Tester-morning I saw th© lesser lake complet- ly hid by mist; but the moment the Sun po«p©i ©v©r th© Mill, th© mist...

  10. 1. INTRODUCTION Polycrystalline CdTe thin films solar cells have shown long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    to the solar panel that can be adapted to any kind of shape and is easy to deploy in space. We have developed ~12% efficiency (AM1.5) CdTe solar cells on glass substrates with a vacuum deposition process [3 in the "superstrate" or "substrate" configuration (see figure 1). High efficiency CdTe solar cells are generally grown

  11. Relation of the Total Nitrogen of the Soil to its Needs as Shown in Pot Experiments. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S.

    1912-01-01

    ram s n itrogen in c ro p . 0.49 '0A9~ 0.63 0.58 0.550.43 0.480.52 0.56 0.67 ???? 13.35 0.56 .049 .0535 ? 0466" .0176.0460 .0259.0341 .0235 .0415 .0198 .0471 190919081909 1908 1908 1908 1908 1908 1908 190819081909191019091910...

  12. 2004 NaturePublishing Group covering approximately 150 years. It was shown that even under the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Martin

    % of the strong warming since then can be of solar origin. There are 31 periods during which the 10-year averaged. The current level of high solar activity has now already lasted close to 65 years and is marked by the arrow on the figure. This implies that not only is the current state of solar activity unusually high, but also

  13. Final Rulemaking, 10 CFR Part 1021, with Amendments Shown In Tracked

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14,Energy 9,UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT|| Department

  14. DOE Takes Action to Stop the Sales of Air-Con Air Conditioner Models Shown

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratory | Department ofPotawatomi Community |

  15. Various factors affect coiled tubing limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-01-15

    Safety and reliability remain the primary concerns in coiled tubing operations. Factors affecting safety and reliability include corrosion, flexural bending, internal (or external) pressure and tension (or compression), and mechanical damage due to improper use. Such limits as coiled tubing fatigue, collapse, and buckling need to be understood to avoid disaster. With increased use of coiled tubing, operators will gain more experience. But at the same time, with further research and development of coiled tubing, the manufacturing quality will be improved and fatigue, collapse, and buckling models will become more mature, and eventually standard specifications will be available. This paper reviews the uses of coiled tubing and current research on mechanical behavior of said tubing. It also discusses several models used to help predict fatigue and failure levels.

  16. Chiral corrections to hyperon axial form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Fujiun; Tiburzi, B. C.

    2008-05-01

    We study the complete set of flavor-changing hyperon axial-current matrix elements at small momentum transfer. Using partially quenched heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, we derive the chiral and momentum behavior of the axial and induced pseudoscalar form factors. The meson pole contributions to the latter posses a striking signal for chiral physics. We argue that the study of hyperon axial matrix elements enables a systematic lattice investigation of the efficacy of three-flavor chiral expansions in the baryon sector. This can be achieved by considering chiral corrections to SU(3) symmetry predictions, and their partially quenched generalizations. In particular, despite the presence of eight unknown low-energy constants, we are able to make next-to-leading order symmetry breaking predictions for two linear combinations of axial charges.

  17. Factors that influence follow-up after an abnormal mammogram 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copeland, Valerie Anne

    2009-05-15

    The focus of this study was to explore women’s experiences with follow-up after an abnormal mammogram, and factors that influence follow-up. Factors, including health status, found in the cancer screening and treatment ...

  18. Factors Analysis on Safety of Indoor Air Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Q.; Liu, Z.; Xiong, J.

    2006-01-01

    Influence factors on safety of indoor air quality (IAQ) were analyzed in this paper. Some regeneration compositions resulting from potential indoor chemical reactions may be more harmful to habitants. A few building flaws may be key factors...

  19. Supplementary Material: List of the 202 genes represented on the DualChip Human General array Symbol Gene General Function Gene bank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Magalhães, João Pedro

    cmyc c-myc Oncogenesis NM012333 COL6A2 CollagenVI-alpha2 Extracellular matrix NM_001849 COX2 FES Feline sarcoma oncogene Oncogenesis X52192 FGF2 fibroblast growth factor 2 Cell proliferation NM

  20. The Dirac Form Factor Predicts the Pauli Form Factor in the Endpoint Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumeet Dagaonkar; Pankaj Jain; John P. Ralston

    2015-03-24

    We compute the momentum-transfer dependence of the proton Pauli form factor $F_{2}$ in the endpoint overlap model. We find the model correctly reproduces the scaling of the ratio of $F_{2}$ with the Dirac Form factor $F_{1}$ observed at the Jefferson Laboratory. The calculation uses the leading-power, leading twist Dirac structure of the quark light-cone wave function, and the same endpoint dependence previously determined from the Dirac form factor $F_{1}$. There are no parameters and no adjustable functions in the endpoint model's prediction for $F_{2}$. The model's predicted ratio $F_{2}(Q^{2})/F_{1}(Q^{2})$ is quite insensitive to the endpoint wave function, which explains why the observed ratio scales like $1/Q$ down to rather low momentum transfers. The endpoint model appears to be the only comprehensive model consistent with all form factor information as well as reproducing fixed-angle proton-proton scattering at large momentum transfer. Any one of the processes is capable of predicting the others.

  1. 2008 Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2457 x 2457 kWh x 0.347 x 0.330 Domestic Coal 3 tonnes x 2523 x 2523 kWh x 0.313 x 0.298 Wood Pellets 4 stations or for industrial purposes have different emission factors. Wood pellets are used in domestic

  2. Iteration of Target Matrices in Exploratory Factor Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tyler Maxwell

    2013-01-01

    extraction methods .Performance of factor extraction methods Several methodshere. How well an extraction method performs is influenced

  3. Annihilation Poles for Form Factors in XXZ Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pakuliak

    1993-07-14

    The annihilation poles for the form factors in XXZ model are studied using vertex operators introduced in \\cite{DFJMN}. An annihilation pole is the property of form factors according to which the residue of the $2n$-particle form factor in such a pole can be expressed through linear combination of the $2n-2$-particle form factors. To prove this property we use the bosonization of the vertex operators in XXZ model which was invented in \\cite{JMMN}.

  4. SUCCESS FACTORS IN INFORMATION SECURITY IMPLEMENTATION IN ORGANIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, John

    SUCCESS FACTORS IN INFORMATION SECURITY IMPLEMENTATION IN ORGANIZATIONS Maryam Al-Awadi University This paper will explore and identify success factors related to the implementation of information security was to identify those factors required to ensure successful implementation of information security, particularly

  5. http://rev.sagepub.com/ Reviews of Human Factors and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://rev.sagepub.com/ Ergonomics Reviews of Human Factors and http://rev.sagepub.com/content/7 Factors and Ergonomics Michael A. Nees and Bruce N. Walker Auditory Displays for In-Vehicle Technologies Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society at: can

  6. SHORT COMMUNICATION Rhizobium Nod factors induce increases in intracellular free

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkel, Joseph G.

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Rhizobium Nod factors induce increases in intracellular free calcium of Massachusetts, Box 35810, Amherst MA 01003±5810, USA Summary Application of Nod factors to growing, responsive region after 10±15 min treatment with Nod factors. The extracellular Ca2+ ¯ux, detected with the non

  7. Human Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation Douglas A. Wiegmann, Gavin R. Essenberg experimental results associated with human factors aspects of using animation to display electric power system. Index Terms--Power System Operations and Planning, Power System Visualization, Animation, Human Factors

  8. The Multivariate Merit Factor of a Boolean T. Aaron Gulliver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Matthew Geoffrey

    The Multivariate Merit Factor of a Boolean Function T. Aaron Gulliver Dept. of Electrical, the multivariate merit factor (MMF) of a Boolean function, is presented, and various infinite recursive quadratic sequence constructions are given for which both uni- variate and multivariate merit factors can be computed

  9. Bayesian CP Factorization of Incomplete Tensors with Automatic Rank Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liqing

    IEEEProof Bayesian CP Factorization of Incomplete Tensors with Automatic Rank Determination Qibin--CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP) tensor factorization of incomplete data is a powerful technique for tensor completion through explicitly capturing the multilinear latent factors. The existing CP algorithms require the tensor rank

  10. Prediction and Informative Risk Factor Selection of Bone Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffalo, State University of New York

    --Electronic health records (EHRs); risk factor analysis; integrated feature extraction; risk factor selection1 Prediction and Informative Risk Factor Selection of Bone Diseases Hui Li, Xiaoyi Li, Murali and the overwhelming amount of electronic health records (EHRs) shared by healthcare institutions and practitioners, we

  11. Influence of environmental and climatic factors on the radial growth of European ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) 1 The aim of the research was to evaluate the influence of various environmen-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of environmental and climatic factors on the radial growth of European ash (Fraxinus on the radial growth of European ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.). Six research plots were selected. Two of them were located in parks and others in the natural forest. The research has shown that the present state of ash

  12. A new friction factor correlation for laminar, single-phase flows through rock fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazridoust, K. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY); Ahmadi, G. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY); Smith, D.H.

    2006-09-30

    Single-phase flow through fractured media occurs in various situations, such as transport of dissolved contaminants through geological strata, sequestration of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs, and in primary oil recovery. In the present study, fluid flows through a rock fracture were simulated. The fracture geometry was obtained from the CT scans of a rock fracture produced by the Brazilian method in a sandstone sample. A post-processing code using a CAD package was developed and used to generate the three-dimensional fracture from the CT scan data. Several sections along the fracture were considered and the GambitTM code was used to generate unstructured grids for flow simulations. FLUENTTM was used to analyze the flow conditions through the fracture section for different flow rates. Because of the small aperture of the fractures, the gravitational effects could be neglected. It was confirmed that the pressure drop was dominated by the smallest aperture passages of the fracture. The accuracy of parallel plate models for estimating the pressure drops through fractures was studied. It was shown that the parallel plate flow model with the use of an appropriate effective fracture aperture and inclusion of the tortuosity factor could provide reasonable estimates for pressure drops in the fracture. On the basis of the CFD simulation data, a new expression for the friction factor for flows through fractures was developed. The new model predictions were compared with the simulation results and favorable agreement was found. It was shown that when the length of the fracture and the mean and standard deviation of the fracture are known, the pressure loss as a function of the flow rate could be estimated. These findings may prove useful for design of lab experiments, computational studied of flows through real rock fractures, or inclusions in simulators for large-scale flows in highly fractured rocks.

  13. Confinement and the safety factor profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; Scott, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    The conjecture that the safety factor profile, q(r), controls the improvement in tokamak plasmas from poor confinement in the Low (L-) mode regime to improved confinement in the supershot regime has been tested in two experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First, helium was puffed into the beam-heated phase of a supershot discharge which induced a degradation from supershot to L-mode confinement in about 100 msec, far less than the current relaxation time. The q and shear profiles measured by a motional Stark effect polarimeter showed little change during the confinement degradation. Second, rapid current ramps in supershot plasmas altered the q profile, but were observed not to change significantly the energy confinement. Thus, enhanced confinement in supershot plasmas is not due to a particular q profile which has enhanced stability or transport properties. The discharges making a continuous transition between supershot and L-mode confinement were also used to test the critical-electron-temperature-gradient transport model. It was found that this model could not reproduce the large changes in electron and ion temperature caused by the change in confinement.

  14. Nucleosome-mediated cooperativity between transcription factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonid A. Mirny

    2009-01-19

    Cooperative binding of transcription factors (TFs) to cis-regulatory regions (CRRs) is essential for precision of gene expression in development and other processes. The classical model of cooperativity requires direct interactions between TFs, thus constraining the arrangement of TFs sites in a CRR. On the contrary, genomic and functional studies demonstrate a great deal of flexibility in such arrangements with variable distances, numbers of sites, and identities of the involved TFs. Such flexibility is inconsistent with the cooperativity by direct interactions between TFs. Here we demonstrate that strong cooperativity among non-interacting TFs can be achieved by their competition with nucleosomes. We find that the mechanism of nucleosome-mediated cooperativity is mathematically identical to the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model of cooperativity in hemoglobin. This surprising parallel provides deep insights, with parallels between heterotropic regulation of hemoglobin (e.g. Bohr effect) and roles of nucleosome-positioning sequences and chromatin modifications in gene regulation. Characterized mechanism is consistent with numerous experimental results, allows substantial flexibility in and modularity of CRRs, and provides a rationale for a broad range of genomic and evolutionary observations. Striking parallels between cooperativity in hemoglobin and in transcription regulation point at a new design principle that may be used in range of biological systems.

  15. Human Factors Aspects of Operating Small Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Deem, R.; Xing, J.; DAgostino, A.

    2010-11-07

    The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. They are considering small modular reactors (SMRs) as one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants, and so may require a concept of operations (ConOps) that also is different. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has begun examining the human factors engineering- (HFE) and ConOps- aspects of SMRs; if needed, they will formulate guidance to support SMR licensing reviews. We developed a ConOps model, consisting of the following dimensions: Plant mission; roles and responsibilities of all agents; staffing, qualifications, and training; management of normal operations; management of off-normal conditions and emergencies; and, management of maintenance and modifications. We are reviewing information on SMR design to obtain data about each of these dimensions, and have identified several preliminary issues. In addition, we are obtaining operations-related information from other types of multi-module systems, such as refineries, to identify lessons learned from their experience. Here, we describe the project's methodology and our preliminary findings.

  16. Commissioning of output factors for uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Ramirez, Eric; Mascia, Anthony; Ding Xiaoning; Okoth, Benny; Zeidan, Omar; Hsi Wen; Harris, Ben; Schreuder, Andries N.; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Current commercial treatment planning systems are not able to accurately predict output factors and calculate monitor units for proton fields. Patient-specific field output factors are thus determined by either measurements or empirical modeling based on commissioning data. The objective of this study is to commission output factors for uniform scanning beams utilized at the ProCure proton therapy centers. Methods: Using water phantoms and a plane parallel ionization chamber, the authors first measured output factors with a fixed 10 cm diameter aperture as a function of proton range and modulation width for clinically available proton beams with ranges between 4 and 31.5 cm and modulation widths between 2 and 15 cm. The authors then measured the output factor as a function of collimated field size at various calibration depths for proton beams of various ranges and modulation widths. The authors further examined the dependence of the output factor on the scanning area (i.e., uncollimated proton field), snout position, and phantom material. An empirical model was developed to calculate the output factor for patient-specific fields and the model-predicted output factors were compared to measurements. Results: The output factor increased with proton range and field size, and decreased with modulation width. The scanning area and snout position have a small but non-negligible effect on the output factors. The predicted output factors based on the empirical modeling agreed within 2% of measurements for all prostate treatment fields and within 3% for 98.5% of all treatment fields. Conclusions: Comprehensive measurements at a large subset of available beam conditions are needed to commission output factors for proton therapy beams. The empirical modeling agrees well with the measured output factor data. This investigation indicates that it is possible to accurately predict output factors and thus eliminate or reduce time-consuming patient-specific output measurements for proton treatments.

  17. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  18. Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasiolek, Maryla A.

    2000-12-21

    The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to development of the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postclosure nominal performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations concerned twenty-four radionuclides. This selection included sixteen radionuclides that may be significant nominal performance dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, five additional radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure, and three relatively short-lived radionuclides important for the human intrusion scenario. Consideration of radionuclide buildup in soil caused by previous irrigation with contaminated groundwater was taken into account in the BDCF development. The effect of climate evolution, from the current arid conditions to a wetter and cooler climate, on the BDCF values was evaluated. The analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. Calculations of nominal performance BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. BDCFs for the nominal performance, when combined with the concentrations of radionuclides in groundwater allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculated estimates of radionuclide concentration in groundwater result from the saturated zone modeling. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) to calculate doses to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

  19. Towards a resolution of the proton form factor problem: new electron and positron scattering data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Adikaram; D. Rimal; L. B. Weinstein; B. Raue; P. Khetarpal; R. P. Bennett; J. Arrington; W. K. Brooks; K. P. Adhikari; A. V. Afanasev; M. J. Amaryan; M. D. Anderson; J. Ball; M. Battaglieri; I. Bedlinskiy; A. S. Biselli; J. Bono; S. Boiarinov; W. J. Briscoe; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; G. Charles; L. Colaneri; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; A. D'Angelo; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; C. Djalali; G. E. Dodge; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; A. Filippi; J. A. Fleming; A. Fradi; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; W. Gohn; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; K. A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; N. Harrison; M. Hattawy; K. Hicks; M. Holtrop; S. M. Hughes; C. E. Hyde; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; D. Jenkins; H. Jiang; K. Joo; S. Joosten; M. Khandaker; W. Kim; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; S. Koirala; V. Kubarovsky; S. E. Kuhn; H. Y. Lu; I . J . D. MacGregor; N. Markov; M. Mayer; B. McKinnon; M. D. Mestayer; C. A. Meyer; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; C. I. Moody; H. Moutarde; A Movsisyan; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Procureur; Y. Prok; D. Protopopescu; A. J. R. Puckett; M. Ripani; A. Rizzo; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; F. Sabatié; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; Y. G. Sharabian; A. Simonyan; I. Skorodumina; E. S. Smith; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; N. Sparveris; S. Stepanyan; S. Strauch; V. Sytnik; M. Taiuti; Ye Tian; A. Trivedi; M. Ungaro; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; D. P. Watts; X. Wei; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; L. Zana; J. Zhang; Z. W. Zhao; I. Zonta; The CLAS Collaboration

    2014-11-25

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, $G_E^p$, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of $G_E^p$ from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization ($\\varepsilon$) and momentum transfer ($Q^2$) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing $\\varepsilon$ at $Q^2 = 1.45 \\text{ GeV}^2$. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at $Q^2\\approx 1.75$ GeV$^2$ and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and $\\Delta$ intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to $2-3$ GeV$^2$.

  20. A Matrix Factorization of Extended Hamiltonian Leads to $N$-Particle Pauli Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irving S. Reed; Todd A. Brun

    2007-01-11

    In this paper the Levy-Leblond procedure for linearizing the Schr\\"odinger equation to obtain the Pauli equation for one particle is generalized to obtain an $N$-particle equation with spin. This is achieved by using the more universal matrix factorization, $G\\tilde{G} = |G| I = (-K)^l I$. Here the square matrix $G$ is linear in the total energy E and all momenta, $\\tilde G$ is the matrix adjoint of $G$, $I$ is the identity matrix, $|G|$ is the determinant of $G$, $l$ is a positive integer and $K=H-E$ is Lanczos' extended Hamiltonian where $H$ is the classical Hamiltonian of the electro-mechanical system. $K$ is identically zero for all such systems, so that matrix $G$ is singular. As a consequence there always exists a vector function $\\underline\\theta$ with the property $G\\underline\\theta=0$. This factorization to obtain the matrix $G$ and vector function $\\underline\\theta$ is illustrated first for a one-dimensional particle in a simple potential well. This same technique, when applied to the classical nonrelativistic Hamiltonian for $N$ interacting particles in an electromagnetic field, is shown to yield for N=1 the Pauli wave equation with spin and its generalization to $N$ particles. Finally this nonrelativistic generalization of the Pauli equation is used to treat the simple Zeeman effect of a hydrogen-like atom as a two-particle problem with spin.

  1. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W.; Adhikari, K.; Afanasev, A.; et al

    2015-02-10

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GpE, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GpE from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentummore »transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ? at Q2=1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2?1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.« less

  2. ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    .K. Konetsky. 2004. Source of toxicity in storm water: Zinc from commonly used paint. Environ. Toxicol. Chem organisms. Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc. 113: 74-85. Stewart, A. J. 1984. Interactions between dissolved humic materials and organic toxicants. In: Synthetic Fossil Fuel Technologies: Results of Health and Environmental

  3. Representing Terrain With Mathematical Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    of the terrain's generation by digging channels in the surface. Given our current reliance on digital map data a series of parameters (including size and area of influence of the drill, as well as the density formation mimics physical phenomena associated with geological terrain formation (such as erosion, digging

  4. PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2013-08-01

    Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

  5. Countries Represented TheELIWeekly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    --Come and work with homeless families. We will cook dinner for them. Car Wash--Have fun in the sun while you to what they were used to. Q: Why do people in the US prefer traveling by car rather than by airplane? A

  6. Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cook, Jeremy L. (Greeley, CO)

    1999-01-01

    A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

  7. Alternative fuels for general aviation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Transportation, Aviation, and Materials, U. S. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, August 29, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Five witnesses representing general aviation and aviation fuel industries and the Federal Aviation Administration testified on the potential for using alternative fuels in general aviation to counteract the effects of high prices and supply vulnerability on the industry. The witnesses described test results of liquid methane and alcohol fuels, noting that those fuels which most closely emulate the properties of petroleum will best serve the industry's needs. Their testimony covered environmental and economic effects as well as fuel performance. The Synthetic Fuels Corporation, DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Department of Defense, as well as the aviation industry have research programs on aviation fuels.

  8. Starting with the End in Mind: A Case Study of Under-Represented, Teacher Education, Community College Transfers in a Predominantly White Institution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, David Arthur

    2012-10-19

    shock. The intent of my study is to research other variables and situations that students may experience that could lead to attrition from teacher education programs. It is through the narratives of under-represented teacher-education transfer students... decided to leave because his grades reflected a student who was succeeding rather than struggling. It then became clear to me that it may be necessary to re-define transfer shock and explore the criteria that allow students of color to succeed after...

  9. Fractionation studies on the unidentified growth factor(s) in distillers dried solubles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dannenburg, Warren Nathaniel

    1955-01-01

    "rltrr ro?v toJ oy itunler urr- . r. roan i ')1, in wn'ch aport it;~ ue. on tr, ited t. iuu whole liver anu dried bre er= yeast ai ?cured to oe . ", o~d s . urces oi tai- l'aCtOr Wnile dried Wiiej, di tiller= dried ~ui Oie-, nid ter. ontat. on s... c: ?ein . ilu . ~@i allan , irotein u' tne, rotein - dice; ? iid . o?cd that it le?t two i'ctur- . . ere required bg tiie cuici. &or og, . imum?io, t i . . )ne factor . ; suyfilied bg liver z ictiun= iii uriod oie, ers yea. . t, while t?= ot...

  10. Prenatal and Perinatal Risk Factors for Autism in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    and perinatal risk factors for autism. Journal of PerinatalB. (1979). Viral exposure and autism. American Journal ofage and the risk of autism spectrum disorder. American

  11. Factors driving wind power development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-01-01

    s Largest Purchase of Wind Power,” September 17, 2001.FACTORS DRIVING WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT IN THE UNITED STATESthe United States third in wind power capacity globally,

  12. Electromagnetic form factors and the hypercentral constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanctis, M. De; Giannini, M. M.; Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A.

    2007-12-15

    We present new results concerning the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon using a relativistic version of the hypercentral constituent quark model and a relativistic current.

  13. Towards large-cohort comparative studies to define the factors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Towards large-cohort comparative studies to define the factors influencing the gut microbial community structure of ASD patients Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  14. Planar superconducting resonators with internal quality factors above one million

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinis, John M.

    Planar superconducting resonators with internal quality factors above one million A. Megrant,1,2 C criti- cal elements for superconducting electromagnetic radiation detectors,1 quantum memories,2

  15. Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: interfacial energetics and blend microstructure April 29, 2009 at 3pm36-428 Jenny Nelson...

  16. Factors Associated with Hepatitis B Testing Among Vietnamese Americans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Asian American adults for hepatitis B: a cross-sectionalFactors Associated with Hepatitis B Testing Among VietnameseBACKGROUND: Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis B- associated

  17. Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by the chemistry of the ejecta on which the relict encrustations are found. This matrix chemistry factor illustrates that the primary fumarolic minerals surrounding the...

  18. Method for determining formation quality factor from well log...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    determining formation quality factor from well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Method for...

  19. Factors governing sustainable groundwater pumping near a river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    study the interplay between riverbed clogging and infiltration.study various factors that can potentially impact infiltrationthat affect infiltration processes. Our study is performed

  20. Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry 2004...

  1. Analyticity properties and unitarity constraints of heavy meson form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Rafael, E; Eduardo de Rafael; Josep Taron; Rafael, Eduardo de; Taron, Josep

    1994-01-01

    We derive new bounds on the b-number form factor $F(q^2)$ of the B meson. (Revised version of hep-ph/9306214).

  2. A NOTE ON THE FACTORIZATION THEOREM OF TORIC ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-20

    In this section, we harvest the fruit “Weak Factorization Theorem” grown upon the tree of the ...... chatov Institute Atomic Energy preprint (1989). [Sumihiro] H.

  3. Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life Cycle Cost...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Life Cycle Cost Analysis, 2013 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life Cycle Cost Analysis, 2013 Handbook describes the annual supplements to the NIST Handbook 135 and...

  4. Critical Factors Driving the High Volumetric Uptake of Methane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Factors Driving the High Volumetric Uptake of Methane in Cu-3(btc)(2) Previous Next List Hulvey, Zeric; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Mason, Jarad A.; Tsivion, Ehud; Dougherty,...

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rescues synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    in mice lacking brain- derived neurotrophic factor. Procterm potentiation by brain- derived neurotrophic factor. JCM, Simmons DA (2007b) Brain-derived neurotrophic factor

  6. Applying Human Factors to the Design of Performance Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pancake, Cherri M.

    Applying Human Factors to the Design of Performance Tools Cherri M. Pancake Oregon State University Abstract. After two decades of research in parallel tools for perfor- mance tuning, why are users still dissatis ed? This paper outlines the human factors issues that determine how performance tools

  7. Factors influencing digital technology use in early childhood education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    Factors influencing digital technology use in early childhood education Courtney K. Blackwell extrinsic and intrinsic factors that influence early childhood educators' digital technology use. Survey data from 1234 early childhood educators indicate that attitudes toward the value of technology to aid

  8. Matrix Factorizations for Information Retrieval Dianne P. O'Leary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Matrix Factorizations for Information Retrieval Dianne P. O'Leary Computer Science Dept that is predominantly linear algebra · Conclusions A Catalog of Matrix Factorizations c 2006 Dianne P. O'Leary 1 or oscillation · understanding Markov chains c 2006 Dianne P. O'Leary 2 University of Maryland, College Park #12

  9. Scaling factor inconsistencies in neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowell, S. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half-life can be suppressed by 15%-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, is overestimated.

  10. Scaling Factor Inconsistencies in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Cowell

    2005-12-05

    The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half life can be suppressed by 15-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, $$ is overestimated.

  11. Journal Diffusion Factors a measure of diffusion? Tove Faber Frandsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Journal Diffusion Factors ­ a measure of diffusion? Tove Faber Frandsen Royal School of Library In this paper we show that the measure of diffusion introduced by Ian Rowlands called the Journal Diffusion Factor (JDF) is highly negatively correlated with the number of citations, leading highly cited journals

  12. The Multivariate Merit Factor of a Boolean T. Aaron Gulliver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Matthew Geoffrey

    The Multivariate Merit Factor of a Boolean Function T. Aaron Gulliver Dept. of Electrical metric, the multivariate merit factor (MMF) of a Boolean function, is presented, and various infinite recursive quadratic sequence constructions are given for which both uni­ variate and multivariate merit

  13. Implementing the Elliptic Curve Method of Factoring in Reconfigurable Hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaj, Krzysztof

    Bachimanchi1 1 Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030-exponential factoring algorithm, with expected run time of O(exp(c log p log log p) M(N)) where c > 0, p is a factor we aim to find, and M(N) denotes the cost of multiplication (mod N). ECM is the best method to perform

  14. A Parallel Jacobi Method for the Takagi Factorization Xiaohong Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Sanzheng

    A Parallel Jacobi Method for the Takagi Factorization Xiaohong Wang Department of Computing-symmetric matrix. We present a multthreading parallel Jacobi algorithm for computing the Takagi factorization Jacobi method, Multithreading. 1 Introduction A matrix A of order n is symmetric if A = A T . When

  15. A Two-factor Authentication Mechanism Using Mobile Phones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -03 Last Modification Date: 2008/08/20 Abstract Mobile devices are becoming more pervasive and more of mobile devices to provide a two-factor authentication method. Our approach uses a combination of one-time passwords, as the first authentication factor, and credentials stored on a mobile device, as the second

  16. FACTORS AFFECTING EXVESSEL PRICES OF SKIPJACK TUNA IN HAWAII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FACTORS AFFECTING EXVESSEL PRICES OF SKIPJACK TUNA IN HAWAII Yung C . Shang The skipj ack -tuna to overfishing. On the other hand, the cost-revenue analysis indicates that, given the past input and tuna prices objective of this paper is to exam- ine the factors affecting the prices of skipj ack tuna. Skipjack

  17. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted mixture of gases and aerosols. Primary emissions include sig- nificant amounts of CH4 and aerosol (organic

  18. Model Order Selection for Boolean Matrix Factorization Pauli Miettinen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldmann, Uwe

    Science Universiteit Antwerpen, Belgium jilles.vreeken@ua.ac.be ABSTRACT Matrix factorizations--where a given data matrix is approximated by a product of two or more factor matrices--are powerful data mining the data mining community in recent years. The technique has desirable properties, such as high

  19. Environmental Factors Affecting Situation Awareness in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scerri, Paul

    Environmental Factors Affecting Situation Awareness in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Prasanna Velagapudi in the application of unmanned aerial systems to a wide variety of problems. One particular class of vehicle that has of unmanned vehicles. One such factor is the physical proximity of operators to the vehicle during deployment

  20. Optimizing Thermoelectric Power Factor by Means of a Potential Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Optimizing Thermoelectric Power Factor by Means of a Potential Barrier Neophytos Neophytou}@iue.tuwien.ac.at Abstract Large efforts in improving thermoelectric energy conversion are devoted to energy filtering design, ~40% improvement in the thermoelectric power factor can be achieved if the following conditions