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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should

2

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

063-2011 063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations,

3

How are lighting exemptions and allowances shown in COMcheck...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guides eLearning Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series How are lighting exemptions and allowances shown in COMcheck? Exemptions and allowances for lighting...

4

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Facility Representative Workshop 0 Facility Representative Workshop May 16-18, 2000 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Tuesday, May 16, 2000 Theme for Day 1: Sustaining the Success of the Facility Representative Program 8:00 a.m. - Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:05 a.m. - Welcome - Kenneth Powers, Deputy Manager Nevada Operations Office 8:15 a.m. - Deputy Secretary Remarks - T. J. Glauthier, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Jerry Lyle, Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, Idaho Operations Office 9:00 a.m. - Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Departmental Representative 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Results and Goals - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager

5

Facility Representative Program: 2012 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2012 Las Vegas, NV Agenda | Presentations | SSO Annual Award | Pictures | Summary Report 2011 Facility Representative of the Year Award 2011 WINNER: Congratulations to Bradley...

6

Facility Representative Program: 2001 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Facility Representative Workshop 1 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2001 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. - Logistics Announcements & Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. - Welcome - Debbie Monette, Assistant Manager for National Security, Nevada Operations Office 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Ralph Erickson, National Nuclear Security Administration 9:00 a.m.- DOE Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Summary - Joe Arango 10:10 a.m. - Management Panel/Questions and Answers

7

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

8

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

9

Facility Representative Program: 2007 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Facility Representative Workshop 7 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2007 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks Joanne Lorence, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office Gerald Talbot, Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:45 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight Perspective and Expectations Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Office of Health, Safety and Security 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board,

10

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

11

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Break 10:00 a.m. - Making Your Observations CountLeading Indicators - Mike Weis, Rocky Flats Field Office 10:45 a.m. - Facility Representative PanelQuestions and Answers (Ben...

12

Facility Representative Program: 2004 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Facility Representative Workshop 4 Facility Representative Workshop May 18 - 20, 2004 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 18, 2004 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathy Carlson, Nevada Site Office Manager 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy Deputy Secretary's Remarks 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - NNSA Evaluation of Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report Brigadier General Ronald J. Haeckel, Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Applications, NNSA Other Information: NASA’S Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report

13

Facility Representative Program: 2006 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Facility Representative Workshop 6 Facility Representative Workshop May 16 - 19, 2006 Knoxville, Tennessee Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final To view Pictures, scroll the mouse over the Picture icon To view Presentations, Picture Slideshows and Video, click on the icon Day 1: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from Oak Ridge Office Gerald Boyd, Manager, Oak Ridge Office 8:25 a.m. Welcome from Y-12 Site Office Theodore Sherry, Manager, Y-12 Site Office 8:35 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight at Environmental Management Activities Dr. Inés Triay, Chief Operating Officer, Office of Environmental Management

14

Property Representatives Lists- HQ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These are the current lists of Headquarters Property Representatives. If you have any questions please contact:Ellen Hall, Office of Logistics Operations, (301) 903-2613.

15

Representativeness of Wind Observations at Airports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind information for use at airports can be called representative if it provides an optimal estimate of wind variations to be expected over the runway. It is shown that a single anemometer at a nonideal but reasonable location will usually ...

J. Wieringa

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Industry Representatives Acknowledgements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computer science: Manitoba curriculum framework of outcomes. Draft Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-7711-3122-4 1. Computer scienceCurricula. 2. Computer scienceStudy and teaching (Secondary)Manitoba. 3. Electronic data processingCurricula. 4. Electronic data processingStudy and teaching (Secondary) Manitoba. I. Manitoba. Manitoba Education and Youth. Copyright 2003, the Crown in Right of Manitoba as represented by the Minister of Education and

Draft September Senior (s; Senior (s; Normand Chtel; Collge Bliveau; Louis Riel; School Division; Geoff Bresch; Scott Greenlay; Bruce Popham; David Tetlock

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Facility Representative Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

18

Glossary Balancing Item: Represents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Balancing Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-report- ing problems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of vari- ations in company accounting and billing practices; differ- ences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data- reporting systems that vary in scope, format, definitions, and type of respondents. Biomass Gas: A medium Btu gas containing methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the action of microorganisms on organic materials such as a landfill. British Thermal

19

The picture represents how motions of distal enzyme loops (shown as thick colored tubes) in the enzyme cyclophilin A can impact the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leading to medicines able to target hard-to-cure diseases such as AIDS, he is also excited about its down the cost of biofuels, making them a more attractive option.--Ron Walli A tree outside ORNL to drugs with fewer side effects, less expensive biofuels and more. Just as a breeze causes leaves

20

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) Meeting 2013 - A Federal Green Chemistry Forum. ...

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Annual Facility Representative Workshop Facility Representative of the Year Award Process Facility Representative of the Year Award 2012 WINNER: John C. Barnes, Savannah River Operations Office Letter from DNFSB Chairman Peter S. Winokur, Ph.D 2012 Nominees: Peter W. Kelley, Brookhaven Site Office James E. Garza, Idaho Operations Office (EM) William R. Watson, Idaho Operations Office (NE) Darlene S. Rodriguez, Los Alamos Field Office Robert R. Robb, Livermore Field Office Kenneth W. Wethington, Grand Junction Project Office's Moab site Thomas P. Denny, Nevada Field Office Michael J. Childers, NNSA Production Office Pantex Site Catherine T. Schidel, NNSA Production Office Y12 Site Chelsea D. Hubbard, Oak Ridge Operations Office (EM)

22

FAQS Reference Guide Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the October 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1151-2010, Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard.

23

Finding minimum representative pattern sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequent pattern mining often produces an enormous number of frequent patterns, which imposes a great challenge on understanding and further analysis of the generated patterns. This calls for finding a small number of representative patterns to best ... Keywords: frequent pattern summarization, representative patterns

Guimei Liu; Haojun Zhang; Limsoon Wong

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Facility Representative Program: Qualification Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training & Qualification Information Training & Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available Link to National Training Center Basic Courses for Facility Representative Qualification Recommended Courses to Expand Facility Representative's Knowledge Base Qualification Standards General Technical Base Qualification Standard, Qualification Card & Reference Guide -- GTB Qualification Standard (DOE-STD-1146-2007), December 2007 [PDF] -- GTB Qualification Card, December 2007 [DOC] -- GTB "Gap" Qualification Card, December 2007 [DOC] -- GTB Qualification Standard Reference Guide, May 2008 [PDF] Facility Representative Qualification Standard, Qualification Card & Reference Guide

25

Facility Representative Program: Basic Courses For Facility Representative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training & Qualification Information Training & Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available Link to National Training Center Basic Courses for Facility Representative Qualification Recommended Courses to Expand Facility Representative's Knowledge Base Basic Courses For Facility Rep Qualification (These courses may be beneficial during the initial qualification of Facility Representatives.) Course Title FR FAQS CN Point of Contact Comments Applied Engineering Fundamentals 13 days * See below Mike Schoener 803-641-8166 E-mail Course description at http://ntc.doe.gov course catalog Asbestos Awareness 2 hours 2.1 Federal employees register through the CHRIS system For course details see

26

Final Rulemaking, 10 CFR Part 1021, with Amendments Shown In Tracked Changes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document presents the final rule as issued September 27, 2011, amendments shown with changes tracked(additions in blue, deletions in red). Categorical exclusions are listed in Appendices A...

27

Subthermocline Eddies in the Western Equatorial Pacific as Shown by an Eddy-Resolving OGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sporadic in situ observations have shown evidence that subthermocline eddies exist off the Mindanao coast. These subthermocline eddies are believed to play an important role in the heat, freshwater, and other ocean property transports of the ...

Tzu-Ling Chiang; Tangdong Qu

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Energy flows are shown in energy units as well as dollar values...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

flows are shown in energy units as well as dollar values. Financial and technical management can now communicate by looking at data that is meaningful to both- One of the...

29

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

30

Regret-minimizing representative databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose the k-representative regret minimization query (k-regret) as an operation to support multi-criteria decision making. Like top-k, the k-regret query assumes that users have some utility or scoring functions; however, ...

Danupon Nanongkai; Atish Das Sarma; Ashwin Lall; Richard J. Lipton; Jun Xu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Data Visualization Perceiving and Representing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Visualization Perceiving and Representing Structured Information using Objects #12;Data #12;Data Visualization Image Based vs Structure Theories s Template theories based on 2D image processing s In structural theories we extract the structure of a scene in terms of 3D primitives #12;Data

Chi, Ed Huai-hsin

32

Representing Drag on Unresolved Terrain as a Distributed Momentum Sink  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In numerical weather prediction models, drag on unresolved terrain is usually represented by augmenting the boundary drag on the model atmosphere, in terms of an effective surface roughness length. But as is shown here, if a terrain-following ...

John D. Wilson

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

DOE Takes Action to Stop the Sales of Air-Con Air Conditioner Models Shown  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Takes Action to Stop the Sales of Air-Con Air Conditioner Takes Action to Stop the Sales of Air-Con Air Conditioner Models Shown to Violate Federal Energy Efficiency Appliance Standards DOE Takes Action to Stop the Sales of Air-Con Air Conditioner Models Shown to Violate Federal Energy Efficiency Appliance Standards September 23, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy announced today that it has taken action against Air-Con, International, requiring the company to stop selling certain air conditioning systems in the U.S. that have been shown to violate minimum energy efficiency appliance standards. DOE is proposing a civil penalty of more than $230,000 for importing and distributing these inefficient cooling products. This action and the proposed penalties are part of the Department's continued commitment to act aggressively to remove

34

Several studies have shown that the availability of solar power plants often is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several studies have shown that the availability of solar power plants often is high during times conditioning. These peaks are intensi- fied during heat waves, which are fueled by solar gain. Thus the equivalent of peaking capaci- ty via load curtailment and user-sited power generation. When dispersed PV

Perez, Richard R.

35

Facility Representative Program: Program Mission Statement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Program Information Program Mission Statement Program Directives and Guidance Facility Representative of the Year Award Program Facility Representative of the Year Award FR...

36

Facility Representative of the Year Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM OBJECTIVE The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD The Facility Representative of the Year Award is determined by a panel representing the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer and managers from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Office of Environmental Management (EM), the Office of Science (SC), and the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE). The Facility Representative Program Manager in

37

Responses to Questions from the Texas House of Representatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Texas. However, several specific factors place the future of transportation in the state at risk. Given1 Responses to Questions from the Texas House of Representatives Select Committee on Transportation Funding Prepared for The Honorable Eddie Rodriguez Vice Chair Select Committee on Transportation Funding

38

Facility Representative Program: Program Performance Indicators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Performance Indicators DOE Corporate Reporting Data (ORPS, CAIRS, Others) Facility Representative Performance Indicator Guidance -- Appendix A in DOE-STD-1063-2011,...

39

Representativeness models of systems: smart grid example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the great emphasis being placed on energy efficiency in contemporary society, in which the smart grid plays a prominent role, this is an opportune time to explore methodologies for appropriately representing system attributes. We suggest this is ... Keywords: Smart grid, System representativeness

Norman Schneidewind

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives from the Facility

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Practical Pyrgeometer Using the Representative Angle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple directional pyrgeometer is tested and compared with a conventional standard pyrgeometer. The system presented in this article has a narrow directional response and points to the representative zenith angle of 52.5. Because of its ...

Satoshi Sakai; Aya Ito; Kazuhiro Umetani; Isao Iizawa; Masanori Onishi

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Finding representative workloads for computer system design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work explores how improved workload characterization can be used for a better selection of representative workloads within the computer system and processor design process. We find that metrics easily available in modern computer systems provide ...

Jan Lodewijk Bonebakker

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Facility Representative Program: Program Directives and Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) Program Directives and Guidance FR Program Standard, DOE STD 1063-2011,...

44

Representing aggregate works in the digital library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the challenge of representing aggregate works such as encyclopedias, collected poems and journals in heterogenous digital library collections. Reflecting on the materials used by humanities academics, we demonstrate the varied range ... Keywords: aggregate documents, architecture, digital libraries

George Buchanan; Jeremy Gow; Ann Blandford; Jon Rimmer; Claire Warwick

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Facility Representative Program Outstanding at ID  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

protects not only the workers, but the public and the environment as well. Specifically, DOE orders say: "The purpose of the DOE Facility Representative Program is to ensure that...

46

Artistic rendering to represent quality of information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representation of information quality, also known as "verity visualization," can be explained as a judgment of the accuracy of specific information in a dataset relative to the whole. The visualization of information quality is an important factor ...

Katharine H. Wray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative, was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

Sharpe, Saxon E

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

48

Representative element modeling of fracture systems based on stochastic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An important task associated with reservoir simulation is the development of a technique to model a large number of fractures with a single description. Representative elements must be developed before reservoir scale simulations can adequately address the effects of intersecting fracture systems on fluid migration. An effective element model will sharply reduce the cost and complexity of large scale simulations to bring these to manageable levels. Stochastic analysis is a powerful tool which can determine the hydraulic and transport characteristics of intersecting sets of statistically defined fractures. Hydraulic and transport characteristics are required to develop representative elements. Given an assumption of fully developed laminar flow, the net fracture conductivities and hence flow velocities can be determined from descriptive statistics of fracture spacing, orientation, aperture, and extent. The distribution of physical characteristics about their mean leads to a distribution of the associated conductivities. The variance of hydraulic conductivity induces dispersion into the transport process. The simplest of fracture systems, a single set of parallel fractures, is treated to demonstrate the usefulness of stochastic analysis. Explicit equations for conductivity of an element are developed and the dispersion characteristics are shown. The analysis reveals the dependence of the representative element properties on the various parameters used to describe the fracture system. 10 refs., 3 figs.

Clemo, T.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

1997 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone E-Mail Anderson Mike ID CFATAN (208) 526-7418 andersmr@id.doe.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 bbell@doeal.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Brown Mark RL TANKS (509) 373-9150 mark_c_brown@rl.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Daniels Rick OR HFIR (423) 574-9143 e29@ornl.gov Dennis Jack AL AAO (806) 477-3176 jdennis@pantex.com Dikeakos Maria CH BHG (516) 344-3950 dikeako@bnl.gov Duey Don AL AAO (806) 477-6987 dduey@pantex.com Earley Larry RL WRAP (509) 373-9388 larry_d_earley@rl.gov Eddy Doug OAK LLNL (925) 422-3379 doug.eddy@oak.doe.gov Edwards Robert SR NMSD (803) 208-2645 robert-e.edwards@srs.gov

50

1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone Fax E-Mail Alvord Bob OAK LLNL (925) 422-0830 (925) 422-0832 robert.alvord@oak.doe.gov Barnes John SR SRTC (803) 208-2628 (803) 208-1123 johnc.barnes@srs.gov Bell Fred AL LAAO (505) 665-4856 (505) 665-9230 fbell@doeal.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 (505) 665-9230 bbell@doeal.gov Bennett Rick RF DOE (303) 966-8155 (303) 966-7447 rick.bennett@rfets.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 (509) 376-9837 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Blanco Jose SR DWPF (803) 208-7022 (803) 557-8223 jose.blanco@srs.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 (509) 373-9839 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Christensen Debbie AL OMD (505) 845-5239 dschristensen@doeal.gov Clifton Gary OR ORNL (423) 576-6810 (423) 574-9275 g7y@ornl.gov

51

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone #  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone # Ames Laboratory Stacy Joiner joiner@ameslab.gov 515-294-5932 Argonne National Laboratory Connie Cleary ccleary@anl.gov 630-252-8111 Brookhaven National Laboratory Walter Copan wcopan@bnl.gov 631-344-3035 Fermi National Acclerator Laboratory Bruce Chrisman chrisman@fnal.gov 630-840-6657 Idaho National Laboratory Steven McMaster steven.mcmaster@inl.gov 208-526-1340 Kansas City Plant Caron O'Dower codower@kcp.com 816-997-2645 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Viviana Wolinsky viwolinsky@lbl.gov 510-486-6463 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Roger Werne werne1@llnl.gov 925-423-9353 Los Alamos National Laboratory John Mott jmott@lanl.gov 505-665-0883 National Energy Technology Laboratory Jessica Sosenko jessica.sosenko@netl.doe.gov 412-386-7417

52

Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1151-2010 October 2010 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1151-2010 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Approved DOE Technical Standards Web Site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/standard/standard.html DOE-STD-1151-2010 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managers responsible for overseeing the Federal Technical Capability Program. This Panel is

53

Relationship between different channel light curves of gamma-ray burst pulses shown in aspects other than the pulse width  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we employ the peak count rate{\\bf \\}$C_p$ and the total count $C_{total}$ of light curves to study in the corresponding aspects the relationship between different channel light curves. To make a direct comparison between count rates of different channel light curves we introduce a plot of $C(\\tau)$ versus $C_H(\\tau)$, where $C(\\tau)$ is the count rate of a channel and $C_H(\\tau)$ is the count rate of a definite cannel, channel H (see the text). According to the plot we define $\\Delta C_{\\max}$ as the maximum deviation of the two count rate values of $C(\\tau)$ associated with a same count rate value of $% C_H(\\tau)$ and define $\\Delta S$ as the area confined by the close curve of $C(\\tau)$ in the plot to measure the difference of the rising and decaying portions of a light curve relative to the count rate of channel H. Under the assumption that some GRBs observed are in the stage of fireballs which expand relativistically, predictions on the relationships between the four quantities{\\bf (}$C_p$, $C_{total}$, $\\Delta C_{\\max}$, and $\\Delta S$) and energy within a wide band, calculated with different rest frame radiation forms and two typical Lorentz factors ($\\Gamma =20$ and 200), are made and presented, which would make the test of our model with the coming Swift data easier. Interpretations to the relationships within the mechanism of fireballs are also presented.

Yi-Ping Qin

2004-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

The underground electromagnetic pulse: Four representative models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I describe four phenomenological models by which an underground nuclear explosion may generate electromagnetic pulses: Compton current asymmetry (or ''Compton dipole''); Uphole conductor currents (or ''casing currents''); Diamagnetic cavity plasma (or ''magnetic bubble''); and Large-scale ground motion (or ''magneto-acoustic wave''). I outline the corresponding analytic exercises and summarize the principal results of the computations. I used a 10-kt contained explosion as the fiducial case. Each analytic sequence developed an equivalent source dipole and calculated signal waveforms at representative ground-surface locations. As a comparative summary, the Compton dipole generates a peak source current moment of about 12,000 A/center dot/m in the submicrosecond time domain. The casing-current source model obtains an equivalent peak moment of about 2 /times/ 10/sup 5/ A/center dot/m in the 10- to 30-/mu/s domain. The magnetic bubble produces a magnetic dipole moment of about 7 /times/ 10/sup 6/ A/center dot/m/sup 2/, characterized by a 30-ms time structure. Finally, the magneto-acoustic wave corresponds to a magnetic dipole moment of about 600 A/center dot/m/sup 2/, with a waveform showing 0.5-s periodicities. 8 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

Wouters, L.F.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2011 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

56

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standarf 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January-March 2012 More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

57

Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program ID Selects Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative of the Year. John Martin was selected as DOE-ID's Facility Representative of the Year and the office's nominee for the 2007 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award. John was selected from an exceptional field of candidates to represent DOE-ID at the Facility Representative Annual Workshop in Las Vegas this May. Each year the Department of Energy recognizes the Facility Representative whose achievements during the calendar year are most exemplary. A panel of senior personnel representing the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Environmental Management (EM), Science (SC), Nuclear Energy (NE) and at least five

58

Representative Air Temperature of Thermally Heterogeneous Urban Areas Using the Measured Pressure Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to measure an area-averaged ground air temperature based on the hydrostatic equation is shown. The method was devised to overcome the problem of finding the most representative surface air temperature over a wide region, a problem that ...

Hirofumi Sugawara; Ken-ichi Narita; Takehiko Mikami

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Greening the Capitol initiative was launched in March, 2007 with the threefold goals of making the U.S. House of Representatives: 1) carbon neutral within 18 months, 2) reducing energy use by 50percent in ten years, and 3) becoming a model of sustainable operations. We report on the recommendations to meet these goals, looking at the targets of opportunity at the Capitol Power Plant, the existing buildings, and the overall operations of the complex. Our findings have shown that these goals are achievable, and that through an integrated approach the savings in carbon and energy can be met. Specific examples include the lighting retrofits in the House offices, parking areas, and the Capitol dome; the retrofits to the HVAC systems and controls, including duct sealing, improving the efficiency of the energy and water use in the food service areas; and improved operations of the steam and chilled water distribution system. A key aspect has been better tracking and feedback to the building operators of the actual energy consumption. We report on the technical opportunities presented by these historic and symbolic buildings in becoming models of sustainability.

Diamond, Rick; Diamond, Rick; Payne, Christopher

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. 3Q CY2003, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representative Representative FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-FacilityRepresentative.docx Description Facility Representative Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Facility Representative

62

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. As of December 31,2003, 93% of all Facility Representatives were fully qualified, exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal for Facility Representative

63

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. A total of 13 Facility Representatives transferred to other positions during the quarter. Five of these accepted Facility Representative positions at other sites. Of the 8 that left the Program. 1 recieved a promotion and 7 accepted lateral positions. All of

64

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. 2Q CY2006, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

65

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives Title Greening the U.S. House of Representatives Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-322E Year of Publication 2008 Authors...

66

Case Study 11 - A Collection of Homes Representing US ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A Collection of Homes Representing US Housing Stock. [Persily AK, Musser A., Leber D. (2006)]. In order to allow nationwide ...

67

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 87% Fully Qualifed ( last quarter was 85%) 86% Staffing Level ( last quarter was 88%)

68

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 76% fully qualified 41% staffing level

69

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to impove the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified 94% Staffing Level ( last quarter was

70

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 72% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was

71

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The percentage of Facility Representatives who are fully qualified reached 91% across DOE. In EM the percenage of 97%, in Sc the percentage is 95% and in NNSA the percentage is 78%. The DOE goal is 75%. Staffing levels for the three organizations continue to be below

72

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below." 1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

73

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representative and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2010 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

74

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data." 1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

75

4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The format of the report is changed from past reports. Information will now be provided according to the major offices having field or site office Facility Representative programs: National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSSA), the Office of

76

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarter 's data concluded: 3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

77

Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Departmental Award Program administered by the Office of Chief Information Officer The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Facility Representative of the Year Award Responsible Contacts Lorrenda Buckner HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT) E-mail lorrenda.buckner@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-8451 More Documents & Publications Safety System Oversight Annual Award

78

Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Departmental Award Program administered by the Office of Chief Information Officer The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Facility Representative of the Year Award Responsible Contacts Lorrenda Buckner HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT) E-mail lorrenda.buckner@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-8451 More Documents & Publications Safety System Oversight Annual Award

79

1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and line management the opportunity to share lessons learned, and to discuss upcoming program improvements. There is no cost for the meeting, however, rooms reserved at the government rate are limited so if you are planning on attending, please make reservations as soon as possible. The hotel phone number is 1-800-453-8000. For more information, please contact Joe Hassenfeldt, Facility Representative Program Manager, FM-10, at 202-586-1643." Microsoft Word - Document1

80

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from April to June 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. Overall, the percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives increased to 80% last quarter, from 78% the previous quarter , and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May May 9,2000 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: .yc,..,%$'! L.W.T oseph Arango, Facl ity Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. You will note that the indicators show the attrition of five Facility Representatives from the program during this reporting period. Of those five, two were promoted

82

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from October to December 2001. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data 4Q CY2001, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications

83

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. As of June 30,2005, 97% of all FRs were fully qualified, down from 88% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications. 2Q CY2005, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

84

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This report reflects changes in DOE STD 1063-2011 that deleted one indicator and changed the way two others are calculated. The changes are discussed below. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January - March

85

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from July to September 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. The percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives in the DOE complex

86

October 2010, Facility Representative Qualification Standard Reference Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Facility Representative Qualification Standard Reference Guide OCTOBER 2010 Table of Contents i LIST OF FIGURES ..................................................................................................................... iii LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ v ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ vi PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1

87

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of...

88

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Energy and Power (May 9, 2012) Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power (May 9, 2012)...

89

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Water Development (March 27, 2012) Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March...

90

Microsoft Word - 2.24 Safety Advisory Committee Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The SAC Representative is expected to: * Possess an understanding of Integrated Safety Management. * Communicate regularly with senior division management and other division...

91

Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends 181 Appendix C Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production Project

92

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small Hotel Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

93

Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Representing a robotic domain using temporal description logics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A temporal logic for representing and reasoning on a robotic domain is presented. Actions are represented by describing what is true while the action itself is occurring, and plans are constructed by temporally relating actions and world states. The ... Keywords: Action Representation, Description Logic, Robotics, Temporal Logic

Alessandro Artale; Enrico Franconi

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives. and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR Program. As of March 31st, 2005, 88% of all FRs were fully qualified, up from 86% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several of the new FRs hired recently completed qualifications. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications

96

4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2004, 86% of all FRs were fully qualified,down from 89% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites added new FRs or switched FRs from their exisiting facilities to new facilities, reducing the overall qualification rate.

97

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of June 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified , exceeding the DOE goal of 80%, but down slightly from the previous quarter. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR staffing is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing

98

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of September 30,2005, 84% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from 87% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites shifted fully-qualifed FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications. Although the overall percentage of fully qualified FRS

99

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of September 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified, the same as last quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR stadding is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing analysis methodology in

100

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 77% Fully Qualified (last quarter was 78%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 90%); 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%); and 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is > 65%)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data: * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). Four FRs left due to transfer,

102

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activities (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

103

1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of March 31,2006 81% of all FRs were fully qualified,up from 78% the previous quarter, and just above the DOE goal of 80%. To assist site offices in continuing to meet the qualification goal, there will be two focused training sessions for FR candidates in the coming months. These

104

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

105

2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This memorandum also announces that Mr. James Heffner has turned over FR Program Manager duties to Mr. Earl Huges. Mr. Heffner is assuming expanded team leader duties over several additional programs within the

106

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2005 78% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from the 84% the previous quarter, and below the DOE goal of 80%. Site offices hired 11 new FRs in the quarter and several sites moved FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications.

107

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 78% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 76%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 89%) 47% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%) 74% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is>65%)"

108

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

109

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Building Type: Secondary school

110

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 176 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 95 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). This staff reflects a

111

4Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 26,2001 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: seph Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. I intend to continue to provide this summary information to you quarterly. These provide

112

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 184 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) which is 92

113

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 76% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 80%) 89% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 89%) 44% Time Spent in the Field ( Department of Energy)(DOE) goal is > 40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

114

High freestream turbulence levels have been shown to greatly augment the heat transfer along a gas turbine airfoil, particularly for the first stage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

along a gas turbine airfoil, particularly for the first stage nozzle guide vane. For this study of the variables affecting boundary layer development on gas turbine airfoils, studies need to be performed of a variety of gas turbine combustors have shown that the levels can range between 8% and 40% (Kuotmos and Mc

Thole, Karen A.

115

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October - December 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR DISTRIBUTION FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: ANDREW C. LAWRENCE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF NUCLEAR SAFETY, QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENVIRONMENT OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October-December (Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2010) This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below:

116

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options. Topics include radionuclide interaction with geomedia, colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Pu colloids), interaction between iodide (accumulate in the interlayer regions of clay minerals) and a suite of clay minerals, adsorption of uranium onto granite and bentonite,

117

Exploring a Full-Sized Black Hole 30 This black ball shown below is the exact size of a black hole with a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring a Full-Sized Black Hole 30 This black ball shown below is the exact size of a black hole with a diameter of 9.0 centimeters. Such a black hole would have a mass of 5 times the mass of our Earth. All of this mass would be INSIDE the ball below. Although it looks pretty harmless, if this black hole were at arms

118

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. CARLSBAD, N.M. - Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state

119

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. WASHINGTON, D.C. - A representative of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., on Tuesday received the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award for her efforts to improve sustainability and reduce travel costs and the number of fleet vehicles. Judy A. McLemore, who works for URS Regulatory and Environmental Services, based in Carlsbad, was honored for helping advance DOE's management and

120

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. CARLSBAD, N.M. - Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state

122

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder,

123

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

124

Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at the National Press Club, U.S Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that the success of China and other countries in clean energy industries represents a new "Sputnik Moment" for...

125

2Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0,2007 0,2007 M E M 0 R A N D ; p s ' X Z FROM: M RK B. WHI DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June (2nd Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 72%) 94% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 9 1 %)

126

Quantum states representing perfectly secure bits are always distillable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proven that recently introduced states with perfectly secure bits of cryptographic key (private states representing secure bit) [K. Horodecki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 160502 (2005)] as well as its multipartite and higher dimension generalizations always represent distillable entanglement. The corresponding lower bounds on distillable entanglement are provided. We also present a simple alternative proof that for any bipartite quantum state entanglement cost is an upper bound on distillable cryptographic key in bipartite scenario.

Pawel Horodecki; Remigiusz Augusiak

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

Factor Separation in Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple method is developed for computing the interactions among various factors influencing the atmospheric circulations. It is shown how numerical simulations can be utilized to obtain the pure contribution of any factor to any predicted field,...

U. Stein; P. Alpert

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Title Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4420E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Hopkins, Asa S., Alexander B. Lekov, James D. Lutz, and Gregory J. Rosenquist Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Pagination 55 Date Published March 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-4420E Abstract This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies.

129

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

130

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for April - June 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 , 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June 20 1 I This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffin~/Qualification/Oversi~ht Data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

131

4Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2008 6, 2008 MEMORANDUM FROM: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATNE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October - December (4th Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%)

132

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

133

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1063, Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63-2011 63-2011 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES DOE-STD-1063-2011 Familiar Level August 2011 1 DOE-STD-1063-2011 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the purpose and scope of DOE-STD-1063-2011? 2. What are the definitions of the terms listed in section 3 of DOE-STD-1063-2011? 3. What are the duties, responsibilities, and authorities of facility representatives (FRs) and other key personnel? 4. What are the requirements of the FR program? 5. What are the Department of Energy (DOE)-wide FR performance indicators (PIs)? 6. How are DOE-wide FR PIs calculated? 7. What are the FR program objectives that should be measured by an FR program

134

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 renews the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate defense nuclear facilities. Retaining highly qualified employees in critical technical skills areas is vital to the maintenance of these technical capabilities. The Department has therefore committed in the revised R? to the development of a model that offices can use to proactively manage and preserve critical technical capabilities. During the

135

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October-December 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN DIRECTOR ~ OFFICE OF :-IDC~AR AFETY OFFICE OF HEAL 'l;H, AFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October- December 20 ll This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full

136

June 21, 1999 Memo, Facility Representative Program Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June June 21, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR: Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Director, Office of Science Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FROM: John Wilcynski, Director, Office of Field Integration SUBJECT: FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities

137

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and

138

Fuel options from microalgae with representative chemical compositions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Representative species of microalgae are examined with respect to their reported chemical compositions. Each species is analyzed under a variety of culture conditions, with the objective being to characterize an optimum mixture of fuel products (e.g., methane, ethanol, methylester) which should be produced by the particular species. Historically the emphasis has been on the entire algal cell mass. Using the reported chemical composition for the representative species under specific sets of growth conditions, some conclusions can be drawn about the preferred fuel product conversion routes that could be employed. 10 references, 7 figures, 12 tables.

Feinberg, D. A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

On the construction of generalized Grassmann representatives of state vectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalized $Z_k$-graded Grassmann variables are used to label coherent states related to the nilpotent representation of the q-oscillator of Biedenharn and Macfarlane when the deformation parameter is a root of unity. These states are then used to construct generalized Grassmann representatives of state vectors.

M. El Baz; Y. Hassouni

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

140

Can Regional Climate Models Represent the Indian Monsoon?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of four regional climate models (RCMs) to represent the Indian monsoon was verified in a consistent framework for the period 19812000 using the 45-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40) as ...

Philippe Lucas-Picher; Jens H. Christensen; Fahad Saeed; Pankaj Kumar; Shakeel Asharaf; Bodo Ahrens; Andrew J. Wiltshire; Daniela Jacob; Stefan Hagemann

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Identifying and representing elements of local contexts in namibia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to represent local context in a 3D visualisation for rural elders in Namibia we have found major differences in the conceptualization of this context between external and local partners in the co-creation process. Through the evaluation ... Keywords: context, context-aware, indigenous knowledge, participatory design, re-contextualization

Kasper Rodil, Kasper Lvborg Jensen, Matthias Rehm, Heike Winschiers-Theophilus

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Representing digital assets usingMPEG-21 Digital Item Declaration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various XML-based approaches aimed at representing compound digital assets have emerged over the last several years. Approaches that are of specific relevance to the digital library community include the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS), ... Keywords: Digital Item, Digital asset, MPEG-21 DID, OAI-PMH, OpenURL

Jeroen Bekaert; Emiel De Kooning; Herbert de Sompel

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPT-LSO-2011-001 ARPT-LSO-2011-001 Site: Livermore Site Office Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment Dates of Activity 01/24/2011 - 01/28/2011 Report Preparer Robert Freeman Activity Description/Purpose: This activity report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of and participation in the Livermore Site Office Self-Assessment of the Facility Representative (FR) Program. This self-assessment was led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Livermore Site Office (LSO) and conducted by LSO staff, HSS staff, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety (CDNS) staff, a peer from Los Alamos Site

144

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge  

SciTech Connect

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA); Thomson, Judi R. (Guelph, CA); Harvey, William J. (Richland, WA); Paulson, Patrick R. (Pasco, WA); Whiting, Mark A. (Richland, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Chappell, Alan R. (Seattle, WA); Butner, R. Scott (Richland, WA)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

DOE | Office of Health, Safety and Security | 2012 Facility Representative,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

146

Domain assignments for FSSP representative set using DomainParser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domain assignments for the FSSP representative set Domain assignments for the FSSP representative set The following are the domain assignments for the FSSP representative set (released on January 31, 2000, 1987 chains in total) using DomainParser. Each line shows a PDB entry (with a chain identifier if any), total number of residues, number of domains, and domain assignments. The result is obtained fully automatically without manual editing. 12asa 327 2 (33-86; 271-288) (4-32; 87-270; 289-330) 153l 185 1 16pk 415 2 (5-205; 409-419) (206-408) 16vpa 311 2 (47-130; 164-233; 324-349) (131-163; 234-323; 395-402) 1914 171 1 19hca 292 2 (45-107) (1-44; 108-292) 1a02f 53 1 1a02j 52 1 1a02n 280 2 (399-569) (570-678) 1a04a 205 2 (5-126) (127-216) 1a0aa 63 1 1a0ca 437 1 1a0fa 201 2 (1-81) (82-201) 1a0ha 159 1 1a0i 332 2 (2-239) (240-349)

147

Consumption Externalities: A Representative Consumer Model when Agents are Heterogeneous *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: We examine a growth model with consumption externalities where agents differ in their initial capital endowment and their reference group. We show under which conditions the aggregate equilibrium with heterogeneous agents replicates that obtained with a representative consumer, despite the fact that different individuals have different consumption levels. Next we consider the implications of the presence of consumption externalities for the long-run distributions of income and wealth. We find that, in a growing economy, keeping up with the Joneses results in less inequality than would prevail in an economy with no consumption externalities.

Cecilia Garca-pealosa; Stephen J. Turnovsky

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Facility Representative Program: Criteria Review and Approach Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Tools Assessment Tools Surveillance Guides Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Walkthroughs Criteria Review and Approach Document This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person. Communications NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan Configuration Management Configuration Management Assessment Plan Confined Space Confined Spaces Assessment Plan Conduct of Operations Conduct of Operations Assessment Plan Electrical Assessment Electrical Safety Assessment Plan Facility Procedures Verification and Validation of Facility Procedures Assessment Plan Hoisting and Rigging

149

M.: An Ontology-Based Framework for Representing Organizational Knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper describes an ontology-based organizational knowledge representation framework focused on the specification of a two kinds of ontologies: the top level ontology containing concepts characterizing the typical organizational background and COKE ontologies representing so called core organizational knowledge entities. The framework constitutes an abstract representation of organizational knowledge providing a semantic support for designing knowledge management infrastructure able to interoperate with systems already existing in an organization. Moreover, the annotation of COKE w.r.t. the top level ontology allowed by the framework facilitates their semi-automatic handling, retrieval and evolution monitoring.

Andrea Gualtieri; Massimo Ruffolo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

4Q CY2008, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (4QCY2008) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 3 1 100 1 100 100 70 86 ID (EM) 13 12 11 85 0 82 82 43 84 OR (EM) 19 18 18 95 0 72 72 44 66 ORP 15 15 14 93 0 79 64 43 72 PPPO 6 5 5 83 0 80 80 44 70 RL 19 18 18 95 1 84 84 45 70 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 30 80 SR 32 24 24 75 2 71 67 45 74 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 42 70 EM Totals 108 98 94 87 4 77 72 44 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of available work hours is the actual number of hours a Facility Representative works in a calendar quarter, including overtime hours. It does not include

151

2Q CY2004, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment Attachment Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report September 20, 2004 Distribution: Kyle McSlarrow, S-2 Bruce Carnes, S-2 Les Novitsky, S-2 David Garman, S-3 Linton Brooks, NA-1 Tyler Przybylek, NA-1 Everet Beckner, NA-10 James Mangeno, NA-3.6 Glenn Podonsky, SP-1 Mike Kilpatrick, OA-1 Patricia Worthington, OA-40 Paul Golan, EM-1 Inés Triay, EM-3 Patty Bubar, EM-3.2 Raymond Orbach, SC-1 Milt Johnson, SC-3 William Magwood, NE-1 Manager, Ames Site Office Manager, Argonne Site Office Manager, Brookhaven Site Office Manager, Carlsbad Field Office Manager, Fermi Site Office Manager, Idaho Operations Office Manager, Livermore Site Office Manager, Los Alamos Site Office Manager, Nevada Site Office Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office Manager, Office of River Protection

152

1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http: Http: OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (1QCY2010) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 3 100 0 100 33 50 78 ID (EM) 13 13 12 92 0 100 100 50 91 OR (EM) 18 17 18 100 0 100 81 45 67 ORP 15 15 14 93 1 93 80 51 81 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 100 100 43 68 RL 19 19 19 100 0 95 95 43 69 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 50 75 SR 32 29 29 91 1 69 69 43 76 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 60 EM Totals 109 105 104 95 2 89 81 45 75 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key:

153

3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (3QCY2007) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 2 2 200 0 100 50 66 86 ID (ICP) 13 12 11 85 1 100 100 40 65 OR (EM) 19 17 16 84 0 94 88 47 71 ORP 14 14 14 100 0 100 93 46 74 PPPO 4 4 4 100 0 100 100 42 75 RL 19 19 19 100 0 100 95 73 69 SR 31 31 25 81 2 88 80 40 79 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 43 65 EM Totals 103 101 93 90 3 96 89 50 73 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of

154

Facility Representative Program Assessment Criteria, Review, and Approach Document (CRAD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 Appendix B B-1 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDE The DOE has implemented its FR Program, and is looking to continuously improve the program's effectiveness DOE-wide. An effective FR Program has many elements, as described in this Standard. These elements are intended to yield a program that provides DOE facilities with well-trained FRs who spend appropriate amounts of time in their facilities and can work effectively with their contractor management counterparts. The program, to be effective, needs the functional support of management. To maintain the continued support of DOE management, the FR program needs to demonstrate its continued performance and effectiveness, which is to be assessed periodically using

155

A BRIEF REVIEW OF MODELS REPRESENTING CREEP OF ALLOY 617  

SciTech Connect

Alloy 617 is being considered for the construction of components to operate in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Service temperatures will range from 650 to 1000 C. To meet the needs of the conceptual designers of this plant, a materials handbook is being developed that will provide information on alloy 617, as well as other materials of interest. The database for alloy 617 to be incorporated into the handbook was produced in the 1970s and 1980s, while creep and damage models were developed from the database for use in the design of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. In the work reported here, the US database and creep models are briefly reviewed. The work reported represents progress toward a useful model of the behavior of this material in the temperature range of 650 to 1000 C.

Swindeman, Robert W [ORNL; Swindeman, Michael [University of Dayton Research Institute; Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

DOE-STD-1063-2000 - Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-97 October 1997 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1063-2000 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The Revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of

157

SIGNATURE O F AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL ENERGY STRATEGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MINOR SUBDIVISION MINOR SUBDIVISION Jeff Martus 01-903-3481 SIGNATURE O F AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL ENERGY STRATEGY See attached. National Energy Strategy The Department of Energy (DOE) was directed by President Bush on July 26, 1989 to begin the development of a comprehensive National Energy Strategy (NES). Published in February 1991, the NES provides the foundation for a more efficient, less vulnerable, and environmentally sustainable energy future. The NES defines international, commercial, regulatory, and technological policy tools that diversify U.S. resources of energy supplies and offers more flexibility and efficiency in the way energy is transformed and used. This proposed schedule provides for the disposition of records that have been created or received by DOE in connection with the

158

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed that EnergyPlus did not capture the heating-side behavior of heat pumps particularly accurately, and that our simple oil furnace and boiler models needed significant recalibration to fit with RECS. Simulating the full RECS sample on a single computer would take many hours, so we used the 'cloud computing' services provided by Amazon.com to simulate dozens of homes at once. This enabled us to simulate the full RECS sample, including multiple versions of each home to evaluate the impact of marginal changes, in less than 3 hours. Once the tool was calibrated, we were able to address several policy questions. We made a simple measurement of the heat replacement effect and showed that the net effect of heat replacement on primary energy use is likely to be less than 5%, relative to appliance-only measures of energy savings. Fuel switching could be significant, however. We also evaluated the national and regional impacts of a variety of 'overnight' changes in building characteristics or occupant behavior, including lighting, home insulation and sealing, HVAC system efficiency, and thermostat settings. For example, our model shows that the combination of increased home insulation and better sealed building shells could reduce residential natural gas use by 34.5% and electricity use by 6.5%, and a 1 degree rise in summer thermostat settings could save 2.1% of home electricity use. These results vary by region, and we present results for each U.S. Census division. We conclude by offering proposals for future work to improve the tool. Some proposed future work includes: comparing the simulated energy use data with the monthly RECS bill data; better capturing the variation in behavior between households, especially as it relates to occupancy and schedules; improving the characterization of recent construction and its regional variation; and extending the general framework of this simulation tool to capture multifamily housing units, such as apartment buildings.

Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

159

2Q CY2009, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (2QCY2009) Field or Ops Office * Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time ** % Oversight Time *** CBFO 3 3 2 67 0 50 50 46 76 ID 13 13 11 85 0 100 100 49 90 OR 19 18 17 89 1 71 71 42 57 ORP 15 15 15 100 0 73 73 53 77 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 67 67 42 70 RL 19 19 19 100 0 84 84 45 69 SR 32 28 28 88 0 64 64 47 73 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 70 EM Totals 109 104 100 92 1 74 74 46 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office; ID = Idaho Operations Office; OR = Oak Ridge Office; ORP = Office of River Protection; PPPO = Portsmouth/Paducah

160

Exclusivity structures and graph representatives of local complementation orbits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a construction that maps any connected graph G on three or more vertices into a larger graph, H(G), whose independence number is strictly smaller than its Lov\\'asz number which is equal to its fractional packing number. The vertices of H(G) represent all possible events consistent with the stabilizer group of the graph state associated with G, and exclusive events are adjacent. Mathematically, the graph H(G) corresponds to the orbit of G under local complementation. Physically, the construction translates into graph-theoretic terms the connection between a graph state and a Bell inequality maximally violated by quantum mechanics. In the context of zero-error information theory, the construction suggests a protocol achieving the maximum rate of entanglement-assisted capacity, a quantum mechanical analogue of the Shannon capacity, for each H(G). The violation of the Bell inequality is expressed by the one-shot version of this capacity being strictly larger than the independence number. Finally, given the correspondence between graphs and exclusivity structures, we are able to compute the independence number for certain infinite families of graphs with the use of quantum non-locality, therefore highlighting an application of quantum theory in the proof of a purely combinatorial statement.

Adan Cabello; Matthew G. Parker; Giannicola Scarpa; Simone Severini

2012-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Community Discovery via Metagraph Factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work aims at discovering community structure in rich media social networks through analysis of time-varying, multirelational data. Community structure represents the latent social context of user actions. It has important applications such as search ... Keywords: MetaFac, community discovery, dynamic social network analysis, metagraph factorization, nonnegative tensor factorization, relational hypergraph

Yu-Ru Lin; Jimeng Sun; Hari Sundaram; Aisling Kelliher; Paul Castro; Ravi Konuru

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Census Bureau. Field Experiences 2 Field Representative Experiences with the Current Population Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September 2007, U.S. Census Bureau researchers completed a third pilot study on factors that contribute to gaining cooperation and successfully completing survey interviews. This pilot study was part of a larger effort to systematically study interview dynamics and how they affect respondent cooperation with Census Bureau surveys. The results of this study will add to extant data on two previous pilot studies on gaining cooperation behavior (Beck, Wright, & Petkunas, 2007). In 2006, we collected data from Program Coordinators, Program Supervisors, and Senior Field Representatives (SFRs) working on (Beck, Wright, & Petkunas, 2007). The current pilot study involved collecting information from a sample of Census Bureau survey interviewers, called Field Representatives (FRs), throughout the United States. Like these other field employees, FRs work from one of the twelve Census Bureau Regional Offices, which are responsible for the management of field data collection. The FRs filled out a brief questionnaire asking them to list practices, techniques, and recommendations they felt were either successful or unsuccessful at gaining respondent cooperation with Current Population Survey (CPS) interviews. The CPS is a panel survey involving eight monthly interviews with each sampled household. Respondents complete four consecutive monthly interviews, rotate out

Jennifer Beck; Jennifer Beck

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Facility Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Industry Documents ... 3 2.1.1 DOE Directives (Polices, Orders, Manuals, Guides) ... 3 2.1.2 DOE...

165

Conversion Factor  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed... 1,110 1,106 1,105 1,106 1,109 Extraction Loss ......

166

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the...

167

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit...

168

Douglas Factors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as Douglas Factors and have been incorporated into the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Personnel Management System and various FAA Labor Agreements.

169

This paper represent the views of the author and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of Statistics Canada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: In the current economic context, all partners in health care delivery systems, be they public or private, are obliged to identify the factors that influence the utilization of health care services. To improve our understanding of the phenomena that underlie these relationships, Statistics Canada and the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation have just set up a new database. For a representative sample of the population of the province of Manitoba, cross-sectional microdata on individuals health and socio-economic characteristics were

Christian Houle; Jean-marie Berthelot; Pierre David; Cam Mustard; D. Sc; Roos L; M. C. Wolfson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix,

171

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena,

172

Selection of a representative set of parameters for robust ordinal regression outranking methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce the concept of a representative set of parameters for multiple criteria outranking methods: ELECTRE^G^K^M^S and PROMETHEE^G^K^S which apply the principle of robust ordinal regression. We exploit the necessary and the possible results provided ... Keywords: ELECTRE-like method, Outranking relation, PROMETHEE-like method, Representative preference model, Representative set of parameters, Robust ordinal regression

Mi?osz Kadzi?ski; Salvatore Greco; Roman S?owi?ski

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and...

174

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and...

175

4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

176

An architecture for component-based design of representative-based clustering algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an architecture for the design of representative-based clustering algorithms based on reusable components. These components were derived from K-means-like algorithms and their extensions. With the suggested clustering design architecture, ... Keywords: Architecture, Generic algorithm, K-means, Representative-based clustering algorithms, Reusable component

Boris Delibai?; Milan Vuki?evi?; Milo Jovanovi?; Kathrin Kirchner; Johannes Ruhland; Milija Suknovi?

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 80% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 87%) 89% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 86%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is > 40%) 76% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is >

178

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Representatives of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations February 26, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify on the Office of Inspector General's recent inquiry concerning Los Alamos National Laboratory. STATEMENT OF GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS, February 26, 2003

179

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) staff on FR Program issues, including staffing, training and qualification, recruitment, and retention. The Board is clearly interested in the

180

The genus Nocardiopsis represents a phylogenetically coherent taxon and a distinct actinomycete lineage: proposal of Nocardiopsaceae fam. nov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The genus Nocardiopsis was shown to be phylogenetically coherent and to represent a distinct lineage within the radiation of the order Actinomycetales. The closest relatives of the genus Nocardiopsis are members of the genera Actinomadura, Thermomonospora, Streptosporangium, and Microtetraspora. The intrageneric structure of the genus Nucardiupsis is shown to consist of a highly related species group containing Nucardiupsis dassonvillei, Nocardiopsis alborubida, and Nocardiopsis antarctica and a second group of less highly related species comprising Nocardiopsis alba subs p. alba, Nocardiopsis alba subs p. prasina, and Nocardiopsis listeri. Nocardiopsis lucentensis occupies a position intermediate between the two species groups. The results of a 16s ribosomal DNA sequence analysis are generally consistent with the available chemotaxonomic, phenotypic, and DNA-DNA hybridization data. The phylogenetic position and the morpho- and chemotaxonomic properties of Nocardiopsis species support the creation of a family for the genus Nocardiopsis, Nocardiopsaceae fam. nov. Meyer described the genus Nocardiopsis for the species Actinomadura dassonvillei in 1976 on the basis of the morphological characteristics and cell wall type of this organism (21). The genus Nocardiopsis currently comprises seven validly described species, Nocardiopsis alborubidus, Nocardiopsis albus, Nocardiopsis antarcticus, Nocardiopsis dassonvillei, Nocardiopsis halophila,

Fred A. Rainey; Naomi Ward-rainey; Reiner M. Kroppenstedt

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record during big move | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for ... U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record

182

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of Representatives Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 1, 2003 Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) reviews of management practices at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In February of this year, I testified before this Subcommittee regarding our Special Inquiry report on Operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/IG-0584, January 2003). That report noted a series of actions taken by

183

Order Module--DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES Order Module--DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES The familiar level of this module is divided into three sections. The first section addresses the purpose and scope of DOE-STD-1063-2011, the purpose of the FR program, and the duties, responsibilities, and authorities of FRs and other key personnel. In the second section, the requirements of the FR program are discussed. The third section covers the three appendices of this standard: FR performance indicators, an FR program assessment guide, and the process to determine FR staffing. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1063, Facility Representatives

184

Selecting Representative Days for More Efficient Dynamical Climate Downscaling: Application to Wind Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new computationally efficient and statistically robust sampling method for generating dynamically downscaled climatologies. It is based on a Monte Carlo method coupled with stratified sampling. A small yet representative set ...

Daran L. Rife; Emilie Vanvyve; James O. Pinto; Andrew J. Monaghan; Christopher A. Davis; Gregory S. Poulos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The U.S. House of Representatives The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization April 5 2005 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify regarding recent allegations of misconduct involving documents associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Disposal of the Nation's high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel is one of the most sensitive and complex challenges facing the U.S.

186

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations March 4, 2004 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Herbert Richardson, Principal Deputy Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify regarding physical security at the Department of Energy's facilities. The Department's activities range from nuclear nonproliferation, to cutting edge research and development, to weapons programs. The sensitive and critical nature of the Department's work

187

On the Use of Multi-dimensional Dynamic Logic Programming to Represent Societal Agents' Viewpoints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the applicability of the new paradigm of Multi-dimensional Dynamic Logic Programming to represent an agent's view of the combination of societal knowledge dynamics. The representation of a dynamic society of agents is the core of ...

Joo Alexandre Leite; Jos Jlio Alferes; Lus Moniz Pereira

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of...

189

Weather pattern classification to represent the urban heat island in present and future climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A classification of weather patterns (WP) is derived that is tailored to best represent situations relevant for the urban heat island (UHI). Three different types of k-means-based cluster methods are conducted. The explained cluster variance is ...

Peter Hoffmann; K. Heinke Schlnzen

190

Can Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds Realistically Represent Wind Speed Distributions?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speeds over the oceans are required for a range of applications but are difficult to obtain through in situ methods. Hence, remote sensing tools, which also offer the possibility of describing spatial variability, represent an attractive ...

R. J. Barthelmie; S. C. Pryor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

An abstract schema for representing semantic roles and modelling the syntax-semantics interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel approach to semantic role annotation implementing an entailment-based view of the concept of semantic role. I propose to represent arguments of predicates with grammatically relevant primitive properties entailed by the semantics ...

Voula Gotsoulia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends oleosin genes. Microscopy examination of Physcomitrella revealed that oil bodies (OBs) were abundant in the photosynthetic vegetative gametophyte and the reproductive spore. Chromatography illustrated the neutral lipids

Gent, Universiteit

193

Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory August 13, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Monday, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will visit the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Secretary Chu will join Representatives Zoe Lofgren and Mike Honda and Stanford University President John Hennessy at a dedication ceremony for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Recovery Act-funded LCLS produces x-ray pulses millions of times brighter than the world's most powerful synchrotron sources, capable of capturing images of atoms and molecules in motion. The LCLS is led by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). Operated by

194

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received funding from the Department for several transformational clean energy research projects. The Secretary is visiting UTC to highlight the importance of investing in innovation and clean energy to put people back to work, grow the economy, and win the future. He will be joined by U.S. Representatives John Larson and Joe Courtney for a tour

195

Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America November 29, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - In a speech at the National Press Club, U.S Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that the success of China and other countries in clean energy industries represents a new "Sputnik Moment" for the United States, and requires a similar mobilization of America's innovation machine so that we can compete in the global race for the jobs of the future. Secretary Chu outlined efforts underway at the Department to give America's entrepreneurs and manufacturers an edge through investments in clean energy innovation.

196

Representative job 'building for video analysis completed using the Utah ergonomic analyzer;.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many ergonomists strive to find links between physical risk factors and injuries in the workplace. To accomplish this, workers are observed in the workplace as (more)

Skinner, Tyson E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations April 5, 2005 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the results of our work at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, one of the Department of Energy's most prominent facilities. STATEMENT OF GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS, May 5, 2005

198

WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENT. REPRESENT. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is charged under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) with modernizing the nation's electricity grid to improve its reliability and efficiency. As part of this effort, DOE is also responsible for increasing awareness of our nation's Smart Grid. Building upon The Smart Grid: An Introduction, a DOE-sponsored publication released in 2008 and available online at www.smartgrid.gov, this publication is one in a series of books designed to better acquaint discrete stakeholder groups with the promise and possibilities of the Smart Grid. Stakeholder groups include Utilities, Regulators, Policymakers, Technology Providers, Consumer Advocates and Environmental Groups.

199

On April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organiz  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff and members of the Compressed Air and Gas Institute (CAGI) along with some compressed air experts at the offices of the Alliance to Save Energy to explore and discuss a consensus approach to advancing energy efficiency of compressed air systems within the context of the DOE's potential rulemaking on compressors. The group discussed the need to assemble the relevant data and technical content that will be valuable in identifying possible pathways to achieve a meaningful and appropriate compressor standard that maximizes energy savings potential without creating an undue burden on the market. Representing the energy efficiency advocacy organizations were Tracy Kohler of the Compressed Air

200

December 17, 1998 Memo, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

mE mE F 1325.8 (a89) EFG (U7-W) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: December 17, 1998 REPLY TO ATTN OF: FM- 10(J. Hassenfeldt, 202 586-1643) SUBJECT Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program TO:Distribution The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40 annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? … An ISCCP Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? - An ISCCP Perspective C. Jakob Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, Australia G. Tselioudis National Aeronautic and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has established comprehensive cloud and radiation observatories in various locations across the globe with the aim of collecting measurements and developing models to better understand the processes that control solar and thermal infrared radiative transfer in clouds and at the surface. The locales of the individual ARM sites were chosen because they represent typical cloud regimes occurring in various climate regimes (Stokes and Schwartz

202

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a controversial nuclear fusion plan. The technical meeting of experts is intended to pave the way of nuclear fusion say it provides an attractive long-term energy option, because the basic materials needed

203

Texas A&M University System Chancellor's Diversity Council Representatives from Texas AgriLife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M University System Chancellor's Diversity Council Representatives from Texas AgriLife Facilitator Joni E. Baker, Ph.D. Director of Equal Opportunity and Diversity The Texas A&M University System 200 Technology Way, Suite 1281 College Station, Texas 77845-3424 979-458-6203 979-458-6206 (fax

204

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

205

Texas Revolution Introduction: In this lesson, students will play a game to represent the Texas Revolution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Revolution Introduction: In this lesson, students will play a game to represent the Texas to use in conjunction with teaching the battles of the Texas Revolution. A large area is needed the students into two teams: the Mexican Army and the Texas Army. Line each team up, shoulder to shoulder

Wilkins, Neal

206

SphereAvatar: a situated display to represent a remote collaborator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An emerging form of telecollaboration utilizes situated or mobile displays at a physical destination to virtually represent remote visitors. An example is a personal telepresence robot, which acts as a physical proxy for a remote visitor, and uses cameras ... Keywords: avatars, mixed reality, remote collaboration, spherical displays, telepresence, telerobotics

Oyewole Oyekoya; William Steptoe; Anthony Steed

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

208

Characterization of representative materials in support of safe, long term storage of surplus plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 containers  

SciTech Connect

The Surveillance and Monitoring Program (SMP) is a joint LANL/SRS effort funded by DOE/EM to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. The chlorides (NaCl, KCl, CaCl{sub 2}, and MgCl{sub 2}) range from less than half of the impurities present to nearly all the impurities. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on over 60 samples of plutonium chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper will summarize the characterization data, including the origin and process history, particle size, surface area, density, calorimetry, chemical analysis, moisture analysis, prompt gamma, gas generation and corrosion behavior.

Smith, Paul H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Narlesky, Joshua E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worl, Laura A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gillispie, Obie W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training To register for this, and any other DAU online course, you must first register in the Federal Acquisition Institute's Training Application System (FAITAS). Steps to register in FAITAS and to register for the course are below. Please note, you are required to provide your Social Security Number (SSN) to complete registration. This is the only time the SSN is required; this information is restricted and not available to unauthorized personnel. Please contact Linda Ott (linda.ott@hq.doe.gov, 202-287-5310) if you have any questions or concerns. If you encounter problems with

210

Facility Representative Performance Indicator Report for for Jan-Mar 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Staffing, Qualification, and Utilization Data OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Location Analysis FTE Approved FTE Actual Staff % Staff * Gains / Losses % Core Qualified * % Fully Qualified * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 4 100 0 100 100 63 ID (EM) 1 7 7 6 86 0 71 71 90 OR (EM) 14 14 13 93 0 86 86 75 ORP 13 13 13 100 0 100 100 90 PPPO 2 6 6 6 100 ±1 100 100 74 RL 17 15 15 88 0 88 82 70 SPRU 3 2 2 2 100 0 100 0 90 SR 4 31 31 27 87 -1 87 87 86 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 75 EM Totals 95 93 88 93 +1, -2 89 86 79 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >65 Location Key: CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office ORP = Office of River Protection SPRU = Separations Process Research Unit

211

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop - Registrants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop DOE Fire Safety Workshop Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) Meeting May 14 - 18, 2012, at the Alexis park Resort Hotel, Las Vegas, NV Registrants As of 5/15/2012 Total Number: 218 First Name Last Name Government /Contractor Agency Secretarial Office Site Position Training Course FTCP FS 5/15 FS 5/16 FR/SSO Plenary FR Track SSO Track Fire Safety Training Tour Ron Alderson Government Employee DOE NNSA Nevada SSO SAF-271 No No No Yes No Yes No No Josh Allen Government Employee DOE EM Richland FR No No No No Yes Yes No No No Mark Alsdorf Government Employee DOE HSS Headquarters NTC Safety Training Manager SAF-271 Yes No No Yes No No No No Xavier Aponte Government Employee

212

WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENT. REPRESENT. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups technology providers policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter grid can work harder and more efficiently to respond to the needs of all consumers, contain costs and enable clean-energy solutions at scale. regulators utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Litos Strategic Communication, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information apparatus, product,

213

On October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, an  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe met with DOE to discuss the proposed rules EERE-2010 BT-TP-0036 RIN 1904-AC38 Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Commercial Ice Makers. The meeting was held at the request of Howe Corporation at the DOE offices in Washington DC. In attendance: Ari Altman, DOE Ashley Armstrong, DOE Robert Bittner, Beecon ProfServe John Cymbalsky, DOE Mary Gade, Gade Environmental Group Mary Howe, Howe Corporation Charles Llenza, DOE Jeff Mackowiak, Howe Corporation Mark O'Malley, Gade Environmental Group Howe Corporation introduced and discussed the following concerns regarding the NOPR. For reference,

214

Representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework  

SciTech Connect

Drainage systems can be categorized into natural or geomorphological drainage systems, agricultural drainage systems and urban drainage systems. They interact closely among themselves and with climate and human society, particularly under extreme climate and hydrological events such as floods. This editorial articulates the need to holistically understand and model drainage systems in the context of climate change and human influence, and discusses the requirements and examples of feasible approaches to representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework.

Li, Hongyi; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

215

Fatigue of Composite Material Beam Elements Representative of Wind Turbine Blade Substructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The database and analysis methods used to predict wind turbine blade structural performance for stiffness, static strength, dynamic response,and fatigue lifetime are validated through the design, fabrication, and testing of substructural elements. We chose a test specimen representative of wind turbine blade primary substructure to represent the spar area of a typical wind turbine blade. We then designed an I-beam with flanges and web to represent blade structure, using materials typical of many U.S.-manufactured blades. Our study included the fabrication and fatigue testing of 52 beams and many coupons of beam material. Fatigue lifetimes were consistent with predictions based on the coupon database. The final beam specimen proved to be a very useful tool for validating strength and lifetime predictions for a variety of flange and web materials, and is serving as a test bed to ongoing studies of structural details and the interaction between manufacturing and structural performance. Th e beam test results provide a significant validation of the coupon database and the methodologies for predicting fatigue of composite material beam elements.

Mandell, J. F.; Samborsky, D. D.; Combs, D. W.; Scott, M. E.; Cairns, D. S. (Department of Chemical Engineering, Montana State University)

1998-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

216

Atmospheric Turbidity Analyzed by Means of Standardized Linke's Turbidity Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of standardized Linke's turbidity factor TLAM2 allows the conversion of the usual TL values, which exhibit virtual diurnal variations into new ones, which are strictly representative of the atmospheric turbidity caused by both water ...

J. C. Grenier; A. De La Casinire; T. Cabot

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Graphical technique for interpolating shape factors for peripheral waterflood systems  

SciTech Connect

A method of interpolating the shape factors between already known sets of data can be utilized in peripheral waterflood systems. This graphical technique should provide reasonably reliable shape factors without necessitating further flow pattern evaluation. A set of interpolated shape factors for the constant pressure difference case is tabulated. These factors were derived from the shape factors previously determined using variation of width technique. A comparison of the interpolated shape factors and the shape factors obtained by the circling-in techniques are also shown. Good agreement was obtained in this comparison.

Kantar, K.; Helander, D.P.

1967-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Gregory H. Friedman: Provided for The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Gregory H. Friedman: Provided for The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives

219

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance

220

Maintenance Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. Criteria: The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance. The maintenance organization structure is well defined and understood. Responsibilities, organizational interfaces, and administrative activities are adequately defined and implemented to provide timely availability of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Statistical description of heavy truck accidents on representative segments of interstate highway  

SciTech Connect

Any quantitative analysis of the risk of transportation accidents requires the use of many different statistical distributions. Included among these are the types of accidents which occur and the severity of these when they do occur. Several previous studies have derived this type of information for truck traffic over U. S. highways in general; these data are not necessarily applicable for the anticipated LMFBR spent fuel cask routes. This report presents data for highway segments representative of the specific LMFBR cask routes which are anticipated. These data are based upon a detailed record-by-record review of filed reports for accidents which occurred along the specified route segments.

Hartman, W.F.; Davidson, C.A.; Foley, J.T.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Dagobert Soergel January 16, 2003 Representing knowledge about databases in an intelligent guide to databases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

example, in the IRCS database of full-text medical papers users can enter comments while then retrieval in a large bibliographic database such as Chemical Abstracts. However, many factors must to be described is, then, a list of entity types and relationship types. The text introduces these entity types

Soergel, Dagobert

223

A Study on the PV System for Simulation Representing Characteristics of DSSC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is an important factor for the honeypot decoy system to accurately analyze on intrusion information and precisely locate them. As there are some conflict and cooperation relationship among the collected data by honeypot system, it needs to fuse the ... Keywords: Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell, PV system, DLL block, Microsoft Visual C++, PSIM

Won-Yong Chae; Kyoung-Jun Lee; Ho-Sung Kim; Dong-Gil Lee; Hee-Je Kim

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents Return to online conversions. Next page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty ...

225

Strain rate, temperature and representative length scale influence on plasticity and yield stress in copper  

SciTech Connect

Shock compression of materials constitutes a complex process involving high strain rates, elevated temperatures and compression of the lattice. Materials properties are greatly affected by temperature, the representative length scale and the strain rate of the deformation. Experimentally, it is difficult to study the dynamic microscopic mechanisms that affect materials properties following high intensity shock loading, but they can be investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Moreover, MD allows a better control over some parameters. We are using MD simulations to study the effect of the strain rate, representative length scale and temperature on the properties of metals during compression. A half-million-atom Cu sample is subjected to strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} at different temperatures ranging from 50K to 1500K. Single crystals as well as polycrystals are investigated. Plasticity mechanisms as well as the evolution of the micro- and macro-yield stress are observed. Our results show that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. We also show that the strain rate at which the transition between constant and increasing yield stress as a function of the temperature occurs increases with increasing temperature. Calculations at different grain sizes will give an insight into the grain size effect on the plasticity mechanisms and the yield stress.

Dupont, Virginie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

226

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative  Safety System Oversight  Fire Safety Facility Representative  Safety System Oversight  Fire Safety Overall Workshop Agenda May 14-18, 2012  Alexis Park Hotel  Las Vegas, Nevada Monday, May 14, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 1) Zeus B Quality Assurance Overview for FR/SSO Personnel Zeus A 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Tuesday, May 15, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Fire Safety Workshop Track Begins (see track agenda) Parthenon 4 SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 2) Zeus B . Safety Culture Workshop Zeus A Federal Technical Capability Panel Parthenon 2 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Wednesday, May 16, 2012 6:30 a.m. - 7:45 a.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer 8:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. FR/SSO Tracks Begin; Plenary session with Fire Safety Track Parthenon 2 & 4

227

Temporal and Spatial Deployment of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies across the Representative Concentration Pathways  

SciTech Connect

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Changes (IPCC) Fifth Assessment (to be published in 2013-2014) will to a significant degree be built around four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) that are intended to represent four scenarios of future development of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, and concentrations that span the widest range of potential future atmospheric radiative forcing. Under the very stringent climate policy implied by the 2.6 W/m2 overshoot scenario, all electricity is eventually generated from low carbon sources. However, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies never comprise more than 50% of total electricity generation in that very stringent scenario or in any of the other cases examined here. There are significant differences among the cases studied here in terms of how CCS technologies are used, with the most prominent being is the significant expansion of biomass+CCS as the stringency of the implied climate policy increases. Cumulative CO2 storage across the three cases that imply binding greenhouse gas constraints ranges by nearly an order of magnitude from 170GtCO2 (radiative forcing of 6.0W/m2 in 2100) to 1600GtCO2 (2.6W/m2 in 2100) over the course of this century. This potential demand for deep geologic CO2 storage is well within published estimates of total global CO2 storage capacity.

Dooley, James J.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

228

Introduction Prior research has shown that energy savings are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a HVAC system. A robust system for collecting occupancy data is necessary to develop HVAC control detectors, CO2 sensors, etc) make efficient system control difficult. Occupancy prediction can be achieved by modeling long traces of occupancy data captured by an occupancy sensing system [2], helping modify HVAC

Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

229

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2003 December 2003 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and implemented. The M&O contractor and other NTS Users management actively participate in the ES program. An implemented Work Control process is in place that ensures

230

Confined Spaces Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONFINED SPACES CONFINED SPACES Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the safety effectiveness of the contractor's confined or enclosed spaces procedure, and for establishing compliance with DOE and OSHA requirements. Specifically, this assessment is to verify the information and findings of the BN Management Self Assessment Report on "Confined Space", ES&H-MSA-03-13, dated December 31, 2003. Criteria: Practices and procedures are in place to protect employees in general industry from the hazards of entry into permit-required confined spaces. 29 CFR 1910.146 (a) Each employee is instructed in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to

231

NASA Benchmarks Safety Functions Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAFETY FUNCTIONS SAFETY FUNCTIONS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should be proactive in addressing safety-related issues. Management should have an established system to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. Criteria: A system is in place to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. (DOE/EH-0135) Procedures clearly define management's responsibility for safety- related decisions and provide for the escalation of matters in an appropriate time frame. (DOE/EH-0135) Management promotes safety programs and the organization's safety culture through sponsoring and attending safety meetings. (DOE/EH- 0135) Management encourages and supports effective programs for reporting

232

DOE-STD-1151-2002; Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1151-2002 1151-2002 April 2002 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1151-2002 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior Department of Energy managers

233

NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Lines of authority are clearly defined with clear and open communications existing between all departments and all levels. Criteria: Dialogue exists between personnel involved in engineering/design, operations, maintenance, safety issues, and remedial actions. Personnel within the departments are promptly informed on issues as they occur on a need-to-know basis. Lessons Learned and feedback is encouraged inter-departmentally regarding safety, adequate resources, and processes to enable prompt and effective corrective actions and resolutions for mission accomplishment. Management has an effective and specified chain of communication in both directions between corporate and facility management. (DOE/EH-0135)

234

NASA Benchmarks Lessons Learned Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LESSONS LEARNED LESSONS LEARNED Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established Lessons Learned Program with an effective system to continuously distribute information of improvement in safe operations to all affected personnel. Criteria: Timely and effective action is taken to track and correct identified deficiencies and to prevent their recurrence by addressing their basic causes and related generic problems. (DOE/EH-0135) Management installs an effective corrective action program (caWeb) for safety-related issues, wherein records are updated and actions are tracked through completion. (DOE/EH-0135) Management uses the corrective action program (caWeb) as the database to analyze safety issues, implement corrective actions, and define

235

Facility Representatives, DOE-STD-1063-2011, Change Notice 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 February 2011 Change Notice 1 March 2012 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Change Notice No. 1 March 2012 Table of Changes Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ Page/Section Change Foreword Update contact information and internet address. Page 20/ Section 5.4.8 Edited the discussion of Interim Qualification to match the language in the Definition section and deleted a redundant word. Page 20/ Section 5.4.10 Clarified qualification requirements for

236

Selection of respirator test panels representative of U.S. adult facial sizes  

SciTech Connect

As requested by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Respirator Research and Development Section, Industrial Hygiene Group, has prepared anthropometric specifications for subjects to test the fit of half-mask, quarter-mask, and full- facepiece respirators. A facial survey of 200 males was conducted, with results similar to those of a recent survey of some 4000 U. S. airmen. Subjects were selected on the basis of face length and face width to wear full-face masks in tests. For testing halfand quarter-masks, face length and lip length were used. Test panels containing 25 male-and-female subjects were used to represent a majority of the working population. A sequential sampling scheme was developed to reduce the amount of testing required to determine if a mask provides adequate protection for diffurent facial sizes. Examples of man test results are given. (auth)

Hack, A.; Hyatt, E.C.; Held, B.J.; Moore, T.O.; Richards, C.P.; McConville, J.T.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Previous page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty notation eg, 123(45) | Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents. Top. ...

238

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March 27, 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development to discuss the President's FY13 budget for the...

239

Facility Representative Program: 2009 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Address Shane Johnson, Acting Assistant Secretary Office of Nuclear Energy 9:00 a.m. ORPS Causal Analysis Tree Training Ed Sierra Quality Management Office Brookhaven National...

240

Facility Representative Program: 2011 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 DOE Safety Links ORPS Info Operating Experience DOE Lessons Learned Accident Investigation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Facility Representative Program: DOE Facility Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP PADU PORTS ANL WVDP MOAB SFO LFO LAFO NFO SRFO RL PNSO ORP ID NPO-PX FSO NBL NPO-Y12 ORO OSO SPRU BHSO PSO SR SR NA26 DOE Facility Site Map Please help keep this...

242

Facility Representative Program: 2002 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

McLaughlin, LANL Root Cause Analysis Course - Marke LaneKen Albers Honeywell Kansas City Plant 10:30 a.m. Leadership Development Panel Moderator: Emil Morrow, Senior Technical...

243

Facility Representative Program: 2012 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lead to Electrical Shock, Michael Hanson, BHSO Lessons and Recommendations from the Fukushima Daiichi Event, Kevin Gray, SSO References Separations Process Research Unit Spill,...

244

Facility Representative Program: 2008 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sherman Chao, LSO Conduct of Operations Improvements at K Basins Dennis Humphreys, RL Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility lessons learned Charlie Wright, ORO...

245

Facility Representative Program: 2005 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sharing of Good Practices and Lessons Learned (4) Inadvertent Startup of Electric Centrifuge at the Weapon Evaluation Test Lab Joyce Arviso-Benally, SSO Facility Rep...

246

Testimony before the Committee on Financial Services U.S. House of Representatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thank you Chairman Frank, Ranking Member Bachus, and other members of the House Committee on Financial Services for inviting me to testify on Unwinding Emergency Federal Reserve Liquidity Programs and Implications for Economic Recovery As you requested I will give my assessment of whether these extraordinary measures have worked and then consider an appropriate policy for unwinding them. Assessment of the Extraordinary Measures Table 1 summarizes the Feds extraordinary measuresmostly special loan and securities purchase programsgoing back to 2007 when the financial crisis first flared up in the money markets. Figures 1 through 5 show how these programs have changed the size and the composition of the Feds balance sheet during this period. Review of Recent Developments The Fed has financed these programs mostly by creating moneycrediting banks with reserve balances at the Fedor by selling other items in its portfolio. From December 2007 until September 2008 it sold other items in its portfolio. Since September 2008 it has added significantly to reserve balances, as shown in Figure 1. During the past year, reserve balances

John B. Taylor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

How well do time-integrated K{sub {alpha}} images represent hot electron spatial distributions?  

SciTech Connect

A computational study is described, which addresses how well spatially resolved time-integrated K{sub {alpha}} images recorded in intense laser-plasma experiments correlate with the distribution of ''hot'' (>1 MeV) electrons as they propagate through the target. The hot electron angular distribution leaving the laser-plasma region is critically important for many applications such as Fast Ignition or laser based x-ray sources; and K{sub {alpha}} images are commonly used as a diagnostic. It is found that K{sub {alpha}} images can easily mislead due to refluxing and other effects. Using the particle-in-cell code LSP, it is shown that a K{sub {alpha}} image is not solely determined by the initial population of forward directed hot electrons, but rather also depends upon ''delayed'' hot electrons, and in fact continues to evolve long after the end of the laser interaction. Of particular note, there is a population of hot electrons created during the laser-plasma interaction that acquire a velocity direction opposite that of the laser and subsequently reflux off the front surface of the target, deflect when they encounter magnetic fields in the laser-plasma region, and then traverse the target in a wide spatial distribution. These delayed fast electrons create significant features in the K{sub {alpha}} time-integrated images. Electrons refluxing from the sides and the back of the target are also found to play a significant role in forming the final K{alpha} image. The relative contribution of these processes is found to vary depending on depth within target. These effects make efforts to find simple correlations between K{alpha} images and, for example, Fast Ignition relevant parameters prone to error. Suggestions for future target design are provided.

Ovchinnikov, V. M.; Kemp, G. E.; Schumacher, D. W.; Freeman, R. R.; Van Woerkom, L. D. [Physics Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Life Cycle Assessment Applied to 95 Representative U.S. Farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since World War II, concern for the environmental impacts of human activities has grown. Agriculture plays a significant role in several impact categories including global warming. Governments, including the U.S., have recently begun or are considering the regulation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission to mitigate the global warming effect. Because agriculture accounts for a large portion of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, it is necessary to establish a baseline measure of the GHG emission of U.S. agriculture at the farm level. The objective of this research is to estimate the GHG emission levels for multicrop farms in the U.S. and identify the major sources of GHG emissions in their supply chains. To accomplish the objective, a partial life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology is used to establish a GHG baseline for the representative farms. LCA as defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) includes four phases: goal and scope definition, inventory, impact assessment, and interpretation. It is a holistic approach that catalogues environmental impacts of all relevant processes at all stages of production, from raw material extraction to disposal. However, this study only catalogues impacts up to the farm gate. Partial LCAs are common in agriculture. Emissions of three GHGs, CO2, CH4, and N2O, are inventoried for 95 U.S. farms. The results are characterized using their 100-year global warming potentials into CO2 equivalents. The CO2 equivalents are then normalized over four functional units: enterprises, acres or head, harvest units, and pounds of production. The variation of GHG intensity between crops and farms is very large. However, it is clear that GHG intensity is affected by three characteristics: location, size, and irrigation practice. Crops grown in their associated regions tend to be more GHG efficient than those grown outside their associated regions. Also, crops grown on large farms tend to be more GHG efficient than the same crop grown on a small farm in the same area. Lastly, with the exceptions of cotton and soybeans, irrigated crops tend to be more GHG intensive than non-irrigated crops. These results combine to suggest that there may be a correlation between production efficiency and carbon efficiency.

Rutland, Christopher T.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

factor.mws - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... 0 "" {TEXT -1 61 "Be default \\+ factor factors over the field of rational numbers. ... {PARA 0 "> " 0 "" {MPLTEXT 1 0 36 "alias(beta=RootOf(x^5+x^3+x^2+x+1));" }...

251

Eastward propagating intraseasonal oscillation represented by Chikira-Sugiyama cumulus parameterization. Part I: Comparison with observation and reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastward propagating intraseasonal oscillation represented by the Chikira-Sugiyama cumulus parameterization in an atmospheric general circulation model is compared with observations and reanalyses. The scheme is characterized by state-...

Minoru Chikira; Masahiro Sugiyama

252

Final Technical Report: "Representing Endogenous Technological Change in Climate Policy Models: General Equilibrium Approaches"  

SciTech Connect

The research supported by this award pursued three lines of inquiry: (1) The construction of dynamic general equilibrium models to simulate the accumulation and substitution of knowledge, which has resulted in the preparation and submission of several papers: (a) A submitted pedagogic paper which clarifies the structure and operation of computable general equilibrium (CGE) models (C.2), and a review article in press which develops a taxonomy for understanding the representation of technical change in economic and engineering models for climate policy analysis (B.3). (b) A paper which models knowledge directly as a homogeneous factor, and demonstrates that inter-sectoral reallocation of knowledge is the key margin of adjustment which enables induced technical change to lower the costs of climate policy (C.1). (c) An empirical paper which estimates the contribution of embodied knowledge to aggregate energy intensity in the U.S. (C.3), followed by a companion article which embeds these results within a CGE model to understand the degree to which autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI) is attributable to technical change as opposed to sub-sectoral shifts in industrial composition (C.4) (d) Finally, ongoing theoretical work to characterize the precursors and implications of the response of innovation to emission limits (E.2). (2) Data development and simulation modeling to understand how the characteristics of discrete energy supply technologies determine their succession in response to emission limits when they are embedded within a general equilibrium framework. This work has produced two peer-reviewed articles which are currently in press (B.1 and B.2). (3) Empirical investigation of trade as an avenue for the transmission of technological change to developing countries, and its implications for leakage, which has resulted in an econometric study which is being revised for submission to a journal (E.1). As work commenced on this topic, the U.S. withdrawal from Kyoto and the administration's announcement of a voluntary target based on emission intensity made it apparent that the degree of emission leakage to developing countries would depend on (i) the form of the emission limit set by developed countries and (ii) the incentives faced by developing nations to accede to an international climate regime. This realization led to synergistic research on the properties of intensity targets under uncertainty, which resulted in two theoretical studies, one which has been published (A.1) and the other which is currently in review (C.5).

Ian Sue Wing

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

None

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Douglas Factors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Douglas Factors Douglas Factors The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as "Douglas Factors: (1) The nature and seriousness of the offense, and its relation to the employee's duties, position, and responsibilities, including whether the offense was intentional or technical or inadvertent, or was committed maliciously or for gain, or was frequently repeated; (2) the employee's job level and type of employment, including supervisory or fiduciary role,

255

Introduction to Solar Energy Conversion Solar energy represents the largest energy input into the terrestrial system. Despite its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the resource to allow supply to meet demand at all times. Photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency hasIntroduction to Solar Energy Conversion Solar energy represents the largest energy input the global energy demand on its own. The challenges that need to be addressed to make solar energy viable

Nur, Amos

256

INTRODUCTION In 1997,The Louisiana House of Representatives passed Bill Number 1698, which addresses warranties in state contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for state highway infrastructure construction projects that are in compliance with FHWA requirements with DOTD archives being utilized to establish distress thresholds. At least five representative projects from each of the eight warranty areas that shared similar characteristics (age, construction type

Harms, Kyle E.

257

Sulfate adsorption and its relationships with properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State, Brazil M.E. Alves, A. Lavorenti* Departamento de Cie^ncias Exatas, Escola Superior de Agricultura ``Luiz de Queiroz''--ESALQ/USP, Caixa Postal 09, 13418-900, Piracicaba (SP), Brazil Received 27 August, electrochemical and mineralogical properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil, were

Sparks, Donald L.

258

Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

Schneider, K.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Conversion factors for energy equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents, For your convenience, you may convert energies online below. Or display factors as: ...

260

factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

36 36 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142253836 Varnish cache server factors Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

FGF growth factor analogs  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

262

Optimizing Power Factor Correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers is studied. Since the billing capacity is determined by dividing the real demand by the power factor (the minimum billing capacity is based on 80 percent of the summer peak billing capacity) and the billing capacity is used to determine the number of kilowatt-hours billed at each pricing tier, the power factor affects both the demand and the energy charge. There is almost no information available in the literature concerning recommended power factor corrections for this situation. The general advice commonly given in the past has been that power factor should be corrected to above 0.9 if it is below that value to begin with, but that does not take into account the facts of the situation studied here. Calculations relevant to a commercial consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 kW and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results are displayed in a series of graphs that enable annual cost savings and payback periods to be readily determined over a range of commonly encountered parameter values. It is found that it is often economically advantageous to correct a power factor to near unity.

Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Motivational factors in educational MMORPGs: some implications for education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies have shown that motivation is an important factor positively related to learning outcomes. Thus, educators have tried to combine digital games with teaching materials to motivate students participating in learning activities for the past two ... Keywords: MMORPG, educational MMORPG, motivation

Kuo-Hsun Hung; Charles Kinzer; Cheng-Ling Alice Chen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Heavy Hadron Form Factor Relations for $m_c\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First order power corrections to current matrix elements between heavy meson or $\\Lambda_\\Q$ baryon states are shown to vanish at the zero recoil point to all orders in QCD. Five relations among the six form factors that parametrize the semileptonic decay $\\Lambda_b \\to \\Lambda_c e \\overline{\

Peter Cho; Benjamin Grinstein

1992-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

Conditioning analysis of incomplete Cholesky factorizations with orthogonal dropping  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of preconditioners based on incomplete Cholesky factorization in which the neglected (dropped) components are orthogonal to the approximations being kept is presented. General estimate for the condition number of the preconditioned system is given which only depends on the accuracy of individual approximations. The estimate is further improved if, for instance, only the newly computed rows of the factor are modified during each approximation step. In this latter case it is further shown to be sharp. The analysis is illustrated with some existing factorizations in the context of discretized elliptic partial differential equations.

Napov, Artem

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

An improved charge pump power factor correction electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

An improved charge pump power factor correction (CPPFC) electronic ballast using the charge pump concept is proposed in this paper. Circuit derivation, principle of operation, and the conditions for achieving unity power factor are discussed. The proposed electronic ballast is implemented and tested with two 40-W fluorescent lamps. It is shown that 84% of overall efficiency and 1.6 of crest factor can be achieved with 200-V line input voltage. The measured line input current harmonics satisfy IEC 1000-3-2 Class C requirements. The lamp power variation range is automatically limited within {+-}15% for {+-}10% line input voltage variation without feedback control.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C.; Yamauchi, T.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Factorization in B ---> V gamma decays  

SciTech Connect

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/m{sub b} using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resum perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, Thomas; /Fermilab; Hill, Richard J.; /SLAC; Neubert, Matthias; /Cornell U., LEPP

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

NIST Atomic Form Factors: Form factors and standard ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2. Form Factors and Standard Definitions. ... with ? in, eg, ngstroms; the "anomalous" scattering factor f? (depending on x-ray energy E and the ...

269

NREL: Energy Analysis - Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors This chart indicates the range of recent capacity factor estimates for utility-scale renewable energy technologies. The dots indicate the average, and the vertical lines represent the range: Average +1 standard deviation and average -1 standard deviation. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update) Operations & Maintenance (September 2013 Update) Utility-Scale Capacity Factors Useful Life Land Use by System Technology LCOE Calculator Capacity factor for energy technologies. For more information, please download supporting data for energy technology costs.

270

Work Controls Assessment Plan Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WORK CONTROLS WORK CONTROLS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established work control process in place with authorized, controlled and documented methods that provide an accurate status of the work to be performed. Criteria: Work planning addresses applicable laws, codes and regulations. Work planning includes operational configuration constraints; material, tool, and manpower requirements; inter-organizational coordination; operational history; special training; safety considerations; hazards protection requirements; post-maintenance testing; quality control requirements; and other considerations as necessary. The work to be accomplished is defined by identifying the existing

271

PQ Encyclopedia: Understanding Power Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This PQ Encylopedia offers a thorough understanding of what power factor is, what factors affect it, and what to be aware of when attempting to improve it. In particular, efforts to remedy power factor can sometimes worsen harmonics.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

ERYTHROPOIETIC FACTOR PURIFICATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for purifying and concentrating the blood plasma erythropoietic factor. Anemic sheep plasma is contacted three times successively with ion exchange resins: an anion exchange resin, a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 5, and a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 6. (AEC)

White, W.F.; Schlueter, R.J.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

national annual quantity-weighted average conversion factors for conventional, reformulated, and oxygenated motor gasolines (see Table A3). The factor ...

274

Bayesian mixtures of common factor analyzers: Model, variational inference, and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, a representative approach, named mixtures of common factor analyzers (MCFA), was proposed for clustering high-dimensional observed data. Existing model-parameter estimation methods for this approach is based on the maximum likelihood criterion ... Keywords: Bayesian mixtures of common factor analyzers, Clustering, Dimension reduction, Variational inference

Xin Wei, Chunguang Li

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Many Factors Affect MPG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy How You Drive Vehicle Maintenance Fuel Variations Vehicle Variations Engine Break-In Vehicles in traffic Quick acceleration and heavy braking can reduce fuel economy by up to 33 percent on the highway and 5 percent around town. New EPA tests account for faster acceleration rates, but vigorous driving can still lower MPG. Excessive idling decreases MPG. The EPA city test includes idling, but more idling will lower MPG. Driving at higher speeds increases aerodynamic drag (wind resistance), reducing fuel economy. The new EPA tests account for aerodynamic drag up to highway speeds of 80 mph, but some drivers exceed this speed. Cold weather and frequent short trips can reduce fuel economy, since your engine doesn't operate efficiently until it is warmed up. In colder

276

Human factoring administrative procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nonnuclear business, administrative procedures bring to mind such mundane topics as filing correspondence and scheduling vacation time. In the nuclear industry, on the other hand, administrative procedures play a vital role in assuring the safe operation of a facility. For some time now, industry focus has been on improving technical procedures. Significant efforts are under way to produce technical procedure requires that a validated technical, regulatory, and administrative basis be developed and that the technical process be established for each procedure. Producing usable technical procedures requires that procedure presentation be engineered to the same human factors principles used in control room design. The vital safety role of administrative procedures requires that they be just as sound, just a rigorously formulated, and documented as technical procedures. Procedure programs at the Tennessee Valley Authority and at Boston Edison's Pilgrim Station demonstrate that human factors engineering techniques can be applied effectively to technical procedures. With a few modifications, those same techniques can be used to produce more effective administrative procedures. Efforts are under way at the US Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and at some utilities (Boston Edison, for instance) to apply human factors engineering to administrative procedures: The techniques being adapted include the following.

Grider, D.A.; Sturdivant, M.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Human Factors Review Plan  

SciTech Connect

''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

DOE-STD-1063-97; DOE Standard Establishing and Maintaining a Facility Representative Program at DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-97 3-97 October 1997 Supersedes DOE-STD-1063-93 DOE STANDARD ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING A FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM AT DOE FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE98001286 DOE-STD-1063-97 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components.

279

Welding Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been implemented. Verify that the requirements implemented are appropriate for preventing loss of life and property from fire, and personal injury from contact with or exposure to molten metals, vapors, radiant energy, injurious rays and sparks. Criteria: Establish designated area in which routine and repetitive welding, cutting, and other spark- or flame producing operations are conducted [1910.252(a)(2)(iv),1910.252(a)(2)(vi)(A), 1910.252(a)(2)(xv), General Requirements].

280

Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Factors Associated with Photovoltaic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOEs Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Power TechnologiesNOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or any agency thereof.

In Paper

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gregory H. Friedman: Provided for the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General U.S. Department of Energyon Oversight and Investigations Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives

283

Evaluation of mixing downstream of tees in duct systems with respect to single point representative air sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air duct systems in nuclear facilities must meet the requirements of ANSI N13.1-1999 and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that the exhaust airflow be monitored with continuous sampling in case of an accidental release of airborne radionuclides. The continuous air sampling in a duct system is based on the concept of single point representative sampling at the sampling location where the velocity and contaminant profiles are nearly uniform. Sampling must be at a location where there is a uniform distribution via mixing in accordance with ANSI N13.1-1999. The purpose of this work is to identify the sampling locations where the velocity, momentum and contaminant concentrations fall below the 20% coefficient of variation (COV) requirements of ANSI N13.1-1999. Four sets of experiments were conducted on a generic 'T' mixing system. Measurements were made of the velocity, tracer gas concentration, ten micrometer particles and average flow swirl angle. The generic 'T' mixing system included three different combinations of sub duct sizes (6"x6", 9"x9" and 12"x12"), one main duct size (12"x12") and five air velocities (0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 fpm). An air blender was also introduced in some of the tests to promote mixing of the air streams from the main duct and sub duct. The experimental results suggested a turbulent mixing provided the accepted velocity COVs by 6 hydraulic diameters downstream. For similar velocity in the main duct and sub duct, an air blender provided the substantial improvement in 3 hydraulic diameters needed to achieve COVs below 10%. Without an air blender, the distance downstream of the T-junction for the COVs below 20% increased as the velocity of the sub duct airflow increased. About 95% of the cases achieved COVs below 10%. With the air blender, most of the cases with the air blender had the lower COVs than without the blender. However, at an area ratio (sub duct area / main duct area) of 0.25 and above a velocity ratio (velocity in the sub duct / velocity in the main duct) of 3, the air blender proved to be less beneficial for mixing. These results can apply to other duct systems with similar geometries and, ultimately, be a basis for selecting a proper sampling location under the requirements of the single point representative sampling.

Kim, Taehong

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Stress Intensification Factors and Flexibility Factors for Unreinforced Branch Connections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides equations, based on analyses and test data, for determining the stress intensification factors and flexibility factors for branch connections. The report contains results of an investigation into the flexibility and stress intensification factors of unreinforced fabricated tees (and other similar configurations). It provides flexibility equations for a more accurate evaluation of these configurations.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

APPOINTMENT TERMS A basic appointment term represents the length of an appointment, in months and the dates. Each of these terms is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05/21/07 APPOINTMENT TERMS A basic appointment term represents the length of an appointment, in months and the dates. Each of these terms is represented by a code. Standard appointment terms range from 9 to 12 months. A 9 month term may be used to indicate that entire length of time or a portion

Thomas, David D.

286

Evaluation of Dosimetric Consequences of Seroma Contour Variability in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using a Constructed Representative Seroma Contour  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Contouring variability of the seroma can have important implications in the planning and delivery of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). This study aimed to quantify the dosimetric impact of these interobserver and intraobserver contouring variations by construction of a representative seroma contour (RSC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with a seroma suitable for APBI underwent four computed tomography (CT) scans: one planning CT and three additional CTs on the first, third, and fifth days of treatment. Three radiation oncologists contoured the seroma on each CT scan. For 3 patients, oncologists repeated contouring twice to assess intraobserver variations. Seroma contour variability was quantified by construction of an RSC. In addition, the percent volume overlap (PVO) was calculated. Root-mean-square (RMS) differences in seroma volume, size, and center of mass position compared to those of the RSC were calculated. Treatment fields from the original plan were applied to the repeated CTs by using the same isocenter shifts as the original plan. The dosimetric impact of the contour variations was assessed using V{sub 95} (volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD). Results: Interobserver RMS volume differences were, on average, 5.6 times larger than intraobserver differences. The median interobserver RMS seroma volume difference was 1.48 cm{sup 3}. The median PVO was 51.6%. V{sub 95} and EUD of the seroma contours were similar for all patients. The median RMS differences of the seroma V{sub 95} and EUD were 0.01% (range, 0%-3.99%) and 0.05 Gy (range, 0-0.98 Gy). Conclusions: Construction of the RSC showed that interobserver variations were most responsible for contour variations of the seroma. Current planning margins provided adequate dose coverage of the seroma despite these contour variations.

Kosztyla, Robert, E-mail: rkosztyla@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Olson, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Carolan, Hannah [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Balkwill, Susan [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kwan, Winkle [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Anthrax Lethal Factor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington The Burnham Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037. Anthrax Toxin is a major virulence factor in the infectious disease, Anthrax1. This toxin is produced by Bacillus anthracis, which is an encapsulated, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium. Inhalation anthrax, the most deadly form, is contracted through breathing spores. Once spores germinate within cells of the immune system called macrophages2, bacterial cells are released into the bloodstream. There they proliferate rapidly and secrete Anthrax Toxin, ultimately leading to septic shock and death. Although antibiotics may be used to kill the bacteria, the level of toxin has often become so high in the bloodstream that removing the bacteria alone is not sufficient to prevent death. Therefore, the design of anti-toxins offers the prospect of treatment in the advanced stages of infection. Together with collaborators from the NIH and Harvard Medical School, we are involved in the atomic resolution study of the Anthrax Toxin components and their complexes, including small molecules with therapeutic potential. Data collection at SSRL and other synchrotron radiation sources has been key to the advances made in this research so far and is expected to play a continuing role in the future.

288

Using partial safety factors in wind turbine design and testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the relationship between wind turbine design and testing in terms of the certification process. An overview of the current status of international certification is given along with a description of limit-state design basics. Wind turbine rotor blades are used to illustrate the principles discussed. These concepts are related to both International Electrotechnical Commission and Germanischer Lloyd design standards, and are covered using schematic representations of statistical load and material strength distributions. Wherever possible, interpretations of the partial safety factors are given with descriptions of their intended meaning. Under some circumstances, the authors` interpretations may be subjective. Next, the test-load factors are described in concept and then related to the design factors. Using technical arguments, it is shown that some of the design factors for both load and materials must be used in the test loading, but some should not be used. In addition, some test factors not used in the design may be necessary for an accurate test of the design. The results show that if the design assumptions do not clearly state the effects and uncertainties that are covered by the design`s partial safety factors, outside parties such as test labs or certification agencies could impose their own meaning on these factors.

Musial, W.D.; Butterfield, C.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Current-source charge-pump power-factor-correction electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

A current-source charge-pump power-factor-correction (CS-CPPFC) electronic ballast is presented in this paper. Unity-power-factor condition and principle of operation using the CP concept are derived and analyzed. Based on the steady-state analysis, the design considerations are discussed in detail. It is shown that the power switch only deals with the resonant load current, which is the same as in the two-stage approach so that small-current rating devices can be used. The developed CS-CPPFC electronic ballast can save one inductor and has a potentially low cost. The CS-CP electronic ballast with switching frequency modulation to improve crest factor is developed, implemented, and tested. It is shown that 0.99 power factor, 11.3% total harmonic distortion (THD), and 1.54 crest factor can be achieved for 85-W fluorescent lamps.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C.Y. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yamauchi, Tokushi [Matsushita Electric Works, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power (May 9, 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman Before the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power to discuss DOEs emergency authority under section...

291

Can Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds Realistically Represent Wind Speed Distributions? Part II: Quantifying Uncertainties Associated with Distribution Fitting Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing tools represent an attractive proposition for measuring wind speeds over the oceans because, in principle, they also offer a mechanism for determining the spatial variability of flow. Presented here is the continuation of research ...

S. C. Pryor; M. Nielsen; R. J. Barthelmie; J. Mann

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Eastward propagating intraseasonal oscillation represented by Chikira-Sugiyama cumulus parameterization. Part II: Understanding moisture variation under weak temperature gradient balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eastward propagating intraseasonal oscillation represented by the Chikira-Sugiyama cumulus scheme in a general circulation model was investigated focusing on the variation of the free-tropospheric humidity. The net effect of the vertical advection ...

Minoru Chikira

293

Human factors engineering program review model  

SciTech Connect

The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Design Factors That Influence Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Corrosion factors that can influence design considerations...Inhibitors Inspection Planned maintenance Source: Ref 25...

295

Analysis, design, and experiments of a high-power-factor electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

A charge pump power-factor-correction (CPPFC) converter is first derived, and its unity power factor condition is then reviewed. A single-stage power-factor-correction electronic ballast using the charge pump concept is analyzed. The design criteria are derived to optimize the electronic ballast based on the steady-state analysis. Constant lamp power operations associated with its control are also discussed. Large signal simulation and experimental results verify the theoretical analysis. It is shown that the designed electronic ballast has 0.995 power factor and 5% total harmonic distortion (THD) with lamp power variation within {+-}15% when the line input voltage changes {+-}10%.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yamauchi, T. [Matsushita Electric Works, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Comments on Form Factor Bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved model independent upper bounds on the weak transition form factors are derived using inclusive sum rules. Comparison of the new bounds with the old ones is made for the form factors h_{A_1} and h_V in B -> D* decays.

Chiang, C W

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Remarks on Form Factor Bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved model independent upper bounds on the weak transition form factors are derived using inclusive sum rules. Comparison of the new bounds with the old ones is made for the form factors h_{A_1} and h_V in B -> D* decays.

Cheng-Wei Chiang

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Electromagnetic form factors of hadrons  

SciTech Connect

A vector meson dominance model of the electromagnetic form factors of hadrons is developed which is based on the use of unstable particle propagators. Least-square fits are made to the proton, neutron, pion and kaon form factor data in both the space and time-like regions. A good fit to the low-energy nucleon form factor data is obtained using only rho, $omega$, and phi dominance, and leads to a determination of the vector meson resonance parameters in good agreement with experiment. The nucleon-vector meson coupling constants obey simple sum rules indicating that there exists no hard core contribution to the form factors within theoretical uncertainties. The prediction for the electromagnetic radii of the proton is in reasonable agreement with recent experiments. The pion and kaon charge form factors as deduced from the nucleon form factors assuming vector meson universality are compared to the data. The pion form factor agrees with the data in both the space and time-like regions. The pion charge radius is in agreement with the recent Dubna result, but the isovector P-wave pion-pion phase shift calculated from the theory disagrees with experiment. A possible contribution to the form factors from a heavy rho meson is also evaluated. (auth)

Zidell, V.S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents Conversion factors for energy equivalents are derived from the following relations: ...

300

Factors of characteristic words: Location and decompositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let @a be an irrational number with 0Keywords: Characteristic word, Decomposition, Location, Overlap factor, Return words, Separate factor

Wai-Fong Chuan; Hui-Ling Ho

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy and water development appropriations for 1986. Part 7. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 7 of the hearing record covers three areas of the DOE appropriations: Atomic Energy Defense activities, power marketing administrations, and departmental administration. Representatives of DOE and the US Army reviewed the nuclear defense mission and activities under the defense and arms control programs. The administrators of the Alaska, Bonneville, Southeastern, Southwestern, and Western Power Administrations and a representative of the Conservation and Renewable Energy division described programs and budget requirements, as well as estimates of power demands for their regions. Administrative personnel described DOE procedures and explained the budget requests. Supporting documentation accompanies the testimony of the 16 witnesses.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Comparative study for EAF's reactive energy compensation methods and power factor improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper is analyzing the current operating conditions of one electric arc furnace (EAF) in order to evaluate the best option to solve the energy consumption problem. Experimental results show that EAFs represent a substantial source of electric ... Keywords: electric arc furnace, flicker, harmonic analysis, improvement, power factor, reactive compensator

Deaconu Sorin Ioan; Popa Gabriel Nicolae; Tihomir Latinovic

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Fermat factorization method revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the well known Fermat factorization method, we call the Fermat factorization equation the equation solved by it: P(x, y) = (x + 2R) 2 ? y 2 ? 4N = 0; where N = p q> 0 is a RSA modulus with primes p and q supposed of equal length. This equation is a bivariate integer polynomial equation and we propose to solve it directly using Coppersmiths methods for bivariate integer polynomials. As we use them as a black box, our proofs will be brief. We show a first result: we can factor N in a polynomial time if |p ? q | < N 5/18. Using the fact that the Newton polygon of P(x, y) is in fact a lower triangle we show a better result: we can indeed factor N in a polynomial time if |p ? q | < N 1/3. We conclude with proposals for future works. 1

Robert Erra; Christophe Grenier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool  

A new software tool enables the easy and quick selection of applicable regulatory guidelines as a starting point for human factors engineering (HFE) analyses. Once selected, each guideline can be viewed on screen. The software tracks and reports the ...

305

Automatic Test Factoring for Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test factoring creates fast, focused unit tests from slow system-widetests; each new unit test exercises only a subset of the functionalityexercised by the system test. Augmenting a test suite with factoredunit tests ...

Saff, David

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

A review of electrochromic window performance factors  

SciTech Connect

The performance factors which will influence the market acceptance of electrochromic windows are reviewed. A set of data representing the optical properties of existing and foreseeable electrochromic window devices was generated. The issue of reflective versus absorbing electrochromics was explored. This data was used in the DOE 2.1 building energy model to calculate the expected energy savings compared to conventional glazings. The effects of several different control strategies were tested. Significant energy and peak electric demand benefits were obtained for some electrochromic types. Use of predictive control algorithms to optimize cooling control may result in greater energy savings. Initial economic results considering annual savings, cooling equipment cost savings, and electrochromic window costs are presented. Calculations of thermal and visual comfort show additional benefits from electrochromics but more work is needed to quantify their importance. The design freedom and aesthetic possibilities of these dynamic glazings should provide additional market benefits, but their impact is difficult to assess at this time. Ultimately, a full assessment of the market viability of electrochromics must consider the impacts of all of these issues.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Rubin, M.; Lee, E.S.; Sullivan, R.; Finlayson, E.; Hopkins, D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Energy and water-development appropriations for 1983. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session. Part 3  

SciTech Connect

Secretary of the Interior James Watt's testimony in support of water-development projects opened part three of the hearing record. Also seeking funds to develop both needed water supplies and hydropower were representatives of the Bureau of Reclamation, the Corps of Engineers, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the Appalachian Regional Commission. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 1. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

This is part 1 of the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations, House of Representatives. This includes statements of witnesses from the Department of the Army, the Corps of Engineers, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works) and Chief of Engineers on topics of funding for the activities of these departments.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 3. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, On Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committed on appropriations, House of Representatives. The topics include the Bureau of Reclamation, testimony of the Secretary of the Interior, Appalachian Regional Commission, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The discussion is related to the funding of activities in these areas.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 7. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations, House of Representatives. This is part 7 which includes the testimony of members of congress and other interested individuals and organizations. Discussion includes funding of various US DOE programs and projects relating to energy efficiency and other topics.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

This book represents a modern treatment of classical control theory and its applications. Theoretically, it is based on the state space approach, where the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preface This book represents a modern treatment of classical control theory and its applications behavior of real physical control systems, which are quite often of high dimensions. The book treats motivation for writing this book is twofold: (1) Undergraduate students usually take only one control systems

Gajic, Zoran

312

CO2 Emissions Determined by HadGEM2-ES to be Compatible with the Representative Concentration Pathway Scenarios and Their Extensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the fossil fuelderived CO2 emissions simulated by the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model, version 2, Earth System (HadGEM2-ES) to be compatible with four representative concentration pathways (RCPs) from 2006 to 2100. ...

Spencer Liddicoat; Chris Jones; Eddy Robertson

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Representing Twentieth-Century SpaceTime Climate Variability. Part I: Development of a 196190 Mean Monthly Terrestrial Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of a 0.5 lat 0.5 long surface climatology of global land areas, excluding Antarctica, is described. The climatology represents the period 196190 and comprises a suite of nine variables: precipitation, wet-day frequency, mean ...

Mark New; Mike Hulme; Phil Jones

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Facility Representative Program: Surveillance Guides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Tools Assessment Tools CRADs Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Walkthroughs Surveillance Guides CMS 3.1 Configuration Management Implementation CMS 3.2 Change Control CMS 3.3 Verification of System Configuration and Operations CMS 3.4 Temporary Changes CPS 8.1 Hoisting and Rigging CPS 8.2 Trenching and Excavation EMS 21.1 Emergency Preparedness ENS 7.1 Definition of Design Requirements ERS 14.1 Satellite Accumulation Ares (RCRA Compliance) ERS 14.2 Emmissions Monitoring ERS 14.3 Underground and Above Ground Diesel Fuel Storage Tanks FPS 12.1 Life Safety FPS 12.2 Fire Protection and Prevention MAS 10.1 Maintenance Activities MAS 10.2 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment MAS 10.3 Seasonal Preparation MSS 1.1 Corrective Action/Issue Management NSS 18.1 Criticality Safety

315

PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., et al. 1984. Comparative acute toxicity of components of coal-derived synthetic products to aquatic:709-724. Mesocosm Testing Giddings, J. M., et al. 1984. Effects of chronic exposure to coal-derived oil of chronic exposure to coal-derived oil on freshwater ecosystems. II. Experimental ponds. Environ. Toxicol

317

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Title The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Thatcher, Tracy L., Melissa M. Lunden, Richard G. Sextro, Susanne V. Hering, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 1 Pagination 846-851 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation

318

The interpretation of screen-factor measurements  

SciTech Connect

Screen-factor (SF) measurements are widely used in the petroleum industry to characterize polymer solutions. The measurements are easy to perform and provide information that is different from solution-viscosity measurements. However, there has been no quantitative explanation of what solution property is being measured by SF. The authors show that SF measures the elongational viscosity of a polymer solution. Experiments on a modified commercial screen viscometer show the relationship between SF measurements and elongational-flow measurements performed by Durst and coworkers. Durst has shown that the elongational flow field in a packed bed of spheres triggers a transition in the conformation of a flexible polymer molecule, such as polyacrylamide, from a coiled to a stretched state. This transition in conformation is accompanied by a jump in the resistance to flow by an order of magnitude. They show that conventional screen viscometers operate in the regime where the molecules are in the highly stretched state. On the basis of Durst's work, it is calculated that the SF measurement is sensitive to high-molecular-weight tails in the polymer molecular-weight distribution.

Lim, T.; Uhl, J.T.; Prud'homme, R.K.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

shown in Figure1. Figure 1- Site Plan National Grid Reference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scroby Sands Offshore Wind Farms third year of operation is summarised in this report. The operation in the two previous years has similarly been reported previously. Scroby Sands Offshore Wind Farm is situated on a sand bank a little over two nautical miles off the coast of Norfolk and consists of 30 2MW turbines giving a capacity of 60MW. The wind farm has completed its third year of operation as summarised within this report. Scroby Sands is a pioneering project being one of the first offshore wind farms in the UK. The learning and experience in operating and maintaining the wind farm has been instrumental in improving reliability, reducing maintenance costs and reducing repair durations. The third year of operation has been successful with both the availability and production performance of the wind farm better than forecast. This was achieved despite the unexpected failure in April of both a cable transition joint (repaired promptly in April) and a sub-sea cable on one of

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

CE990 Graduate Seminar Presentations The presentation materials shown in this file were prepared by graduate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

presented, including supporting design calculations, drawings, cost estimates, and conclusions reached, drawings, findings and cost estimates cannot be used, in whole or in part, for the design and and screening equipment piloted. ·Able to process and crush stockpiled concrete material into a higher quality

Saskatchewan, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

In the Fall of 2002, the ANP had shown a better way to deal with Iraq  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, the United States launched a pre-emptive strike against Iraq which was largely defended by the Bush Administration as an act to protect national security. In the months leading up to the attack, however, the US was still in the decision-making ... Keywords: ANP, Analytic network process, Iraqi war, Operation Iraqi freedom

Bethany Simunich

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Harmonic mean, the Gamma factor and Speed of Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relationship between the harmonic mean and special relativity is concisely elucidated. The arguments in favor and against SRT are explored. It is shown that the ratio of the speed of light to the harmonic mean of the onward and return speeds of light in a moving frame under Newtonian mechanics, when equitably distributed between space and time as a correction, leads to the Lorentz transformation. This correction implies an apparent contraction of objects and time dilation. However, the symmetry of the onward and inverse transformations give a different meaning to the gamma factor

Chandru Iyer

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

323

Comments on: 'Implementation of self-tuning regulators with variable forgetting factors'  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The similarities are pointed out between the variable forgetting factor given in the paper by Fortescue, Kershenbaum and Ydstie and that given in Wellstead and Sanoff. Moreover, it is shown that the method of Fortescue, Kershenbaum and Ydstie can be ... Keywords: Adaptive control, stochastic control, time-varying systems

S. P. Sanoff; P. E. Wellstead

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Greenhouse window U-factors under field conditions  

SciTech Connect

Field measurements of U-factor are reported for two projecting greenhouse windows, each paired with a picture window of comparable insulation level during testing. A well-known calorimetric field test facility was used to make the measurements. The time-varying U-factors obtained are related to measurements of exterior conditions. For one of the greenhouse windows, which was the subject of a published laboratory hotbox test and simulation study, the results are compared with published test and simulation data and found to be in disagreement. Data on interior and exterior film coefficients are presented, and it is shown that the greenhouse window has a significantly lower interior film coefficient than a conventional window under the same interior conditions. This is advanced as a possible explanation of the disagreement.

Klems, J.H.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

An experimental survey of the factors that affect leaching from low-level radioactive waste forms  

SciTech Connect

This report represents the results of an experimental survey of the factors that affect leaching from several types of solidified low-level radioactive waste forms. The goal of these investigations was to determine those factors that accelerate leaching without changing its mechanism(s). Typically, although not in every case,the accelerating factors include: increased temperature, increased waste loading (i.e., increased waste to binder ratio), and decreased size (i.e., decreased waste form volume to surface area ratio). Additional factors that were studied were: increased leachant volume to waste form surface area ratio, pH, leachant composition (groundwaters, natural and synthetic chelating agents), leachant flow rate or replacement frequency and waste form porosity and surface condition. Other potential factors, including the radiation environment and pressure, were omitted based on a survey of the literature. 82 refs., 236 figs., 13 tabs.

Dougherty, D.R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Common Risk Factors in Currency Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We identify a slope factor in exchange rates. High interest rate currencies load more on this slope factor than low interest rate currencies. This factor accounts for most of the cross-sectional variation in average ...

Roussano, Nikolai

327

Primeless factoring-based cryptography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factoring-based public-key cryptosystems have an overall complexity which is dominated by the key-production algorithm, which requires the generation of prime numbers. This is most inconvenient in settings where the key-generation is not an one-off process, ...

Sonia Bogos, Ioana Boureanu, Serge Vaudenay

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Factorization of a 512-bit RSA modulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the factorization of the 512-bit number RSA-155 by the Number Field Sieve factoring method (NFS) and discusses the implications for RSA.

Stefania Cavallar; Bruce Dodson; Arjen K. Lenstra; Walter Lioen; Peter L. Montgomery; Brian Murphy; Herman Te Riele; Karen Aardal; Jeff Gilchrist; Grard Guillerm; Paul Leyland; Jol Marchand; Franois Morain; Alec Muffett; Chris Putnam; Craig Putnam; Paul Zimmermann

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Oak Ridge Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN More Documents & Publications Major Risk Factors to the Integrated...

330

Energy and water development appropriations for 1985. Part 6. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 6 of the hearing record covers testimony by representatives of DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which was given in Executive Session over four days because of the sensitive nature of some of the information. The DOE witnesses discussed the design, testing, and manufacture of nuclear weapons and described DOE support for military applications of inertial fusion. Other responsibilities include the production, verification and monitoring of nuclear materials, and the dissemination of classified information. Chairman Nunzio Palladino and other officials of the NRC were asked to include comments on the licensing problems at the Byron and Zimmer plants in their review of the NRC budget requirements and program plans.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Energy and water development appropriations for 1986. Part 3. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 3 of the hearing record covers testimony given by the Director and managers of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the chairman and advisors of the Appalachian Regional Commission, the Secretary of the Interior, and representatives of the Bureau of Reclamation. The witnesses presented the administration's budget requests for fiscal year 1986, described the anticipated income and expenditures of their programs, and presented details of specific projects. The administration's proposals were significantly reduced over previous funding levels, and termination was the recommendation for the Appalachian Regional Commission. Supporting documentation accompanies the testimony of the 18 witnesses.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Energy and water development appropriations for 1986. Part 1. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of the hearing record covers the testimony of witnesses from the Corps of Engineers before the House Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development on appropriations for Corps activities in 1986. The first section of the record gives an overview of civil works programs in the context of the 1986 budget of $2.34 billion. Particular emphasis is on 60 proposed water projects. Separate sections cover testimony by the divisional representatives of the Missouri River, Ohio River, North Central, North Atlantic, New England, and Southwestern Divisions. Their testimony includes details of specific projects and supporting documentation for the projects as well as proposals for cost sharing and user fees.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Energy and water development appropriations for 1985. Part 2. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 2 of the hearing record covers testimony given by the Corps of Engineers on the Lower Mississippi Valley, Southwestern, North Pacific, South Pacific, and Pacific Ocean Divisions, and by the Delaware and Susquehanna River Basin Commissions and the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. Representatives of the Corps' engineering, planning, and program development offices described projects in each of the divisions which relate to navigation, flood control, job development, and other matters. The Committee reviewed appropriation levels for each of the projects. The hearing record includes background and supporting documentation as well as the statements and testimony of the witnesses.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

FTCP Human Factors Engineering Supplemental Competencies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Human Factors Engineering Functional Area Qualification Competencies Examples for DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel

335

Mechanism Based Anticancer Drugs that Degrade Sp Transcription Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Curcumin is the active component of tumeric, and this polyphenolic compound has been extensively investigated as an anticancer drug that modulates multiple pathways and genes. We demonstrated that curcumin inhibited 253JB-V and KU7 bladder cancer cell growth, and this was accompanied by induction of apoptosis and decreased expression of the proapoptotic protein survivin and the angiogenic proteins vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1). Since expression of survivin, VEGF and VEGFR1 are dependent on specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors, we also investigated the effects of curcumin on downregulation of Sp protein expression as an underlying mechanism for the apoptotic and antiangiogenic activity of this compound. Curcumin decreases expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in blader cancer cells indicating that the cancer chemotherapeutic activity of curcumin is due, in part, to decreased expression of Sp transcription factors and Sp-dependent genes. Betulinic acid (BA) and curcumin are phytochemical anticancer agents, and we hypothesized that both compounds decrease EGFR expression in bladder cancer through downregulation of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors. BA and curcumin decreased expression of EGFR, Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and Sp-dependent proteins in 253JB-V and KU7 cells; EGFR was also decreased in cells transfected with a cocktail (iSp) containing small inhibitory RNAs for Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 showing that EGFR is an Sp-regulated gene. Methyl 2-cyano-3,11-dioxo-18?-olean-1,12- dien-30-oate (CDODA-Me) is a synthetic triterpenoid derived from glycyrrhetinic acid which inhibits proliferation of KU7 and 253JB-V bladder cancer cells. CDODA-Me also decreased expression of specificity protein-1 (Sp1), Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors. Similar results were observed for a structurally-related triterpenoid, methyl 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me), which is currently in clinical trials for treatment of leukemia. Celastrol, a naturally occurring triterpenoid acid from an ivy-like vine exhibits anticancer activity against bladder cancer cells. Celastrol decreased cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and decreased expression of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and several Sp-dependent genes like Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). In vivo studies using KU7 cells as xenografts showed that celastrol represents novel class of anticancer drugs that acts, in part, through targeting downregulation of Sp transcription factors.

Chadalapaka, Gayathri

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

PROJECT SHEET SUBCOMMITTEE: Food Residues Subcommittee PROJECT TITLE: Expansion, Development and Harmonization of Crop Groups With Specified Representative Crops for Field Crop Residues Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GOAL/OBJECTIVE: To further develop and implement Crop groups utilized by NAFTA and based on representative commodities to foster worldwide harmonization of Crop groups and commodity terminology which will help remove trade irritants due to differences in commodity tolerance levels or MRLs for minor and specialty crops. PROJECT DESCRIPTION/PROCEDURE The Chairperson (Hong Chen) of the International Crop Grouping Consulting Committee (ICGCC) forwards the Symposium proposal for a particular crop group to the appropriate workgroup of the ICGCC via emails and requests the workgroup members to provide input on crop information and maximum residue limit (MRL) information (includes U.S., NAFTA, Codex and EU) on the commodities. Growers and commodity experts also provide valuable input on commodities. International members provide specific information on the commodities grown in their countries and regions which provides perspectives on harmonization approaches. Based on the input, the ICGCC Chairperson will prepare commodity monographs, divide subgroups, select representative crops and draft new crop group petitions. The draft petitions will be forwarded to the workgroup for review and comments before being finalized, and the

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Electrical and Production Load Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for the industrial sector. The operating hours of small and medium sized manufacturing facilities are analyzed to identify the most common operating hour or shift work patterns. About 75% of manufacturing facilities fall into expected operating hour patterns with operating hours near 40, 80, 120 and 168 hours/week. Two types of load factors, electrical and production are computed for each shift classification within major industry categories in the U.S. The load factor based on monthly billing hours (ELF) increases with operating hours from about 0.4 for a nominal one shift operation, to about 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. On the other hand, the load factor based on production hours (PLF) shows an inverse trend, varying from about 1.4 for one shift operation to 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. When used as a diagnostic tool, if the PLF exceeds unity, then unnecessary energy consumption may be taking place. For plants operating at 40 hours per week, the ELF value was found to greater than the theoretical maximum, while the PLF value was greater than one, suggesting that these facilities may have significant energy usage outside production hours. The data for the PLF however, is more scattered for plants operating less than 80 hours per week, indicating that grouping PLF data based on operating hours may not be a reasonable approach to benchmarking energy use in industries. This analysis uses annual electricity consumption and demand along with operating hour data of manufacturing plants available in the U.S. Department of Energys Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database. The annual values are used because more desirable monthly data are not available. Monthly data are preferred as they capture the load profile of the facility more accurately. The data there come from Industrial Assessment Centers which employ university engineering students, faculty and staff to perform energy assessments for small to medium-sized manufacturing plants. The nation-wide IAC program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Sen, Tapajyoti

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Reduction factor for the ground resistance of the foot in substation yards  

SciTech Connect

Limited thickness of the surface layer of gravel in a substation yard decreases the ground resistance of the foot from its value for the infinite thickness of the surface layer, by reduction factor C. The foot is usually represented by an equivalent circular plate of radius 8 cm. This paper presents method and equations to accurately determine the reduction factor for the circular plate. The equations are valid for any depth of the upper layer. The data are presented in the form of graphs. A simple empirical equation for determining the value of C is also presented.

Thapar, B.; Gerez, V.; Kejriwal, H. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has identified nine issue areas which, in our judgment, represent the most significant challenges facing the Department of Energy (Department)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Investigations and Investigations of the Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives FOR RELEASE ON DELIVERY 10:00 AM Friday, June 9, 2006 Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee, I am pleased to be here at your request to testify on cyber security issues at the Department of Energy. The Department of Energy, which spends over $2 billion each year on information technology (IT), has a current inventory of approximately 800 information systems, including up to 115,000 personal computers; many powerful supercomputers; numerous servers; and, a broad array of related peripheral equipment. These systems process operational, financial, and highly classified national security data. The need to protect this data and the related systems is of paramount concern to the Department and to the

340

PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Suspect Counterfeit Items Criteria Review and Approach Document , Phase 1 - Management - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Suspect/Counterfeit Items Suspect/Counterfeit Items Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Phase 1 - Management Performance Objective: Management should have a formal system under Quality Assurance with adequate controls defined and implemented to identify and preclude Suspect/Counterfeit Items (S/CI) from being introduced into safety systems and applications that create potential hazards. CRITERIA: Management should have a formal system of controls in place for assurance that all items procured meet the requirements for their intended use. Management should have a system of mechanisms to continuously maintain current, accurate, updated information on SC/Is and associated suppliers using all available sources. Management should have a training program with detailed records that

342

Clinch River: an alternate financing plan. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, first session, 20 Sep 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Representatives of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) project, the nuclear industry, taxpayers, the financial community, and legislators testified at a hearing held to review administration plans for completing the CRBR by attaching its financing to a continuing resolution and avoiding the legislative process. A Congressional Budget Office report noted that the administration's financing proposal will generate up to 37% return on investment from tax relief alone, which is more appropriate for high-risk than government-backed investment. The Congressional Research Service challenged that the plant's power production capacity was overstated and its price overvalued. Of concern to the committee was the fairness of asking taxpayers to share in the $2.5 billion needed to complete the project. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony of 20 witnesses.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Mobil/Marathon takeover. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, November 19, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The exercise of corporate power and money as well as the effect on energy policy were the underlying issues in a hearing on the proposed merger of Mobil and Marathon oil companies. The use of capital in this way would deny funds for economic recovery and energy development at a time when the oil companies complain that they need more financial incentives. The companies' response in the direction of mergers suggest that deregulation and tax incentives are not developing solutions to energy supply, but are creating new problems. The witnesses included representatives of Ohio, DOE's Office of Competition, and independent oil jobbers and distributors, who argued against the merger. Additional letters and statement from the witnesses follow their testimony. (DCK)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Energy and water development appropriations for 1980: Part 1. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, first session  

SciTech Connect

President Carter's water-policy-reform initiatives and his FY 1980 budget recommendations for the water-resources program were announced June 6, 1978. The new policy was to accomplish the following: place a new national emphasis on water conservation, improve the planning and evaluation of water projects, enhance Federal-State cooperative in water management, and give greater concern to the environmental effects of water projects. The hearings collected here covered testimony given over four days in February 1979. On February 5, W. Bowman Cutter, OMB, first presented a general statement in support of the water-policy-reform initiatives and the 1980 budget recommendations. Other testimony was given by representatives from the DOI Water Resources Council on February 6; DOI Bureau of Reclamation on February 7; and Office of the Secretary of the Army and Office of the Chief of Engineers on February 8. (MCW)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Inquiry into School Libraries and Teacher Librarians in Australian Schools QCEC submission to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Education and Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Queensland Catholic Education Commission (QCEC) welcomes the opportunity to make this submission to the House of Representatives Inquiry into school libraries and teacher librarians in Australian Schools, which will inquire into and report on the role, adequacy and resourcing of school libraries and teacher librarians in Australias public and private schools. This submission is made on behalf of the 22 Catholic school employing authorities and the 288 Catholic schools in Queensland. Some of the individual schooling authorities and teacher librarians may choose to make separate submissions. Background Teaching and learning in schools is achieved through the complex interaction of people and physical structures. School libraries are included in this. As there is the tendency to variously term school libraries as resource centre, information service centre a statement of what is meant by a school library in this submission becomes necessary.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

347

RADSOURCE: Volume 1, Part 1: A Scaling Factor Prediction Computer Program Technical Manual and Code Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed a mathematical model, RADSOURCE, for determining plant-specific scaling factors. Use of this code can complement a utility's 10CFR61 waste characterization program by providing a tool that is less subject to waste sampling representativeness and analytic uncertainties. Application of the RADSOURCE code may also reduce the required sampling of waste streams and provide a more accurate means of characterizing waste.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Use power factor correction to cut SCR rig fuel bills  

SciTech Connect

When drilling with SCR-powered drilling rigs, there are specific instances on every well when the kVA capacity of the AC generators prohibits efficient engine loading. It then becomes necessary to run another engine-generator set to provide sufficient kVA to power the load, even though the kW required by the load can be furnished by existing engine(s) on line. The practice of running one more engine than can be fully loaded causes all engines on line to run at a less efficient point on the brake specific fuel consumption curve (BSFC) and therefore costs more in terms of engine hours, fuel and maintenance costs. This article presents a study of the load represented by the mud pump and drawworks along with a graphical representation that shows the effect of these loads on the engine generator system both with and without a power factor correction device.

Logan, R.T.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Development of periodic response factors for use with the radiant time series method  

SciTech Connect

Harris and McQuiston (1988) developed conduction transfer function (CTF) coefficients corresponding to 41 representative wall assemblies and 42 representative roof assemblies for use with the transfer function method (TFM). They also developed a grouping procedure that allows design engineers to determine the correct representative wall or roof assembly that most closely matches a specific wall or roof assembly. The CTF coefficients and the grouping procedure have been summarized in the ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals (1989, 1993, 1997) and the ASHRAE Cooling and Heating Load Calculation Manual, second edition. More recently, a new, simplified design cooling load calculation procedure, the radiant time series method (RTSM), has been developed. The RTSM uses periodic response factors to model transient conductive heat transfer. While not a true manual load calculation procedure, it is quite feasible to implement the RTSM in a spreadsheet. To be useful in such an environment, it would be desirable to have a pre-calculated set of periodic response factors. Accordingly, a set of periodic response factors has been calculated and is presented in this paper.

Spitler, J.D.; Fisher, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Factors for Bioenergy Market Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Focusing on the development of the whole bioenergy market rather than isolated projects, this paper contributes to the identification of barriers and drivers behind bioenergy technology implementation. It presents a framework for the assessment of the potentials for bioenergy market growth to be used by decision makers in administration and industry. The conclusions are based on case studies of operating bioenergy markets in Austria, US and Sweden. Six important factors for bioenergy market growth have been identified: (1) Integration with other business, e.g. for biomass procurement, (2) Scale effects of bioenergy market, (3) Competition on bioenergy market, (4) Competition with other business, (5) National policy, (6) Local policy and local opinion. Different applications of the framework are discussed.

Roos, A.; Hektor, B.; Graham, R.L.; Rakos, C.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

351

Form factors from lattice QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precision computation of hadronic physics with lattice QCD is becoming feasible. The last decade has seen precent-level calculations of many simple properties of mesons, and the last few years have seen calculations of baryon masses, including the nucleon mass, accurate to a few percent. As computational power increases and algorithms advance, the precise calculation of a variety of more demanding hadronic properties will become realistic. With this in mind, I discuss the current lattice QCD calculations of generalized parton distributions with an emphasis on the prospects for well-controlled calculations for these observables as well. I will do this by way of several examples: the pion and nucleon form factors and moments of the nucleon parton and generalized-parton distributions.

Dru Renner

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Capacity Factor Risk At Nuclear Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior ...

Du, Yangbo

353

Emission Factors from Brazilian Deforestation Fires Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of emission factors from 19 deforestation fires in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil. LBA-ECO TG-10 Fire Emission Factors in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil: 2004...

354

Definition: Distribution Factor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Also Known As Transfer Distribution Factor Related Terms Interchange Transaction, transmission lines, facility, Interchange, transmission line, flowgate, smart grid...

355

Updating an LU Factorization with Pivoting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how to compute an LU factorization of a matrix when the factors of a leading principle submatrix are already known. The approach incorporates pivoting akin to partial pivoting, a strategy we call incremental pivoting. An implementation ... Keywords: LU factorization, linear systems, pivoting, updating

Enrique S. Quintana-Ort; Robert A. Van De Geijn

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Prime Factorization in the Duality Computer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give algorithms to factorize large integers in the duality computer. We provide three duality algorithms for factorization based on a naive factorization method, the Shor algorithm in quantum computing, and the Fermat's method in classical computing. All these algorithms are polynomial in the input size.

Wan-Ying Wang; Bin Shang; Chuan Wang; Gui Lu Long

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nonnegative matrix factorization with quadratic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) solves the following problem: find such nonnegative matrices A@?R"+^I^x^J and X@?R"+^J^x^K that Y@?AX, given only Y@?R^I^x^K and the assigned index J (K@?I>=J). Basically, the factorization is achieved by alternating ... Keywords: Blind source separation, Nonnegative matrix factorization, Quadratic programming

Rafal Zdunek; Andrzej Cichocki

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Variational learning for rectified factor analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear factor models with non-negativity constraints have received a great deal of interest in a number of problem domains. In existing approaches, positivity has often been associated with sparsity. In this paper we argue that sparsity of the factors ... Keywords: Positive factor analysis, Source separation, Variational Bayes

Markus Harva; Ata Kabn

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Telomerase Activation. Authors: Natarajan M.,1 Mohan S.,2 Pandeswara, S.L.,1 and Herman T.S.1 Institutions: Departments of 1Radiation Oncology and 2Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas Activation of NF-kB in response to low doses of ionizing radiation was first shown in our laboratory. Although studies have shown that NF-kB plays an important role in anti-apoptotic function, little has been done to understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcome such as enhanced cell survival after low dose low-linear transfer (LET) radiation. Because upregulation of telomerase activity is associated with longevity and allows cells to escape from senescence, we hypothesize

360

Written Statement of David Huizenga Senior Advisor for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States House of Representatives (May 9, 2013)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Senior Advisor David Huizenga represented the Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Step Complexity Measure for Emergency Operating Procedures - Determining Weighting Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In complex systems, such as nuclear power plants (NPPs) or airplane control systems, human error has been regarded as the primary cause of many events. Therefore, to ensure system safety, extensive effort has been made to identify the significant factors that can cause human error. According to related studies, written manuals or operating procedures are revealed as one of the important factors, and the understandability is pointed out as one of the major reasons for procedure-related human errors.Many qualitative checklists have been suggested to evaluate emergency operating procedures (EOPs) of NPPs so as to minimize procedure-related human errors. However, since qualitative evaluations using checklists have some drawbacks, a quantitative measure that can quantify the complexity of EOPs is indispensable.From this necessity, Park et al. suggested the step complexity (SC) measure to quantify the complexity of procedural steps included in EOPs. To verify the appropriateness of the SC measure, averaged step performance time data obtained from emergency training records of the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and the excess steam demand event were compared with estimated SC scores. However, although averaged step performance time data and estimated SC scores show meaningful correlation, some important issues such as determining proper weighting factors have to be clarified to ensure the appropriateness of the SC measure. These were not properly dealt with due to a lack of backup data.In this paper, to resolve one of the important issues, emergency training records are additionally collected and analyzed in order to determine proper weighting factors. The total number of collected records is 66, and the training scenarios cover five emergency conditions including the LOCA, the steam generator tube rupture, the loss of all feedwater, the loss of off-site power, and the station blackout. From these records, average step performance time data are retrieved, and new weighting factors are determined by using a nonlinear regression analysis. The results show that the SC scores quantified by the new weighting factors show statistically meaningful correlation with averaged step performance time data. Thus, it can be concluded that the SC measure can represent the complexity of procedural steps included in EOPs.

Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea; Kim, Jaewhan; Ha, Jaejoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Downscaling Aerosols and the Impact of Neglected Subgrid Processes on Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing for a Representative Global Climate Model Grid Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to many global climate models include detailed, prognostic aerosol calculations intended to better reproduce the observed climate. However, the trace gas and aerosol fields are treated at the grid-cell scale with no attempt to account for sub-grid impacts on the aerosol fields. This paper begins to quantify the error introduced by the neglected sub-grid variability for the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a representative climate model grid spacing of 75 km. An analysis of the value added in downscaling aerosol fields is also presented to give context to the WRF-Chem simulations used for the sub-grid analysis. We found that 1) the impact of neglected sub-grid variability on the aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in regions of complex topography and complicated flow patterns, and 2) scale-induced differences in emissions contribute strongly to the impact of neglected sub-grid processes on the aerosol radiative forcing. The two of these effects together, when simulated at 75 km vs. 3 km in WRF-Chem, result in an average daytime mean bias of over 30% error in top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a large percentage of central Mexico during the MILAGRO field campaign.

Gustafson, William I.; Qian, Yun; Fast, Jerome D.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

363

Analysis and experimental results of a single-stage high-power-factor electronic ballast based on flyback converter  

SciTech Connect

A new single-stage high-power-factor electronic ballast based on a flyback converter is presented in this paper. The ballast is able to supply a fluorescent lamp assuring a high-input power factor for the utility line. Other features are lamp power regulation against line voltage variations and low lamp current crest factor, both assuring long lamp life. The ballast is analyzed at steady-state operation, and design equations and characteristics are obtained. Also, a procedure for the ballast design is presented. Finally, simulation and experimental results from a laboratory prototype are shown.

Calleja, A.J.; Alonso, J.M.; Lopez, E.; Ribas, J.; Martinez, J.A.; Rico-Secades, M.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Volume III (of 4): Characterization and simulation of representative resources. Final report, February 14, 1995--October 13, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant innovations have been made in seismic processing and reservoir simulation. In addition, significant advances have been made in deviated and horizontal drilling technologies. Effective application of these technologies along with improved integrated resource management methods offer opportunities to significantly increase Gulf of Mexico production, delay platform abandonments, and preserve access to a substantial remaining oil target for both exploratory drilling and advanced recovery processes. In an effort to illustrate the impact that these new technologies and sources of information can have upon the estimates of recoverable oil in the Gulf of Mexico, additional and detailed data was collected for two previously studied reservoirs: a South March Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil, whose exact location has been blind-coded at their request, and an additional third representative reservoir in the Gulf of Mexico, the KEKF-1 reservoir in West Delta Block 84 Field. The new data includes reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data was used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation also provided additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressures, and water compatibility. Geologic investigations were also conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. These results were also used, in part, to assist in the recharacterization of these reservoirs.

Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

1997-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

365

Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six limiting factors are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004, which were determined using the semiautomated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative.

Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-Andr; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (SSRL); (JCSG); (UCSD); (Burnham)

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Appendix A Conversion Factors for Standard Units  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy, work, heat(a) joule J ... a utility-specific factor that has incorporated actual fuel mix ... Arizona Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Utah Wyoming

368

politics factors into climate bill, too  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

06/2 - POLITICS FACTORS INTO CLIMATE BILL, TOO. In A 987-page bill, six committees with jurisdiction, a mammoth oil spill to consider, no bipartisan support,...

369

Health Information Technology (IT), Human Factor Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on a research program aimed at developing human factors guidelines for ... technical guidelines will help support safe, effective, error-free EHR use ...

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

370

Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

Jian-Wei Qiu

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Factors associated with participation restriction in community ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 26, 2007 ... restriction, after adjusting for age and gender in a logistic regression analysis. Health and disability factors most strongly and independently...

372

Mini-Conference on Factorization Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, The University of Iowa, Iowa City. Non-Atomic Unique Factorization. 3:00-3:45 PM Franz Halter-Koch, Karl

Coykendall, James

373

OpenEI - electricity emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4650 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

374

OpenEI - hourly emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4640 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

375

Factors that Predict Quality Classroom Technology Use.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite technological advancements intended to enhance teaching and learning in the 21st century, numerous teacher and school factors continue to impede quality classroom technology use. (more)

Hastings, Tricia A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nucleon Form Factor Measurements and Interpretation  

SciTech Connect

The data base for the form factors of the nucleon obtained from elastic ep scattering is discussed, as well as some recent developments in their calculation.

Charles F. Perdrisat

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Exposure Rate Conversion Factor for Nuclear Fallout  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fallout is comprised of approximately 2000 radionuclides. About 1000 of these radionuclides are either primary fission products or activated fission products that are created during the burn process. The exposure rate one meter above the surface produced by this complex mixture of radionuclides varies rapidly with time since many of the radionuclides are short-lived and decay numerous times before reaching a stable isotope. As a result, the mixture of radionuclides changes rapidly with time. Using a new code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the mixture of radionuclides at any given point in time can be calculated. The code also calculates the exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for all 3864 individual isotopes contained in its database based on the total gamma energy released per decay. Based on the combination of isotope mixture and individual ECFs, the time-dependent variation of the composite exposure rate conversion factor for nuclear fallout can be easily calculated. As example of this new capability, a simple test case corresponding to a 10 kt, uranium-plutonium fuel has been calculated. The results for the time-dependent, composite ECF for this test case are shown in Figure 1. For comparison, we also calculated the composite exposure rate conversion factor using the conversion factors found in Federal Guidance Report No.12 (FGR-12) published by ORNL, which contains the conversion factors for approximately 1000 isotopes. As can be noted from Figure 1, the two functions agree reasonably well at times greater than about 30 minutes. However, they do not agree at early times since FGR-12 does not include all of the short-lived isotopes that are produced in nuclear fallout. It should also be noted that the composite ECF at one hour is 19.7 R/hr per Ci/m{sup 2}. This corresponds to 3148 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile, which agrees reasonably well with the value of 3000 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile as quoted by Glasstone. We have also tabulated the top 50 contributors to the exposure rate at various points in time following a detonation. These major contributors are given in Table 1.

Spriggs, G D

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

378

New continuous-input current charge pump power-factor-correction electronic ballast  

SciTech Connect

Continuous-input current charge pump power-factor-correction (CIC-CPPFC) electronic ballasts are proposed in this paper. The CPPFC circuit and unity power factor condition using the charge pump concept are derived and analyzed. The average lamp current control with switching frequency modulation was developed so that the low crest factor and constant lamp power operation can be achieved. The developed electronic ballast has continuous input current, so that a small line input filter can be used. The proposed CIC-CPPFC electronic ballast was implemented and tested with two 45-W fluorescent lamps. It is shown that the measured line input current harmonics satisfy IEC 1000-3-2 Class C requirements.

Qian, J.; Lee, F.C. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yamauchi, Tokushi [Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd., Osaka (Japan). Lighting Research and Development Center

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

De-caf-einated : life without chromatin assembly factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTORS THAT ACTSaccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin- assembly factors thatSaccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin-assembly factors that act

Kats, Ellen Simona

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Distributed large-scale natural graph factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural graphs, such as social networks, email graphs, or instant messaging patterns, have become pervasive through the internet. These graphs are massive, often containing hundreds of millions of nodes and billions of edges. While some theoretical models ... Keywords: asynchronous algorithms, distributed optimization, graph algorithms, graph factorization, large-scale machine learning, matrix factorization

Amr Ahmed, Nino Shervashidze, Shravan Narayanamurthy, Vanja Josifovski, Alexander J. Smola

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Jet acollinearity and quark form factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbative Quantum Chromodynamic corrections involving the emission of gluons which are both soft and collinear are discussed for both hadronic production of lepton pairs and e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. The result is an exponential, double logarithmic quark form factor. The effect of sub-leading corrections and the possible experimental observation of the form factor are discussed.

Stirling, W.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Jacobian factor in free energy simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of Jacobian factors in free energy simulations is described. They provide a simple interpretation of moment of inertia correction and dynamic stretch free energy terms in such simulations. Since the relevant Jacobian factors can often be evaluated analytically by use of the configurational partition function of a polyatomic molecule

Stefan Boresch; Martin Karplus

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Gradient based variable forgetting factor RLS algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate new variable forgetting factor recursive least-square adaptive algorithm is derived. An improved mean square behaviour analysis is presented, which shows that the theoretical analysis and the simulation results are close to each other. The ... Keywords: RLS algorithm, adaptive filters, variable forgetting factor

C. F. So; S. C. Ng; S. H. Leung

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Emission Factor Database IPCC Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/EFDB/main.php References: IPCC-EFDB[1] About "EFDB is meant to be a recognised library, where users can find emission factors and other parameters with background documentation or technical references that can be used for estimating greenhouse gas emissions and removals. The responsibility of using this information appropriately will always remain with the users themselves." References ↑ "IPCC-EFDB" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=IPCC_Emission_Factor_Database&oldid=367213"

385

Energy and water development appropriations for 1984. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Part 2 of the hearing record covers testimony received from the Corps of Engineers, the Delaware and Susquehanna River Basin Commissions, and the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. Representatives of the Corps of Engineers described the activities in each of the six divisions, and reviewed the need for additional appropriations to complete prpjects. Representatives of the two river basin commissions presented highlights of their appropriation requirements to finance development programs. (DCK)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County --  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Title Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2003 Authors Erdmann, Christine A., Georgianna Farren, Kimberly Baltzell, Terri Chew, Cynthia Clarkson, Ruth Fleshman, Colin Leary, Mary Mizroch, Fern Orenstein, Marion L. Russell, Virginia Souders-Mason, and Margaret Wrensch Abstract The purpose of the Personal Environmental Risk Factor Study (PERFS) pilot project was to develop methodologies and a questionnaire for a future population-based case-control study to investigate the role of selected environmental exposures in breast cancer development. Identification of etiologically relevant exposures during a period of potential vulnerability proximate to disease onset offers the possibility of clinical disease prevention even when disease initiation may have already occurred many years earlier. Certain personal environmental agents or combinations of agents may influence disease promotion. Therefore, this pilot study focused on exposures that occurred during the ten-year period prior to diagnosis for cases and the last ten years for controls, rather than more historic exposures. For this pilot study, we used a community-based research approach. In our collaborative efforts, community members participated with academic researchers in all phases of the research, including research question identification, study design, development of research tools, development of the human subjects protocol, and report writing. Community member inclusion was based upon the concept that community participation could improve the relevance of scientific studies and ultimate success of the research by encouraging an ongoing dialogue between community members and academic representatives. Early activities of this project focused on the collection of input from the community regarding the possible role of environmental factors in the incidence of breast cancer in Marin County. The intent was to inform the scientists of community concerns, enhance the research team's understanding of the community being studied, and provide interested community members with a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional research methods through active participation in the research process. This pilot study identified specific testable hypotheses through review of the literature and consultation with relevant experts and the affected community. Initially, the study was to focus on modifiable personal environmental exposures that are associated with breast tumor promotion and higher socioeconomic status (SES). However, little information was available in the scientific literature regarding the putative mechanism by which some of the suspected environmental factors may act (i.e., initiator vs. promoter). Likewise, little is known about the distribution of personal environmental risk factors by socioeconomic status. Therefore, tumor promotion involvement and association with SES were not very useful as selection criteria, and selection of topics was based primarily on published scientific findings of human studies and community input. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at the University of California at San Francisco (Committee on Human Research) and at the University of California at Berkeley (Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects)

387

Status Report: Pretreatment chemistry evaluation-Wash and leach factors for the single-shell tank waste inventory  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses a methodology developed to depict overall wash and leach factors for the Hanford single-shell tank (SST) inventory. The factors derived from this methodology, which is based on available partitioning data, are applicable to a composite SST inventory rather than only an assumed insoluble portion. The purpose of considering the entire inventory is to provide a more representative picture of the partitioning behavior of the analytes during envisioned waste retrieval and processing activities. The work described in this report was conducted by the Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation task of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The leach factors will be used to estimate the further removal of analytes, such as sodium, aluminum, phosphate, and other minor components. Wash and leach factors are given for elements expected to drive the volume of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW).

Colton, N.G.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

NIST: Triatomic - Special Units, ... and Useful Conver. Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5. Special Units, Fundamental Constants, and Useful Conversion Factors. 5.a. Special Units. ... 5.b. Fundamental Constants and Conversion Factors. ...

389

The Dose Rate Conversion Factors for Nuclear Fallout  

SciTech Connect

In a previous paper, the composite exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for nuclear fallout was calculated using a simple theoretical photon-transport model. The theoretical model was used to fill in the gaps in the FGR-12 table generated by ORNL. The FGR-12 table contains the individual conversion factors for approximate 1000 radionuclides. However, in order to calculate the exposure rate during the first 30 minutes following a nuclear detonation, the conversion factors for approximately 2000 radionuclides are needed. From a human-effects standpoint, it is also necessary to have the dose rate conversion factors (DCFs) for all 2000 radionuclides. The DCFs are used to predict the whole-body dose rates that would occur if a human were standing in a radiation field of known exposure rate. As calculated by ORNL, the whole-body dose rate (rem/hr) is approximately 70% of the exposure rate (R/hr) at one meter above the surface. Hence, the individual DCFs could be estimated by multiplying the individual ECFs by 0.7. Although this is a handy rule-of-thumb, a more consistent (and perhaps, more accurate) method of estimating the individual DCFs for the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table is to use the linear relationship between DCF and total gamma energy released per decay. This relationship is shown in Figure 1. The DCFs for individual organs in the body can also be estimated from the estimated whole-body DCF. Using the DCFs given FGR-12, the ratio of the organ-specific DCFs to the whole-body DCF were plotted as a function of the whole-body DCF. From these plots, the asymptotic ratios were obtained (see Table 1). Using these asymptotic ratios, the organ-specific DCFs can be estimated using the estimated whole-body DCF for each of the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table. Although this procedure for estimating the organ-specific DCFs may over-estimate the value for some low gamma-energy emitters, having a finite value for the organ-specific DCFs in the table is probably better than having no value at all. A summary of the complete ECF and DCF values are given in Table 2.

Spriggs, G D

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

390

Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

391

Factors Causing Unexpected Variations in Ada Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benchmarks are often used to describe the performance of computer systems. This report considers factors that may cause Ada benchmarks to produce inaccurate results. Included are examples from the ongoing benchmarking efforts of the Ada Embedded Systems Testbed (AEST) Project using bare target computers with several Ada compilers. 1. Introduction One of the goals of the Ada Embedded Systems Testbed (AEST) Project is to assess the readiness of the Ada programming language and Ada tools for developing embedded systems. The benchmarking and instrumentation subgroup within the AEST Project is running various suites of Ada benchmarks to obtain data on the real-time performance of Ada on a number of different target systems. The purpose of this report is to categorize the factors which cause anomalous results to be produced by the benchmarks. Some of these factors have been observed, while others are more speculative in nature. All these factors should be understood if accurate, comparable,...

Neal Altman; Neal Altman

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

393

CCG supertags in factored statistical machine translation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combinatorial Categorial Grammar (CCG) supertags present phrase-based machine translation with an opportunity to access rich syntactic information at a word level. The challenge is incorporating this information into the translation process. Factored ...

Alexandra Birch; Miles Osborne; Philipp Koehn

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Spatial Ontology in Factored Statistical Machine Translation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a statistical phrase-based machine translation system which is enriched with semantic data coming from a spatial ontology. Paper presents the spatial ontology, how it is integrated in statistical machine translation system using factored ...

Raivis Skadi?

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Definition: Capacity factor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power)12 View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The net capacity factor of a power plant is the ratio of its actual output over a period of time, to its potential output if...

396

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

William Watson

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Gust Factors Applied to Hurricane Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important consideration in the design of structures is their response to extreme winds. This is especially true in regions affected by hurricanes. In this research, gust factors derived from hurricane wind-speed records are compared with those ...

William R. Krayer; Richard D. Marshall

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Faster Quantum Number Factoring via Circuit Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major obstacle to implementing Shor's quantum number-factoring algorithm is the large size of modular-exponentiation circuits. We reduce this bottleneck by customizing reversible circuits for modular multiplication to individual runs of Shor's algorithm. Our circuit-synthesis procedure exploits spectral properties of multiplication operators and constructs optimized circuits from the traces of the execution of an appropriate GCD algorithm. Empirically, gate counts are reduced by 4-5 times, and circuit latency is reduced by larger factors.

Igor L. Markov; Mehdi Saeedi

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

IV Estimation of Panels with Factor Residuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In microeconometric panels, the factor structure may capture different sources of unobserved individual-specific heterogeneity, the impact of which varies intertem- porally in an arbitrary way. For instance, in studies of production functions, the factor loadings may... supply, Euler equations for household consumption, and em- pirical growth models. In these models the coefficient of the lagged dependent variable captures inertia, habit formation and costs of adjustment and therefore it has structural significance (see...

Robertson, Donald; Sara dis, Vasilis

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

400

ORNL/CP-97155 Instantaneous Reactive Power and Power Factor of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ORNL/CP-97155 ORNL/CP-97155 Instantaneous Reactive Power and Power Factor of Instantaneous Phasor s ' 4 . L;/, Oak Ridge National Laboratory* P f Senior Member &Eb "'ii Lf/ .. John S. Hsu 4- p d Post Office Box 2009, MS 8038 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3783 1-8038 Key wordr: Instantaneous reactive power, Symmetrical property, Instantaiteous phasors, Phasors of one phase, n r e e phases. Abstract The unique property of instantaneous phasors is that at any instant the instantaneous three-phase currents and voltages can be represented by a set of balanced phasors. The instantaneous reactive power and the concept of instantaneous power factor can be clearly understood from the instantaneous phasors. This provides a theoretical foundation for power quality monitoring, diagnostics,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

241-SY-101 strain concentration factor development via nonlinear analysis. Volume 1 of 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 241-SY-101 waste storage tank at the Hanford-Site has been known to accumulate and release significant quantities of hydrogen gas. An analysis was performed to assess the tank`s structural integrity when subjected to postulated hydrogen deflagration loads. The analysis addressed many nonlinearities and appealed to a strain-based failure criteria. The model used to predict the global response of the tank was not refined enough to confidently predict local peak strains. Strain concentration factors were applied at structural discontinuities that were based on steel-lined reinforced-concrete containment studies. The discontinuities included large penetrations, small penetrations, springline geometries, stud/liner connections, and the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch liner thickness transition. The only tank specific strain concentration factor applied in the evaluation was for the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch liner thickness change in the dome. Review of the tank drawings reveals the possibility that a 4 inches Sch. 40 pipe penetrates the dome thickness transition region. It is not obvious how to combine the strain concentration factors for a small penetration with that of a thickness transition to arrive at a composite strain concentration factor. It is the goal of this effort to make an approximate determination of the relative significance of the 4 inch penetration and the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch thickness transition in the 241-SY-101 dome geometry. This is accomplished by performing a parametric study with three general finite-element models. The first represents the thickness transition only, the second represents a 4 inch penetration only, and the third combines the thickness transition with a penetration model.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Subduction of South Pacific Tropical Water and Its Equatorward Pathways as Shown by a Simulated Passive Tracer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the subduction of South Pacific Tropical Water (SPTW) and its equatorward pathways using a simulated passive tracer of the consortium Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO). The results show that ...

Tangdong Qu; Shan Gao; Rana A. Fine

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The transcription factor PU.1 does not regulate lineage commitment but has lineagespecific effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: PU.1 is a transcription factor shown to regulate the expression of many important genes in myeloid and B cells. At birth, mice homozygous for the disruption of the PU.1 gene have erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, and T cells, but no mature myeloid or B cells. Cells with an inability to develop to maturity were found in this mouse for B cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells, and monocytes. Rescue of early monocytic cells by transfection with the PU.1 gene results in renewed development to macrophages. These results demonstrate that PU.1 is an important regulator in the development of cells in the hematopoietic system. J. Leukoc.

Scott R. Mckercher; Gregory W. Henkel; Richard A. Maki

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Pricing Effect of Restaurant Industry Related Factors on Fama French Three Factor Model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of restaurant industry-related factors on the accuracy and explanatory power of the (more)

Denizci, Basak

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

EcoFactor Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EcoFactor Inc EcoFactor Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EcoFactor Inc Place Millbrae, California Zip 94030 Product California-based home energy management service provider. Coordinates 37.60276°, -122.395444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.60276,"lon":-122.395444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

406

Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emission Factors (EMFAC) Emission Factors (EMFAC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: EMFAC Agency/Company /Organization: California Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: http://www.arb.ca.gov/msei/onroad/latest_version.htm The EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model is used to calculate emission rates from all motor vehicles, such as passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks, operating on highways, freeways and local roads in California. EMFAC2007 is the most recent version of this model.

407

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor L. Smilenov Columbia University Abstract miRNA are 21-23 mer RNA molecules which are essential for organism development and cell functions. They regulate gene expression by binding to the 3’UTR of mRNA, inducing either mRNA degradation or mRNA silencing. The most characteristic properties of miRNA are their multi-targeting potential (one miRNA may target many genes). This high information content of miRNAs makes them very important factors in cell reprogramming. Since these are small molecules which can potentially pass through gap junctions, it is logical to consider their role in cell to cell communication. We hypothesized that miRNA transfer between cells is likely to occur under stress conditions. To test this hypothesis we developed a system designed

408

Paramagnetic form factors from itinerant electron theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elastic neutron scattering experiments performed over the past two decades have provided accurate information about the magnetic form factors of paramagnetic transition metals. These measurements have traditionally been analyzed in terms of an atomic-like theory. There are, however, some cases where this procedure does not work, and there remains the overall conceptual problem of using an atomistic theory for systems where the unpaired-spin electrons are itinerant. We have recently developed computer codes for efficiently evaluating the induced magnetic form factors of fcc and bcc itinerant electron paramagnets. Results for the orbital and spin contributions have been obtained for Cr, Nb, V, Mo, Pd and Rh based on local density bands. By using calculated spin enhancement parameters, we find reasonable agreement between theory and neutron form factor data. In addition, these zero parameter calculations yield predictions for the bulk susceptibility on an absolute scale which are in reasonable agreement with experiment in all treated cases except palladium.

Cooke, J.F.; Liu, S.H.; Liu, A.J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Charge form factor and sum rules of electromagnetic response functions in Carbon-12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An "ab initio" calculation of the Carbon-12 elastic form factor, and sum rules of longitudinal and transverse response functions measured in inclusive (e,e') scattering, is reported, based on realistic nuclear potentials and electromagnetic currents. The longitudinal elastic form factor and sum rule are found to be in satisfactory agreement with available experimental data. A direct comparison between theory and experiment is difficult for the transverse sum rule. However, it is shown that the calculated one has large contributions from two-body currents, indicating that these mechanisms lead to a significant enhancement of the quasi-elastic transverse response. This fact may have implications for the anomaly observed in recent neutrino quasi-elastic charge-changing scattering data off Carbon-12.

A. Lovato; S. Gandolfi; Ralph Butler; J. Carlson; Ewing Lusk; Steven C. Pieper; R. Schiavilla

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor miRNA as Bystander Effect Factor L. Smilenov 1 , M. Grad 2 , D. Attinger 2 and E.Hall 1 1 Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University DOE Grant: DEPS0208ER0820 Abstract: miRNA are 21-23 mer RNA molecules which are essential for organism development and cell functions. They regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'UTR of mRNA, inducing either

411

Ccg supertags in factored statistical machine translation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combinatorial Categorial Grammar (CCG) supertags present phrase-based machine translation with an opportunity to access rich syntactic information at a word level. The challenge is incorporating this information into the translation process. Factored translation models allow the inclusion of supertags as a factor in the source or target language. We show that this results in an improvement in the quality of translation and that the value of syntactic supertags in flat structured phrase-based models is largely due to better local reorderings. 1

Alexandra Birch; Miles Osborne

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Momentum compaction and phase slip factor  

SciTech Connect

Section 2.3.11 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is updated. The slip factor and its higher orders are given in terms of the various orders of the momentum compaction. With the aid of a simplified FODO lattice, formulas are given for the alteration of the lower orders of the momentum compaction by various higher multipole magnets. The transition to isochronicity is next demonstrated. Formulas are given for the extraction of the first three orders of the slip factor from the measurement of the synchrotron tune while changing the rf frequency. Finally bunch-length compression experiments in semi-isochronous rings are reported.

Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Annotated bibliography of human factors applications literature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography was prepared as part of the Human Factors Technology Project, FY 1984, sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Safety, US Department of Energy. The project was conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with Essex Corporation as a subcontractor. The material presented here is a revision and expansion of the bibliographic material developed in FY 1982 as part of a previous Human Factors Technology Project. The previous bibliography was published September 30, 1982, as Attachment 1 to the FY 1982 Project Status Report.

McCafferty, D.B.

1984-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to High Momentum Transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon characterize the effect of its internal structure on its response to an electromagnetic probe as studied in elastic electronnucleon scattering. These form factors are functions of the squared four-momentum transfer Q2 between the electron and the proton. The two main classes of observables of this reaction are the scattering cross section and polarization asymmetries, both of which are sensitive to the form factors in different ways. When considering large f momentum transfers, double-polarization observables offer superior sensitivity to the electric form factor. This thesis reports the results of a new measurement of the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton at high momentum transfer using the recoil polarization technique. A polarized electron beam was scattered from a liquid hydrogen target, transferring polarization to the recoiling protons. These protons were detected in a magnetic spectrometer which was used to reconstruct their kinematics, including their scattering angles and momenta, and the position of the interaction vertex. A proton polarimeter measured the polarization of the recoiling protons by measuring the azimuthal asymmetry in the angular distribution of protons scattered in CH2 analyzers. The scattered electron was detected in a large acceptance electromagnetic calorimeter in order to suppress inelastic backgrounds. The measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the scattered proton is directly proportional to the ratio of form factors GpE=GpM. The measurements reported in this thesis took place at Q2 =5.2, 6.7, and 8.5 GeV2, and represent the most accurate measurements of GpE in this Q2 region to date.

Andrew Puckett

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Factorization studies in SIDIS at Jlab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data for positive and negative pion electroproduction from both hydrogen and deuterium targets are found to satisfy factorization tests in the kinematic region Q{sup 2} > 2 GeV{sup 2}, 0.2 < 0.45, W > 2 GeV, M{sub x} > 1.5 GeV, and 0.3 < 0.6.

Peter Bosted; Rolf Ent; David Gaskell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Tigran Navasardyan; Varden Tadevosyan

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

Community discovery using nonnegative matrix factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex networks exist in a wide range of real world systems, such as social networks, technological networks, and biological networks. During the last decades, many researchers have concentrated on exploring some common things contained in those large ... Keywords: Community discovery, Nonnegative matrix factorization

Fei Wang; Tao Li; Xin Wang; Shenghuo Zhu; Chris Ding

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Facility Representative Program: DOE Fundamentals Handbooks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamentals Handbooks Fundamentals Handbooks Classical Physics (DOE-HDBK-1010-92) Volume 1 of 1 Electrical Science (DOE-HDBK-1011-92) Volume 1 of 4 Volume 2 of 4 Volume 3 of 4 Volume 4 of 4 Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow (DOE-HDBK-1012-92) Volume 1 of 3 Volume 2 of 3 Volume 3 of 3 Instrumentation and Control (DOE-HDBK-1013-92) Volume 1 of 2 Volume 2 of 2 Mathematics (DOE-HDBK-1014-92) Volume 1 of 2 Volume 2 of 2 Chemistry (DOE-HDBK-1015-93) Volume 1 of 2 Volume 2 of 2 Engineering Symbology, Prints and Drawings (DOE-HDBK-1016-93) Volume 1 of 2 Volume 2 of 2 Material Science (DOE-HDBK-1017-93) Volume 1 of 2 Volume 2 of 2 Mechanical Science (DOE-HDBK-1018-93) Volume 1 of 2 Volume 2 of 2 Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory (DOE-HDBK-1019-93) Volume 1 of 2

418

Facility Representative Program: Subject Matter Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subject Matter Links Subject Matter Links Nuclear Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Regulatory Commission American Nuclear Society (ANS) Nuclear Energy Institute International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Electrical OSHA Electrical Safety Information Underwriters Laboratories National Electrical Manufacturers Association Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) IPC - Association Connecting Electronics Industries OSHA Laser Hazards Chemical DOE Chemical Safety Program DOE Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program EPA Chemical Information Material Safety Data Sheets Search NIOSH Guide to Chemical Hazards American Petroleum Institute Alternative Fluorocarbons Environmental Acceptability Study American Institute of Chemical Engineers Chemical Reactivity Worksheet

419

Represents Premium Diesel WG Company Classification ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ExxonMobil Producer yes *July07 Gardner, KW Fuels Quality Manager kwgardner@exxonmobil.com (703) 846-5400 (703) 846-4831 ...

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

420

Representing and reasoning on XForms document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forms are the most common way to interface users and Web-based applications. Traditional forms cannot provide the functionality needed to fulfil the requirements of complex applications. As such, there is a need for a more advanced format of forms to ...

Peng Yew Cheow; Guido Governatori

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Representing and visualizing calendar expressions in texts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temporal expressions that refer to a part of a calendar area in terms of common calendar divisions are studied. Our claim is that such a "calendar expression" (CE) can be described by a succession of operators operating on a calendar base (CB). These ...

Delphine Battistelli; Javier Couto; Jean-Luc Minel; Sylviane R. Schwer

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Representing parameterised fault trees using Bayesian networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fault trees are used to model how failures lead to hazards and so to estimate the frequencies of the identified hazards of a system. Large systems, such as a rail network, do not give rise to endless different hazards. Rather, similar hazards arise repeatedly ... Keywords: Bayesian network, fault tree, risk analysis

William Marsh; George Bearfield

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone #  

world-class fundamental research and applied R&D. Scientific ... and scientific innovation often result in ... business and the transition of scie ...

424

Facility Representative of the Year Award Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer and managers from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Office of Environmental Management (EM), the Office of...

425

Accountable Property Representatives List by Organization, May...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SPENCER 950 LEN 7042 (202) 287-1550 HG-ADP PATRAICIA SPENCER 950 LEN 7045 (202) 287-1550 HSS SHERRY MAIN GTN C-464 (301) 903-3272 HSS-1.33 SHERRY MAIN GTN C-464 (301) 903-3272 IE...

426

How children represent sustainability in the home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an exploratory study about children's perspective on sustainability in the house through a drawing-telling method. Here, we describe the methodological framework used for interviewing children about issues related to sustainability ... Keywords: children, drawing and telling method, eco-visualization, home, sustainability

Audrey Desjardins; Ron Wakkary

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Facility Representative Program: Headquarters Program Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Name Phone Number E-Mail HQ HS-32 Blackburn Mark 301-903-8396 mark.blackburn@hq.doe.gov HQ NA-SH-80 (CDNS) Crowe Dick 301-903-6214 richard.crowe@nnsa.doe.gov HQ HS-1.1 Do...

428

Facility Representative Program: Nuclear Safety Basis Fundamentals...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available...

429

Representative Microstructures of P/M Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...finishing and fabrication operations, such as steam blackening and joining, are also discussed. An extensive atlas of P/M microstructures

430

Argonne Code Center installation representative guide  

SciTech Connect

The program and operating procedures of the Argonne Code Center are described. The activities of the Center are discussed in terms of tae following: (1) information services, (2) program exchange, (3) ACCFSS facilities, and (4) cooperative efforts. (MOW

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Worksheet.xlsx More Documents & Publications Applications for Certification (Technical Project Officer) Policy Flash 2013-54 Acquisition Certification Program Handbook 4th Edition...

432

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Job/Task Analysis Job/Task Analysis Importance Scale Frequency Scale Competency Need Timeframe 0 Not Performed or N/A 3 Important 0 Not Performed 3 Every few days to weekly 1 On first day 4 After 1st 6 months 1 Not Important 4 Very Important 1 Every few months to yearly 4 Every few hours to daily 2 Within first 3 months 5 Prior to Qualification 2 Somewhat Important 5 Extremely Important 2 Every few weeks to monthly 5 Hourly to many times each hour 3 Within first 4-6 months 1 CONDUCTING THE JOB / TASK ANALYSIS Step 1 Identify and evaluate tasks - Develop a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job. o A great starting point is the list of Duties and Responsibilities from the FAQS. o Give careful thought to additional tasks that could be considered.

433

# Class representing script interface to an output ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... exact -- $protocol($type) { vectorField { # Piece together a permanent file name set idx [lsearch -glob $scalars $driver:Iteration] set iter [format %07d ...

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

Accountable Property Representatives and Property Pass Authorization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IM-11 (202) 586-0194 SHARIATI, LINDA SC-41 (301) 903-7433 SHARPE, DEBORAH L. NE-21 (301) 903-4921 SHEA, JOHN ED-1 (202) 586-7898 Employee Authorized...

435

Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation  

SciTech Connect

The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

Karen S. Browning

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Factors affecting the adoption of home-heating energy-conservation measures: a behavioral approach  

SciTech Connect

The basic aim of this research is to better understand homeowners' adoption of home-heating energy-conservation measures by analyzing a number of factors that are thought to be underlying determinants of adoption behavior. The basic approach is behavioral drawing on the knowledge built up in behavioral geography through studies on natural hazards and innovation diffusion, and borrowing from psychological theories of attitude formation and decision making. In particular, six factors (information, environmental personality, socio-economic and demographic factors, dwelling unit characteristics, psychological variables, and past experience) are shown to directly and indirectly affect adoption behavior. By this means, differences between adopters and nonadopters in the underlying cognitive structures and in the situational factors that affect their decisions are identified. The study focuses on the adoption of three measures: reducing winter night-time thermostat settings, changing or cleaning furnace filters, and installing an automatic setback thermostat. Personal interviews with a random sample of 159 homeowners in Decatur, Illinois serve as the main data base. Results indicate that adoption behavior is determined more by past experience, than by intention. Beliefs, attitudes, and social influences affect behavior indirectly through intention. These psychological variables also act as mediators between information, knowledge, environmental personality, situational variables and behavior. In particular, respondent's age, previous home ownership, and length of residence act indirectly on adoption behavior. Each of these reflects the amount of past experience the respondent is likely to have.

Macey, S.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell...

438

Critical factors influencing employment of disabled persons in Malaysia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines key factors that affect opportunities for employment of disabled people in Malaysia. Four factors are covered by the study; these are namely, (more)

Ramakrishnan, Prabha.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Definition: Generator-To-Load Distribution Factor | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on an identified transmission facility or Flowgate.1 Related Terms Load Shift Factor, transmission lines, Generator Shift Factor, transmission line, flowgate, smart grid...

440

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Title Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Efficient multivariate factorization over finite fields - CECM - Simon ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Times are in CPU seconds on a Sparcstation 20/51. The example .... Another area for future work is the data structure used for representing poly- nomials in...

442

Using Two-Factor RSA Token  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Using Two-Factor RSA Token Using Two-Factor RSA Token with VPN User Guide November 2013 Using Your RSA token with WebVPN 1. Establish a connection to the Internet and connect to https://connect.doe.gov 2. Users who are using their RSA Token for the first time should follow the steps below for PIN creation. Others who have already set up their PIN and used their RSA token previously should enter their six digit numeric username and passcode; this is the PIN + the RSA token code. The result of this successful login will be Step 8 below. 3. A login page similar to the picture below will be displayed. Enter your VPN Username (six-digit numeric ID) and your Password by typing your generated RSA Token code and then click the Login button. Example; your generated RSA token code is 032848 (from above). In the Password box, you will enter

443

Reliability based investigation of design factors  

SciTech Connect

Second-moment probabilistic techniques are used to formulate structural resistances and loads and to derive reliability-based safety, load, and strength factors for design. Existing concepts of the second-moment reliability theory have been extended to the practical case of multiple load combinations. This development consistently includes the stochastic character of loads and the unpredictable nature of their combinations. For this purpose, a new technique for the evaluation of load combinations is presented, whereby the moments of the extreme of combined loads is obtained in terms of the moments of individual loads and parameters describing their random fluctuations in time. Reliability-based safety, load, and strength factors are derived in terms of the acceptable level of risk, the coefficients of variation of the loads and resistance, uncertainties associated with errors in modeling and estimation, and a set of parameters describing the stochastic nature of loads and their combinations.

1978-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Predicting structure in nonsymmetric sparse matrix factorizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many computations on sparse matrices have a phase that predicts the nonzero structure of the output, followed by a phase that actually performs the numerical computation. We study structure prediction for computations that involve nonsymmetric row and column permutations and nonsymmetric or non-square matrices. Our tools are bipartite graphs, matchings, and alternating paths. Our main new result concerns LU factorization with partial pivoting. We show that if a square matrix A has the strong Hall property (i.e., is fully indecomposable) then an upper bound due to George and Ng on the nonzero structure of L + U is as tight as possible. To show this, we prove a crucial result about alternating paths in strong Hall graphs. The alternating-paths theorem seems to be of independent interest: it can also be used to prove related results about structure prediction for QR factorization that are due to Coleman, Edenbrandt, Gilbert, Hare, Johnson, Olesky, Pothen, and van den Driessche.

Gilbert, J.R. (Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA (United States)); Ng, E.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Infinite Dimensional VARs and Factor Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and any r 2 f1; ::;mg. ASSUMPTION 14 (Random factor loadings) isr = sr + #17;isr for s 2 f1; ::; kg , r 2 f1; ::;mg and any i 2 N, (69) where #17;isr #24; IID #0; 0; #27;2#17;sr #1; , isr does not change with N #21; i. #17;isr is independently... distributed of "r0t and ut for any s 2 f1; ::; kg ; r; r0 2 f1; ::;mg ; i 2 N and any t 2 Z. Furthermore, the third and the fourth moments of #17;isr are bounded. ASSUMPTION 15 (Non-random factor loadings) isr = O (1) for any i 2 N and any s 2 f1; ::; kg, r 2...

Chudik, Alexander; Pesaran, M Hashem

446

Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Program. Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Mining and Natural Resources of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, May 7, 1985  

SciTech Connect

A hearing on the management of the Department of Interior's (DOI) Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Program examined the question of geology versus market forces in determining lease boundaries and lease offerings. At issue was the question of possible fraud and the loss of revenue to states when leases are sold over the counter or by lottery, as described by Senator Dale Bumpers of Arkansas and the Governor of Wyoming, and the potential environmental damage that could result from an accelerated federal leasing program. Representatives of DOI described leasing procedures and efforts to balance the need for orderly exploration while also meeting economic and environmental goals. The witnesses also included representatives of environmental groups, geologists, and the oil and gas industry. An appendix with additional correspondence, statements, and other material submitted for the record follows the testimony of the 13 witnesses.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Superintegrable Systems and Higher Rank Factorizations  

SciTech Connect

We consider a class of two-dimensional super-integrable systems that can be considered as the natural generalization of some well known one-dimensional factorized systems. Using standard methods to find the shape-invariant intertwining operators we find an so(6) dynamical algebra and its Hamiltonian hierarchies. In particular we consider those associated to unitary representations that can be displayed by means of three-dimensional polyhedral lattices.

Negro, Javier; Calzada, Juan A.; Olmo, Mariano A. del [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

448

GROA AIRBORNE RELEASE DISPERSION FACTOR CALCULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to calculate airborne release dispersion factors ({chi}/Q) for the surface and subsurface facilities at the Geological Repository Operations Area (GROA). The calculated {chi}/Q values may be used to estimate radiological consequences to workers for potential releases from normal operations and event sequences for License Application. The scope of this document is to provide estimates of {chi}/Q values at potential onsite receptors from facility releases, under normal operating conditions and event sequences.

J. Wang

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

449

Fukushima Daiichi Accident -- Technical Causal Factor Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant experienced a seismic event and subsequent tsunami. The accident and the ensuing mitigation and recovery activities occurred over several days, involved a number of incidents, and might provide several opportunities for lessons learned. The objective of this report is to determine the fundamental causative factors for the loss of critical systems at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors that resulted in core damage and subsequent radioactive release. ...

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

450

Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1985. Part 8. Testimony of members of Congress and other interested individuals and organizations. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 8 of the hearing record covers the testimony of members of Congress and interested individuals and organizations. This volume begins with comments on Texas projects, but also covers projects in several states relating to navigation and flood control, nuclear waste disposal, renewable energy, energy storage system, and other projects in several states. The witnesses represented energy companies, state and local officials, environmental and other citizen groups, as well as the members of Congress.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Urgent supplemental appropriation bill, 1980: Low-income energy assistance program. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Two supplemental budget requests are considered, for low-income full assistance programs. One totals $150 million which, if approved would remain in the Community Services Administration (CSA); the second totals $1.2 billion, which would be, if approved, transferred from CSA to HEW. Specific testimony is presented by Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. House of Representatives; Patrica Roberts Harris, HEW; and Graciela Olivarez, Community Services Administration. Statements by many other interested members of Congress are presented. (MCW)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Energy and water development appropriations for 1984. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Nineth-Eighth Congress, First Session, Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. Part 5  

SciTech Connect

Part 5 of the hearing record covers the testimony of Energy Secretary Donald Hodel, who summarized the Department's budget request needed to carry out its mission. Other witneses represented the Electric Power Administration, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), energy research programs, uranium supply and enrichment, and solar and renewable energy programs. Witnesses outlined the financial and development status in each program area, and gave justifications for the budget requests. (DCK)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

DETERMINATION OF RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF NONPROLIFERATION FACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Methodologies to determine the proliferation resistance (PR) of nuclear facilities often rely on either expert elicitation, a resource-intensive approach without easily reproducible results, or numeric evaluations, which can fail to take into account the institutional knowledge and expert experience of the nonproliferation community. In an attempt to bridge the gap and bring the institutional knowledge into numeric evaluations of PR, a survey was conducted of 33 individuals to find the relative importance of a set of 62 nonproliferation factors, subsectioned into groups under the headings of Diversion, Transportation, Transformation, and Weaponization. One third of the respondents were self-described nonproliferation professionals, and the remaining two thirds were from secondary professions related to nonproliferation, such as industrial engineers or policy analysts. The factors were taken from previous work which used multi-attribute utility analysis with uniform weighting of attributes and did not include institutional knowledge. In both expert and non-expert groups, all four headings and the majority of factors had different relative importance at a confidence of 95% (p=0.05). This analysis and survey demonstrates that institutional knowledge can be brought into numeric evaluations of PR, if there is a sufficient investment of resources made prior to the evaluation.

Richard Metcalf

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Parametric Analysis of the Factors...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Parametric Analysis of the Factors Controlling the Costs of Sedimentary Geothermal Systems - Preliminary Results (Poster)...

455

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units ...

456

Derivation of Accident-Specific Material-at-Risk Equivalency Factors  

SciTech Connect

A novel method for calculating material at risk (MAR) dose equivalency developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) now allows for increased utilization of dose equivalency for facility MAR control. This method involves near-real time accounting for the use of accident and material specific release and transport. It utilizes all information from the committed effective dose equation and the five factor source term equation to derive dose equivalency factors which can be used to establish an overall facility or process MAR limit. The equivalency factors allow different nuclide spectrums to be compared for their respective dose consequences by relating them to a specific quantity of an identified reference nuclide. The ability to compare spectrums to a reference limit ensures that MAR limits are in fact bounding instead of attempting to establish a representative or bounding spectrum which may lead to unintended or unanalyzed configurations. This methodology is then coupled with a near real time material tracking system which allows for accurate and timely material composition information and corresponding MAR equivalency values. The development of this approach was driven by the complex nature of processing operations in some INL facilities. This type of approach is ideally suited for facilities and processes where the composition of the MAR and possible release mechanisms change frequently but in well defined fashions and in a batch-type nature.

Jason P. Andrus; Dr. Chad L. Pope

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites  

SciTech Connect

The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative sequence data in the identification of transcription factor binding sites and is an important step toward understanding the evolution of functional non-coding DNA.

Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

Host factor regulation of Toxoplasma gondii growth and differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has been shown that the NF-kB subunit p65 is phosphorylatedas a consequence of NF-kB signaling upon parasite

Weilhammer, Dina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Tropical Cyclogenesis Factors in a Warming Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the underlying causes of tropical cyclone formation is crucial to predicting tropical cyclone behavior in a warming environment, given the Earth's current warming trend. This study examines two sets of simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model version 3.1 (CAM3): one with aerosol forcings and one without. We looked at how four factors known to be important to tropical cyclone formation vary as carbon dioxde and the ensuing temperature changes increase to very high levels. These factors include Maximum Potential Intensity (MPI), mid-tropospheric moisture content, 200-850 mb vertical wind shear, and 850 mb absolute vorticity. We considered different representations of mid-tropospheric moisture by examining both relative humidity and chi, a non-dimensional measure of the saturation entropy deficit at 600 mb. We also looked at different combinations of these factors, including several variations of a Genesis Potential Index (GPI) and an incubation parameter, gamma, that is related to the length of time required to saturate the middle troposphere and aid tropical cyclogenesis. Higher MPI, lower saturation deficits and higher relative humidity, lower wind shear, and higher absolute vorticity all act to enhance the GPI and lower the incubation time, meaning larger environmental support for tropical cyclone development and intensification. In areas where tropical cyclone development is prevalent today, we found that shear generally decreased, but MPI decreased, absolute vorticity decreased, and the saturation deficit increases. Thus, in today's prevalent tropical cyclone regions, conditions become less favorable for development and intensification as the climate warms. On the other hand, genesis regions tend to push northward into the subtropics, as conditions become much more favorable for development up to ~40 degrees North due to both decreased wind shear and much higher MPI values.

Cathey, Stephen Christopher

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Survey of nucleon electromagnetic form factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has been greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in compar- ison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at MIT-Bates, MAMI, and JLab. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed.

Perdrisat, Charles F. [William and Mary College; Punjabi, Vina A. [Norfolk State U.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Physical Nucleon Form Factors from Lattice QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the possibility of extrapolating state of the art lattice QCD calculations of nucleon electromagnetic form factors to the physical regime. We find that the lattice results can be reproduced using the Light Front Cloudy Bag Model by letting its parameters be analytic functions of the quark mass. We then use the model to extrapolate the lattice result to the physical value of the pion mass, thereby allowing us to study how the predicted zero in GE(Q2)/GM(Q2) for proton varies as a function of quark mass.

Matevosyan, Hrayr H. [Louisiana State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Miller, Gerald A. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Box 351560, Seattle, WA 98195-1560 (United States); Thomas, Anthony W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

462

Resources required for topological quantum factoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a hypothetical topological quantum computer composed of either Ising or Fibonacci anyons. For each case, we calculate the time and number of qubits (space) necessary to execute the most computationally expensive step of Shor's algorithm, modular exponentiation. For Ising anyons, we apply Bravyi's distillation method [S. Bravyi, Phys. Rev. A 73, 042313 (2006)] which combines topological and nontopological operations to allow for universal quantum computation. With reasonable restrictions on the physical parameters we find that factoring a 128-bit number requires approximately 10{sup 3} Fibonacci anyons versus at least 3x10{sup 9} Ising anyons. Other distillation algorithms could reduce the resources for Ising anyons substantially.

Baraban, M. [Department of Physics, Yale University, 217 Prospect Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Bonesteel, N. E. [Department of Physics and National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Simon, S. H. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Performance of Anidolic Daylighting Systems in tropical climates - Parametric studies for identification of main influencing factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Making daylight more available in buildings is highly desirable, not only for reasons of energy-efficiency, but also for improvement of occupants' health and well-being. Core-daylighting, that is daylight provision in areas situated at considerable distances from facades and windows, is currently one of the main challenges in sustainable building design. Anidolic Daylighting Systems (ADSs) are one very promising technology in the field of core-daylighting, but commercial solutions that are not only well-performing but also financially competitive are not yet widely available. This article presents results of parametric studies on Anidolic Integrated Ceilings (AICs), a special type of ADS, for identification of main influencing factors. The article describes a reliable method for simulating ADS and AIC performance under given sky conditions. Various simulation results for the example location Singapore are discussed in detail, it is concluded that the main influencing factors are coating material, system dimensions and external obstruction, and those influencing factors' potential impacts are quantified. It is shown that AIC overall efficiencies can reach up to almost 50% in Singapore. The essentially new results presented in this article can be of great help to architects, engineers and scientists in the future, when it comes to precisely dimensioning ADS for various buildings and daylight conditions. (author)

Linhart, Friedrich; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis [Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory (LESO-PB), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Wittkopf, Stephen K. [School of Design and Environment, Department of Architecture, National University of Singapore, 4 Architecture Drive, Singapore 117566 (Singapore)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

H. R. 3058: This Act may be cited as the Tire Recycling and Recovery Act of 1991, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 25, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on July 25, 1991 to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act in order to provide for a scrap tire management and recovery program. The objectives of this legislation are to provide temporary federal incentives to eliminate scrap tire piles through environmentally sound methods, including recycling, recovery and reuse. All future scrap tires are to be managed by the states through programs that will manage and minimize the buildup of scrap tire piles in the future.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

High-speed rail transportation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Transportation and Hazardous Materials of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, October 16, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

H.R. 1087 would authorize a high speed rail transportation development and commercialization program, establish a national high speed rail transportation policy, and promote development and commercialization of high speed rail transportation by providing Federal guarantees of certain investments in high speed rail transportation facilities. Testimony was heard from representatives of MAGLEV USA, Federal Railroad Administration, National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak), the Office of Technology Assessment, MAGLEV, Inc., National Maglev Initiative, High Speed Rail Association, and the Texas High-Speed Rail Association. Additional information was supplied by the Coalition of Northeastern Governors, Republic Locomotive, Washington State High Speed Ground Transportation, and the Texas High Speed Authority.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Energy and water development appropriations for 1984. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. Part 8  

SciTech Connect

Part 8 of the appropriations hearing record covers the testimony given by members of Congress and other interested individuals in support of projects included in the 1984 budget. It begins on page 1003 with the April 5th, 1983 testimony on Kentucky projects by representatives of that state. Their testimony is followed by that of witnesses speaking for the Upper Colorado River Commission, the Arkansas basin, and numerous projects around the country. This portion of the record concludes with testimony relating to the nuclear fuels industry and nuclear plant construction. An alphabetical list of over 500 witnesses whose testimony appears in this volume follows. (DCK)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry`s practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

Benson, B.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry's practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

Benson, B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Two-point gauge invariant quark Green's functions with polygonal phase factor lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polygonal lines are used for the paths of the gluon field phase factors entering in the definition of gauge invariant quark Green's functions. This allows classification of the Green's functions according to the number of segments the polygonal lines contain. Functional relations are established between Green's functions with polygonal lines with different numbers of segments. An integrodifferential equation is obtained for the quark two-point Green's function with a path along a single straight line segment where the kernels are represented by a series of Wilson loop averages along polygonal contours. The equation is exactly and analytically solved in the case of two-dimensional QCD in the large-$N_c$ limit. The solution displays generation of an infinite number of dynamical quark masses accompanied with branch point singularities that are stronger than simple poles. An approximation scheme, based on the counting of functional derivatives of Wilson loops, is proposed for the resolution of the equation in four dimensions.

H. Sazdjian

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

470

Factors affecting home range of mallard pairs  

SciTech Connect

Certain habitat and social factors were investigated for their effect on home range size of mallard (Anas platyhynchos) pairs breeding in a forested region of north-central Minnesota during the spring of 1971--72. Data from 31 radio-marked hens and drakes were used, but primary emphasis was placed on 8 pairs (5 with both members of the pair marked). Pairs were radio-tracked on river marsh areas, river channels, and large sand lakes to provide comparative data for evaluating home range size differences. Home ranges varied from an average of 53 ha for pairs using primarily river habitat to 871 ha for pairs using only large sand lakes. River and lake shorelines varied considerably in species and density of vegetation. Interaction between pairs as well as density of flocked males appeared to be influenced by these habitat differences with resultant effects on home range sizes.

Riechmann, J.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

hourly emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

60 60 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278660 Varnish cache server hourly emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

472

Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Process Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation practices, such as heat recovery and integration, require that many chemical and related processes use advanced control systems. Many of the more advanced process control strategies and algorithms can cause operator confusion, leading to incorrect operator actions and negating the advantages of the advanced control. If the operator makes a mistake and upsets the process, or fails to respond correctly to a process upset, the loss can exceed the possible savings of the advanced control. Further, the experience can result in the operator not using the control capability in the future. Display and man/machine interface techniques, based on an understanding of human factors and of an operator's typical analysis of a process, can be used to present information to the operator in a manner which will prevent confusion. This paper discusses techniques for selecting and displaying process and control information to the operator.

Shaw, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Factor Structure in Groups Selected on Observed Scores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corresponding to item format ('minor' answer key and 'other' answer key). There are two quantitative factors,into the full sample answer key factors (2 and 3). The five

Muthen, Bengt O.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model...

475

A New Approach to an Accurate Wind Chill Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winter weather often shows a severity marked by low dry-bulb temperature combined with high wind speed. The wind chill factor is now a standard meteorological term to express this severity. This factor, or more appropriately the wind chill ...

Maurice Bluestein; Jack Zecher

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Shortwave Shape Factor Inversion of Earth Radiation Budget Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shape factor technique is routinely used to invert wide-angle radiometric measurements at satellite altitude to flux at the top of the atmosphere. The derivation of a shortwave shape factor requires assumptions on both the viewed radiation ...

Richard N. Green; G. Louis Smith

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Factors Involved in Search Dog Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Events of significant impact as recent as hurricane Ike yielded a consistent disturbing truth: we lack sufficient numbers of competent search dog [Canis familiaris] teams. This study was conceived to provide information in identifying factors involved in training competent search dogs. Obedience training methods, age training was initiated, previous handler canine training experience, and handler perception and emotional attachment to their search dog were examined through a sixty-six question survey. Achievement of a national certification was used as a measure of performance success. Association between factors and performance success was evaluated through Chi-Square testing. Surveys were announced through the National Search Dog Alliance (NSDA) and were available online; 177 were fully completed by respondents and used in the data analysis. Seventy-two percent of nationally certified canine team respondents preferred positive reinforcement methods. Several statistically significant associations were detected: (a) female handlers preferred positive reinforcement training methods [x^2 = 8.504, d.f.=1, P = 0.004], (b) as dogs matured use of active training equipment increased [x^2 = 54.043, d.f.= 2, P training each week had a higher proportion of national certifications [x^2 = 16.379, d.f. = 1, P less than 0.001]. The data also indicated a trend for handlers to have previous canine training experience equal to or greater than search dog training experience [x^2 = 118.36, d.f. = 9, P =0.05]. The results warrant further research on the effects of early training, the effects of training time investment, and the interaction between canine selection and handler understanding of canine learning theory.

Alexander, Michael B.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

EPRI-CRIEPI Joint Human Factors Program Summary Report: Joint EPRI-CRIEPI Human Factors Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI-CRIEPI Joint Human Factors Program developed an array of intervention products that provide logical solutions to performance problems confronting nuclear power plant maintenance workers. These products, designed to reduce the incidence of errors and increase productivity, range from job performance cards to a software-based authoring system for training material.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

479

Factors Affecting the Dissolution of Resorbable Bioactive Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factors affecting dissolution are numerous: residual stress, composition, ... and manufacturing method on the dissolution behaviour of glasses with fixed overall...

480

Experimental determination of the evolvability of a transcription factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gene regulation by transcription factors and micrornas. Nat Rev Genet 8:93­103. 35. Sparrow D, Guillen

Quake, Stephen R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "factors shown represent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... M. Misakian, TL Nelson and WE Feero. Regarding Electric Energy Savings, Power Factors, and Carbon Footprints: A Primer. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

482

Microsoft Word - EVS25_Primary Factors Impact Fuel Consumption of PHEV_FINAL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EVS-25 Shenzhen, China, Nov. 5-9, 2010 EVS-25 Shenzhen, China, Nov. 5-9, 2010 The 25th World Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exhibition Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Richard 'Barney' Carlson, Matthew G. Shirk, and Benjamin M. Geller Energy Storage and Transportation Systems Department, Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83401, USA E-mail: richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract- Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption when compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles by utilizing onboard electrical energy storage for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEVs, analysis has shown that fuel consumption of PHEVs is more

483

Nuclear reactor safety. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, May 22 and July 16, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two days of hearings addressed reactor safety and public perceptions that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has neglected the problem of utility mismanagement of nuclear power plants. One point of concern has been the proprietary approach to safety that has evolved since the NRC delegated much of the regulation to the industry-sponsored Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Other points of contention were the move to standardize reactor designs which have already been identified as having safety problems. Attention during the second day focused on the Pilgrim plant in Massachusetts which was allowed to operate despite management deficiencies. The 18 witnesses included NRC commissioners, utilities, and several representatives of government agencies and private groups from Massachusetts. Additional material submitted for the record follows their testimony.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Probability based load factors for design of concrete containment structures  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a procedure for developing probability-based load combinations for the design of concrete containments. The proposed criteria are in a load and resistance factor design (LRFD) format. The load factors and resistance factors are derived for use in limit states design and are based on a target limit state probability. In this paper, the load factors for accident pressure and safe shutdown earthquake are derived for three target limit state probabilities. Other load factors are recommended on the basis of prior experience with probability-based design criteria for ordinary building construction. 6 refs.

Hwang, H.; Kagami, S.; Reich, M.; Ellingwood, B.; Shinozuka, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Electricity Factors  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program (Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emission Coefficients) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Emission Coefficients Table 1: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion Table 2: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Transportation Fuels Table 3: Generic Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Stationary Fuel Combustion Table 4: Specific Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Biogenic Fuel Sources Table 5: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions Factors for Highway Vehicles Table 6: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Table 7: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Non-Highway Mobile Combustion

486

Human Factors Aspects of Operating Small Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. They are considering small modular reactors (SMRs) as one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants, and so may require a concept of operations (ConOps) that also is different. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has begun examining the human factors engineering- (HFE) and ConOps- aspects of SMRs; if needed, they will formulate guidance to support SMR licensing reviews. We developed a ConOps model, consisting of the following dimensions: Plant mission; roles and responsibilities of all agents; staffing, qualifications, and training; management of normal operations; management of off-normal conditions and emergencies; and, management of maintenance and modifications. We are reviewing information on SMR design to obtain data about each of these dimensions, and have identified several preliminary issues. In addition, we are obtaining operations-related information from other types of multi-module systems, such as refineries, to identify lessons learned from their experience. Here, we describe the project's methodology and our preliminary findings.

OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Deem, R. (BNL); Xing, J.; DAgostino, A. (NRC)

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

487

FACTORS AFFECTING SMALLHOLDER FARMERS ADOPTION OF SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION PRACTICES IN ZAMBIA By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land and water for agriculture are scarce natural resources hence the promotion of good land management has taken center stage in Zambia. This study attempts to measure the factors that could be associated with the adoption of conservation farming practices considering that farmers have multiple practices to choose from and may adopt a given technology package in pieces. Based on a 1999/2000 national representative sample, the study suggests that farmers may be using intercropping to manage risk in low rainfall areas whereas pot holing does not yet appear to be considered as a risk reduction option. The thrust of this study is that policy makers should strive to build human capital, while at the same time retain skilled farmers through reduced adult mortalities. Provision of extension services should concentrate in areas with relevant physiographical factors while infrastructure should be improved to minimize costs of delivering extension services and agricultural inputs. DEDICATION This thesis is dedicated to my wife Doreen and my little daughter Chomba. The patience they showed and the support they provided during the time I was studying up to the very end of writing this thesis was wonderful. iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Many thanks and appreciation goes to the following institutions and individuals whom without their help and support, the successful completion of my study would not have been possible:

Geoffrey Ndawa Chomba; Geoffrey Ndawa Chomba

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Astrophysical S factors for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the potential cluster model where orbital states are classified according to Young diagrams and isospin, astrophysical S factors are considered for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei at energies of up to 1 and 10 keV, respectively. It is shown that the approach used, which takes into account only the E1 transition for the p{sup 3}H capture process, makes it possible to describe well the most recent experimental data at c.m. energies in the range from 50 keV to 5MeV. In the case of proton capture by {sup 7}Li nuclei, an M1 processwas taken into account in addition to the E1 transition, and a general behavior and the magnitude of the experimental S factor could be correctly reproduced owing to this at astrophysical energies, including the region around the resonance at 0.441 MeV (in the laboratory frame).

Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: dubovichenko@gmail.com [Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute, NC SRT NSA RK (Kazakhstan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z