Sample records for factor pef neutron

  1. Power Ecalene Fuels Inc PEF | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIIIRockEcalene Fuels Inc PEF

  2. SICANE: a Detector Array for the Measurement of Nuclear Recoil Quenching Factors using Monoenergetic Neutron Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Simon; L. Berge; A. Broniatowski; R. Bouvier; B. Chambon; M. De Jesus; D. Drain; L. Dumoulin; J. Gascon; J. P. Hadjout; A. Juillard; O. Martineau; C. Pastor; M. Stern; L. Vagneron

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    SICANE is a neutron scattering multidetector facility for the determination of the quenching factor (ratio of the response to nuclear recoils and to electrons) of cryogenic detectors used in direct WIMP searches. Well collimated monoenergetic neutron beams are obtained with inverse (p,n) reactions. The facility is described, and results obtained for the quenching factors of scintillation in NaI(Tl) and of heat and ionization in Ge are presented.

  3. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  4. PEF(FORNWNC'EA!iuROBLIST/iESSTRADES I[jLQG REGULATOR DESIGN+ John B. Moore *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John Barratt

    PEF(FORNWNC'EA!iuROBLIST/iESSTRADES I[jLQG REGULATOR DESIGN+ John B. Moore * Dagfinn Gangsaas Airplane Company Research Coritract, "Design of Adaptive Flight Control Systems," P.O. Y-202277-0S135N. #12, there are a number of design methods. Focusing on optimal linear regulator design using quadratic indices, it is well

  5. Exact limiting relation between the structure factors in neutron and x-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. B. Bobrov; S. A. Trigger; S. N. Skovorod'ko

    2010-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratio of the static matter structure factor measured in experiments on coherent X-ray scattering to the static structure factor measured in experiments on neutron scattering is considered. It is shown theoretically that this ratio in the long-wavelength limit is equal to the nucleus charge at arbitrary thermodynamic parameters of a pure substance (the system of nuclei and electrons, where interaction between particles is pure Coulomb) in a disordered equilibrium state. This result is the exact relation of the quantum statistical mechanics. The experimental verification of this relation can be done in the long wavelength X-ray and neutron experiments.

  6. Measurement of the Neutron electric form factor at Q2=0.8 2(GeV\\\\c)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Glazier

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleon form factors allow a sensitive test for models of the nucleon. Recent experiments utilising polarisation observables have resulted, for the first time, in a model-independent determination of the neutron electric form factor GnE. This method employed an 80% longitudinally polarised, high intensity (10 uA) electon beam (883 MeV) that was quasi-elastically scattered off a liquid deuterium target in the reaction D (e, en)p. A neutron polarimeter was designed and installed to measure the ratio of transverse-to-longitudinal polarisation using neutron scattering asymmetries. This ratio allowed a determination of the neutron elastic form factor, GnE, free of the previous large systematic uncertainties associated with the deuterium wave function. The experiment took place in the A1 experimental hall at MAMI taking advantage of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer. A detailed investigation was carried out into the performance of the neutron polarimeter.

  7. Reduced neutron spectroscopic factors when using potential geometries constrained by Hartree-Fock calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenny Lee; J. A. Tostevin; B. A. Brown; F. Delaunay; W. G. Lynch; M. J. Saelim; M. B. Tsang

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We carry out a systematic analysis of angular distribution measurements for selected ground-state to ground-state (d,p) and (p,d) neutron transfer reactions, including the calcium isotopes. We propose a consistent three-body model reaction methodology in which we constrain the transferred-neutron bound state and nucleon-target optical potential geometries using modern Hartree-Fock calculations. Our deduced neutron spectroscopic factors are found to be suppressed by ~30% relative to independent-particle shell-model values, from 40Ca through 49Ca. The other nuclei studied, ranging from B to Ti, show similar average suppressions with respect to large-basis shell-model expectations. Our results are consistent with deduced spectroscopic strengths for neutrons and protons from intermediate energy nucleon knockout reactions, and for protons from (e,e'p) reactions, on well-bound nuclei. PACS: 24.50.+g, 24.10.Eq, 25.40.-h, 25.45.-z

  8. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) low cost generator design using power MOSFET and Cockcroft-Walton multiplier circuit as high voltage DC source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaeman, M. Y.; Widita, R. [Department of Physics, Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Non-ionizing radiation therapy for cancer using pulsed electric field with high intensity field has become an interesting field new research topic. A new method using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) offers a novel means to treat cancer. Not like the conventional electroporation, nsPEFs able to create nanopores in all membranes of the cell, including membrane in cell organelles, like mitochondria and nucleus. NsPEFs will promote cell death in several cell types, including cancer cell by apoptosis mechanism. NsPEFs will use pulse with intensity of electric field higher than conventional electroporation, between 20–100 kV/cm and with shorter duration of pulse than conventional electroporation. NsPEFs requires a generator to produce high voltage pulse and to achieve high intensity electric field with proper pulse width. However, manufacturing cost for creating generator that generates a high voltage with short duration for nsPEFs purposes is highly expensive. Hence, the aim of this research is to obtain the low cost generator design that is able to produce a high voltage pulse with nanosecond width and will be used for nsPEFs purposes. Method: Cockcroft-Walton multiplier circuit will boost the input of 220 volt AC into high voltage DC around 1500 volt and it will be combined by a series of power MOSFET as a fast switch to obtain a high voltage with nanosecond pulse width. The motivation using Cockcroft-Walton multiplier is to acquire a low-cost high voltage DC generator; it will use capacitors and diodes arranged like a step. Power MOSFET connected in series is used as voltage divider to share the high voltage in order not to damage them. Results: This design is expected to acquire a low-cost generator that can achieve the high voltage pulse in amount of ?1.5 kV with falltime 3 ns and risetime 15 ns into a 50? load that will be used for nsPEFs purposes. Further detailed on the circuit design will be explained at presentation.

  9. Clean measurements of the nucleon axial-vector and free-neutron magnetic form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Deur

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the feasibility of a weak charged current experiment using a low energy electron beam. A first goal is to measure the Q^2 dependence of the axial-vector form factor g_a(Q^2). It can be measured model-independently and as robustly as for electromagnetic form factors from typical electron scattering experiments, in contrast to the methods used so far to measure g_a(Q^2). If g_a(Q^2) follows a dipole form, the axial mass can be extracted with a better accuracy than the world data altogether. The most important detection equipment would be a segmented neutron detector with good momentum and angular resolution that is symmetric about the beam direction, and covers a moderate angular range. A high intensity beam (100 uA) is necessary. Beam polarization is highly desirable as it provides a clean measurement of the backgrounds. Beam energies between 70 and 110 MeV are ideal. This range would provide a Q^2 mapping of g_a between 0.01

  10. A Measurement of the neutron electric form factor at very large momentum transfer using polaried electrions scattering from a polarized helium-3 target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aidan Kelleher

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the nucleon is essential for an understanding of nucleon structure. Of the form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron has been measured over the smallest range in Q{sup 2} and with the lowest precision. Jefferson Lab experiment 02-013 used a novel new polarized {sup 3}He target to nearly double the range of momentum transfer in which the neutron form factor has been studied and to measure it with much higher precision. Polarized electrons were scattered off this target, and both the scattered electron and neutron were detected. G{sup n}{sub E} was measured to be 0.0242 ± 0.0020(stat) ± 0.0061(sys) and 0.0247 ± 0.0029(stat) ± 0.0031(sys) at Q{sup 2} = 1.7 and 2.5 GeV{sup 2}, respectively.

  11. Neutron spectroscopic factors of 7Li and astrophysical 6Li(n,g)7Li reaction rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Su; Zhihong Li; Bing Guo; Xixiang Bai; Zhichang Li; Jiancheng Liu; Youbao Wang; Gang Lian; Sheng Zeng; Baoxiang Wang; Shengquan Yan; Yunju Li; Ertao Li; Qiwen Fan; Weiping Liu

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Angular distributions of the 7Li(6Li,6Li)7Li elastic scattering and the 7Li(6Li,7Li_{g.s.})6Li, 7Li(6Li,7Li*_{0.48})6Li transfer reactions at Ec.m. = 23.7 MeV were measured with the Q3D magnetic spectrograph. The optical potential of 6Li+7Li was obtained by fitting the elastic scattering differential cross sections. Based on the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) analysis, spectroscopic factors of 7Li=6Li+n were determined to be 0.73 +- 0.05 and 0.90 +- 0.09 for the ground and first exited states in 7Li, respectively. Using the spectroscopic factors, the cross sections of the 6Li(n,g)7Li direct neutron capture reactions and the astrophysical 6Li(n,g)7Li reaction rates were derived.

  12. The neutron electric form factor to Q² = 1.45 (GeV/c)²

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaster, Bradley R. (Bradley Robert), 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nucleon elastic electromagnetic form factors are fundamental quantities needed for an understanding of nucleon and nuclear electromagnetic structure. The evolution of the Sachs electric and magnetic form factors with ...

  13. Calculation of extremity neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood-Zika, Annmarie Ruth

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surface fluence spectra 45 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page Properties of commercially available TLDs . . PNNL dose equivalent averaged quality factors . 16 3 MCNP input deck geometries Phantoms modeled in MCNP input decks . . Comparison of calculated..., PNNL and DOELAP fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors for bare '"Cf . . . . 37 Comparison of calculated, PNNL and DOELAP fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors for D, O moderated '"Cf. 37 Fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors...

  14. A measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor Gn?M? form quasi-elastic ²[right arrow]H ([right arrow]e, e') at low Q²

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meitanis, Nikolas (Nikolas C.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron magnetic form factor GnM has been measured using the inclusive electro-disintegration 2H(e, e') of the deuteron for the first time. The longitudinally polarized electron beam of the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator ...

  15. Precise measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor GMn [G superscript n subscript M] in the Few-GeV2 [V superscript 2] region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowntree, D.

    The neutron elastic magnetic form factor was extracted from quasielastic electron scattering on deuterium over the range Q2=1.0–4.8 [Q superscript 2 = 1.0-4.8] ??GeV2 [Ge V superscript 2] with the CLAS detector at Jefferson ...

  16. Neutron scatter camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Krenz, Kevin D.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source has been described. This instrument can improve the signal to background compared to non imaging neutron detection techniques by a factor given by ratio of the angular resolution window to 4.pi.. In addition to being a neutron imager, this instrument will also be an excellent neutron spectrometer, and will be able to differentiate between different types of neutron sources (e.g. fission, alpha-n, cosmic ray, and D-D or D-T fusion). Moreover, the instrument is able to pinpoint the source location.

  17. Evaluated cross section libraries and kerma factors for neutrons up to 100 MeV on {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evaluations of the interaction of 20 to 100 MeV neutrons with oxygen and nitrogen nuclei, which follows on from our previous work on carbon. Our aim is to accurately represent integrated cross sections, inclusive emission spectra, and kerma factors, in a data library which can be used in radiation transport calculations. We apply the FKK-GNASH nuclear model code, which includes Hauser-Feshbach, preequilibrium, and direct reaction mechanisms, and use experimental measurements to optimize the calculations. We determine total, elastic, and nonelastic cross sections, angle-energy correlated emission spectra, for light ejectiles with A{<=}4 and gamma-rays, and average energy depositions. Our results for charged-particle emission spectra agree well with the measurements of Subramanian et al.. We compare kerma factors derived from our evaluated cross sections with experimental data, providing an integral benchmarking of our work. The evaluated data libraries are available as electronic files.

  18. Probing shell structure and shape changes in neutron-rich sulfur isotopes through transient-field g factor measurements on fast radioactive beams of 38S and 40S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Davies; A. E. Stuchbery; P. F. Mantica; P. M. Davidson; A. N. Wilson; A. Becerril; B. A. Brown; C. M. Campbell; J. M. Cook; D. C. Dinca; A. Gade; S. N. Liddick; T. J. Mertzimekis; W. F. Mueller; J. R. Terry; B. E. Tomlin; K. Yoneda; H. Zwahlen

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The shell structure underlying shape changes in neutron-rich nuclei near N=28 has been investigated by a novel application of the transient field technique to measure the first-excited state g factors in 38S and 40S produced as fast radioactive beams. There is a fine balance between proton and neutron contributions to the magnetic moments in both nuclei. The g factor of deformed 40S does not resemble that of a conventional collective nucleus because spin contributions are more important than usual.

  19. Neutronic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wende, Charles W. J. (Augusta, GA); Babcock, Dale F. (Wilmington, DE); Menegus, Robert L. (Wilmington, DE)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  20. Neutron skins and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarewicz, J. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

  1. Neutron guide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greene, Geoffrey L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  2. Neutron Scattering Tutorials | Neutron Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Scattering Tutorials SHARE Neutron Scattering Tutorials The following lectures were presented at the 2011 and 2010 National School on Neutron & X-Ray Scattering. This...

  3. Measurement of the Charge Form Factor of the Neutron $G^{E}_{n}$ from ${\\vec{d}(\\vec{e},e'n)p}$ at $Q^{2}=0.5$ and $1.0 (GeV/c)^{2}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Savvinov

    2002-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We determined the electric form factor of the neutron $G_E^n$ via the reaction ${\\vec{d}(\\vec{e},e'n)p}$ using a longitudinally polarized electron beam and a frozen, polarized $^{15}ND_3$ target at Jefferson Lab. The knocked out neutrons were detected in a segmented plastic scintillator in coincidence with the quasi-elastically scattered electrons which were tracked in Hall C's High Momentum Spectrometer. To extract $G_E^n$, we compared the experimental beam--target asymmetry with theoretical calculations based on different $G_E^n$ models. We report the preliminary results of the fall 2001 run at $Q^{2}=0.5$ and $1.0 (GeV/c)^{2}$.

  4. A Measurement of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron through $\\vec{d}(\\vec{e},e'n)p$ at $Q^2 = 0.5$ (GeV/c)$^2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E93026 Collaboration; H. Zhu

    2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of the neutron electric form factor $G_E^n$ via $\\vec{d}(\\vec{e},e'n)p$ using a solid polarized target. $G_E^n$ was determined from the beam-target asymmetry in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from polarized deuterated ammonia, $^{15}$ND$_3$. The measurement was performed in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) in quasi free kinematics with the target polarization perpendicular to the momentum transfer. The electrons were detected in a magnetic spectrometer in coincidence with neutrons in a large solid angle segmented detector. We find $G_E^n = 0.04632\\pm0.00616 (stat.) \\pm0.00341 (syst.)$ at $Q^2 = 0.495$ (GeV/c)$^2$.

  5. Neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stephan, Andrew C. (Knoxville, TN); Jardret; Vincent D. (Powell, TN)

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  6. Neutron tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Lou, Tak Pui (Berkeley, CA); Reijonen, Jani (Oakland, CA)

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  7. Fusion integral experiments and analysis and the determination of design safety factors - II: Application to the prediction uncertainty of tritium production rate from the U.S. DOE/JAERI collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many fusion integral experiments were performed during the last decade within a well-established collaboration between the United States and Japan on fusion breeder neutronics. The tritium production rate (TPR) has the prime focus among other reactions. The experimental and calculational data sets of local TPR in each experiment were interpolated to give an estimate of the prediction uncertainty, and the standard deviation, of the line-integrated TPR, a quantity that is closely related to the total breeding ratio (TBR) in the test assembly. A novel methodology developed during the collaboration was applied to arrive at estimates to design safety factors that fusion blanket designers can use to ensure that the achievable TBR in a blanket does not fall below a minimum required value. Associated with each safety factor is a confidence level, designers may choose to have, that calculated TPR will not exceed the actual measured value. Higher confidence levels require larger safety factors. Tabular and graphical forms for these factors are given, as derived independently for TPR from Li-6(T{sub 6}), Li-7 (T{sub 7}), and natural lithium (T{sub n}). Furthermore, distinction was made between safety factors based on the technique applied, discrete ordinates methods, and Monte Carlo methods in the U.S. calculations, JAERI`s calculations, and in both calculations considered simultaneously. The derived factors are applicable to TPR in Li{sub 2}O breeding material, 48 refs., 51 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  9. Precise Extraction of the Neutron Magnetic Form Factor from Quasi-elastic 3He(pol)(e(pol),e') at Q^2 = 0.1-0.6 (GeV/c)^2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jens-ole Hansen; Brian Anderson; Leonard Auerbach; Todd Averett; William Bertozzi; Tim Black; John Calarco; Lawrence Cardman; Gordon Cates; Zhengwei Chai; Jiang-Ping Chen; Seonho Choi; Eugene Chudakov; Steve Churchwell; G Corrado; Christopher Crawford; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Dipangkar Dutta; John Finn; Haiyan Gao; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Charles Glashausser; Walter Gloeckle; Jacek Golak; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Calvin Howell; Emlyn Hughes; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Piotr Zolnierczuk; Cornelis De Jager; John Jensen; Xiaodong Jiang; Cathleen Jones; Mark Jones; R Kahl; H Kamada; A Kievsky; Ioannis Kominis; Wolfgang Korsch; Kevin Kramer; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Michael Kuss; Enkeleida Lakuriqi; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; John LeRose; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Jeffery Martin; Kathy McCormick; Robert McKeown; Kevin McIlhany; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Greg Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Sirish Nanda; Emanuele Pace; Tina Pavlin; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; David Pripstein; David Prout; Ronald Ransome; Yves Roblin; Marat Rvachev; Giovanni Salme; Michael Schnee; Charles Seely; Taeksu Shin; Karl Slifer; Paul Souder; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Mark Sutter; Bryan Tipton; Luminita Todor; M Viviani; Branislav Vlahovic; John Watson; Claude Williamson; H Witala; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Feng Xiong; Wang Xu; Jen-chuan Yeh

    2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the transverse asymmetry A{sub T'} in the quasi-elastic {sup 3}/rvec He/(/rvec e/,e') process with high precision at Q{sup 2}-values from 0.1 to 0.6 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The neutron magnetic form factor G{sub M}{sup n} was extracted at Q{sup 2}-values of 0.1 and 0.2 (GeV/c){sup 2} using a non-relativistic Faddeev calculation which includes both final-state interactions (FSI) and meson-exchange currents (MEC). Theoretical uncertainties due to the FSI and MEC effects were constrained with a precision measurement of the spin-dependent asymmetry in the threshold region of {sup 3}/rvec He/(/rvec e/,e'). We also extracted the neutron magnetic form factor G{sub M}{sup n} at Q{sup 2}-values of 0.3 to 0.6 (GeV/c){sup 2} based on Plane Wave Impulse Approximation calculations.

  10. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  11. Neutron Multiplicity Measurements With 3He Alternative: Straw Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Counting neutrons emitted by special nuclear material (SNM) and differentiating them from the background neutrons of various origins is the most effective passive means of detecting SNM. Unfortunately, neutron detection, counting, and partitioning in a maritime environment are complex due to the presence of high-multiplicity spallation neutrons (commonly known as ‘‘ship effect ’’) and to the complicated nature of the neutron scattering in that environment. A prototype neutron detector was built using 10B as the converter in a special form factor called ‘‘straws’’ that would address the above problems by looking into the details of multiplicity distributions of neutrons originating from a fissioning source. This paper describes the straw neutron multiplicity counter (NMC) and assesses the performance with those of a commercially available fission meter. The prototype straw neutron detector provides a large-area, efficient, lightweight, more granular (than fission meter) neutron-responsive detection surface (to facilitate imaging) to enhance the ease of application of fission meters. Presented here are the results of preliminary investigations, modeling, and engineering considerations leading to the construction of this prototype. This design is capable of multiplicity and Feynman variance measurements. This prototype may lead to a near-term solution to the crisis that has arisen from the global scarcity of 3He by offering a viable alternative to fission meters. This paper describes the work performed during a 2-year site-directed research and development (SDRD) project that incorporated straw detectors for neutron multiplicity counting. The NMC is a two-panel detector system. We used 10B (in the form of enriched boron carbide: 10B4C) for neutron detection instead of 3He. In the first year, the project worked with a panel of straw neutron detectors, investigated its characteristics, and developed a data acquisition (DAQ) system to collect neutron multiplicity information from spontaneous fission sources using a single panel consisting of 60 straws equally distributed over three rows in high-density polyethylenemoderator. In the following year, we developed the field-programmable gate array and associated DAQ software. This SDRD effort successfully produced a prototype NMC with*33% detection efficiency compared to a commercial fission meter.

  12. Neutron Repulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver K. Manuel

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth is connected gravitationally, magnetically and electrically to its heat source - a neutron star that is obscured from view by waste products in the photosphere. Neutron repulsion is like the hot filament in an incandescent light bulb. Excited neutrons are emitted from the solar core and decay into hydrogen that glows in the photosphere like a frosted light bulb. Neutron repulsion was recognized in nuclear rest mass data in 2000 as the overlooked source of energy, the keystone of an arch that locked together these puzzling space-age observations: 1.) Excess 136Xe accompanied primordial helium in the stellar debris that formed the solar system (Fig. 1); 2.) The Sun formed on the supernova core (Fig. 2); 3.) Waste products from the core pass through an iron-rich mantle, selectively carrying lighter elements and lighter isotopes of each element into the photosphere (Figs. 3-4); and 4.) Neutron repulsion powers the Sun and sustains life (Figs. 5-7). Together these findings offer a framework for understanding how: a.) The Sun generates and releases neutrinos, energy and solar-wind hydrogen and helium; b.) An inhabitable planet formed and life evolved around an ordinary-looking star; c.) Continuous climate change - induced by cyclic changes in gravitational interactions of the Sun's energetic core with planets - has favored survival by adaptation.

  13. Neutron Repulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Oliver K

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth is connected gravitationally, magnetically and electrically to its heat source - a neutron star that is obscured from view by waste products in the photosphere. Neutron repulsion is like the hot filament in an incandescent light bulb. Excited neutrons are emitted from the solar core and decay into hydrogen that glows in the photosphere like a frosted light bulb. Neutron repulsion was recognized in nuclear rest mass data in 2000 as the overlooked source of energy, the keystone of an arch that locked together these puzzling space-age observations: 1.) Excess 136Xe accompanied primordial helium in the stellar debris that formed the solar system (Fig. 1); 2.) The Sun formed on the supernova core (Fig. 2); 3.) Waste products from the core pass through an iron-rich mantle, selectively carrying lighter elements and lighter isotopes of each element into the photosphere (Figs. 3-4); and 4.) Neutron repulsion powers the Sun and sustains life (Figs. 5-7). Together these findings offer a framework for understanding...

  14. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A. [Centro NAST, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'G. Occhialini', Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, Universita di Padova (Italy); Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Platt, S. P. [School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancs. PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  15. Measurement of the electric form factor of the neutron at low momentum transfers using a vector polarized deuterium gas target at BLAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziskin, Vitaliy

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elastic form factors are fundamental quantities that characterize the electromagnetic structure of the nucleon. High precision measurements of these quantities are essential in understanding the structure of hadronic matter. ...

  16. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guillen, Donna P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Longhurst, Glen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Porter, Douglas L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parry, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  17. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  18. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  19. Spectrum tailoring of the neutron energy spectrum in the context of delayed neutron detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koehler, William E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Steve J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fensin, Mike L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of measuring plutonium mass in spent fuel, a delayed neutron instrument is of particular interest since, if properly designed, the delayed neutron signal from {sup 235}U is significantly stronger than the signature from {sup 239}Pu or {sup 241}Pu. A key factor in properly designing a delayed neutron instrument is to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U. This minimization is achieved by keeping the interrogating neutron spectrum below {approx} 1 MeV. In the context of spent fuel measurements it is desirable to use a 14 MeV (deuterium and tritium) neutron generator for economic reasons. Spectrum tailoring is the term used to describe the inclusion of material between the 14 MeV neutrons and the interrogated object that lower the neutron energy through nuclear reactions and moderation. This report quantifies the utility of different material combination for spectrum tailoring.

  20. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  1. SHARP Neutronics Expanded

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SHARP neutronics module, PROTEUS, includes neutron and gamma transport solvers and cross-section processing tools as well as the capability for depletion and fuel cycle analysis.

  2. Plutonium Detection with Straw Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A kilogram of weapons grade plutonium gives off about 56,000 neutrons per second of which 55,000 neutrons come from spontaneous fission of 240Pu (~6% by weight of the total plutonium). Actually, all even numbered isotopes (238Pu, 240Pu, and 242Pu) produce copious spontaneous fission neutrons. These neutrons induce fission in the surrounding fissile 239Pu with an approximate multiplication of a factor of ~1.9. This multiplication depends on the shape of the fissile materials and the surrounding material. These neutrons (typically of energy 2 MeV and air scattering mean free path >100 meters) can be detected 100 meters away from the source by vehicle-portable neutron detectors. [1] In our current studies on neutron detection techniques, without using 3He gas proportional counters, we designed and developed a portable high-efficiency neutron multiplicity counter using 10B-coated thin tubes called straws. The detector was designed to perform like commercially available fission meters (manufactured by Ortec Corp.) except instead of using 3He gas as a neutron conversion material, we used a thin coating of 10B.

  3. New measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. B. Grammer; R. Alarcon; L. Barrón-Palos; D. Blyth; J. D. Bowman; J. Calarco; C. Crawford; K. Craycraft; D. Evans; N. Fomin; J. Fry; M. Gericke; R. C. Gillis; G. L. Greene; J. Hamblen; C. Hayes; S. Kucuker; R. Mahurin; M. Maldonado-Velázquez; E. Martin; M. McCrea; P. E. Mueller; M. Musgrave; H. Nann; S. I. Penttilä; W. M. Snow; Z. Tang; W. S. Wilburn

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow neutron scattering provides quantitative information on the structure and dynamics of materials of interest in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology, geology, and other fields. Liquid hydrogen is a widely-used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. In particular the rapid drop of the slow neutron scattering cross section of liquid parahydrogen below 14.5~meV is especially interesting and important. We have measured the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43~meV and 16.1~meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6~K using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At 1~meV this measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work which has been used in the design of liquid hydrogen moderators at slow neutron sources. We describe our measurements, compare them with previous work, and discuss the implications for designing more intense slow neutron sources.

  4. Neutrostriction in Neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. Ignatovich

    2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that not only gravity, but also neutrostriction forces due to optical potential created by coherent elastic neutron-neutron scattering can hold a neutron star together. The latter forces can be stronger than gravitational ones. The effect of these forces on mass, radius and structure of the neutron star is estimated.

  5. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  6. Imaging with Scattered Neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ballhausen; H. Abele; R. Gaehler; M. Trapp; A. Van Overberghe

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-resolution images by scattered neutron radiography and tomography are presented.

  7. The effective delayed neutron fraction for bare-metal criticals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearlstein, S.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given sufficient material, a large number of actinides could be used to form bare-metal criticals. The effective delayed neutron fraction for a bare critical comprised of a fissile material is comparable with the absolute delayed neutron fraction. The effective delayed neutron fraction for a bare critical composed of a fissionable material is reduced by factors of 2 to 10 when compared with the absolute delayed neutron fraction. When the effective delayed neutron fraction is small, the difference between delayed and prompt criticality is small, and extreme caution must be used in critical assemblies of these materials. This study uses an approximate but realistic model to survey the actinide region to compare effective delayed neutron fractions with absolute delayed neutron fractions.

  8. Neutron streak camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1981-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  9. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  10. Neutron streak camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon. 4 figs.

  11. Neutron production enhancements for the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) was the first high energy spallation neutron source in the US dedicated to materials research. It has operated for sixteen years, and in that time has had a very prolific record concerning the development of new target and moderator systems for pulsed spallation sources. IPNS supports a very productive user program on its thirteen instruments, which are oversubscribed by more than two times, meanwhile having an excellent overall reliability of 95%. Although the proton beam power is relatively low at 7 kW, the target and moderator systems are very efficient. The typical beam power which gives an equivalent flux for long-wavelength neutrons is about 60 kW, due to the use of a uranium target and liquid and solid methane moderators, precluded at some sources due to a higher accelerator power. The development of new target and moderator systems is by no means stagnant at IPNS. They are presently considering numerous enhancements to the target and moderators that offer prospects for increasing the useful neutron production by substantial factors. Many of these enhancements could be combined, although their combined benefit has not yet been well established. Meanwhile, IPNS is embarking on a coherent program of study concerning these improvements and their possible combination and implementation. Moreover, any improvements accomplished at IPNS would immediately increase the performance of IPNS instruments.

  12. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector of very high temporal resolution is described. It may be used to measure distributions of neutrons produced by fusion reactions that persist for times as short as about 50 picoseconds.

  13. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Hsu, Hsiao-Hua (Los Alamos, NM); Casson, William H. (Los Alamos, NM); Vasilik, Dennis G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kleck, Jeffrey H. (Menlo Park, CA); Beverding, Anthony (Foster City, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  14. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mook, Jr., Herbert A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The wave are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  15. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The waves are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  16. Simulation of a D-T Neutron Source for Neutron Scattering Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lou, T.P.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Vujic, J.L.; Leung, K.-N.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T Neutron Source for Neutron Scattering Experiments T.P. Louor cold neutrons for neutron scattering experiments. Thisto simulate a neutron scattering setup and to estimate

  17. Bouncing Neutrons and the Neutron Centrifuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. J. S. Watson

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent observation of the quantum state of the neutron bouncing freely under gravity allows some novel experiments. A method of purifying the ground state is given, and possible applications to the measurement of the electric dipole moment of the neutron and the short distance behaviour of gravity are discussed.

  18. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  19. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  20. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio G{sub En}/G{sub Mn} via the {sup 2}H(e{yields},e{sup '}n{yields}){sup 1}H reaction to Q{sup 2}=1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaster, B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Semenov, A.Yu.; Semenova, I.A. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna RU-141980 (Russian Federation); Aghalaryan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Stepanyan, S.; Tadevosyan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan 375036 (Armenia); Crouse, E.; Finn, J.M.; Perdrisat, C.; Roche, J. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); MacLachlan, G.; Opper, A.K. [Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Tajima, S.; Churchwell, S.; Howell, C.R. [Duke University and TUNL, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Tireman, W. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); Northern Michigan University, Marquette, Michigan 49855 (United States); Ahmidouch, A. [North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 (United States); Anderson, B. D. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States)] (and others)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G{sub En}/G{sub Mn}, deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic {sup 2}H(e{yields},e{sup '}n{yields}){sup 1}H reaction, at three Q{sup 2} values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The data at Q{sup 2}=1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2} are the first direct experimental measurements of G{sub En} employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q{sup 2}>1 (GeV/c){sup 2} region and stand as the most precise determinations of G{sub En} for all values of Q{sup 2}.

  1. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form-factor ratio G(En) / G(Mn) via the H-2(polarized-e, e-prime,polarized-n)H-1 reaction to Q**2 = 1.45-(GeV/c)**2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley Plaster; A.Yu. Semenov; A. Aghalaryan; Erick Crouse; Glen MacLachlan; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Hartmuth Arenhovel; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Alan Baldwin; David Barkhuff; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Michael Christy; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; T. Eden; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Ashot Gasparian; Kenneth Garrow; Paul Gueye; Calvin Howell; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; Richard Madey; D. Manley; Pete Markowitz; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Allena Opper; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Brian Raue; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Nikolai Savvinov; Irina Semenova; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Stepan Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Shawn Taylor; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; John Watson; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G{sub En}/G{sub Mn}, deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic {sup 2}H({rvec e}, e{prime}{rvec n}) {sup 1}H reaction, at three Q{sup 2} values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The data at Q{sup 2} = 1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2} are the first direct experimental measurements of GEn employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} region and stand as the most precise determinations of GEn for all values of Q{sup 2}.

  2. Optimizing Moderator Dimensions for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jinkui [ORNL; Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. In a recent study of the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility [1,2], we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter for a smaller viewing area [4]. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories, those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. We found that the cross-sections of the sample and the neutron guide, respectively, are the deciding factors for choosing the moderator. Beam divergence plays no role as long as it is within the reach of practical constraints. Namely, the required divergence is not too large for the guide or sample to be located close enough to the moderator on an actual spallation source.

  3. Cooling neutrons using non-dispersive magnetic excitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Zimmer

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method is proposed for cooling neutrons by inelastic magnetic scattering in weakly absorbing, cold paramagnetic systems. Kinetic neutron energy is removed in constant decrements determined by the Zeeman energy of paramagnetic atoms or ions in an external magnetic field, or by zero-field level splittings in magnetic molecules. Analytical solutions of the stationary neutron transport equation are given using inelastic neutron scattering cross sections derived in an appendix. They neglect any inelastic process except the paramagnetic scattering and hence still underestimate very-cold neutron densities. Molecular oxygen with its triplet ground state appears particularly promising, notably as a host in fully deuterated oxygen-clathrate hydrate, or more exotically, in dry oxygen-He4 van der Waals clusters. At a neutron temperature about 6 K, for which neutron conversion to ultra-cold neutrons by single-phonon emission in pure superfluid He4 works best, conversion rates due to paramagnetic scattering in the clathrate are found to be a factor 9 larger. While in conversion the neutron imparts only a single energy quantum to the medium, the multi-step paramagnetic cooling cascade leads to further strong enhancements of very-cold neutron densities, e.g., by a factor 14 (57) for an initial neutron temperature of 30 K (100 K), for the moderator held at about 1.3 K. Due to a favorable Bragg cutoff of the oxygen-clathrate the cascade-cooling can take effect in a moderator with linear extensions smaller than a meter. The paramagnetic cooling mechanism may offer benefits in novel intense sources of very cold neutrons and for enhancing production of ultra-cold neutrons.

  4. RECENT MAGNETIC STRUCTURE STUDIES BY NEUTRON DIFFRACTION(1) By C. G. SHULL,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    classification by neutron scattering include the determination of the magnitude and quality of an atom of this moment as represented in the form factor for neutron scattering. Within the second classification169 RECENT MAGNETIC STRUCTURE STUDIES BY NEUTRON DIFFRACTION(1) By C. G. SHULL, Massachusetts

  5. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Rai Ko S.F. (Albany, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning.

  6. Semiconductor neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ianakiev, Kiril D. (Los Alamos, NM); Littlewood, Peter B. (Cambridge, GB); Blagoev, Krastan B. (Arlington, VA); Swinhoe, Martyn T. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James L. (Los Alamos, NM); Sullivan, Clair J. (Los Alamos, NM); Alexandrov, Boian S. (Los Alamos, NM); Lashley, Jason Charles (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector has a compound of lithium in a single crystal form as a neutron sensor element. The lithium compound, containing improved charge transport properties, is either lithium niobate or lithium tantalate. The sensor element is in direct contact with a monitor that detects an electric current. A signal proportional to the electric current is produced and is calibrated to indicate the neutrons sensed. The neutron detector is particularly useful for detecting neutrons in a radiation environment. Such radiation environment may, e.g. include gamma radiation and noise.

  7. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rai, K.S.F.

    1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields is described. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning. 2 figures.

  8. Fusion of neutron rich oxygen isotopes in the crust of accreting neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Horowitz; H. Dussan; D. K. Berry

    2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion reactions in the crust of an accreting neutron star are an important source of heat, and the depth at which these reactions occur is important for determining the temperature profile of the star. Fusion reactions depend strongly on the nuclear charge $Z$. Nuclei with $Z\\le 6$ can fuse at low densities in a liquid ocean. However, nuclei with Z=8 or 10 may not burn until higher densities where the crust is solid and electron capture has made the nuclei neutron rich. We calculate the $S$ factor for fusion reactions of neutron rich nuclei including $^{24}$O + $^{24}$O and $^{28}$Ne + $^{28}$Ne. We use a simple barrier penetration model. The $S$ factor could be further enhanced by dynamical effects involving the neutron rich skin. This possible enhancement in $S$ should be studied in the laboratory with neutron rich radioactive beams. We model the structure of the crust with molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the crust of accreting neutron stars may contain micro-crystals or regions of phase separation. Nevertheless, the screening factors that we determine for the enhancement of the rate of thermonuclear reactions are insensitive to these features. Finally, we calculate the rate of thermonuclear $^{24}$O + $^{24}$O fusion and find that $^{24}$O should burn at densities near $10^{11}$ g/cm$^3$. The energy released from this and similar reactions may be important for the temperature profile of the star.

  9. The Neutron Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. E. Wietfeldt

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of the free neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino is the prototype semileptonic weak decay and the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. The nucleon vector and axial vector weak coupling constants G_V and G_A determine the neutron lifetime as well as the strengths of weak interaction processes involving free neutrons and protons that are important in astrophysics, cosmology, solar physics and neutrino detection. In combination with a neutron decay angular correlation measurement, the neutron lifetime can be used to determine the first element of the CKM matrix Vud. Unfortunately the two main experimental methods for measuring the neutron lifetime currently disagree by almost 4 sigma. I will present a brief review of the status of the neutron lifetime and prospects for the future.

  10. Tailoring the Neutron Spectrum from a 14-MeV Neutron Generator to Approximate a Spontaneous-Fission Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Simpson; David Chichester

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many applications of neutrons for non-invasive measurements began with isotopic sources such as AmBe or Cf-252. Political factors have rendered AmBe undesirable in the United States and other countries, and the supply of Cf-252 is limited and significantly increasing in price every few years. Compact and low-power deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generators can often provide sufficient flux, but the 14-MeV neutron spectrum is much more energetic (harder) than an isotopic neutron source. A series of MCNP simulations were run to examine the extent to which the 14-MeV DT neutron spectrum could be softened through the use of high-Z and low-Z materials. Some potential concepts of operation require a portable neutron generator system, so the additional weight of extra materials is also a trade-off parameter. Using a reference distance of 30 cm from the source, the average neutron energy can be lowered to be less than that of either AmBe or Cf-252, while obtaining an increase in flux at the reference distance compared to a bare neutron generator. This paper discusses the types and amounts of materials used, the resulting neutron spectra, neutron flux levels, and associated photon production.

  11. Neutron sources and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  12. Fusion of neutron rich oxygen isotopes in the crust of accreting neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion reactions in the crust of an accreting neutron star are an important source of heat, and the depth at which these reactions occur is important for determining the temperature profile of the star. Fusion reactions depend strongly on the nuclear charge $Z$. Nuclei with $Z\\le 6$ can fuse at low densities in a liquid ocean. However, nuclei with $Z=8$ or 10 may not burn until higher densities where the crust is solid and electron capture has made the nuclei neutron rich. We calculate the $S$ factor for fusion reactions of neutron rich nuclei including $^{24}$O + $^{24}$O and $^{28}$Ne + $^{28}$Ne. We use a simple barrier penetration model. The $S$ factor could be further enhanced by dynamical effects involving the neutron rich skin. This possible enhancement in $S$ should be studied in the laboratory with neutron rich radioactive beams. We model the structure of the crust with molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the crust of accreting neutron stars may contain micro-crystals or regions of phase sep...

  13. Spallation-neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaudon, A.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of particular interest for neutron-physics studies are spallation-neutron sources (SNSs) using intense proton beams with energies in the GeV range. Some SNSs already provide average fluxes of thermal and cold neutrons comparable with those of high-flux reactors. Most SNSs are pulsed with high peak fluxes that can be used with the powerful time-of-flight (TOF) method. Also, SNSs could be developed to much higher performance.

  14. Neutron Science Forum | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environment for discussion, innovation, and dissemination of information within the neutron scattering community as well as engaging closely related disciplines through...

  15. Lujan Neutron Scattering Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent...

  16. Deuterium density profile determination at JET using a neutron camera and a neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eriksson, J., E-mail: jacob.eriksson@physics.uu.se; Castegnetti, G.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Hellesen, C. [EURATOM-VR, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University (Sweden); Giacomelli, L. [Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); EURATOM-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we estimate the fuel ion density profile in deuterium plasmas at JET, using the JET neutron camera, the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFOR, and fusion reactivities modeled by the transport code TRANSP. The framework has been tested using synthetic data, which showed that the density profile could be reconstructed with an average accuracy of the order of 10 %. The method has also been applied to neutron measurements from a neutral beam heated JET discharge, which gave n{sub d}/n{sub e} ? 0.6 ± 0.3 in the plasma core and n{sub d}/n{sub e} ? 0.4 ± 0.3 towards the edge. Correction factors for detector efficiencies, neutron attenuation, and back-scattering are not yet included in the analysis; future work will aim at refining the estimated density.

  17. HFIR History - ORNL Neutron Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has grown to include materials irradiation, neutron activation, and, most recently, neutron scattering. In 2007, HFIR completed the most dramatic transformation in its...

  18. Compact neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  19. Neutron capture therapies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C. (Cambridge, MA); Shefer, Ruth E. (Newton, MA); Klinkowstein, Robert E. (Winchester, MA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  20. Pocked surface neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGregor, Douglas (Whitmore Lake, MI); Klann, Raymond (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  1. Pulsed neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, deceased, J. Craig (late of Albuquerque, NM); Rowland, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

  2. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  3. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Neutronic Core Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Dan [ORNL] [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL] [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AHTR is a 3400 MW(t) FHR class reactor design concept intended to serve as a central generating station type power plant. While significant technology development and demonstration remains, the basic design concept appears sound and tolerant of much of the remaining performance uncertainty. No fundamental impediments have been identified that would prevent widespread deployment of the concept. This paper focuses on the preliminary neutronic design studies performed at ORNL during the fiscal year 2011. After a brief presentation of the AHTR design concept, the paper summarizes several neutronic studies performed at ORNL during 2011. An optimization study for the AHTR core is first presented. The temperature and void coefficients of reactivity are then analyzed for a few configurations of interest. A discussion of the limiting factors due to the fast neutron fluence follows. The neutronic studies conclude with a discussion of the control and shutdown options. The studies presented confirm that sound neutronic alternatives exist for the design of the AHTR to maintain full passive safety features and reasonable operation conditions.

  4. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ``The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.`` The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Neutron irradiation effects on metal-gallium nitride contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, Evan J.; Lin, Chung-Han; Zhang, Zhichun [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Mishra, Umesh K. [Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Brillson, Leonard J., E-mail: brillson.1@osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics and Center for Materials Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the effect of fast and thermal neutrons on GaN Schottky barriers and ohmic contacts using current–voltage and transmission line method electrical techniques, optical, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy morphological techniques, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy chemical techniques. These studies reveal a 10{sup 15}?n/cm{sup 2} neutron threshold for Schottky barrier ideality factor increases, a 10{sup 15}?n/cm{sup 2} fast plus thermal neutron threshold for ohmic contact sheet and contact resistance increases, and 10{sup 16}?n/cm{sup 2} neutron fluence threshold for major device degradation identified with thermally driven diffusion of Ga and N into the metal contacts and surface phase changes. These results demonstrate the need for protecting metal-GaN contacts in device applications subject to neutron radiation.

  6. Versatile module for experiments with focussing neutron guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P. [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Brandl, G.; Chacon, A.; Wagner, J. N.; Rahn, M.; Mühlbauer, S.; Georgii, R. [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, FRM II, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the development of a versatile module that permits fast and reliable use of focussing neutron guides under varying scattering angles. A simple procedure for setting up the module and neutron guides is illustrated by typical intensity patterns to highlight operational aspects as well as typical parasitic artefacts. Combining a high-precision alignment table with separate housings for the neutron guides on kinematic mounts, the change-over between neutron guides with different focussing characteristics requires no readjustments of the experimental setup. Exploiting substantial gain factors, we demonstrate the performance of this versatile neutron scattering module in a study of the effects of uniaxial stress on the domain populations in the transverse spin density wave phase of single crystal Cr.

  7. Effects of neutron irradiation of ultra-thin HfO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, K.-W.; Bian, S.; Shohet, J. L. [Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Ren, H. [Applied Materials, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States); Agasie, R. J. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nishi, Y. [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron irradiation at low fluence decreases the Pb-type and E? defect levels in ultra-thin hafnium dioxide films because electrons can fill existing states. These electrons come from electron-hole pairs generated by neutron interactions with silicon and oxygen. Thus, a low fluence of neutrons “anneals” the sample. However, when neutron fluence increases, more neutrons collide with oxygen atoms and cause them to leave the lattice or to transmute into different atoms. This causes the E? states to increase. As defect-state concentrations increase, leakage currents increase, but since the E? is much lower than the Pb concentration, this is not a dominant factor.

  8. Hypernuclear Physics for Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurgen Schaffner-Bielich

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of hypernuclear physics for the physics of neutron stars is delineated. Hypernuclear potentials in dense matter control the hyperon composition of dense neutron star matter. The three-body interactions of nucleons and hyperons determine the stiffness of the neutron star equation of state and thereby the maximum neutron star mass. Two-body hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon interactions give rise to hyperon pairing which exponentially suppresses cooling of neutron stars via the direct hyperon URCA processes. Non-mesonic weak reactions with hyperons in dense neutron star matter govern the gravitational wave emissions due to the r-mode instability of rotating neutron stars.

  9. New measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. B. Grammer; R. Alarcon; L. Barrón-Palos; D. Blyth; J. D. Bowman; J. Calarco; C. Crawford; K. Craycraft; D. Evans; N. Fomin; J. Fry; M. Gericke; R. C. Gillis; G. L. Greene; J. Hamblen; C. Hayes; S. Kucuker; R. Mahurin; M. Maldonado-Velázquez; E. Martin; M. McCrea; P. E. Mueller; M. Musgrave; H. Nann; S. I. Penttilä; W. M. Snow; Z. Tang; W. S. Wilburn

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function $g(r)$ inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section $d\\sigma \\over d\\Omega$ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43~meV and 16.1~meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6~K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1~meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra non-equilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely-used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. We describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  10. Switchable radioactive neutron source device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanford, G.S.; Rhodes, E.A.; Devolpi, A.; Boyar, R.E.

    1987-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons. 3 figs.

  11. Switchable radioactive neutron source device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyar, Robert E. (La Grange, IL); DeVolpi, Alexander (Bolingbrook, IL); Stanford, George S. (Downers Grove, IL); Rhodes, Edgar A. (Woodridge, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons.

  12. Quantification of design margins/safety factors based on the prediction uncertainty in tritium production rate from fusion integral experiments of the USDOE/JAERI collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Various engineering-oriented fusion integral experiments were performed within the USDOE/JAERI Collaborative Program on Fusion Blanket Neutronics during the last decade. The objectives of this ten-year program were: (a) to establish new experimental techniques for design-related neutronics experiments, (b) to provide experimental data on local and integrated parameters such as tritium production rate, nuclear heating, and activation for the purpose of assessing the accuracies of present nuclear data and calculational methods, and (c) to provide designers with design margin for important responses. Tritium breeding rate (TPR) has the prime focus among other reactions. The program consisted of three phases in which local and integrated measurements inside a Li{sub 2}O test assembly that has various engineering features of a prototypical blanket (e.g. SS FW, H{sub 2}O coolant channels, beryllium multiplier). The analysis of the experiments were performed independently by the US and JAERI using their own codes/databases. A wide range of the calculated-to-experimental (C/E) values were observed in all these experiments for local TPR from Li-6 (T{sub 6}), from Li-7 (T{sub 7}), and from Li-natural (T{sub n}). In this paper, the experimental and calculational data sets of local TPR in each experiment were interpreted to give estimate to the prediction uncertainty, u{sub i}, of the line-integrated TPR and its standard deviation, {sigma}{sub i}.

  13. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  14. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  15. Strangeness in Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridolin Weber; Alexander Ho; Rodrigo P. Negreiros; Philip Rosenfield

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally agreed on that the tremendous densities reached in the centers of neutron stars provide a high-pressure environment in which several intriguing particles processes may compete with each other. These range from the generation of hyperons to quark deconfinement to the formation of kaon condensates and H-matter. There are theoretical suggestions of even more exotic processes inside neutron stars, such as the formation of absolutely stable strange quark matter. In the latter event, neutron stars would be largely composed of strange quark matter possibly enveloped in a thin nuclear crust. This paper gives a brief overview of these striking physical possibilities with an emphasis on the role played by strangeness in neutron star matter, which constitutes compressed baryonic matter at ultra-high baryon number density but low temperature which is no accessible to relativistic heavy ion collision experiments.

  16. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  17. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  18. Neutron knockout of 12Be populating neutron-unbound states in 11Be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, William A; Brown, B A; Brown, J; DeYoung, P A; Finck, J E; Frank, N; Jones, K L; Lecouey, J -L; Luther, B; Peaslee, G F; Rogers, W F; Schiller, A; Thoennessen, M; Tostevin, J A; Yoneda, K

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron-unbound resonant states of 11Be were populated in neutron knock-out reactions from 12Be and identified by 10Be-n coincidence measurements. A resonance in the decay-energy spectrum at 80(2) keV was attributed to a highly excited unbound state in 11Be at 3.949(2) MeV decaying to the 2+ excited state in 10Be. A knockout cross section of 15(3) mb was inferred for this 3.949(2) MeV state suggesting a spectroscopic factor near unity for this 0p3/2- level, consistent with the detailed shell model calculations.

  19. Neutrons from multifragmentation reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Trautmann; A. S. Botvina; J. Brzychczyk; N. Buyukcizmeci; I. N. Mishustin; P. Pawlowski; ALADIN2000 Collaboration

    2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron emission in the fragmentation of stable and radioactive Sn and La projectiles of 600 MeV per nucleon has been studied with the Large Neutron Detector LAND coupled to the ALADIN forward spectrometer at SIS. A cluster-recognition algorithm is used to identify individual particles within the hit distributions registered with LAND. The obtained momentum distributions are extrapolated over the full phase space occupied by the neutrons from the projectile-spectator source. The mean multiplicities of spectator neutrons reach values of up to 12 and depend strongly on the isotopic composition of the projectile. An effective source temperature of T approx. 3 - 4 MeV is deduced from the transverse momentum distributions. For the interpretation of the data, calculations with the Statistical Multifragmentation Model for a properly chosen ensemble of excited sources were performed. The possible modification of the liquid-drop parameters of the fragment description in the hot environment is studied, and a significant reduction of the symmetry-term coefficient is found necessary to simultaneously reproduce the neutron multiplicities and the mean neutron-to-proton ratios /Z of Z <= 10 fragments. Because of the similarity of the freeze-out conditions with those encountered in supernova scenarios, this is of astrophysical interest.

  20. Method for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>1.0E4)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Heineck, Daniel; Voss, Lars F.; Wang, Tzu Fang; Shao, Qinghui

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>10.sup.4) are provided. A structure is provided that includes a p+ region on a first side of an intrinsic region and an n+ region on a second side of the intrinsic region. The thickness of the intrinsic region is minimized to achieve a desired gamma discrimination factor of at least 1.0E+04. Material is removed from one of the p+ region or the n+ region and into the intrinsic layer to produce pillars with open space between each pillar. The open space is filed with a neutron sensitive material. An electrode is placed in contact with the pillars and another electrode is placed in contact with the side that is opposite of the intrinsic layer with respect to the first electrode.

  1. Neutron-deuteron breakup reaction as a tool for studying neutron-neutron interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konobeevski, E. S., E-mail: konobeev@inr.ru; Zuyev, S. V.; Mordovskoy, M. V.; Potashev, S. I.; Sharapov, I. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the most recent data on the reaction nd {yields} pnn revealed a serious discrepancy between theoretical predictions and cross sections measured for this reaction in various configurations where the role of neutron-neutron interactions is important. In view of this, it seems necessary both to develop theoretical approaches and to obtain new experimental data. For this purpose, a setup for studying the neutron-deuteron breakup reaction was created at the Institute for Nuclear Research on the basis of the neutron beam in the RADEX channel and deuterium targets. This facility makes it possible to perform experiments over a broad region of primary-neutron energies (10-60 MeV) and in various (final-state interaction, quasifree scattering, and spatial-star) configurations. Preliminary results of the respective experiment were obtained for configurations of final-state neutron-neutron interaction and quasifree neutron-neutron scattering.

  2. Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a signal for fast neutron capture.

  3. Strangeness in Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridolin Weber

    2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally agreed on that the tremendous densities reached in the centers of neutron stars provide a high-pressure environment in which numerous novel particles processes are likely to compete with each other. These processes range from the generation of hyperons to quark deconfinement to the formation of kaon condensates and H-matter. There are theoretical suggestions of even more exotic processes inside neutron stars, such as the formation of absolutely stable strange quark matter, a configuration of matter even more stable than the most stable atomic nucleus, iron. In the latter event, neutron stars would be largely composed of pure quark matter, eventually enveloped in a thin nuclear crust. No matter which physical processes are actually realized inside neutron stars, each one leads to fingerprints, some more pronounced than others though, in the observable stellar quantities. This feature combined with the unprecedented progress in observational astronomy, which allows us to see vistas with remarkable clarity that previously were only imagined, renders neutron stars to nearly ideal probes for a wide range of physical studies, including the role of strangeness in dense matter.

  4. Portable Neutron Sensors for Emergency Response Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Maurer, R., Detweiler, R.

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This slide-show presents neutron measurement work, including design, use and performance of different neutron detection systems.

  5. Neutron beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imel, G.R.; Urbatsch, T.; Pruett, D.P.; Ross, J.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) is a 250-kW TRIGA Reactor operated by Argonne National Laboratory and is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The reactor and its facilities regarding radiography are detailed in another paper at this conference; this paper summarizes neutron flux measurements and calculations that have been performed to better understand and potentially improve the neutronics characteristics of the reactor.

  6. Spherical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A spherical neutron generator is formed with a small spherical target and a spherical shell RF-driven plasma ion source surrounding the target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) ion plasma is produced by RF excitation in the plasma ion source using an RF antenna. The plasma generation region is a spherical shell between an outer chamber and an inner extraction electrode. A spherical neutron generating target is at the center of the chamber and is biased negatively with respect to the extraction electrode which contains many holes. Ions passing through the holes in the extraction electrode are focused onto the target which produces neutrons by D-D or D-T reactions.

  7. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Ching L. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention comprises a neutron detector (50) of very high temporal resolution that is particularly well suited for measuring the fusion reaction neutrons produced by laser-driven inertial confinement fusion targets. The detector comprises a biased two-conductor traveling-wave transmission line (54, 56, 58, 68) having a uranium cathode (60) and a phosphor anode (62) as respective parts of the two conductors. A charge line and Auston switch assembly (70, 72, 74) launch an electric field pulse along the transmission line. Neutrons striking the uranium cathode at a location where the field pulse is passing, are enabled to strike the phosphor anode and produce light that is recorded on photographic film (64). The transmission line may be variously configured to achieve specific experimental goals.

  8. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falk, Roger B. (Lafayette, CO); Tyree, William H. (Boulder, CO)

    1984-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  9. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falk, R.B.; Tyree, W.H.

    1982-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  10. Neutron Scattering Tutorials | Neutron Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3,Neutron Scattering Tutorials SHARE

  11. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  12. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  13. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  14. Neutron Science and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3,Neutron Scattering3 Neutron Science

  15. NEUTRON AND NON-NEUTRON NUCLEAR DATA FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    1999-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    NEUTRON NUCLEAR DATA THAT IS USED IN REACTOR DOSIMETRY INCLUDE THERMAL NEUTRON CROSS SECTIONS AND NEUTRON RESONANCE INTEGRALS, FISSION SPECTRUM AVERAGED CROSS SECTIONS FOR REACTIONS ON A TARGET NUCLEUS. NON-NEUTRON NUCLEAR DATA USED IN REACTOR DOSIMETRY INCLUDE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF TARGET NUCLIDES AND RADIOACTIVE HALF-LIVES, GAMMA-RAY ENERGIES AND INTENSITIES OF REACTION PRODUCT NUCLIDES. ALL OF THESE DATA ARE PERIODICALLY EVALUATED AND RECOMMENDED VALUES ARE PROVIDED IN THE HANDBOOK OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS. THE LATEST RECOMMENDED VALUES ARE DISCUSSED AND THEY ARE CONTRASTED WITH SOME EARLIER NUCLEAR DATA, WHICH WAS PROVIDED WITH NEUTRON DETECTOR FOILS.

  16. Salt-Dependent Compaction of Di-and Trinucleosomes Studied by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langowski, Jörg

    Salt-Dependent Compaction of Di- and Trinucleosomes Studied by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering, Germany, and Institut Laue-Langevin Grenoble, F-38042 Grenoble, France ABSTRACT Using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we have measured the salt-dependent static structure factor of di- and trinucleosomes from

  17. The tokamak as a neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendel, H.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the tokamak in its role as a neutron source, with emphasis on experimental results for D-D neutron production. The sections summarize tokamak operation, sources of fusion and non-fusion neutrons, principal neutron detection methods and their calibration, neutron energy spectra and fluxes outside the tokamak plasma chamber, history of neutron production in tokamaks, neutron emission and fusion power gain from JET and TFTR (the largest present-day tokamaks), and D-T neutron production from burnup of D-D tritons. This paper also discusses the prospects for future tokamak neutron production and potential applications of tokamak neutron sources. 100 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shaber, Eric L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DuPont, John N. (Whitehall, PA); Robino, Charles V. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, David B. (Bethlehem, PA)

    2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  19. Dose-equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, R.V.; Hankins, D.E.; Tomasino, L.; Gomaa, M.A.M.

    1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurement indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer contaning conversion material such as /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet.

  20. Solid state neutron detector array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, J.G.; Ruddy, F.H.; Brandt, C.D.; Dulloo, A.R.; Lott, R.G.; Sirianni, E.; Wilson, R.O.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors. 7 figs.

  1. Solid state neutron detector array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, John G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ruddy, Frank H. (Monroeville, PA); Brandt, Charles D. (Mount Lebanon, PA); Dulloo, Abdul R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Lott, Randy G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sirianni, Ernest (Monroeville, PA); Wilson, Randall O. (Greensburg, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors.

  2. SU-E-T-75: Commissioning Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeters for Fast Neutron Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, L [UniversityWashington, Seattle, WA (United States); Yang, F; Sandison, G [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Woodworth, D [University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); McCormick, Z [University of Nevada - Reno, Reno, Nevada (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Fast neutrons therapy used at the University of Washington is clinically proven to be more effective than photon therapy in treating salivary gland and other cancers. A nanodot optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) system was chosen to be commissioned for patient in vivo dosimetry for neutron therapy. The OSL-based radiation detectors are not susceptible to radiation damage caused by neutrons compared to diodes or MOSFET systems. Methods: An In-Light microStar OSL system was commissioned for in vivo use by radiating Landauer nanodots with neutrons generated from 50.0 MeV protons accelerated onto a beryllium target. The OSLs were calibrated the depth of maximum dose in solid water localized to 150 cm SAD isocenter in a 10.3 cm square field. Linearity was tested over a typical clinical dose fractionation range i.e. 0 to 150 neutron-cGy. Correction factors for transient signal fading, trap depletion, gantry angle, field size, and wedge factor dependencies were also evaluated. The OSLs were photo-bleached between radiations using a tungsten-halogen lamp. Results: Landauer sensitivity factors published for each nanodot are valid for measuring photon and electron doses but do not apply for neutron irradiation. Individually calculated nanodot calibration factors exhibited a 2–5% improvement over calibration factors computed by the microStar InLight software. Transient fading effects had a significant impact on neutron dose reading accuracy compared to photon and electron in vivo dosimetry. Greater accuracy can be achieved by calibrating and reading each dosimeter within 1–2 hours after irradiation. No additional OSL correction factors were needed for field size, gantry angle, or wedge factors in solid water phantom measurements. Conclusion: OSL detectors are a useful for neutron beam in vivo dosimetry verification. Dosimetric accuracy comparable to conventional diode systems can be achieved. Accounting for transient fading effects during the neutron beam calibration is a critical component for achieving comparable accuracy.

  3. Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

  4. Nucleon form factors and final state radiative corrections to $e^+e^-\\to \\bar p p ?$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henryk Czyz; Johann H. Kuhn; Szymon Tracz

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    New parametrisation for the electric and the magnetic form factors of proton and neutron are presented. The proton form factors describe well the recent measurements by BaBar collaboration and earlier ones of the ratio of the form factors in space-like region. The neutron form factors are consistent with earlier measurements of neutron pair production and ratio of the form factors in the space-like region. These form factors are implemented into the generator PHOKHARA, which simulates the reactions $e^+e^-\\to \\bar p p \\gamma$ and $e^+e^-\\to \\bar n n\\gamma$. The influence of final state radiation is investigated.

  5. Parity Violating Measurements of Neutron Densities: Implications for Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Horowitz; J. Piekarewicz

    2002-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Parity violating electron scattering can measure the neutron density of a heavy nucleus accurately and model independently. This is because the weak charge of the neutron is much larger then that of the proton. The Parity Radius Experiment (PREX) at Jefferson Laboratory aims to measure the root mean square neutron radius of $^{208}$Pb with an absolute accuracy of 1% ($\\pm 0.05$ Fm). This is more accurate then past measurements with hadronic probes, which all suffer from controversial strong interaction uncertainties. PREX should clearly resolve the neutron-rich skin. Furthermore, this benchmark value for $^{208}$Pb will provide a calibration for hadronic probes, such as proton scattering, which can then be used to measure neutron densities of many exotic nuclei. The PREX result will also have many implications for neutron stars. The neutron radius of Pb depends on the pressure of neutron-rich matter: the greater the pressure, the larger the radius as neutrons are pushed out against surface tension. The same pressure supports a neutron star against gravity. The Pb radius is sensitive to the equation of state at normal densities while the radius of a 1.4 solar mass neutron star also depends on the equation of state at higher densities. Measurements of the radii of a number of isolated neutron stars such as Geminga and RX J185635-3754 should soon improve significantly. By comparing the equation of state information from the radii of both Pb and neutron stars one can search for a softening of the high density equation of state from a phase transition to an exotic state. Possibilities include kaon condensates, strange quark matter or color superconductors.

  6. Commissioning of the new high-intensity ultracold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Lauss

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissioning of the new high-intensity ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) has started in 2009. The design goal of this new generation high intensity UCN source is to surpass by a factor of ~100 the current ultracold neutron densities available for fundamental physics research, with the greatest thrust coming from the search for a neutron electric dipole moment. The PSI UCN source is based on neutron production via proton induced lead spallation, followed by neutron thermalization in heavy water and neutron cooling in a solid deuterium crystal to cold and ultracold energies. A successful beam test with up to 2 mA proton beam on the spallation target was conducted recently. Most source components are installed, others being finally mounted. The installation is on the track for the first cool-down and UCN production in 2010.

  7. Reconciliation of Measured and TRANSP-calculated Neutron Emission Rates in the National Spherical Torus Experiment: Circa 2002-2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.S. Medley; D.S. Darrow; A.L. Roquemore

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A change in the response of the neutron detectors on the National Spherical Torus Experiment occurred between the 2002-2003 and 2004 experimental run periods. An analysis of this behavior by investigating the neutron diagnostic operating conditions and comparing measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates is presented. Also a revised procedure for cross calibration of the neutron scintillator detectors with the fission chamber detectors was implemented that delivers good agreement amongst the measured neutron rates for all neutron detectors and all run periods. For L-mode discharges, the measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates now match closely for all run years. For H-mode discharges over the entire 2002-2004 period, the 2FG scintillator and fission chamber measurements match each other but imply a neutron deficit of 11.5% relative to the TRANSP-calculated neutron. The results of this report impose a modification on all of the previously used calibration factors for the entire neutron detector suite over the 2002-2004 period. A tabular summary of the new calibration factors is provided including certified calibration factors for the 2005 run.

  8. Neutron Compound Refractive Prisms - DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Jay Theodore Cremer, Jr

    2011-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the research led to a pulsed electromagnetic periodic magnetic field array (PMF), which coupled with a pair of collimation slits, and a mechanical chopper slit, were able to deflect spin-up neutrons to a band of line-fused neutrons a focal plane heights that correspond to the time-varying magnetic field amplitude. The electromagnetic field PMF produced 5.4 pulses per minute in which each pulse was 50 msec in duration with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 7.5 msec. The calculated 7.7 mm vertical height of the band of focused spin-up neutrons corresponded closely to the measured 7.5 mm height of the center line of the imaged band of neutrons. The band of deflected spin-up neutrons was 5 mm in vertical width and the bottom of the band was 5 mm above the surface of the PMF pole. The limited exposure time of 3 hours and the smaller 0.78 T magnetic field allowed focused and near focused neutrons of 1.8 ���� to 2.6 ���� neutrons, which were in the tails of the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center Bay 4 Maxwell Boltzmann distribution of neutrons with peak flux at 1.1-1.2 ����. The electromagnetic PMF was expected to produces a 2.0 T peak magnetic field amplitude, which would be operational at a higher duty factor, rather than the as built 7.5 msec FWHM with pulse repetition frequency of 5.4 pulses per minute. The fabricated pulsed electromagnetic PMF with chopper is expected to perform well on a cold, very cold or ultra cold beam line as a spectrometer or monochromator source of spin-up polarized neutron. In fact there may be a possible use of the PMF to do ultra-cold neutron trapping, see paper by A. I. Frank1, V. G. Nosov, Quantum Effects in a One-Dimensional Magnetic Gravitational Trap for Ultracold Neutrons, JETP Letters, Vol. 79, No. 7, 2004, pp. 313�¢����315. The next step is to find a cold or very cold neutron facility, where further testing or use of the pulsed magnetic field PMF can be pursued.

  9. Porous material neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diawara, Yacouba (Oak Ridge, TN); Kocsis, Menyhert (Venon, FR)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

  10. Neutron Scattering Stiudies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kegel, Gunter H.R.; Egan, James J

    2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project covers four principal areas of research: Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in odd-A terbium, thulium and other highly deformed nuclei near A=160 with special regard to interband transitions and to the investigation of the direct-interaction versus the compound-nucleus excitation process in these nuclei. Examination of new, fast photomultiplier tubes suitable for use in a miniaturized neutron-time-of-flight spectrometer. Measurement of certain inelastic cross sections of 238U. Determination of the multiplicity of prompt fission gamma rays in even-A fissile actinides. Energies and mean lives of fission isomers produced by fast fission of even-Z, even-A actinides. Study of the mean life of 7Be in different host matrices and its possible astro-physical significance.

  11. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  12. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Seagraves, David T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  13. Neutron Science Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3,Neutron Scattering

  14. Why Use Neutrons For Research? | Neutron Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    better understand how biomass can be efficiently converted into fuel. Neutrons have many properties that make them ideal for certain types of research. Because of their unique...

  15. REVIEW OF NON-NEUTRON AND NEUTRON NUCLEAR DATA, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2004-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Review articles are in preparation for the 2004 edition of the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics dealing with the evaluation of both non-neutron and neutron nuclear data. Data on the discovery of element 110, Darmstadtium, and element 111 have been officially accepted, while data on element 11 8 have been withdrawn. Data to be presented include revised values for very short-lived nuclides, long-lived nuclides and beta-beta decay measurements. There has been a reassessment of the spontaneous fission (sf) half-lives, which distinguishes between sf decay half-lives and cluster decay half-lives and with cluster-fission decay. New measurements of isotopic abundance values for many elements will be discussed with an emphasis on the minor isotopes of interest for use in neutron activation analysis measurements. Neutron resonance integrals will be discussed emphasizing the differences between the calculated values obtained from the analytical integration over neutron resonances and the measured values in a neutron reactor-spectrum, which does not quite conform to the assumed 1/E neutron energy spectrum. The method used to determine the neutron resonance integral from measurement, using neutron activation analysis, will be discussed.

  16. Review of Non-Neutron and Neutron Nuclear Data, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, Norman E. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Review articles are in preparation for the 2004 edition of the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics dealing with the evaluation of both non-neutron and neutron nuclear data. Data on the discovery of element 110, Darmstadtium, and element 111 have been officially accepted, while data on element 118 have been withdrawn. Data to be presented include revised values for very short-lived nuclides, long-lived nuclides, and beta-beta decay measurements. There has been a reassessment of the spontaneous fission (sf) half-lives, which distinguishes between sf decay half-lives and cluster decay half-lives, and with cluster-fission decay. New measurements of isotopic abundance values for many elements will be discussed with an emphasis on the minor isotopes of interest for use in neutron activation analysis measurements. Neutron resonance integrals will be discussed emphasizing the differences between the calculated values obtained from the analytical integration over neutron resonances and the measured values in a neutron reactor-spectrum, which does not quite conform to the assumed 1/E neutron energy spectrum. The method used to determine the neutron resonance integral from measurement, using neutron activation analysis, will be discussed.

  17. Neutron cameras for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, L.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Batistoni, P. [ITER San Diego Joint Work Site, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron cameras with horizontal and vertical views have been designed for ITER, based on systems used on JET and TFTR. The cameras consist of fan-shaped arrays of collimated flight tubes, with suitably chosen detectors situated outside the biological shield. The sight lines view the ITER plasma through slots in the shield blanket and penetrate the vacuum vessel, cryostat, and biological shield through stainless steel windows. This paper analyzes the expected performance of several neutron camera arrangements for ITER. In addition to the reference designs, the authors examine proposed compact cameras, in which neutron fluxes are inferred from {sup 16}N decay gammas in dedicated flowing water loops, and conventional cameras with fewer sight lines and more limited fields of view than in the reference designs. It is shown that the spatial sampling provided by the reference designs is sufficient to satisfy target measurement requirements and that some reduction in field of view may be permissible. The accuracy of measurements with {sup 16}N-based compact cameras is not yet established, and they fail to satisfy requirements for parameter range and time resolution by large margins.

  18. Neutron Detector Gamma Insensitivity Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Stephens, Daniel L.

    2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The shortage of 3He has triggered the search for an effective alternative neutron detection technology for radiation portal monitor applications. Any new detection technology must satisfy two basic criteria: 1) it must meet the neutron detection efficiency requirement, and 2) it must be insensitive to gamma ray interference at a prescribed level, while still meeting the neutron detection requirement. It is the purpose of this document to define this latter criterion.

  19. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Bruce H. (Los Alamos, NM); Vasilik, Dennis G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  20. CHRPR Neutron Board Replacement Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erikson, Rebecca L.; Myjak, Mitchell J.

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document will walk through the steps to exchange the neutron channel boards with gamma channel boards in the CHRPR box.

  1. Centrifugal quantum states of neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; A. K. Petukhov; K. V. Protasov; A. Yu. Voronin

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method for observation of the quasi-stationary states of neutrons, localized near the curved mirror surface. The bounding effective well is formed by the centrifugal potential and the mirror Fermi-potential. This phenomenon is an example of an exactly solvable "quantum bouncer" problem that could be studied experimentally. It could provide a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, as well as quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. We develop formalism, which describes quantitatively the neutron motion near the mirror surface. The effects of mirror roughness are taken into account.

  2. Analytical applications for delayed neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccleston, G.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical formulations that describe the time dependence of neutron populations in nuclear materials contain delayed-neutron dependent terms. These terms are important because the delayed neutrons, even though their yields in fission are small, permit control of the fission chain reaction process. Analytical applications that use delayed neutrons range from simple problems that can be solved with the point reactor kinetics equations to complex problems that can only be solved with large codes that couple fluid calculations with the neutron dynamics. Reactor safety codes, such as SIMMER, model transients of the entire reactor core using coupled space-time neutronics and comprehensive thermal-fluid dynamics. Nondestructive delayed-neutron assay instruments are designed and modeled using a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code. Calculations on high-burnup spent fuels and other materials that contain a mix of uranium and plutonium isotopes require accurate and complete information on the delayed-neutron periods, yields, and energy spectra. A continuing need exists for delayed-neutron parameters for all the fissioning isotopes.

  3. Neutron-deuteron breakup and quasielastic scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasielastic scattering and deuteron breakup in the 200 MeV region is studied by impinging a pulsed neutron beam on a deuterium target at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The ...

  4. Requirements, possible alternatives & international NEUTRON SCATTERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimeo, Robert M.

    Requirements, possible alternatives & international NEUTRON SCATTERING DETECTORS for Rob Dimeo NIST neutron scattering instruments are the most demanding require background low #12;#12;The Helium-3 Supply Crisis ­ Alternative Techniques to Helium-3 based Detectors for Neutron Scattering Applications

  5. New neutron physics using spallation sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extraordinary neutron intensities available from the new spallation pulsed neutron sources open up exciting opportunities for basic and applied research in neutron nuclear physics. The energy range of neutron research which is being explored with these sources extends from thermal energies to almost 800 MeV. The emphasis here is on prospective experiments below 100 keV neutron energy using the intense neutron bursts produced by the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos. 30 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Measuring the Neutron's Mean Square Charge Radius Using Neutron Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. E. Wietfeldt; M. Huber; T. C. Black; H. Kaiser; M. Arif; D. L. Jacobson; S. A. Werner

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron is electrically neutral, but its substructure consists of charged quarks so it may have an internal charge distribution. In fact it is known to have a negative mean square charge radius (MSCR), the second moment of the radial charge density. In other words the neutron has a positive core and negative skin. In the first Born approximation the neutron MSCR can be simply related to the neutron-electron scattering length b_ne. In the past this important quantity has been extracted from the energy dependence of the total transmission cross-section of neutrons on high-Z targets, a very difficult and complicated process. A few years ago S.A. Werner proposed a novel approach to measuring b_ne from the neutron's dynamical phase shift in a perfect crystal close to the Bragg condition. We are conducting an experiment based on this method at the NIST neutron interferometer which may lead to a five-fold improvement in precision of b_ne and hence the neutron MSCR.

  7. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tremsin, A S; Tittelmeier, K; Schillinger, B; Schulz, M; Lerche, M; Feller, W B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and...

  8. HFIR Experiment Facilities | ORNL Neutron Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scattering Neutron Scattering Facilities at HFIR The fully instrumented HFIR will eventually include 15 state-of-the-art neutron scattering instruments, seven of which will be...

  9. Search for: "neutron scattering" | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    neutron scattering" Find + Advanced Search Advanced Search All Fields: "neutron scattering" Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator Author: Name Name ORCID Search...

  10. 11th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering LANSCE 11th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering Home Abstract Lecturers Lecturer Abstracts Hands-On Experiments Free Day About the...

  11. LANSCE | International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LINAC Outreach Affiliations Visiting LANSCE Facilities Isotope Production Facility Lujan Neutron Scattering Center Materials Test Station Proton Radiography Ultra-Cold Neutrons...

  12. Physics of Neutron Star Crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Chamel; P. Haensel

    2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics of neutron star crusts is vast, involving many different research fields, from nuclear and condensed matter physics to general relativity. This review summarizes the progress, which has been achieved over the last few years, in modeling neutron star crusts, both at the microscopic and macroscopic levels. The confrontation of these theoretical models with observations is also briefly discussed.

  13. Review of Indirect Methods Used to Determine the $^1S_0$ Neutron-Neutron Scattering Length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Howell

    2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined a value for the $^1S_0$ neutron-neutron scattering length ($a_{nn}$) from high-precision measurements of time-of-flight spectra of neutrons from the $^2H(\\pi^-,n \\gamma)n$ capture reaction. The measurements were done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility by the E1286 collaboration. The high spatial resolution of our gamma-ray detector enabled us to make a detailed assessment of the systematic uncertainties in our techniques. The value obtained in the present work is $a_{nn} = -18$.63 $\\pm $0.10 (statistical) $\\pm$ 0.44 (systematic) $\\pm$ 0.30 (theoretical) fm. This result is consistent with previous determinations of $a_{nn}$ from the $\\pi^-d$ capture reaction. We found that the analysis of the data with calculations that use a relativistic phase-space factor gives a more negative value for $a_{nn}$ by 0.33 fm over the analysis done using a nonrelativistic phase-space factor. Combining the present result with the previous ones from $\\pi^-d$ capture gives: $a_{nn} = - 18$.63 $\\pm$ 0.27 (expt) $\\pm$ 0.30 fm (theory). For the first time the combined statistical and systematic experimental uncertainty in $a_{nn}$ is smaller than the theoretical uncertainty and comparable to the uncertainty in the proton-proton $^1S_0$ scattering length ($a_{pp}$). This average value of $a_{nn}$ when corrected for the magnetic-moment interaction of the two neutrons becomes -18.9 $\\pm$ 0.4 fm which is 1.6 $\\pm$ 0.5 fm different from the recommended value of $a_{pp}$, thereby confirming charge symmetry breaking at the 1% confidence level.

  14. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  15. Fast neutron environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Lu, Ping; Brewer, Luke N. (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA); Goods, Steven Howard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Foiles, Stephen Martin; Puskar, Joseph David; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Boyce, Brad Lee; Clark, Blythe G.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this LDRD project is to develop a rapid first-order experimental procedure for the testing of advanced cladding materials that may be considered for generation IV nuclear reactors. In order to investigate this, a technique was developed to expose the coupons of potential materials to high displacement damage at elevated temperatures to simulate the neutron environment expected in Generation IV reactors. This was completed through a high temperature high-energy heavy-ion implantation. The mechanical properties of the ion irradiated region were tested by either micropillar compression or nanoindentation to determine the local properties, as a function of the implantation dose and exposure temperature. In order to directly compare the microstructural evolution and property degradation from the accelerated testing and classical neutron testing, 316L, 409, and 420 stainless steels were tested. In addition, two sets of diffusion couples from 316L and HT9 stainless steels with various refractory metals. This study has shown that if the ion irradiation size scale is taken into consideration when developing and analyzing the mechanical property data, significant insight into the structural properties of the potential cladding materials can be gained in about a week.

  16. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 86, 024612 (2012) Neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering as a probe of neutron density distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jonathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C 86, 024612 (2012) Neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering as a probe of neutron manuscript received 25 July 2012; published 30 August 2012) Neutrino-nucleus coherent elastic scattering provides a theoretically appealing way to measure the neutron part of nuclear form factors. Using

  17. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  18. Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue.

  19. Neutron Beta-Decay Jeff Martin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    : ­ superthermal sources for UCN, SNS's for CN #12;Example Experiment: The most precise measurements of neutron

  20. Boron nitride solid state neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention describes an apparatus useful for detecting neutrons, and particularly for detecting thermal neutrons, while remaining insensitive to gamma radiation. Neutrons are detected by direct measurement of current pulses produced by an interaction of the neutrons with hexagonal pyrolytic boron nitride.

  1. The Magnetism of Neutron States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Sidharth

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent measurement by Bignami and co-workers of the magnetic field of a neutron star for the first time gives a value that differs by about two orders of magnitude from the expected value. The speculation has been that the nuclear matter in the neutron stars exhibits some exotic behaviour. In this note we argue that this exotic behaviour is an anomalous statistics obeyed by the neutrons, and moreover these considerations lead to a value of the magnetic field that agrees with the observation. The same considerations also correctly give the magnetic fields of the earth and Jupiter.

  2. Scattered neutron tomography based on a neutron transport problem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scipolo, Vittorio

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scattering objects because it does not adequately account for the scattering component of the neutron beam intensity exiting the sample. We proposed a new method of computed tomography which employs an inverse problem analysis of both the transmitted...

  3. Scattered neutron tomography based on a neutron transport problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scipolo, Vittorio

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scattering objects because it does not adequately account for the scattering component of the neutron beam intensity exiting the sample. We proposed a new method of computed tomography which employs an inverse problem analysis of both the transmitted...

  4. Modulating the Neutron Flux from a Mirror Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D D

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 14-MeV neutron source based on a Gas-Dynamic Trap will provide a high flux of 14 MeV neutrons for fusion materials and sub-component testing. In addition to its main goal, the source has potential applications in condensed matter physics and biophysics. In this report, the author considers adding one more capability to the GDT-based neutron source, the modulation of the neutron flux with a desired frequency. The modulation may be an enabling tool for the assessment of the role of non-steady-state effects in fusion devices as well as for high-precision, low-signal basic science experiments favoring the use of the synchronous detection technique. A conclusion is drawn that modulation frequency of up to 1 kHz and modulation amplitude of a few percent is achievable. Limitations on the amplitude of modulations at higher frequencies are discussed.

  5. Method of assaying uranium with prompt fission and thermal neutron borehole logging adjusted by borehole physical characteristics. [Patient application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnard, R.W.; Jensen, D.H.

    1980-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium formations are assayed by prompt fission neutron logging techniques. The uranium in the formation is proportional to the ratio of epithermal counts to thermal or epithermal dieaway. Various calibration factors enhance the accuracy of the measurement.

  6. The nuclear physics of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarewicz, J. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the unique and fascinating structure of neutron stars. Although neutron stars are of interest in many areas of Physics, our aim is to provide an intellectual bridge between Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics. We argue against the naive perception of a neutron star as a uniform assembly of neutrons packed to enormous densities. Rather, by focusing on the many exotic phases that are speculated to exist in a neutron star, we show how the reality is different and far more interesting.

  7. On formation of the asymptotic spectrum of delayed neutron emitters in measuring the VVER-1000 scram system effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shishkov, L. K., E-mail: slk@vver.kiae.ru; Zizin, M. N., E-mail: zizin_m@mail.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of formation of an asymptotic distribution of the neutron flux density in the reactor systems after introducing different negative reactivities is considered. The impact of two factors after the reactivity introduction is evaluated: (1) nonuniformity of perturbation of core properties, on one hand, and (2) a sharp reduction in the density of prompt neutrons, which prevents the appearance of new delayed neutron emitters distributed in accordance with the “new” prompt neutron distribution, on the other hand. The results of calculations show that the errors of measuring the scram system effectiveness using the method of inverse solution of the kinetics equation are caused by the fact that, after the negative reactivity insertion, the sources of prompt and delayed neutrons have different spatial distributions. In the case of high negative reactivities, this difference remains while the system still has neutrons, which can be measured.

  8. Discrimination of gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering in AGATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ataç; A. Kas¸kas A; S. Akkoyun A; M. S¸enyi?git A; T. Hüyük A; S. O. Kara A; J. Nyberg B

    Possibilities of discriminating neutrons and ? rays in the AGATA ?-ray tracking spectrometer have been investigated with the aim of reducing the background due to inelastic scattering of neutrons in the high-purity germanium crystals. This background may become a serious problem especially in experiments with neutron-rich radioactive ion beams. Simulations using the Geant4 toolkit and a tracking program based on the forward tracking algorithm were carried out by emitting neutrons and ? rays from the center of AGATA. Three different methods were developed and tested in order to find “fingerprints ” of the neutron interaction points in the detectors. In a simulation with simultaneous emission of six neutrons with energies in the range 1-5 MeV and ten ? rays with energies between 150 and 1450 keV, the peak-to-background ratio at a ?-ray energy of 1.0 MeV was improved by a factor of 2.4 after neutron rejection with a reduction of the photopeak efficiency at 1.0 MeV of only a factor of 1.25.

  9. Discrimination of gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering in AGATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ataç; A. Ka?ka?; S. Akkoyun; M. ?enyi?it; T. Hüyük; S. O. Kara; J. Nyberg

    2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Possibilities of discriminating neutrons and gamma rays in the AGATA gamma-ray tracking spectrometer have been investigated with the aim of reducing the background due to inelastic scattering of neutrons in the high-purity germanium crystals. This background may become a serious problem especially in experiments with neutron-rich radioactive ion beams. Simulations using the Geant4 toolkit and a tracking program based on the forward tracking algorithm were carried out by emitting neutrons and gamma rays from the center of AGATA. Three different methods were developed and tested in order to find 'fingerprints' of the neutron interaction points in the detectors. In a simulation with simultaneous emission of six neutrons with energies in the range 1-5 MeV and ten gamma rays with energies between 150 and 1450 keV, the peak-to-background ratio at a gamma-ray energy of 1.0 MeV was improved by a factor of 2.4 after neutron rejection with a reduction of the photopeak efficiency at 1.0 MeV of only a factor of 1.25.

  10. Transport properties and neutrino emissivity of dense neutron-star matter with localized protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Baiko; P. Haensel

    1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    As pointed out by Kutschera and W{\\'o}jcik, very low concentration of protons combined with a specific density dependence of effective neutron-proton interaction could lead to a localization of ``proton impurities'' in neutron medium at densities exceeding four times normal nuclear matter density. We study consequences of the localization of protons for transport processes in dense neutron star cores, assuming random distribution of proton impurities. Kinetic equations, relevant for the transport of charge, heat and momentum, are solved using variational method. Localization of protons removes a T^{-2} factor from the transport coefficients, which leads, at lower temperatures, to a strong decrease of thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and shear viscosity of neutron star matter, as compared to the standard case, where protons form a Fermi liquid. Due to the localization of protons a number of conventional neutrino emission processes (including modified URCA process) become inoperative in neutron star cores. On the other hand, the energy loss rate from neutrino-antineutrino pair bremsstrahlung due to electron and neutron scattering off (localized) protons, will have a specific T^6 dependence, which could modify the cooling of the neutron star core, as compared to the standard case. Possible astrophysical implications of the localization of protons for neutron star evolution and dynamics are discussed.

  11. The structure of fillers, polymers and their interfaces in polymer composites using neutron scattering methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjelm, R.P.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron scattering methods, small-angle neutron scattering and neutron reflectometry, provide information on the structure of polymer composite materials that is not available from other structural probes. The unique capabilities of these methods derive from three factors. First, the length scales probed correspond to polymer conformation, molecular and domain scales and to the characteristic sizes of many fillers. Second, neutrons are able to penetrate relatively thick samples, allowing bulk samples to be measured, and enabling buried interfaces to be studied. This characteristic also allows for the construction of special sample containment needed for studying materials under stress, extremes in pressure and temperature, etc. Third, neutrons readily distinguish between different light elements, and between different isotopes of the same element. The ability to distinguish between hydrogen and deuterium is particularly important in this regard. New ways of exploiting the capabilities of neutrons are opening up with the development of improved sources and instruments in the US and elsewhere. In this talk the author will discuss the basic concepts that give rise to the unique capabilities of neutron scattering, giving several examples of the uses of neutron scattering techniques in the study of polymer composites. The examples will include the morphology of fillers, polymer binders and matrices, interfaces and defect structures.

  12. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a target of tungsten metal, neutrons are produced. These neutrons and protons are used to investigate, high explosives used to initiate weapons detonations, and radioisotope production for medical the Isotope Production Facility, Lujan Center, Proton Radiography Facility, Ultracold Neutrons Facility

  13. Distribution of neutron resonance widths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans A. Weidenmueller

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data on neutron resonance widths indicate disagreement with the Porter-Thomas distribution (PTD). I discuss the theoretical arguments for the PTD, possible theoretical modifications, and I summarize the experimantal evidence.

  14. Coherent control of neutron interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pushin, Dmitry A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, several novel techniques are proposed and demonstrated for measuring the coherent properties of materials and testing aspects of quantum information processing using a single crystal neutron interferometer. ...

  15. Materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, W.F.; Daemen, L.L. [comps.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Workshop on Materials for Spallation Neutron Sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, February 6 to 10, 1995, gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss areas in which work is needed, successful designs and use of materials, and opportunities for further studies. During the first day of the workshop, speakers presented overviews of current spallation neutron sources. During the next 3 days, seven panels allowed speakers to present information on a variety of topics ranging from experimental and theoretical considerations on radiation damage to materials safety issues. An attempt was made to identify specific problems that require attention within the context of spallation neutron sources. This proceedings is a collection of summaries from the overview sessions and the panel presentations.

  16. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  17. acp safeguards neutron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29 Supercool Neutrons (Ultracold Neutrons) Physics Websites Summary: . Korobkina, NCSU Neutron scattering is a valuable tool to study the structure of materials. Because Helium...

  18. Neutron Scattering: Condensed Matter and Magnetic Science, MPA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Scattering Neutron Scattering Capability description: Neutron scattering is a powerful probe of structure and collective modes of condensed matter. We are focused on direct...

  19. Application of neutron computed tomography in the geosciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilding, M.; Shields, K.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of neutron computed tomography in the geosciences Martinthat applies neutron computed tomography (CT) to geologicalthe use of neutron computed tomography (CT) in the analy-

  20. 11th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering | About the School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    students calculate results About the LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering The annual Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) School on Neutron Scattering is 9- to 10-day school...

  1. Neutron detectors comprising boron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Makela, Mark F; Spaulding, Randy Jay

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

  2. Alternative Neutron Detection Testing Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. Most currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large area neutron detector. This type of neutron detector is used in the TSA and other RPMs installed in international locations and in the Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation RPMs deployed primarily for domestic applications. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world and, thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated wavelength-shifting plastic fibers. Reported here is a summary of the testing carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on these technologies to date, as well as measurements on 3He tubes at various pressures. Details on these measurements are available in the referenced reports. Sponsors of these tests include the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Defense (DoD), as well as internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory funds.

  3. Neutron Structure — New Results with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sebastian Kuhn

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New measurements using the 6 GeV continuous electron beam and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab have collected information on the form factors and the unpolarized structure functions of the neutron, with minimal uncertainty from nuclear binding effects. One experiment has also tried to measure these binding effects more directly, using the method of ''spectator tagging''. These experiments are forerunners for an extensive program with the energy-upgraded 12 GeV accelerator at Jefferson Lab.

  4. Consistent neutron kinetics data generation for nodal transient calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akdeniz, B. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mueller, E.; Panayotov, D. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, SE - 721 63 Vaesteraas (Sweden); Ivanov, K. N. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current three-dimensional transient codes for thermal reactors are mostly based on two-group diffusion-theory nodal models. In the two-group approach no explicit distinction is made between prompt fission neutrons and delayed neutrons. Consequently, effective delayed neutron fractions have traditionally been used in an attempt to compensate for this shortcoming. A fundamentally better approach would be to solve the nodal kinetics equations in a sufficient number of energy groups to explicitly capture neutron emission spectrum effects. However, this would require the availability of a multi-group nodal transient code as well as a lattice code to generate the appropriate multi-group nodal data for the simulator. One such simulator is the PARCS nodal transient code, which is widely used and recognized as representative of the current state-of-the-art. Unfortunately, a proper nodal data preparation path between PARCS and a lattice code is not available. Even though several industrial lattice codes could be considered as candidates, most of them are tailored to producing two-group nodal data and would require modifications to produce multi-group prompt and delayed neutron emission spectra. In this paper, the particular modifications required to match the TransLAT lattice code and the PARCS nodal transient code for BWR transient applications are reported. Some modifications to PARCS were also required to make two-group and multi-group applications fully consistent. Numerical results are presented both to verify the proper functioning of these modifications and to illuminate the impact of various nodal kinetics data approximations in a selected transient calculation. In particular, the significance of blending rodded and un-rodded kinetics data in partially rodded nodes is demonstrated. It is also confirmed that the use of delayed neutron importance factors in two-group calculations notably reduces the differences between two-group and multi-group kinetics calculations. (authors)

  5. Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung by electrons in neutron star crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Kaminker; C. J. Pethick; A. Y. Potekhin; V. Thorsson; D. G. Yakovlev

    1998-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung by relativistic degenerate electrons in a neutron-star crust at densities (10^9 - 1.5x10^{14}) g/cm^3 is analyzed. The processes taken into account are neutrino emission due to Coulomb scattering of electrons by atomic nuclei in a Coulomb liquid, and electron-phonon scattering and Bragg diffraction (the static-lattice contribution) in a Coulomb crystal. The static-lattice contribution is calculated including the electron band-structure effects for cubic Coulomb crystals of different types and also for the liquid crystal phases composed of rod- and plate-like nuclei in the neutron-star mantle (at 10^{14} - 1.5x10^{14} g/cm^3). The phonon contribution is evaluated with proper treatment of the multi-phonon processes which removes a jump in the neutrino bremsstrahlung emissivity at the melting point obtained in previous works. Below 10^{13} g/cm^3, the results are rather insensitive to the nuclear form factor, but results for the solid state near the melting point are affected significantly by the Debye-Waller factor and multi-phonon processes. At higher densities, the nuclear form factor becomes more significant. A comparison of the various neutrino generation mechanisms in neutron star crusts shows that electron bremsstrahlung is among the most important ones.

  6. System and apparatus for neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1991-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a neutron radiography apparatus. It comprises an imaging plane; a neutron moderator having a cavity defining a convergent collimator, the cavity having a base and converging walls of neutron moderating material terminating at an aperture; a divergent collimator coaxially joined to the cavity at the aperture, the divergent collimator having diverging walls of radiation- absorbing material extending from the aperture to an expanded distal opening for irradiating the imaging plane; sources of neutrons disposed symmetrically about the base of the cavity; a neutron moderating material disposed for maximum neutron thermalization between the sources and the base of the cavity; and means for substantially shielding the plane from electromagnetic energy.

  7. Neutronics analysis for HYLIFE-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, M.T.

    1990-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary neutronics analysis of the HYLIFE-2 reactor concept gives a tritium breeding ratio of 1.17 and a system energy multiplication factor of 1.14. Modified SS-316 (in which Mn is substituted for Ni) is superior to Hastelloy X and Hastelloy N as a firstwall material considering He generation, dpa-limited lifetime, and shallow-burial index. Since Flibe is corrosive to Mn metals, however, a favorable first-wall material is yet to be decided on. Flibe impurities considered (e.g., inherent impurities and those arising from wall erosion or secondary-coolant leakage) do not increase the hazard to the public over that of pure Flibe. The main issues for HYLIFE-2 are the high shallow-burial index (106) and the requirement to contain some 99.7% of the {sup 18}F inventory to prevent its release to the public 18 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. atomic bomb neutrons: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the neutron density. Finally, in the case of neutron stars, where again the neutron-neutron scattering length is negative and fixed, we determine the condensate fraction as a...

  9. Neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering as a probe of neutron density distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly Patton; Jonathan Engel; Gail C. McLaughlin; Nicolas Schunck

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino-nucleus coherent elastic scattering provides a theoretically appealing way to measure the neutron part of nuclear form factors. Using an expansion of form factors into moments, we show that neutrinos from stopped pions can probe not only the second moment of the form factor (the neutron radius) but also the fourth moment. Using simple Monte Carlo techniques for argon, germanium, and xenon detectors of 3.5 tonnes, 1.5 tonnes, and 300 kg, respectively, we show that the neutron radii can be found with an uncertainty of a few percent when near a neutrino flux of $3\\times10^{7}$ neutrinos/cm$^{2}$/s. If the normalization of the neutrino flux is known independently, one can determine the moments accurately enough to discriminate among the predictions of various nuclear energy functionals.

  10. 2013 Review of Neutron and Non-Neutron Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years since the ISRD-14 Symposium has been performed and the highlights are presented. Included in the data review are the status of new chemical elements, new measurements of the isotopic composition for many chemical elements and the resulting change in the atomic weight values. New half-life measurements for both short-lived and longlived nuclides, some alpha decay and double beta decay measurements for quasistable nuclides are discussed. The latest evaluation of atomic masses has been published. Data from new measurements on the very heavy (trans-meitnerium) elements are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross section and resonance integral measurements are discussed and tabulated.

  11. - and -delayed neutron- decay of neutron-rich copper isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Winger, J. A. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Ilyushkin, S. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Batchelder, J. C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Borzov, Ivan N [ORNL; Goodin, C. [Vanderbilt University; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Hamilton, Joseph H [ORNL; Krolas, W. [Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge; Liddick, S. N. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Mazzocchi, C. [University of Warsaw; Nelson, C. [Vanderbilt University; Nowacki, F. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Strasbourg, France; Padgett, Stephen [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Piechaczek, A. [Louisiana State University; Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Sieja, K. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany; Zganjar, E. F. [Louisiana State University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {beta}-decay properties of neutron-rich Cu isotopes produced in proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U were studied at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The data were collected using high-resolution online mass separation, reacceleration, and digital {beta}-{gamma} spectroscopy methods. An improved decay scheme of N = 49 {sup 78}Cu and the first observation of N = 50 {sup 79}Cu {beta}-delayed neutron decay followed by a gamma transition are reported. Spin and parity (5{sup -}) are deduced for {sup 78gs}Cu. The {beta}-delayed neutron branching ratios (P{sub {beta}n}) for the {sup 77}Cu and {sup 79}Cu precursors are analyzed with the help of nuclear structure models.

  12. Old and new neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruderman, M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The youngest known radiopulsar in the rapidly spinning magnetized neutron star which powers the Crab Nebula, the remnant of the historical supernova explosion of 1054 AD. Similar neutron stars are probably born at least every few hundred years, but are less frequent than Galactic supernova explosions. They are initially sources of extreme relativistic electron and/or positron winds (approx.10/sup 38/s/sup -1/ of 10/sup 12/ eV leptons) which greatly decrease as the neutron stars spin down to become mature pulsars. After several million years these neutron stars are no longer observed as radiopulsars, perhaps because of large magnetic field decay. However, a substantial fraction of the 10/sup 8/ old dead pulsars in the Galaxy are the most probable source for the isotropically distributed ..gamma..-ray burst detected several times per week at the earth. Some old neutron stars are spun-up by accretion from companions to be resurrected as rapidly spinning low magnetic field radiopulsars. 52 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  13. BF3 Neutron Detector Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world; thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and detection capabilities are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the efficiency of BF3 tubes at a pressure of 800 torr. These measurements were made partially to validate models of the RPM system that have been modified to simulate the performance of BF3-filled tubes. While BF3 could be a potential replacement for 3He, there are limitations to its use in deployed systems.

  14. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korton, George (Cincinnati, OH)

    2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure by encompassing the sides of the fuel element between the header plates.

  15. A New Polyethylene Scattering Law Determined Using Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavelle, Christopher M [ORNL; Liu, C [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S (Q, E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for T =300 K, and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 300 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We describe the experimental methods, review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, and compare computations using these models to the measured S (Q, E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the 1 phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work.

  16. Neutron Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    August 3 2009 Non-invasive, non-destructive technique based on attenuation of the neutron beam. Neutrons interact with nuclei and their scattering power does not vary in...

  17. 10th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering LANSCE 10th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering Home Abstract Lecturers Hands-On Experiments Free Day About the School Sponsors FAQ's...

  18. SEARCH FOR NEUTRON ANTI-NEUTRON OSCILLATION AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    SEARCH FOR NEUTRON ANTI-NEUTRON OSCILLATION AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY A Thesis Presented to explain the baryon asymmetry of the universe. In this thesis, a limit on the neutron anti-neutron (nnbar is sampled from the three phases of the SNO experiment to construct a three-phase blind analysis. The profile

  19. Neutron scattering and models: Titanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.B.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental titanium were measured from 4.5 {r_arrow} 10.0 MeV in incident energy increments of {approx} 0.5 MeV. At each energy the measurements were made at forty or more scattering angles distributed between {approx} 17 and 160{degree}. Concurrently, differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured for observed excitations of 0.975 {+-} 0.034, 1.497 {+-} 0.033, 2.322 {+-} 0.058, 3.252 {+-} 0.043, 3.700 {+-} 0.093, 4.317 {+-} 0.075 and 4.795 {+-} 0.100 MeV. All of the observed inelastically-scattered neutron groups were composites of contributions from several isotopes and/or levels. The experimental results were used to develop energy-average optical, statistical and coupled-channels models.

  20. LAT and Solar Neutrons: Preliminary estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longo, Francesco [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    GLAST LAT will detect several solar flares in gamma rays. Motivated by the CGRO results on neutrons emitted during a solar flare, we try to estimate the possibility of the LAT to detect solar neutrons. Besides gamma rays, neutrons could indeed interact in the LAT instrument and mimic a gamma-ray signal. An estimate of the contamination of gamma-ray detection in solar flares by the neutron component is given.

  1. Semiconductor High-Level Dosimeters Used in the SLAC Mixed Gamma and Neutron Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Stan

    2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an exploration of Semiconductor High-Level Dosimetry (SHLD) in the accelerator radiation fields, the response of SHLD system, composed of dual MOSFETs, wide-base PIN diode, and a microprocessor-controlled reader, was calibrated in photon (Co-60) and neutron (Bare-reactor) fields. The response curves for the MOSFET and the PIN diode were determined. The neutron sensitivity of the PIN diode is about a factor of 2200 times higher than its photon sensitivity. Therefore, the PIN diode can be used to measure the neutron dose and virtually ignore the photon dose contribution. The MOSFET can be used to estimate the photon dose after subtracting the ionizing effect of the neutrons. The SHLD was used in the SLAC mixed field to measure the photon and neutron doses around a copper beam dump. The photon measurements near the copper dump agreed reasonably with the FLUKA Monte Carlo calculations. The neutron measurements agreed with FLUKA calculations to within a factor of two.

  2. Nuclear Physics of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Piekarewicz

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of cold nuclear matter, namely, the relation between the pressure and energy density, is a central goal of nuclear physics that cuts across a variety of disciplines. Indeed, the limits of nuclear existence, the collision of heavy ions, the structure of neutron stars, and the dynamics of core-collapse supernova, all depend critically on the equation of state of hadronic matter. In this contribution I will concentrate on the special role that nuclear physics plays in constraining the EOS of cold baryonic matter and its impact on the properties of neutron stars.

  3. CHINA SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE DESIGN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEI,J.

    2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an accelerator-based high-power project currently in preparation under the direction of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The complex is based on an H- linear accelerator, a rapid cycling proton synchrotron accelerating the beam to 1.6 GeV, a solid tungsten target station, and five initial instruments for spallation neutron applications. The facility will operate at 25 Hz repetition rate with a phase-I beam power of about 120 kW. The major challenge is to build a robust and reliable user's facility with upgrade potential at a fractional of ''world standard'' cost.

  4. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Hongwu [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  5. Neutron Science | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3,Neutron Scattering3 Neutron

  6. A neutron transmission study of environmental Gd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristiana Oprea; Ioan Alexandru Oprea; Alexandru Mihul

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for the determination of environmental Gd by neutron transmission (NT) experiments is proposed. The NT method is based on the measurements of neutron spectra passing through a target. From the attenuation neutron spectra new data as concentration, width, resonance energies and cross section have been obtained.

  7. Neutron Scattering Studies of Correlated Electron Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothroyd, Andrew

    Neutron Scattering Studies of Correlated Electron Systems Lucy Helme Thesis submitted submitted for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Trinity Term 2006 This thesis presents neutron scatteringO2, through inelastic neutron scattering studies of the crystal field transitions above and below

  8. RisR1125(EN) Neutron Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø­R­1125(EN) Neutron Scattering Studies of Modulated Magnetic Structures Steen Aagaard Sørensen investigations of the magnetic systems DyFe4Al8 and MnSi by neutron scattering and in the former case also by X and the correlations between the scattering entities of the sample. The theoretical framework of neutron scattering

  9. Measurements of the Thermal Neutron Scattering Kernel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Measurements of the Thermal Neutron Scattering Kernel Li (Emily) Liu, Yaron Danon, Bjorn Becker and discussions Problems and Future study Questions #12;3 M. Mattes and J. Keinert, Thermal Neutron Scattering experimental data used was from 1973-1974! M. Mattes and J. Keinert, Thermal Neutron Scattering Data

  10. 2002 REVIEW OF NEUTRON AND NON NEUTRON NUCLEAR DATA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2002-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Review articles are in preparation for the 2003 edition of the CRC's Handbook of Chemistry and Physics dealing with both non-neutron and neutron nuclear data. Highlights include: withdrawal of the claim for discovery of element 118; new measurements of isotopic abundances have led to changes for many elements; a new set of recommended standards for calibration of {gamma}-ray energies have been published for many nuclides; new half-life measurements reported for very short lived isotopes, many long-lived nuclides and {beta}{beta} decay measurements for quasi-stable nuclides; a new reassessment of spontaneous fission (sf) half-lives for ground state nuclides, distinguishing half-lives from sf decay and cluster decay half-lives and the new cluster-fission decay; charged particle cross sections, (n,p) and (n,{alpha}) measurements for thermal neutrons incident on light nuclides; new thermal (n,{gamma}) cross sections and neutron resonance integrals measured. Details are presented.

  11. Scattered Neutron Tomography Based on A Neutron Transport Inverse Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Charlton

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron radiography and computed tomography are commonly used techniques to non-destructively examine materials. Tomography refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object from either transmission or reflection data collected by illuminating the object from many different directions.

  12. Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron source for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

    therapy [1, 2]. Lithium targets for two modes of neutron beam production are developed. The first one. Target will be created as a 2 ­ 3 µm thick lithium layer on the surface of tungsten disk cooled by liquidW cm­2 . ii) Production of target with lithium layer thickness of 2 ­ 3 µm. #12;248 iii) Evaporation

  13. Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, A.J.

    1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method is disclosed for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue. 1 fig.

  14. Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cook, Jeremy L. (Greeley, CO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

  15. The bound coherent neutron scattering length of the oxygen isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Henry E [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Simonson, J Michael {Mike} [ORNL; Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Lemmel, Hartmut [Technical University Vienna; Rauch, Helmut [E141 Atominstitut der Österreichischen Universitäten,; Zeidler, Anita [University of Bath; Salmon, Phil [University of Bath

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of neutron interferometry was used to measure the bound coherent neutron scattering length bcoh of the oxygen isotopes 17O and 18O. From the measured difference in optical path between two water samples, either H2 17O or H2 18O versus H2 natO, where nat denotes the natural isotopic composition, we obtain bcoh , 17O = 5.867(4) fm and bcoh , 18O = 6.009(5) fm, based on the accurately known value of bcoh , natO = 5.805(4) fm which is equal to bcoh , 16O within the experimental uncertainty. Our results for bcoh , 17O and bcoh , 18O differ appreciably from the standard tabulated values of 5.6(5) fm and 5.84(7) fm, respectively. In particular, our measured scattering length contrast of 0.204(3) fm between 18O and natO is nearly a factor of 6 greater than the tabulated value, which renders feasible neutron diffraction experiments using 18O isotope substitution and thereby offers new possibilites for measuring the partial structure factors of oxygen-containing compounds, such as water.

  16. Radiation from condensed surface of magnetic neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew van Adelsberg; Dong Lai; Alexander Y. Potekhin; Phil Arras

    2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations show that the thermal X-ray spectra of many isolated neutron stars are featureless and in some cases (e.g., RX J1856.5-3754) well fit by a blackbody. Such a perfect blackbody spectrum is puzzling since radiative transport through typical neutron star atmospheres causes noticeable deviation from blackbody. Previous studies have shown that in a strong magnetic field, the outermost layer of the neutron star may be in a condensed solid or liquid form because of the greatly enhanced cohesive energy of the condensed matter. The critical temperature of condensation increases with the magnetic field strength, and can be as high as 10^6 K (for Fe surface at B \\sim 10^{13} G or H surface at B \\sim a few times 10^{14} G). Thus the thermal radiation can directly emerge from the degenerate metallic condensed surface, without going through a gaseous atmosphere. Here we calculate the emission properties (spectrum and polarization) of the condensed Fe and H surfaces of magnetic neutron stars in the regimes where such condensation may be possible. For a smooth condensed surface, the overall emission is reduced from the blackbody by less than a factor of 2. The spectrum exhibits modest deviation from blackbody across a wide energy range, and shows mild absorption features associated with the ion cyclotron frequency and the electron plasma frequency in the condensed matter. The roughness of the solid condensate (in the Fe case) tends to decrease the reflectivity of the surface, and make the emission spectrum even closer to blackbody. We discuss the implications of our results for observations of dim, isolated neutron stars and magnetars.

  17. B{sub 4}C thin films for neutron detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeglund, Carina [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Thin Film Physics Division, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Birch, Jens; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Thin Film Physics Division, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Andersen, Ken; Hall-Wilton, Richard [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bigault, Thierry; Buffet, Jean-Claude; Correa, Jonathan; Esch, Patrick van; Guerard, Bruno; Piscitelli, Francesco [Institute Laue Langevin, Rue Jules Horowitz, FR-380 00 Grenoble (France); Khaplanov, Anton [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Institute Laue Langevin, Rue Jules Horowitz, FR-380 00 Grenoble (France); Vettier, Christian [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, FR-380 43 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Vollenberg, Wilhelmus [Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings Group (TE/VSC), CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the very limited availability of {sup 3}He, new kinds of neutron detectors, not based on {sup 3}He, are urgently needed. Here, we present a method to produce thin films of {sup 10}B{sub 4}C, with maximized detection efficiency, intended to be part of a new generation of large area neutron detectors. B{sub 4}C thin films have been deposited onto Al-blade and Si wafer substrates by dc magnetron sputtering from {sup nat}B{sub 4}C and {sup 10}B{sub 4}C targets in an Ar discharge, using an industrial deposition system. The films were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, x-ray reflectivity, and neutron radiography. We show that the film-substrate adhesion and film purity are improved by increased substrate temperature and deposition rate. A deposition rate of 3.8 A/s and substrate temperature of 400 deg. C result in films with a density close to bulk values and good adhesion to film thickness above 3 {mu}m. Boron-10 contents of almost 80 at. % are obtained in 6.3 m{sup 2} of 1 {mu}m thick {sup 10}B{sub 4}C thin films coated on Al-blades. Initial neutron absorption measurements agree with Monte Carlo simulations and show that the layer thickness, number of layers, neutron wavelength, and amount of impurities are determining factors. The study also shows the importance of having uniform layer thicknesses over large areas, which for a full-scale detector could be in total {approx}1000 m{sup 2} of two-side coated Al-blades with {approx}1 {mu}m thick {sup 10}B{sub 4}C films.

  18. Maximally incompressible neutron star matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy S. Olson

    2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic kinetic theory, based on the Grad method of moments as developed by Israel and Stewart, is used to model viscous and thermal dissipation in neutron star matter and determine an upper limit on the maximum mass of neutron stars. In the context of kinetic theory, the equation of state must satisfy a set of constraints in order for the equilibrium states of the fluid to be thermodynamically stable and for perturbations from equilibrium to propagate causally via hyperbolic equations. Application of these constraints to neutron star matter restricts the stiffness of the most incompressible equation of state compatible with causality to be softer than the maximally incompressible equation of state that results from requiring the adiabatic sound speed to not exceed the speed of light. Using three equations of state based on experimental nucleon-nucleon scattering data and properties of light nuclei up to twice normal nuclear energy density, and the kinetic theory maximally incompressible equation of state at higher density, an upper limit on the maximum mass of neutron stars averaging 2.64 solar masses is derived.

  19. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  20. Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misti A Lillo

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

  1. Neutron sources: Present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500 MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-producing efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: fundamental neutron-nuclear research, nuclear data acquisition, materials damage studies, engineering tests, and biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Neutron spectrometer for improved SNM search.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Aigeldinger, Georg

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the exception of large laboratory devices with very low sensitivities, a neutron spectrometer have not been built for fission neutrons such as those emitted by special nuclear materials (SNM). The goal of this work was to use a technique known as Capture Gated Neutron Spectrometry to develop a solid-state device with this functionality. This required modifications to trans-stilbene, a known solid-state scintillator. To provide a neutron capture signal we added lithium to this material. This unique triggering signal allowed identification of neutrons that lose all of their energy in the detector, eliminating uncertainties that arise due to partial energy depositions. We successfully implemented a capture gated neutron spectrometer and were able to distinguish an SNM like fission spectrum from a spectrum stemming from a benign neutron source.

  3. Delayed neutron yield from fast neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piksaikin, V M; Isaev, S G; Kazakov, L E; Roshchenko, V A; Tertytchnyi, R G

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurements of the total delayed neutron yield from fast neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U were made. The experimental method based on the periodic irradiation of the fissionable sample by neutrons from a suitable nuclear reaction had been employed. The preliminary results on the energy dependence of the total delayed neutron yield from fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U are obtained. According to the comparison of experimental data with our prediction based on correlation properties of delayed neutron characteristics, it is concluded that the value of the total delayed neutron yield near the threshold of (n,f) reaction is not a constant.

  4. Characterization of the CR-39 neutron track etch dosimeter and evaluation of a combination CR-39/thermoluminescent dosimeter badge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoover, Paul Steven

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . Objectives . THEORY 2 5 9 12 14 Charged Particle Interactions and Damage Track Formation Neutron Converters The Etching Process Background Effects The Quality Factor MATERIALS AND METHODS 14 16 18 21 22 31 CR-39 Supply . CR-39... effectiveness and used for calculating the dose equivalent (H) of exposed personnel, do not offer the same margin of safety for all radiations, including neutrons. The result is a proposed increase in applied Q values to assure comparable safety in all...

  5. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  6. Superresolution of a compact neutron spectrometer at energies relevant for fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reginatto, M.; Zimbal, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to achieve resolution that is better than the instrument resolution (i.e., superresolution) is well known in optics, where it has been extensively studied. Unfortunately, there are only a handful of theoretical studies concerning superresolution of particle spectrometers, even though experimentalists are familiar with the enhancement of resolution that is achievable when appropriate methods of data analysis are used, such as maximum entropy and Bayesian methods. Knowledge of the superresolution factor is in many cases important. For example, in applications of neutron spectrometry to fusion diagnostics, the temperature of a burning plasma is an important physical parameter which may be inferred from the width of the peak of the neutron energy spectrum, and the ability to determine this width depends on the superresolution factor. Kosarev has derived an absolute limit for resolution enhancement using arguments based on a well known theorem of Shannon. Most calculations of superresolution factors in the literature, however, are based on the assumption of Gaussian, translationally invariant response functions and therefore not directly applicable to neutron spectrometers which typically have response functions not satisfying these requirements. In this work, we develop a procedure that allows us to overcome these difficulties and we derive estimates of superresolution for liquid scintillator spectrometers of a type commonly used for neutron measurements. Theoretical superresolution factors are compared to experimental results.

  7. Synthesize Neutron-Drip-Line-Nuclides with Free-Neutron Bose-Einstein Condensates Experimentally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao-Guo Dong

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We first show a possible way to create a new type of matter, free-neutron Bose-Einstein condensate by the ultracold free-neutron-pair Bose-Einstein condensation and then determine the neutron drip line experimentally. The Bose-Einstein condensation of bosonic and fermionic atoms in atomic gases was performed experimentally and predicted theoretically early. Neutrons are similar to fermionic atoms. We found free neutrons could be cooled to ultracold neutrons with very low energy by other colder neutral atoms which are cooled by the laser. These neutrons form neutron pairs with spin zero, and then ultracold neutron-pairs form Bose-Einstein condensate. Our results demonstrate how these condensates can react with accelerated ion beams at different energy to synthesize very neutron-rich nuclides near, on or/and beyond the neutron drip line, to determine the neutron drip line and whether there are long-life nuclide or isomer islands beyond the neutron drip line experimentally. Otherwise, these experimental results will confirm our prediction that is in the whole interacting region or distance of nuclear force in all energy region from zero to infinite, Only repulsive nuclear force exists among identical nucleons and only among different nucleons exists attractive nuclear force.

  8. Workshop on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P. (eds.)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior.

  9. Summary of experiments and analysis from the JAERI/USDOE collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The JAERI/USDOE Collaborative program on Fusion Blanket Neutronics was started officially on Oct. 23, 1984 using the intense D-T neutron generator FNS and terminated in 1993. The objectives of the program are: (1) to validate neutronics methods, codes and nuclear data, (2) to provide estimates of uncertainties in satisfying tritium self-sufficiency in fusion reactors, (3) to provide integral data on nuclear heating, induced radioactivity and afterheat, and (4) to develop the neutronics technology for the design and testing of the next fusion devices. The program was divided into three phases depending on the ideas of the source and test blanket arrangements. Useful and reliable benchmark data have been accumulated through this collaboration experiments. They are tritium production rates (TPR) of Li-6, Li-7 and Li-natural, various reaction rates measured by activation foils, neutron spectra, gamma-ray spectra, gamma-ray heating rates and so on. Both Japan and US analyzed these benchmark experiments using latest and/or newly developed data and methods, e.g., GMVP, MCNP, JENDL-3, etc. A novel methodology has been developed to estimate design safety factors and the associated confidence levels. These safety factors are based on the prediction uncertainties of TPR as derived from the numerous calculational and experimental data accumulated during the program.

  10. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosko, Andrey

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular...

  11. Measurement of delayed-neutron yield from {sup 237}Np fission induced by thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundorin, N. A.; Zhdanova, K. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Pikelner, L. B., E-mail: plb@nf.jinr.ru; Rebrova, N. V.; Salamatin, I. M.; Smirnov, V. I.; Furman, V. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The delayed-neutron yield from thermal-neutron-induced fission of the {sup 237}Np nucleus was measured using a sample periodically exposed to a pulsed neutron beam with subsequent detection of neutrons during the time intervals between pulses. The experiment was realized on an Isomer-M setup mounted in the IBR-2 pulsed reactor channel equipped with a mirror neutron guide. The setup and the experimental procedure are described, the background sources are thoroughly analyzed, and the experimental data are presented. The total delayed-neutron yield from {sup 237}Np fission induced by thermal neutrons is {nu}{sub d} = 0.0110 {+-} 0.0009. This study was performed at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (JINR, Dubna)

  12. Ion sources for sealed neutron tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E.J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Neutron Tube Dept.; Bischoff, G.C. [Lockheed Martin Specialty Components, Largo, FL (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast and thermal neutron activation analysis with sealed neutron generators has been used to detect oil (oil logging), hazardous waste, fissile material, explosives, and contraband (drugs). Sealed neutron generators, used in the above applications, must be small and portable, have good electrical efficiency and long life. The ion sources used in the sealed neutron tubes require high gas utilization efficiencies or low pressure operation with high ionization efficiencies. In this paper, the authors compare a number of gas ion sources that can be used in sealed neutron tubes. The characteristics of the most popular ion source, the axial Penning discharge will be discussed as part of the zetatron neutron generator. Other sources to be discussed include the SAMIS source and RF ion source.

  13. Aerial Neutron Detection: Neutron Signatures for Nonproliferation and Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurer, Richard J.; Stampahar, Thomas G.; Smith, Ethan X.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Rourke, Timothy J.; LeDonne, Jeffrey P.; Avaro, Emanuele; Butler, D. Andre; Borders, Kevin L.; Stampahar, Jezabel; Schuck, William H.; Selfridge, Thomas L.; McKissack, Thomas M.; Duncan, William W.; Hendricks, Thane J.

    2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    From 2007 to the present, the Remote Sensing Laboratory has been conducting a series of studies designed to expand our fundamental understanding of aerial neutron detection with the goal of designing an enhanced sensitivity detection system for long range neutron detection. Over 35 hours of aerial measurements in a helicopter were conducted for a variety of neutron emitters such as neutron point sources, a commercial nuclear power reactor, nuclear reactor spent fuel in dry cask storage, depleted uranium hexafluoride and depleted uranium metal. The goals of the project were to increase the detection sensitivity of our instruments such that a 5.4 × 104 neutron/second source could be detected at 100 feet above ground level at a speed of 70 knots and to enhance the long-range detection sensitivity for larger neutron sources, i.e., detection ranges above 1000 feet. In order to increase the sensitivity of aerial neutron detection instruments, it is important to understand the dynamics of the neutron background as a function of altitude. For aerial neutron detection, studies have shown that the neutron background primarily originates from above the aircraft, being produced in the upper atmosphere by galactic cosmic-ray interactions with air molecules. These interactions produce energetic neutrons and charged particles that cascade to the earth’s surface, producing additional neutrons in secondary collisions. Hence, the neutron background increases as a function of altitude which is an impediment to long-range neutron detection. In order to increase the sensitivity for long range detection, it is necessary to maintain a low neutron background as a function of altitude. Initial investigations show the variation in the neutron background can be decreased with the application of a cosmic-ray shield. The results of the studies along with a representative data set are presented.

  14. Ferromagnetism in neutron matter and its implication for the neutron star equation of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diener, J. P. W. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Stellenbosch University, P.O. Box X1, Matieland, 7602 (South Africa); Scholtz, F. G. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Stellenbosch University, P.O. Box X1, Matieland, 7602 (South Africa); National Institute for Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box X1, Matieland, 7602 (South Africa)

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possible contribution of the ferromagnetic phase of neutron matter in the neutron star interior to the star's magnetic field. We introduce a relativistic, self-consistent calculation of the ferromagnetic phase in neutron matter within the context of the relativistic mean-field approximation. The presence of the ferromagnetic phase stiffens the star's equation of state which implies a larger neutron star radius compared to the non-ferromagnetic case.

  15. Neutron Generators for Spent Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A

    2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE has initiated a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in, and detect the diversion of pins from, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies with non-destructive assay (NDA). The 14 NDA techniques being studied include several that require an external neutron source: Delayed Neutrons (DN), Differential Die-Away (DDA), Delayed Gammas (DG), and Lead Slowing-Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This report provides a survey of currently available neutron sources and their underlying technology that may be suitable for NDA of SNF assemblies. The neutron sources considered here fall into two broad categories. The term 'neutron generator' is commonly used for sealed devices that operate at relatively low acceleration voltages of less than 150 kV. Systems that employ an acceleration structure to produce ion beam energies from hundreds of keV to several MeV, and that are pumped down to vacuum during operation, rather than being sealed units, are usually referred to as 'accelerator-driven neutron sources.' Currently available neutron sources and future options are evaluated within the parameter space of the neutron generator/source requirements as currently understood and summarized in section 2. Applicable neutron source technologies are described in section 3. Commercially available neutron generators and other source options that could be made available in the near future with some further development and customization are discussed in sections 4 and 5, respectively. The pros and cons of the various options and possible ways forward are discussed in section 6. Selection of the best approach must take a number of parameters into account including cost, size, lifetime, and power consumption, as well as neutron flux, neutron energy spectrum, and pulse structure that satisfy the requirements of the NDA instrument to be built.

  16. Information from leading neutrons at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Khoze; A. D. Martin; M. G. Ryskin

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In principle, leading neutrons produced in photoproduction and deep-inelastic scattering at HERA have the potential to determine the pion structure function, the neutron absorptive cross section and the form of the pion flux. To explore this potential we compare theoretical predictions for the x_L and p_t spectra of leading neutrons, and the Q^2 dependence of the cross section, with the existing ZEUS data.

  17. Neutrons used to study model vascular systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the endothelial cells and the supporting substrate. In what may be the first use of neutron scattering to study complex bio-medical systems under dynamic conditions, Los...

  18. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  19. Neutron Imaging of Advanced Engine Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Science Division Hassina Z. Bilheux & Sophie Voisin Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Scattering Science Division Jens Gregor University of Tennessee - Knoxville Dept....

  20. The Neutron Imaging Diagnostic at NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherly, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of ICF implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  1. Neutronic Characterization of the Megapie Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Panebianco; Olivier Bringer; Pavel Bokov; Sebastien Chabod; Frederic Chartier; Emmeric Dupont; Diane Dore; Xavier Ledoux; Alain Letourneau; Ludovic Oriol; Aurelien Prevost; Danas Ridikas; Jean-Christian Toussaint

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The MEGAPIE project is one of the key experiments towards the feasibility of Accelerator Driven Systems. On-line operation and post-irradiation analysis will provide the scientific community with unique data on the behavior of a liquid spallation target under realistic irradiation conditions. A good neutronics performance of such a target is of primary importance towards an intense neutron source, where an extended liquid metal loop requires some dedicated verifications related to the delayed neutron activity of the irradiated PbBi. In this paper we report on the experimental characterization of the MEGAPIE neutronics in terms of the prompt neutron (PN) flux inside the target and the delayed neutron (DN) flux on the top of it. For the PN measurements, a complex detector, made of 8 microscopic fission chambers, has been built and installed in the central part of the target to measure the absolute neutron flux and its spatial distribution. Moreover, integral information on the neutron energy distribution as a function of the position along the beam axis could be extracted, providing integral constraints on the neutron production models implemented in transport codes such as MCNPX. For the DN measurement, we used a standard 3He counter and we acquired data during the start-up phase of the target irradiation in order to take sufficient statistics at variable beam power. Experimental results obtained on the PN flux characteristics and their comparison with MCNPX simulations are presented, together with a preliminary analysis of the DN decay time spectrum.

  2. Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, Charles K.

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 ?m which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

  3. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Highlights | Neutron Reflectometry (NR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the crystallinity of the sample (single crystal, polycrystalline, or amorphous). Neutron scattering is a unique tool to study such nanolayered composites because the...

  4. Data Analysis & Visualization | Neutron Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Analysis and Visualization As the data sets generated by the increasingly powerful neutron scattering instruments at HFIR and SNS grow ever more massive, the facilities'...

  5. Chemical and Engineering Materials | Neutron Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and novel engineering materials. The user community takes advantage of capabilities of neutron scattering for measurements over wide ranges of experimental and operating...

  6. Neutron Data Analysis & Visualization | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Analysis and Visualization As the data sets generated by the increasingly powerful neutron scattering instruments at HFIR and SNS grow ever more massive, the facilities'...

  7. Ultracold Neutrons at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the decay electrons. UCNb UCNb measures the potential distortion of the neutron beta-decay energy spectrum due to physics beyond the Standard Model. Nab The Nab...

  8. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolinski, M J

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}DBD) is a lepton-number violating process that can occur only for a massive Majorana neutrino. The search for 0{nu}DBD is currently the only practical experimental way to determine whether neutrinos are identical to their own antiparticles (Majorana neutrinos) or have distinct particle and anti-particle states (Dirac neutrinos). In addition, the observation of 0{nu}DBD can provide information about the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The Cuoricino experiment was a sensitive search for 0{nu}DBD, as well as a proof of principle for the next generation experiment, CUORE. CUORE will search for 0{nu}DBD of {sup 130}Te with a ton-scale array of unenriched TeO{sub 2} bolometers. By increasing mass and decreasing the background for 0{nu}DBD, the half-life sensitivity of CUORE will be a factor of twenty better than that of Cuoricino. The site for both of these experiments is the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, an underground laboratory with 3300 meters water equivalent rock overburden and a cosmic ray muon attenuation factor of 10{sup -6}. Because of the extreme low background requirements for CUORE, it is important that all potential sources of background in the 0{nu}DBD peak region at 2530 keV are well understood. One potential source of background for CUORE comes from neutrons, which can be produced underground both by ({alpha},n) reactions and by fast cosmic ray muon interactions. Preliminary simulations by the CUORE collaboration indicate that these backgrounds will be negligible for CUORE. However, in order to accurately simulate the expected neutron background, it is important to understand the cross sections for neutron interactions with detector materials. In order to help refine these simulations, I have measured the gamma-ray production cross sections for interactions of neutrons on the abundant stable isotopes of Te using the GEANIE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. In addition, I have used the GEANIE data to set an upper limit for the production of a 2529 keV gamma-ray from the {sup 126}Te(n,n{prime}{gamma}) reaction. This gamma-ray is a potential source of interference for the 0{nu}DBD peak. Based on this measurement, the contribution of this line to the background is expected to be negligible.

  9. World record neutron beam at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    World record neutron beam at LANL World record neutron beam at Los Alamos National Laboratory Scientists have created the largest neutron beam ever made by a short-pulse laser,...

  10. 22.05 Neutron Science and Reactor Physics, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, John A.

    This course introduces fundamental properties of the neutron. It covers reactions induced by neutrons, nuclear fission, slowing down of neutrons in infinite media, diffusion theory, the few-group approximation, point ...

  11. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Jon

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA IRVINE Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the Intermediate Valence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Inelastic Neutron Scattering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.a Neutron Scattering Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.b

  12. Fully portable, highly flexible dilution refrigerator systems for neutron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    775 Fully portable, highly flexible dilution refrigerator systems for neutron scattering P. A systems developed specifically for neutron scattering environ- ments. The refrigerators are completely relatively recently however, the lowest temperatures available in almost all neutron scattering laboratories

  13. EIS-0247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States needs a high-flux, short- pulsed neutron source to provide its scientific and industrial research communities with a much more intense source of pulsed neutrons for neutron...

  14. Wolter mirror microscope : novel neutron focussing and imaging optic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bagdasarova, Yelena S. (Yelena Sergeyevna)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I investigated the effectiveness of a Wolter Type I neutron microscope as a focusing and imaging device for thermal and cold neutrons sources by simulating the performance of the optics in a standard neutron ...

  15. Investigation of delayed neutron emission through neutron and gamma- ray spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratz, K L; Ohm, H; Franz, H; Ristori, C; Zendel, M; Herrmann, G; Nuh, F M; Slaughter, D R; Shihab-Eldin, A A; Prussin, S G

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast radiochemical separations have permitted detailed and high resolution measurements of neutron and gamma -ray spectra from several delayed neutron emitting systems. The apparent discrete line structure in delayed neutron spectra, high intensity neutron branching to excited states in decay of intermediate levels in the emitter, and the peaking in the beta /sup -/-decay intensity to regions well above the neutron binding energy, indicate persistence of distinct nuclear structure effects at excitation energies of 5-7 MeV in the emitter nuclides.

  16. Calibration of the JET neutron yield monitors using the delayed neutron counting technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Belle, P.; Jarvis, O.N.; Sadler, G. (JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3EA (Great Britain)); de Leeuw, S.; D'Hondt, P. (C.E.N./S.C.K., B-2400 Mol (Belgium)); Pillon, M. (Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, CRE Frascati (Italy))

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time-resolved neutron yield is routinely measured on the JET tokamak using a set of fission chambers. At present, the preferred technique is to employ activation reactions to determine the neutron fluence at a well-chosen position and to relate the measured fluence to the total neutron emission by means of neutron transport calculations. The delayed neutron counting method is a particularly convenient method of performing the activation measurement and the fission cross sections are accurately known. This paper outlines the measurement technique as used on JET.

  17. accelerator based neutron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of suitable neutron sources that are compactible with installation in a hospital enviroment. A low-energy accelerator-based neutron source has the potential for meeting...

  18. ans advanced neutron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    readout using discriminators have the advantage of being able to treat several neutron impacts partially overlapping in time, hence reducing global dead time. A single neutron...

  19. alternative neutron sources: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of suitable neutron sources that are compactible with installation in a hospital enviroment. A low-energy accelerator-based neutron source has the potential for meeting...

  20. Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction and Infrared Imaging Techniques Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction and Infrared Imaging Techniques 2011 DOE...

  1. Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences SHARE Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences JINS is located on Chestnut Ridge within the 80-acre SNS site, part of Oak Ridge National...

  2. Non-Destructive Neutron Imaging to Analyze Particulate Filters...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Neutron Imaging to Analyze Particulate Filters Non-Destructive Neutron Imaging to Analyze Particulate Filters Non-destructive, non-invasive imaging is being employed in the...

  3. axis neutron spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    other hand, interact with nuclei mapped and measured via neutron imaging. N5: Small Angle Neutron Scattering, HFIR CG2 General Purpose Pennycook, Steve 3 Parabolic versus elliptic...

  4. advanced spallation neutron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments....

  5. advanced neutron transport: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    section in different regions 1 12; any order of spherical Kurien, Susan 2 Electron-neutron scattering and transport properties of neutron stars Nuclear Theory (arXiv)...

  6. arsinde neutron imaging: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross...

  7. absorber neutronics performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments....

  8. Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Homeland Security & Defense Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement As part of the Laboratory's national security...

  9. Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer Detection August 05, 2013 Researcher Maria Cekanova analyzes the neutron radiographs of a canine breast...

  10. Neutron Sciences Staff Give Back, Teach US Particle Accelerator...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Sciences Staff Give Back, Teach US Particle Accelerator School Courses Katie Bethea - March 13, 2014 Neutron Science Directorate staff hosted students from the US Particle...

  11. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Abstract: Hydrogen...

  12. Thermal Neutron Computed Tomography of Soil Water and Plant Roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leanne G. Tumlinson; Hungyuan Liu; Wendy K. Silk; Jan W. Hopmans

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000. 3D neutron computed tomography: Requirements and2002. Using x-ray computed tomography in hydrology: Systems,of neutron computed tomography in the geosciences. Nucl.

  13. 2012 LANSCE Neutron Scattering School | Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 LANSCE Neutron Scattering School LANSCE 2012 LANSCE Neutron Scattering School Home About the School Hands-On Experiments Quick Links Application - Closed Schedule Poster...

  14. Proton Angular Distribution for 90 Mev Neutron-proton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadley, James

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recoil protons in neutron -proton scattering at 90 Mev hasFOR 90 lWEV NEUTRON-PROTON SCATTERING James Hadley, Cecil E.

  15. Application of Neutron Imaging and Scattering to Fluid Flow and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application of Neutron Imaging and Scattering to Fluid Flow and Fracture in EGS Environments Application of Neutron Imaging and Scattering to Fluid Flow and Fracture in EGS...

  16. 11th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering | Lecturers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Rex Hjelm Rex P. Hjelm is the Instrument Scientist for the small-angle neutron scattering instrument, LQD, at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center of LANSCE at...

  17. Paul Langan to lead ORNL's Neutron Sciences Directorate | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science activities, which include two leading DOE Office of Science user facilities for neutron scattering analysis: The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope...

  18. International Conference on Neutron Scattering 2005 Darling Harbour. Sydney. Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Conference on Neutron Scattering 2005 Darling Harbour. Sydney. Australia 27 November, Hillerød, Denmark Combined application of small-angle neutron scattering and oscillatory shear

  19. 11th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering | About the School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactions in Extremes Planning and logistic support is provided by: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center New Mexico State University Los Alamos Neutron Science Center New...

  20. 2012 LANSCE Neutron Scattering School | Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 LANSCE Neutron Scattering School LANSCE 2011 LANSCE Neutron Scattering School Home NSS 2011 About the School Lecturers Hands-On Experiments Quick Links Application Schedule...

  1. Neutron Star Properties with Hyperons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittenbury, D L; Thomas, A W; Tsushima, K; Stone, J R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the light of the recent discovery of a neutron star with a mass accurately determined to be almost two solar masses, it has been suggested that hyperons cannot play a role in the equation of state of dense matter in $\\beta$-equilibrium. We re-examine this issue in the most recent development of the quark-meson coupling model. Within a relativistic Hartree-Fock approach and including the full tensor structure at the vector-meson-baryon vertices, we find that not only must hyperons appear in matter at the densities relevant to such a massive star but that the maximum mass predicted is completely consistent with the observation.

  2. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  3. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iverson, Daniel C. (Aiken, SC)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  4. Neutron Log | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel Wind Power ProjectNeutron Log Jump to:

  5. Neutron Diffraction and Optics of a Noncentrosymmetric Crystal. New Feasibility of a Search for Neutron EDM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Fedorov; V. V. Voronin

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently strong electric fields (up to 10^9 V/cm) have been discovered, which affect the neutrons moving in noncentrosymmetric crystals. Such fields allow new polarization phenomena in neutron diffraction and optics and provide, for instance, a new feasibility of a search for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM). A series of experiments was carried out in a few last years on study of the dynamical diffraction of polarized neutrons in thick (1-10 cm) quartz crystals, using the forward diffraction beam and Bragg angles close to 90^0. As well new neutron optics phenomena were investigated. The feasibility of experiment on a search for neutron EDM using Laue diffraction in crystals without a center of symmetry was tested at the reactors: WWR-M in Gatchina and HFR in Grenoble. It was shown that the sensitivity can reach (3 - 6)\\cdot 10^{-25}e cm per day for the available quartz crystal and cold neutron beam flux.

  6. Neutron Interactions: Q-Equation, Elastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Since a neutron has no charge it can easily enter into a nucleus and cause a reaction. Neutrons interact primarily with the nucleus of an atom, except in the special case of magnetic scattering where the interaction involves the neutron spin and the magnetic moment of the atom. Because magnetic scattering is of no interest in this class, we can neglect the interaction between neutrons and electrons and think of atoms and nuclei interchangeably. Neutron reactions can take place at any energy, so one has to pay particular attention to the energy variation of the interaction cross section. In a nuclear reactor neutrons can have energies ranging from 10-3 ev (1 mev) to 10 7 ev (10 Mev). This means our study of neutron interactions, in principle, will have to cover an energy range of 10 ten orders of magnitude. In practice we will limit ourselves to two energy ranges, the slowing down region (ev to Kev) and the thermal region (around 0.025 ev). For a given energy region – thermal, epithermal, resonance, fast – not all the possible reactions are equally important. Which reaction is important depends on the target nucleus and the neutron energy. Generally speaking the important types of interactions, in the order of increasing complexity from the standpoint of theoretical

  7. From Neutron Stars to Strange Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridolin Weber

    2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses several most intruigung astrophysical implications connected with the possible absolute stability of strange quark matter.This is followed by a discussion of two astrophysical signals that may point at the existence of quark matter in both isolated neutron stars as well as in neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs).

  8. Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klann, Raymond T. (Bolingbrook, IL); McGregor, Douglas S. (Whitmore Lake, MI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

  9. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  10. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  11. Benchmark Results for Delayed Neutron Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marck, S.C. van der; Meulekamp, R. Klein; Hogenbirk, A.; Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG, P.O. Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}eff for 32 benchmark configurations for which measurements have been reported. We use these results to test the delayed neutron data of JEFF-3.0, ENDF/B-VI.8, and JENDL-3.3.

  12. Full Scale Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride (BF3)-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated non-scintillating plastic fibers. Reported here are the results of tests of the full-scale 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT) and Saint Gobain, and is a follow-up report to an earlier one on a smaller prototype system.

  13. Boron-Lined Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    PNNL-18938 Revision Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. Reported here are the results of tests of a newly designed boron-lined proportional counter option. This testing measured the neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of two successive prototypes of a system manufactured by GE Reuter Stokes.

  14. Lithium Loaded Glass Fiber Neutron Detector Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world and, thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. Reported here are the results of tests of the lithium-loaded glass fibers option. This testing measured the neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a small system manufactured by Nucsafe (Oak Ridge, TN).

  15. Boron-Lined Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. Reported here are the results of tests of a newly designed boron-lined proportional counter option. This testing measured the neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Reuter Stokes.

  16. Binderless composite scintillator for neutron detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hodges, Jason P [Knoxville, TN; Crow, Jr; Lowell, M [Oak Ridge, TN; Cooper, Ronald G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite scintillator material consisting of a binderless sintered mixture of a Lithium (Li) compound containing .sup.6Li as the neutron converter and Y.sub.2SiO.sub.5:Ce as the scintillation phosphor, and the use of this material as a method for neutron detection. Other embodiments of the invention include various other Li compounds.

  17. The Maximum Mass of a Neutron Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliki Kalogera; Gordon Baym

    1996-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational identification of black holes as members of binary systems requires the knowledge of the upper limit on the gravitational mass of a neutron star. We use modern equations of state for neutron star matter, fitted to experimental nucleon-nucleon scattering data and the properties of light nuclei, to calculate, within the framework of Rhoades & Ruffini (1974), the minimum upper limit on a neutron star mass. Regarding the equation of state as valid up to twice nuclear matter saturation density, rho_{nm}, we obtain a secure upper bound on the neutron star mass equal to 2.9 solar masses. We also find that in order to reach the lowest possible upper bound of 2.2 solar masses, we need understand the physical properties of neutron matter up to a density of about 4 times rho_{nm}.

  18. An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blue, Thomas, E

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were 1) that the neutron field quality be as good as the neutron field quality for the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT, 2) that the patient treatment time be reasonable, 3) that the proton current required to treat patients in reasonable times be technologially achievable at reasonable cost with good reliability, and accelerator space requirements which can be met in a hospital, and finally 4) that the treatment be safe for the patients.

  19. Compact neutron imaging system using axisymmetric mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khaykovich, Boris; Moncton, David E; Gubarev, Mikhail V; Ramsey, Brian D; Engelhaupt, Darell E

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A dispersed release of neutrons is generated from a source. A portion of this dispersed neutron release is reflected by surfaces of a plurality of nested, axisymmetric mirrors in at least an inner mirror layer and an outer mirror layer, wherein the neutrons reflected by the inner mirror layer are incident on at least one mirror surface of the inner mirror layer N times, wherein N is an integer, and wherein neutrons reflected by the outer mirror are incident on a plurality of mirror surfaces of the outer layer N+i times, where i is a positive integer, to redirect the neutrons toward a target. The mirrors can be formed by a periodically reversed pulsed-plating process.

  20. Axion emission from a magnetized neutron gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skobelev, V. V., E-mail: v.skobelev@inbox.ru [Moscow State Industrial University (Russian Federation)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By using the polarization density matrix for a neutron in a magnetic field, the axion luminosity of magnetic neutron stars that is associated with the flip of the anomalous magnetic moment of degenerate nonrelativistic neutrons is calculated. It is shown that, at values of the magnetic-field induction in the region B Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10{sup 18} G, this mechanism of axion emission is dominant in 'young' neutron stars of temperature about a few tens of MeV units. At B {approx} 10{sup 17} G, it is one of the basic mechanisms. The Fermi energy of a degenerate neutron gas in a magnetic field is found, and it is shown that there is no such mechanism of axion emission in the degenerate case.

  1. Safety control circuit for a neutronic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellsworth, Howard C. (Richland, WA)

    2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutronic reactor comprising an active portion containing material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy, means to control a neutronic chain reaction within the reactor comprising a safety device and a regulating device, a safety device including means defining a vertical channel extending into the reactor from an aperture in the upper surface of the reactor, a rod containing neutron-absorbing materials slidably disposed within the channel, means for maintaining the safety rod in a withdrawn position relative to the active portion of the reactor including means for releasing said rod on actuation thereof, a hopper mounted above the active portion of the reactor having a door disposed at the bottom of the hopper opening into the vertical channel, a plurality of bodies of neutron-absorbing materials disposed within the hopper, and means responsive to the failure of the safety rod on actuation thereof to enter the active portion of the reactor for opening the door in the hopper.

  2. Accumulation and extraction of ultracold neutrons from a superfluid helium converter coated with fluorinated grease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Zimmer; P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; M. Assmann; M. Fertl; J. Klenke; S. Mironov; H. -F. Wirth; B. van den Brandt

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report experiments on the production of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a converter of superfluid helium coated with fluorinated grease. We employed our technique of window-free extraction of accumulated UCN from the helium, in which they were produced by downscattering neutrons of a cold beam from the Munich research reactor. The time constant for UCN passage through the same extraction aperture as in a previous experiment was a factor two shorter, despite a lower mean velocity of the accumulated UCN in the present experiments. A time-of-flight measurement of the cold neutron spectrum incident on the converter allowed us to estimate the multi-phonon contribution to the UCN production. The UCN production rate inferred from two methods agrees with the theoretical expectation.

  3. Spectroscopy of 13,14B via the one-neutron knockout reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Guimaraes; J. J. Kolata; D. Bazin; B. Blank; B. A. Brown; T. Glasmacher; P. G. Hansen; R. W. Ibbotson; D. Karnes; V. Maddalena; A. Navin; B. Pritychenko; B. M. Sherrill

    2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The single-nucleon knockout reactions 9Be(14B, 13B + gamma)X and 197Au(14B, 13B + gamma)X, at an incident energy of 60 MeV per nucleon, have been used to probe the structure of 14B and of the core fragment 13B. A dominant 2s configuration is deduced for the neutron in the ground state of 14B. The longitudinal momentum distribution for this state is consistent with "neutron halo" structure. Spin assignments for 13B excited states at 3.48 and 3.68 MeV are proposed based on the observed spectroscopic factors for one-neutron removal.

  4. Gamma and neutron detection modeling in the nuclear detection figure of merit (NDFOM) portal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stroud, Phillip D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Detection Figure Of Merit (NDFOM) portal is a database of objects and algorithms for evaluating the performance of radiation detectors to detect nuclear material. This paper describes the algorithms used to model the physics and mathematics of radiation detection. As a first-principles end-to-end analysis system, it starts with the representation of the gamma and neutron spectral fluxes, which are computed with the particle and radiation transport code MCNPX. The gamma spectra emitted by uranium, plutonium, and several other materials of interest are described. The impact of shielding and other intervening material is computed by the method of build-up factors. The interaction of radiation with the detector material is computed by a detector response function approach. The construction of detector response function matrices based on MCNPX simulation runs is described in detail. Neutron fluxes are represented in a three group formulation to treat differences in detector sensitivities to thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons.

  5. Fusion reactions with the one-neutron halo nucleus 15C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Alcorta; K. E. Rehm; B. B. Back; S. Bedoor; P. F. Bertone; C. M. Deibel; B. DiGiovine; H. Esbensen; J. P. Greene; C. R. Hoffmann; C. L. Jiang; J. C. Lighthall; S. T. Marley; R. C. Pardo; M. Paul; A. M. Rogers; C. Ugalde; A. H. Wuosmaa

    2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of 15C, with an s1/2 neutron weakly bound to a closed-neutron shell nucleus 14C, makes it a prime candidate for a one-neutron halo nucleus. We have for the first time studied the cross section for the fusion-fission reaction 15C + 232Th at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier and compared it to the yield of the neighboring 14C + 232Th system measured in the same experiment. At sub-barrier energies, an enhancement of the fusion yield by factors of 2-5 was observed for 15C, while the cross sections for 14C match the trends measured for 12,13C.

  6. Measurement of Leading Proton and Neutron Production in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adloff

    1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep--inelastic scattering events with a leading baryon have been detected by the H1 experiment at HERA using a forward proton spectrometer and a forward neutron calorimeter. Semi--inclusive cross sections have been measured in the kinematic region 2 neutron with energy E' >= 160 GeV. The measurements are used to test production models and factorization hypotheses. A Regge model of leading baryon production which consists of pion, pomeron and secondary reggeon exchanges gives an acceptable description of both semi-inclusive cross sections in the region 0.7 neutron data are used to estimate for the first time the structure function of the pion at small Bjorken--x.

  7. Processing of Neutron Diffraction Data for Strain Measurement in Geological Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL] [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL] [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL] [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Dessieux Jr, Luc Lucius [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Conventional rock mechanics testing techniques typically involve the loading of samples and measurement of displacements or strains on the outer boundary of the specimen surface. Neutron diffraction based strain measurement techniques represent a unique and powerful tool for measuring the strain within geological materials under load. The structural variability and non-uniform crystallinity of geological materials, however, create many complexities in the intensity patterns that must be analyzed to quantify strains within the material. The attenuating and scattering properties of the pressure cell housing the sample further add difficulties to the data analysis. This paper describes the methods and processes used to process neutron scattering data for strain measurement in geological materials. It is intended to provide a primer for those in the rock mechanics community that are interested in utilizing this technique along with additional discussion of neutron diffraction experimental factors that may affect data quality.

  8. Experimental approach to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leifels, Yvonne [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is of fundamental importance in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics In the laboratory, there are different means to study the nuclearmatter equation of state and its density dependence in particular: nuclear masses, neutron skins, pygmy resonance, and nuclear structure at the drip line give access to nuclear matter properties at densities lower than and at saturation density ?0. Heavy ion reactions at energies above 0.1 AGeV are the only means to study nuclear matter at densities larger than normal nuclear matter density ?0. In the beamenergy range of 0.1 to 2A GeV nuclear matter is compressed upto three times ?0. Access to nuclear matter properties is achieved by simulating nuclear collisions by means of microscopic transport codes, or statistical or hydrodynamicalmodels. Characteristics of heavy-ion collisions are discussed, and experimental observables which allow to constrain nuclear matter properties by comparing experimental results with those of transport codes are presented. Special emphasis will be given to the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is the most relevant connection between neutron stars and heavy ion collisions.

  9. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viganò, Daniele; Miralles, Juan A; Rea, Nanda

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  10. SU-E-T-304: Study of Secondary Neutrons From Uniform Scanning Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, M [Lawrence Cancer Center, KS (United States); Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Benton, E [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are unwanted byproducts from proton therapy and exposure from secondary radiation during treatment could increase risk of developing a secondary cancer later in a patient's lifetime. The purpose of this study is to investigate secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams under various beam conditions using both measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: CR-39 Plastic Track Nuclear Detectors (PNTD) were used for the measurement. CR-39 PNTD has tissue like sensitivity to the secondary neutrons but insensitive to the therapeutic protons. In this study, we devised two experimental conditions: a) hollow-phantom; phantom is bored with a hollow cylinder along the direction of the beam so that the primary proton passes through the phantom without interacting with the phantom material, b) cylindrical-phantom; a solid cylinder of diameter close to the beam diameter is placed along the beam path. CR-39 PNTDs were placed laterally inside a 60X20X35 cm3 phantom (hollow-phantom) and in air (cylindrical-phantom) at various angles with respect to the primary beam axis. We studied for three different proton energies (78 MeV, 162 MeV and 226 MeV), using a 4 cm modulation width and 5cm diameter brass aperture for the entire experiment and simulation. A comparison of the experiment was performed using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Results: The measured secondary neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranges from 2.1 ± 0.2 to 25.42 ± 2.3 mSv/Gy for the hollow phantom study, and 2.7 ± 0.3 to 46.4 ± 3.4 mSv/Gy for the cylindrical phantom study. Monte Carlo simulations predicated neutron dose equivalent from measurements within a factor of 5. Conclusion: The study suggests that the production of external neutrons is significantly higher than the production of internal neutrons.

  11. INL Neutron Interrogation R&D: FY2010 MPACT End of Year Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury; J. Wharton; S. M. Watson

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been carried out to investigate the feasibility and utility of using neutron interrogation and small-scale, portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) instruments for assaying uranium for safeguards applications. Prior work has shown the potential of the PGNAA technique for assaying uranium using reactor-based neutron sources and high-yield electronic neutron generators (ENGs). In this project we adapted Idaho National Laboratory's portable isotopic neutron spectroscopy (PINS) PGNAA system for measuring natural-enrichment uranium yellowcake and metallic depleted uranium and highly enriched uranium. This work used 252Cf as well as deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) ENGs. For PGNAA measurements a limiting factor when assaying large objects is the detector dead time due to fast-neutron scattering off of the uranium; this limits the maximum useable neutron source strength to O(107) neutrons per second. Under these conditions the low PGNAA reaction cross sections for uranium prohibited the collection of useful uranium PGNAA signatures from either the yellowcake or metallic uranium samples. Measurement of the decay product activation in these materials following irradiation in the PGNAA geometry similarly did not produce useful uranium activation product – fission product signatures. A customized irradiation geometry tailored to optimally thermalize the interrogation neutron source, intended only for generating long-lived activation products – fission products and not intended for PGNAA measurements, might be possible using small scale ENGs but an application need and a modeling and simulation exercise would be recommended before advancing to experiments. Neutron interrogation PGNAA using a DT-ENG was found to be a quick and useful qualitative method for detecting the presence of oxygen in natural-enrichment uranium yellowcake. With a low effort of development work it would be reasonable to expect this measurement could be transitioned to a qualitative technique for assaying oxides as well as other common uranium matrices including nitrides, fluorides, carbides, and sodium-bonded metals. Inert-matrix fuel material confirmation would also be well-served through this technique. This may be of interest for nuclear Material Protection, Accounting, and Control for Transmutation (MPACT) safeguards applications as a method for confirming material-form declarations in advanced fuel cycle material inventories and for quality control during fuel fabrication.

  12. SU-D-BRE-07: Neutron Shielding Assessment for a Compact Proton Therapy Vault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prusator, M; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To perform a neutron shielding assessment of a commercially available compact proton therapy system. Methods: TOPAS (TOol for PArticle Simulation) beta release was used to model beam line components for Mevion S250 proton treatment system the design of which is that the cyclotron is present in the treatment room. Three neutron production sources were taken into account in the simulation. These are the cyclotron, the treatment nozzle and the patient itself, respectively. The cyclotron was modeled as a cylindrical iron target (r =5 cm, length = 8 cm). A water phantom (10 cm ×10 cm ×60 cm) was used to model the patient and various structures (scattering foils, range modulator wheel, applicator and compensator) defaulted in TOPAS were used to model the passive scattering treatment nozzle. Neutron fluences and energy spectra were counted in a spherical scoring geometry per incident proton in 18 angular bins (10 degree each). Fluence to dose conversion factors from ICRU publication 74 were used to acquire neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10). A point source line of sight model was then used to calculate neutron dose at eight locations beyond shielding barriers. Results: The neutron ambient dose equivalent was calculated at the 8 points of interest around the proton treatment vault. The highest dose was found to be less than 0.781 mSv/year outside south barrier wall. However, the dose is less than 0.05 mSv/year at the control room area of the proton vault. Conclusion: All Points of interest were well under annual dose limits. This suggests that the shielding design of this compact proton therapy system is sufficient for radiation protection purpose. However, it is important to note that the workload and the occupancy factors are direct multipliers for dose calculations beyond the barrier and must be accurately estimated for validation of our results.

  13. Reconstructing the neutron-star equation of state with gravitational-wave detectors from a realistic population of inspiralling binary neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin D. Lackey; Leslie Wade

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational-wave observations of inspiralling binary neutron star systems can be used to measure the neutron-star equation of state (EOS) through the tidally induced shift in the waveform phase that depends on the tidal deformability parameter $\\lambda$. Previous work has shown that $\\lambda$, a function of the neutron-star EOS and mass, is measurable by Advanced LIGO for a single event when including tidal information up to the merger frequency. In this work, we describe a method for stacking measurements of $\\lambda$ from multiple inspiral events to measure the EOS. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the parameters of a 4-parameter piecewise polytrope EOS that matches theoretical EOS models to a few percent. We find that, for "realistic" event rates ($\\sim 40$ binary neutron star inspiral events per year with signal-to-noise ratio $> 8$ in a single Advanced LIGO detector), combining a year of gravitational-wave data from a three-detector network with the constraints from causality and recent high mass neutron-star measurements, the EOS above nuclear density can be measured to better than a factor of two in pressure in most cases. We also find that in the mass range $1M_\\odot$--$2M_\\odot$, the neutron-star radius can be measured to better than $\\pm 1$ km and the tidal deformability can be measured to better than $\\pm 1 \\times 10^{36}$ g cm$^2$ s$^2$ (10%--50% depending on the EOS and mass). The overwhelming majority of this information comes from the loudest $\\sim 5$ events. Current uncertainties in the post-Newtonian waveform model, however, lead to systematic errors in the EOS measurement that are as large as the statistical errors, and more accurate waveform models are needed to minimize this error.

  14. Method and apparatus for determination of temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vagelatos, Nicholas (San Diego, CA); Steinman, Donald K. (San Diego, CA); John, Joseph (San Diego, CA); Young, Jack C. (Escondido, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear method and apparatus determines the temperature of a medium by injecting fast neutrons into the medium and detecting returning slow neutrons in three first energy ranges by producing three respective detection signals. The detection signals are combined to produce three derived indicia each systematically related to the population of slow neutrons returning from the medium in a respective one of three second energy ranges, specifically exclusively epithermal neutrons, exclusively substantially all thermal neutrons and exclusively a portion of the thermal neutron spectrum. The derived indicia are compared with calibration indicia similarly systematically related to the population of slow neutrons in the same three second energy ranges returning from similarly irradiated calibration media for which the relationships temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power to such calibration indicia are known. The comparison indicates the temperature at which the calibration indicia correspond to the derived indicia and consequently the temperature of the medium. The neutron absorption cross section and moderating power of the medium can be identified at the same time.

  15. Neutrinos from Decaying Muons, Pions, Kaons and Neutrons in Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reetanjali Moharana; Nayantara Gupta

    2012-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In the internal shock model of gamma ray bursts ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons are likely to be produced in the interactions of shock accelerated relativistic protons with low energy photons (KeV-MeV). These particles subsequently decay to high energy neutrinos/antineutrinos and other secondaries. In the high internal magnetic fields of gamma ray bursts, the ultrahigh energy charged particles ($\\mu^+$, $\\pi^+$, $K^+$) lose energy significantly due to synchrotron radiations before decaying into secondary high energy neutrinos and antineutrinos. The relativistic neutrons decay to high energy antineutrinos, protons and electrons. We have calculated the total neutrino flux (neutrino and antineutrino) considering the decay channels of ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons. We have shown that the total neutrino flux generated in neutron decay can be higher than that produced in $\\mu^+$ and $\\pi^+$ decay. The charged kaons being heavier than pions, lose energy slowly and their secondary total neutrino flux is more than that from muons and pions at very high energy. Our detailed calculations on secondary particle production in $p\\gamma$ interactions give the total neutrino fluxes and their flavour ratios expected on earth. Depending on the values of the parameters (luminosity, Lorentz factor, variability time, spectral indices and break energy in the photon spectrum) of a gamma ray burst the contributions to the total neutrino flux from the decay of different particles (muon, pion, neutron and kaon) may vary and they would also be reflected on the neutrino flavour ratios.

  16. Neutron spectrometer for fast nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osipenko, M; Ricco, G; Caiffi, B; Pompili, F; Pillon, M; Angelone, M; Verona-Rinati, G; Cardarelli, R; Mila, G; Argiro, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe the development and first tests of a neutron spectrometer designed for high flux environments, such as the ones found in fast nuclear reactors. The spectrometer is based on the conversion of neutrons impinging on $^6$Li into $\\alpha$ and $t$ whose total energy comprises the initial neutron energy and the reaction $Q$-value. The $^6$LiF layer is sandwiched between two CVD diamond detectors, which measure the two reaction products in coincidence. The spectrometer was calibrated at two neutron energies in well known thermal and 3 MeV neutron fluxes. The measured neutron detection efficiency varies from 4.2$\\times 10^{-4}$ to 3.5$\\times 10^{-8}$ for thermal and 3 MeV neutrons, respectively. These values are in agreement with Geant4 simulations and close to simple estimates based on the knowledge of the $^6$Li(n,$\\alpha$)$t$ cross section. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was found to be better than 100 keV when using 5 m cables between the detector and the preamplifiers.

  17. Neutron spectrometer for fast nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Osipenko; M. Ripani; G. Ricco; B. Caiffi; F. Pompili; M. Pillon; M. Angelone; G. Verona-Rinati; R. Cardarelli; G. Mila; S. Argiro

    2015-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe the development and first tests of a neutron spectrometer designed for high flux environments, such as the ones found in fast nuclear reactors. The spectrometer is based on the conversion of neutrons impinging on $^6$Li into $\\alpha$ and $t$ whose total energy comprises the initial neutron energy and the reaction $Q$-value. The $^6$LiF layer is sandwiched between two CVD diamond detectors, which measure the two reaction products in coincidence. The spectrometer was calibrated at two neutron energies in well known thermal and 3 MeV neutron fluxes. The measured neutron detection efficiency varies from 4.2$\\times 10^{-4}$ to 3.5$\\times 10^{-8}$ for thermal and 3 MeV neutrons, respectively. These values are in agreement with Geant4 simulations and close to simple estimates based on the knowledge of the $^6$Li(n,$\\alpha$)$t$ cross section. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was found to be better than 100 keV when using 5 m cables between the detector and the preamplifiers.

  18. Method and apparatus for detecting neutrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard W. (Richland, WA); Reeder, Paul L. (Richland, WA); Wogman, Ned A. (Richland, WA); Warner, Ray A. (Benton City, WA); Brite, Daniel W. (Richland, WA); Richey, Wayne C. (Richland, WA); Goldman, Don S. (Orangevale, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The instant invention is a method for making and using an apparatus for detecting neutrons. Scintillating optical fibers are fabricated by melting SiO.sub.2 with a thermal neutron capturing substance and a scintillating material in a reducing atmosphere. The melt is then drawn into fibers in an anoxic atmosphere. The fibers may then be coated and used directly in a neutron detection apparatus, or assembled into a geometrical array in a second, hydrogen-rich, scintillating material such as a polymer. Photons generated by interaction with thermal neutrons are trapped within the coated fibers and are directed to photoelectric converters. A measurable electronic signal is generated for each thermal neutron interaction within the fiber. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation. When the fibers are arranged in an array within a second scintillating material, photons generated by kinetic neutrons interacting with the second scintillating material and photons generated by thermal neutron capture within the fiber can both be directed to photoelectric converters. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation.

  19. The Neutron Scattering Society www.neutronscattering.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sow-Hsin

    The Neutron Scattering Society of America www.neutronscattering.org Press Release, February 4, 2008 The Neutron Scattering Society of America is pleased to announce the 2008 recipients of its 3 major prizes. The Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA) established the Clifford G. Shull Prize in Neutron Science

  20. Neutron counter based on beryllium activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bienkowska, B.; Prokopowicz, R.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Paducha, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM), Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Scholz, M.; Igielski, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAS (IFJPAN), Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Karpinski, L. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Rzeszow University of Technology, Pola 2, 35-959 Rzeszow (Poland); Pytel, K. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), Soltana 7, 05-400 Otwock - Swierk (Poland)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion reaction occurring in DD plasma is followed by emission of 2.45 MeV neutrons, which carry out information about fusion reaction rate and plasma parameters and properties as well. Neutron activation of beryllium has been chosen for detection of DD fusion neutrons. The cross-section for reaction {sup 9}Be(n, ?){sup 6}He has a useful threshold near 1 MeV, which means that undesirable multiple-scattered neutrons do not undergo that reaction and therefore are not recorded. The product of the reaction, {sup 6}He, decays with half-life T{sub 1/2} = 0.807 s emitting ?{sup ?} particles which are easy to detect. Large area gas sealed proportional detector has been chosen as a counter of ?–particles leaving activated beryllium plate. The plate with optimized dimensions adjoins the proportional counter entrance window. Such set-up is also equipped with appropriate electronic components and forms beryllium neutron activation counter. The neutron flux density on beryllium plate can be determined from the number of counts. The proper calibration procedure needs to be performed, therefore, to establish such relation. The measurements with the use of known ?–source have been done. In order to determine the detector response function such experiment have been modeled by means of MCNP5–the Monte Carlo transport code. It allowed proper application of the results of transport calculations of ?{sup ?} particles emitted from radioactive {sup 6}He and reaching proportional detector active volume. In order to test the counter system and measuring procedure a number of experiments have been performed on PF devices. The experimental conditions have been simulated by means of MCNP5. The correctness of simulation outcome have been proved by measurements with known radioactive neutron source. The results of the DD fusion neutron measurements have been compared with other neutron diagnostics.

  1. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ); Micklich, Bradley J. (Princeton, NJ)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An arrangement is provided for controlling neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices having inboard and outboard vacuum vessel walls for containment of the neutrons of a fusion plasma. Neutron albedo material is disposed immediately adjacent the inboard wall, and is movable, preferably in vertical directions, so as to be brought into and out of neutron modifying communication with the fusion neutrons. Neutron albedo material preferably comprises a liquid form, but may also take pebble, stringer and curtain-like forms. A neutron flux valve, rotatable about a vertical axis is also disclosed.

  2. Neutron beam testing of triblades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Four IBM Triblades were tested in the Irradiation of Chips and Electronics facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Triblades include two dual-core Opteron processors and four PowerXCell 8i (Cell) processors. The Triblades were tested in their field configuration while running different applications, with the beam aimed at the Cell processor or the Opteron running the application. Testing focused on the Cell processors, which were tested while running five different applications and an idle condition. While neither application nor Triblade was statistically important in predicting the hazard rate, the hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was significantly higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors. In addition, four Cell blades (one in each Triblade) suffered voltage shorts, leading to their inoperability. The hardware tested is the same as that in the Roadrunner supercomputer.

  3. Field-theory calculation of the electric dipole moment of the neutron and paramagnetic atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Blundell; J. Griffith; J. Sapirstein

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric dipole moments (edms) of bound states that arise from the constituents having edms are studied with field-theoretic techniques. The systems treated are the neutron and a set of paramagnetic atoms. In the latter case it is well known that the atomic edm differs greatly from the electron edm when the internal electric fields of the atom are taken into account. In the nonrelativistic limit these fields lead to a complete suppression, but for heavy atoms large enhancement factors are present. A general bound-state field theory approach applicable to both the neutron and paramagnetic atoms is set up. It is applied first to the neutron, treating the quarks as moving freely in a confining spherical well. It is shown that the effect of internal electric fields is small in this case. The atomic problem is then revisited using field-theory techniques in place of the usual Hamiltonian methods, and the atomic enhancement factor is shown to be consistent with previous calculations. Possible application of bound-state techniques to other sources of the neutron edm is discussed.

  4. Angular distributions of neutron-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Tapan; Lahiri, Joydev; Basu, D. N. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the total and the differential cross sections with respect to angle for neutron-induced reactions from an analytical model having a simple functional form to demonstrate the quantitative agreement with the measured cross sections. The energy dependence of the neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections are estimated successfully for energies ranging from 5 to 600 MeV. In this work, the effect of the imaginary part of the nuclear potential is treated more appropriately compared to our earlier work. The angular distributions for neutron scattering also agree reasonably well with the experimental data at forward angles.

  5. Characterization of a neutron calibration range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menchaca, Daniel Isidoro

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Mr. R. Kim Piper for the loan of the AN/PDR-70rsi neutron instrument, Mr. R. B. Schwartz for help with neutron scattering information, and lastly the Office of Radiological Safety, particularly Mr. C. M. Meyer. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT al.... Even in (ct, n) reactions, in which the alpha particle is emitted with discrete energies, the neutrons are not. This is due to the fact that alpha particle energy is lost in the material and that the beryllium target is subject to various alpha...

  6. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  7. Uncertainty Quantification on Prompt Fission Neutrons Spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talou, P. [T-16, Nuclear Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: talou@lanl.gov; Madland, D.G.; Kawano, T. [T-16, Nuclear Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties in the evaluated prompt fission neutrons spectra present in ENDF/B-VII.0 are assessed in the framework of the Los Alamos model. The methodology used to quantify the uncertainties on an evaluated spectrum is introduced. We also briefly review the Los Alamos model and single out the parameters that have the largest influence on the calculated results. Using a Kalman filter, experimental data and uncertainties are introduced to constrain model parameters, and construct an evaluated covariance matrix for the prompt neutrons spectrum. Preliminary results are shown in the case of neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U from thermal up to 15 MeV incident energies.

  8. Neutron detector using sol-gel absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Wallace, Steven A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An neutron detector composed of fissionable material having ions of lithium, uranium, thorium, plutonium, or neptunium, contained within a glass film fabricated using a sol-gel method combined with a particle detector is disclosed. When the glass film is bombarded with neutrons, the fissionable material emits fission particles and electrons. Prompt emitting activated elements yielding a high energy electron contained within a sol-gel glass film in combination with a particle detector is also disclosed. The emissions resulting from neutron bombardment can then be detected using standard UV and particle detection methods well known in the art, such as microchannel plates, channeltrons, and silicon avalanche photodiodes.

  9. Neutron Interferometry constrains dark energy chameleon fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Lemmel; Ph. Brax; A. N. Ivanov; T. Jenke; G. Pignol; M. Pitschmann; T. Potocar; M. Wellenzohn; M. Zawisky; H. Abele

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present phase shift measurements for neutron matter waves in vacuum and in low pressure Helium using a method originally developed for neutron scattering length measurements in neutron interferometry. We search for phase shifts associated with a coupling to scalar fields. We set stringent limits for a scalar chameleon field, a prominent quintessence dark energy candidate. We find that the coupling constant $\\beta$ is less than 1.9 $\\times10^7$~for $n=1$ at 95\\% confidence level, where $n$ is an input parameter of the self--interaction of the chameleon field $\\varphi$ inversely proportional to $\\varphi^n$.

  10. Self-regulating neutron coincidence counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baron, N.

    1980-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for accurately measuring the mass of /sup 240/Pu and /sup 239/Pu in a sample having arbitrary moderation and mixed with various contaminants. The device utilizes a thermal neutron well counter which has two concentric rings of neutron detectors separated by a moderating material surrounding the well. Neutron spectroscopic information derived by the two rings of detectors is used to measure the quantity of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu in device which corrects for background radiation, deadtime losses of the detector and electronics and various other constants of the system.

  11. Neutron Interferometry constrains dark energy chameleon fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmel, H; Ivanov, A N; Jenke, T; Pignol, G; Pitschmann, M; Potocar, T; Wellenzohn, M; Zawisky, M; Abele, H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present phase shift measurements for neutron matter waves in vacuum and in low pressure Helium using a method originally developed for neutron scattering length measurements in neutron interferometry. We search for phase shifts associated with a coupling to scalar fields. We set stringent limits for a scalar chameleon field, a prominent quintessence dark energy candidate. We find that the coupling constant $\\beta$ is less than 1.9 $\\times10^7$~for $n=1$ at 95\\% confidence level, where $n$ is an input parameter of the self--interaction of the chameleon field $\\varphi$ inversely proportional to $\\varphi^n$.

  12. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negret, Alexandru [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  13. Cold neutron scattering in imperfect deuterium crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Adamczak

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The differential cross sections for cold neutron scattering in mosaic deuterium crystals have been calculated for various target temperatures. The theoretical results are compared with the recent experimental data for the neutron wavelengths $\\lambda\\approx$~1--9~\\AA. It is shown that the structures of observed Bragg peaks can be explained by the mosaic spread of about $3^{\\circ}$ and contributions from a~limited number of crystal orientations. Such a~crystal structure should be also taken into account in ultracold neutron upscattering due to the coherent phonon annihilation in solid deuterium.

  14. Active neutron multiplicity counting of bulk uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensslin, N.; Krick, M.S.; Langner, D.G.; Miller, M.C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new nondestructive assay technique being developed to assay bulk uranium containing kilogram quantities of {sup 235}U. The new technique uses neutron multiplicity analysis of data collected with a coincidence counter outfitted with AmLi neutron sources. We have calculated the expected neutron multiplicity count rate and assay precision for this technique and will report on its expected performance as a function of detector design characteristics, {sup 235 }U sample mass, AmLi source strength, and source-to-sample coupling. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Forward Helion Scattering and Neutron Polarization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttimore, N. H. [Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The elastic scattering of spin half helium-3 nuclei at small angles can show a sufficiently large analyzing power to enable the level of helion polarization to be evaluated. As the helion to a large extent inherits the polarization of its unpaired neutron the asymmetry observed in helion collisions can be transformed into a measurement of the polarization of its constituent neutron. Neutron polarimetry therefore relies upon understanding the spin dependence of the electromagnetic and hadronic interactions in the region of interference where there is an optimal analyzing power.

  16. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Simpson, M.L.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination. 3 figs.

  17. Epithermal Neutron Source for Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy (NRS) using High Intensity, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higginson, D P; McNaney, J M; Swift, D C; Bartal, T; Hey, D S; Pape, S L; Mackinnon, A; Mariscal, D; Nakamura, H; Nakanii, N; Beg, F N

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy (NRS) has been developed using high intensity, short pulse lasers. This measurement technique will allow for robust measurements of interior ion temperature of laser-shocked materials and provide insight into equation of state (EOS) measurements. The neutron generation technique uses protons accelerated by lasers off of Cu foils to create neutrons in LiF, through (p,n) reactions with {sup 7}Li and {sup 19}F. The distribution of the incident proton beam has been diagnosed using radiochromic film (RCF). This distribution is used as the input for a (p,n) neturon prediction code which is compared to experimentally measured neutron yields. From this calculation, a total fluence of 1.8 x 10{sup 9} neutrons is infered, which is shown to be a reasonable amount for NRS temperature measurement.

  18. High Spatial Resolution Fast-Neutron Imaging Detectors for Pulsed Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mor, I; Bar, D; Feldman, G; Goldberg, M B; Katz, D; Sayag, E; Shmueli, I; Cohen, Y; Tal, A; Vagish, Z; Bromberger, B; Dangendorf, V; Mugai, D; Tittelmeier, K; Weierganz, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two generations of a novel detector for high-resolution transmission imaging and spectrometry of fast-neutrons are presented. These devices are based on a hydrogenous fiber scintillator screen and single- or multiple-gated intensified camera systems (ICCD). This detector is designed for energy-selective neutron radiography with nanosecond-pulsed broad-energy (1 - 10 MeV) neutron beams. Utilizing the Time-of-Flight (TOF) method, such a detector is capable of simultaneously capturing several images, each at a different neutron energy (TOF). In addition, a gamma-ray image can also be simultaneously registered, allowing combined neutron/gamma inspection of objects. This permits combining the sensitivity of the fast-neutron resonance method to low-Z elements with that of gamma radiography to high-Z materials.

  19. The Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway, a TeraGrid Science Gateway to Support the Spallation Neutron Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan

    by a service oriented architecture for functional implementation. KEY WORDS: Portal, Neutron Scattering, TeraGrid, Science Gateway, Service Architecture, Grid 1. INTRODUCTION Neutron Science: Neutron scattering is used, earth science, and fundamental physics [3]. As a diagnostic tool, neutron scattering provides unique

  20. NEUTRONS AND 2 D ADSORBED PHASES. NEUTRON SCATTERING FROM 36ArAND 4HeFILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    NEUTRONS AND 2 D ADSORBED PHASES. NEUTRON SCATTERING FROM 36ArAND 4HeFILMS K. CARNEIRO Physics. - The technique of neutron scattering is well established as a unique tool to investigate the details technique to physisorbed phases is quite natural. But on the other hand since neutron scattering, compared

  1. Yields of delayed-neutron groups in thermal-neutron fission of sup 229 Th

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gudkov, A.N.; Koldobskii, A.B.; Krivasheev, S.V.; Lebedev, N.A.; Pchelin, V.A. (Moscow Engineering-Physics Institute (SU))

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absolute yields of five delayed-neutron groups in thermal-neutron fission of {sup 229}Th have been determined for the first time. A significant discrepancy is noted between the experimental yields of delayed neutrons of the fourth group and the corresponding theoretical values. From the results of the experimental studies, corrections have been determined for even--odd effects in the charge distributions of the yields of fragment nuclides.

  2. Delayed neutrons as a probe of nuclear charge distribution in fission of heavy nuclei by neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaev, S G; Piksaikin, V M; Roshchenko, V A

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of the determination of cumulative yields of delayed neutron precursors is developed. This method is based on the iterative least-square procedure applied to delayed neutron decay curves measured after irradiation of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U sample by thermal neutrons. Obtained cumulative yields in turns were used for deriving the values of the most probable charge in low-energy fission of the above-mentioned nucleus.

  3. Mechanical approach to the neutrons spectra collimation and detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeghi, H.; Roshan, M. V. [Energy Engineering and Physics Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrons spectra from most of known sources require being collimated for numerous applications; among them one is the Neutron Activation Analysis. High energy neutrons are collimated through a mechanical procedure as one of the most promising methods. The output energy of the neutron beam depends on the velocity of the rotating Polyethylene disks. The collimated neutrons are then measured by an innovative detection technique with high accuracy.

  4. Data acquisition system for the neutron scattering instruments at the intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, R.K.; Daly, R.T.; Haumann, J.R.; Hitterman, R.L.; Morgan, C.B.; Ostrowski, G.E.; Worlton, T.G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a major new user-oriented facility which is now coming on line for basic research in neutron scattering and neutron radiation damage. This paper describes the data-acquisition system which will handle data acquisition and instrument control for the time-of-flight neutron-scattering instruments at IPNS. This discussion covers the scientific and operational requirements for this system, and the system architecture that was chosen to satisfy these requirements. It also provides an overview of the current system implementation including brief descriptions of the hardware and software which have been developed.

  5. Neutron resonance study of a delayed neutron emitter, /sup 87/Kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogelberg, B; Macklin, R L; Raman, S; Stelson, P H

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unbound levels in /sup 87/Kr have been studied as neutron resonances up to 400 keV neutron energy at the ORELA linear electron accelerator. The observed p-wave resonances, with I/sup pi /=1/2/sup - / and 3/2/sup -/ can also be populated in the beta -decay of the 3/2 /sup -/ ground state of /sup 87/Br. When comparing the present results with previous studies of beta -delayed neutron spectra, the authors find that almost all observed p-wave resonances can be identified with peaks in the delayed neutron spectra. (0 refs).

  6. Subcritical Neutron Multiplication Measurements of HEU Using Delayed Neutrons as the Driving Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollas, C.L.; Goulding, C.A.; Myers, W.L.

    1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for the determination of the multiplication of highly enriched uranium systems is presented. The method uses delayed neutrons to drive the HEU system. These delayed neutrons are from fission events induced by a pulsed 14-MeV neutron source. Between pulses, neutrons are detected within a medium efficiency neutron detector using {sup 3}He ionization tubes within polyethylene enclosures. The neutron detection times are recorded relative to the initiation of the 14-MeV neutron pulse, and subsequently analyzed with the Feynman reduced variance method to extract singles, doubles and triples neutron counting rates. Measurements have been made on a set of nested hollow spheres of 93% enriched uranium, with mass values from 3.86 kg to 21.48 kg. The singles, doubles and triples counting rates for each uranium system are compared to calculations from point kinetics models of neutron multiplicity to assign multiplication values. These multiplication values are compared to those from MC NP K-Code calculations.

  7. Concepts of Neutron ScatteringConcepts of Neutron Scattering 66thth PSI Summer School on Condensed Matter ResearchPSI Summer School on Condensed Matter Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothroyd, Andrew

    Concepts of Neutron ScatteringConcepts of Neutron Scattering 66thth PSI Summer School on Condensed Andrew Boothroyd University of Oxford Basic features of neutron scattering Neutron diffraction Neutron on the lattice * * * #12;ScatteringScattering ``nuts and boltsnuts and bolts'' Neutrons, photons, electrons

  8. Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

  9. International workshop on cold neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. (comps.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)) [comps.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

  10. Neutron Deficient Isotopes of Rhodium and Palladium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perlman, I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    r' Contract l~o. W-7405-eng-48 To be published as a letterLaboratory Contract No. W-7405-eng-48 NEUTRON DEFICIEI\\lT I

  11. Computer simulation of neutron capture therapy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Arne Peter

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical methods are developed to simulate on a large digital computer the production and use of reactor neutron beams f or boron capture therapy of brain tumors. The simulation accounts for radiation dose distributions ...

  12. Computer simulation of neutron capture therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Arne Peter

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical methods are developed to simulate on a large digital computer the production and use of reactor neutron beams f or boron capture therapy of brain tumors. The simulation accounts for radiation dose distributions ...

  13. Simulated liquid argon interactions with neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Kathleen M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GEANT4 physics simulation program is known to have errors in how hadronic interactions are implemented. This has the potential to cause errors in the Monte Carlos used to determine the expected neutron backgrounds in ...

  14. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  15. ITERATIVE METHODS FOR NEUTRON TRANSPORT EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Ivan

    Abstract. We discuss iterative methods for computing criticality in nuclear reactors. In general as the inner solver. Key words. neutron transport, criticality, generalised eigenvalue problem, symmetry. Reactor criticality problems. Climate change is a challenging problem of great contemporary interest

  16. Delayed neutrons measurement at the MEGAPIE target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Panebianco; Pavel Bokov; Diane Dore; Xavier Ledoux; Alain Letourneau; Aurelien Prevost; Danas Ridikas

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the Neutronic and Nuclear Assessment Task Group of the MEGAPIE experiment we measured the delayed neutron (DN) flux at the top of the target. The measurement was proposed mainly for radioprotection purposes since the DN flux at the top of the target has been estimated to be of the same order of magnitude as the prompt neutron flux. Given the strong model-dependence of DN predictions, the measurement of DN contribution to the total neutron activity at the top of the target was thus desired. Moreover, this measurement is complementary to the DN experiments performed at PNPI (Gatchina) on solid lead and bismuth targets. The DN measurement at MEGAPIE was performed during the start-up phase of the target. In this paper we present a detailed description of the experimental setup and some preliminary results on decay spectra.

  17. Delayed neutrons measurement at the MEGAPIE target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panebianco, Stefano; Dore, Diane; Ledoux, Xavier; Letourneau, Alain; Prevost, Aurelien; Ridikas, Danas

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the Neutronic and Nuclear Assessment Task Group of the MEGAPIE experiment we measured the delayed neutron (DN) flux at the top of the target. The measurement was proposed mainly for radioprotection purposes since the DN flux at the top of the target has been estimated to be of the same order of magnitude as the prompt neutron flux. Given the strong model-dependence of DN predictions, the measurement of DN contribution to the total neutron activity at the top of the target was thus desired. Moreover, this measurement is complementary to the DN experiments performed at PNPI (Gatchina) on solid lead and bismuth targets. The DN measurement at MEGAPIE was performed during the start-up phase of the target. In this paper we present a detailed description of the experimental setup and some preliminary results on decay spectra.

  18. Delayed neutron alignment in sup 117 I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, E.S.; Waring, M.P.; Clark, R.M.; Forbes, S.A.; Fossan, D.B.; Hughes, J.R.; LaFosse, D.R.; Liang, Y.; Ma, R.; Vaska, P.; Wadsworth, R. (Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom) Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States) Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO1 5DD (United Kingdom) Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rotational alignment of {ital h}{sub 11/2} neutrons is considerably delayed ({Delta}{h bar}{omega}{similar to}0.11 MeV) in the {pi}{ital h}{sub 11/2}(550)1/2{sup {minus}} intruder band in {sup 117}I when compared to bands built on normal-parity states. Comparison with cranked shell-model calculations suggests that this effect may indicate a larger quadrupole deformation for the intruder orbital. A strong neutron-proton interaction between the aligning {ital h}{sub 11/2} neutrons and the {ital h}{sub 11/2} proton intruder may also play a role. In addition, noncollective oblate states at {ital I}{sup {pi}}=39/2{sup {minus}},43/2{sup {minus}}, and 45/2{sup {minus}} compete energetically with rotational states of the intruder band which may also perturb the neutron alignment.

  19. Low energy neutron-proton interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daub, Brian (Brian Hollenberg)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been few measurements of cross sections for neutron-proton scattering and radiative capture below 1 MeV. Those measurements which do exist are at a small number of energies and are often inconsistent with ...

  20. Magnetic Field Evolution in Superconducting Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graber, Vanessa; Glampedakis, Kostas; Lander, Samuel K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of superconducting and superfluid components in the core of mature neutron stars calls for the rethinking of a number of key magnetohydrodynamical notions like resistivity, the induction equation, magnetic energy and flux-freezing. Using a multi-fluid magnetohydrodynamics formalism, we investigate how the magnetic field evolution is modified when neutron star matter is composed of superfluid neutrons, type-II superconducting protons and relativistic electrons. As an application of this framework, we derive an induction equation where the resistive coupling originates from the mutual friction between the electrons and the vortex/fluxtube arrays of the neutron and proton condensates. The resulting induction equation allows the identification of two timescales that are significantly different from those of standard magnetohydrodynamics. The astrophysical implications of these results are briefly discussed.

  1. Towards a metallurgy of neutron star crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobyakov, D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the standard picture of the crust of a neutron star, matter there is simple: a body-centered-cubic (bcc) lattice of nuclei immersed in an essentially uniform electron gas. We show that at densities above that for neutron drip ($\\sim4\\times10^11$) g cm$^{-3}$ or roughly one thousandth of nuclear matter density, the interstitial neutrons give rise to an attractive interaction between nuclei that renders the lattice unstable. We argue that the likely equilibrium structure is similar to that in displacive ferroelectric materials such as BaTiO$_3$. As a consequence, properties of matter in the inner crust are expected to be much richer than previously appreciated and we mention consequences for observable neutron star properties.

  2. Towards a metallurgy of neutron star crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Kobyakov; C. J. Pethick

    2013-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In the standard picture of the crust of a neutron star, matter there is simple: a body-centered-cubic (bcc) lattice of nuclei immersed in an essentially uniform electron gas. We show that at densities above that for neutron drip ($\\sim4\\times10^11$) g cm$^{-3}$ or roughly one thousandth of nuclear matter density, the interstitial neutrons give rise to an attractive interaction between nuclei that renders the lattice unstable. We argue that the likely equilibrium structure is similar to that in displacive ferroelectric materials such as BaTiO$_3$. As a consequence, properties of matter in the inner crust are expected to be much richer than previously appreciated and we mention consequences for observable neutron star properties.

  3. Cryogenic hydrogen circulation system of neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Y. N. [Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, BJ100190 China and University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, BJ100049 (China); Hu, Z. J.; Wu, J. H.; Li, Q.; Zhang, Y. [Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, BJ100190 (China); Zhang, P. [School of Energy and Power Engineering, HuaZhong University of Science and Technology, WH430074 (China); Wang, G. P. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, BJ100049 (China)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold neutron sources of reactors and spallation neutron sources are classic high flux neutron sources in operation all over the world. Cryogenic fluids such as supercritical or supercooled hydrogen are commonly selected as a moderator to absorb the nuclear heating from proton beams. By comparing supercritical hydrogen circulation systems and supercooled hydrogen circulation systems, the merits and drawbacks in both systems are summarized. When supercritical hydrogen circulates as the moderator, severe pressure fluctuations caused by temperature changes will occur. The pressure control system used to balance the system pressure, which consists of a heater as an active controller for thermal compensation and an accumulator as a passive volume controller, is preliminarily studied. The results may provide guidelines for design and operation of other cryogenic hydrogen system for neutron sources under construction.

  4. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  5. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  6. Aspects of a high intensity neutron source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Peter H. (Peter Henry)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique methodology for creating a neutron source model was developed for deuterons and protons incident on solid phase beryllium and lithium targets. This model was then validated against experimental results already ...

  7. Neutron Imaging of Advanced Engine Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Highly sensitive to water and hydrocarbonsfuel * Can image carbon soot layer due to absorption of water and HC - Image is based on absence of neutrons * X-ray imaging relies upon...

  8. Neutron Imaging of Advanced Engine Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Highly sensitive to water and hydrocarbonsfuel * Can image carbon soot layer due to absorption of water and HC - Image is based on absence of neutrons * X-ray absorption increases...

  9. associated-particle sealed-tube neutron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Supercool Neutrons (Ultracold Neutrons) Physics Websites Summary: . Korobkina, NCSU Neutron scattering is a valuable tool to study the structure of materials. Because Helium...

  10. am-be isotopic neutron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fast neutrons. Earlier studies characteristic gamma photons through inelastic scattering of an external neutron beam. These stable isotopes canNeutron Stimulated...

  11. Dynamic structure factors of a dense mixture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supurna Sinha

    2005-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the dynamic structure factors of a dense binary liquid mixture. These describe dynamics on molecular length scales, where structural relaxation is important. We find that the presence of a few large particles in a dense fluid of small particles slows down the dynamics considerably. We also observe a deep narrowing of the spectrum for a disordered mixture composed of a nearly equal packing of the two species. In contrast, a few small particles diffuse easily in the background of a dense fluid of large particles. We expect our results to describe neutron scattering from a dense mixture.

  12. Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, P J

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

  13. Helium nuclei around the neutron drip line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhubrata Bhattacharya; G. Gangopadhyay; Subinit Roy

    2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron rich He nuclei have been investigated using relativistic mean field approach in co-ordinate space. Elastic partial scattering cross sections for proton scattering in inverse kinematics have been calculated using the theoretically obtained density for $^{6,8}$He and compared with experiment. The energies of the low-lying resonance states in the neutron unstable nuclei $^{5,7}$He have also been calculated and compared with experimental observations.

  14. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  15. Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

  16. Neutrino-Pair Emission due to Electron-Phonon Scattering in a Neutron Star Crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. G. Yakovlev; A. D. Kaminker

    1996-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung radiation is considered due to electron--phonon scattering of degenerate, relativistic electrons in a lattice of spherical atomic nuclei in a neutron star crust. The neutrino energy generation rate is calculated taking into account exact spectrum of phonons, the Debye--Waller factor, and the nuclear form--factor in the density range from $10^7$~g~cm$^{-3}$ to $10^{14}$~g~cm$^{-3}$ at arbitrary nuclear composition for body-centered-cubic and face-centered-cubic Coulomb crystals. The results are fitted by a unified analytic expression. A comparison is given of the neutrino bremsstrahlung energy losses in a neutron star crust composed of ground state and accreted matter, in the solid and liquid phases.

  17. Shear viscosity in neutron star cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Shternin; D. G. Yakovlev

    2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the shear viscosity $\\eta = \\eta_{e\\mu}+\\eta_{n}$ in a neutron star core composed of nucleons, electrons and muons ($\\eta_{e\\mu}$ being the electron-muon viscosity, mediated by collisions of electrons and muons with charged particles, and $\\eta_{n}$ the neutron viscosity, mediated by neutron-neutron and neutron-proton collisions). Deriving $\\eta_{e\\mu}$, we take into account the Landau damping in collisions of electrons and muons with charged particles via the exchange of transverse plasmons. It lowers $\\eta_{e\\mu}$ and leads to the non-standard temperature behavior $\\eta_{e\\mu}\\propto T^{-5/3}$. The viscosity $\\eta_{n}$ is calculated taking into account that in-medium effects modify nucleon effective masses in dense matter. Both viscosities, $\\eta_{e\\mu}$ and $\\eta_{n}$, can be important, and both are calculated including the effects of proton superfluidity. They are presented in the form valid for any equation of state of nucleon dense matter. We analyze the density and temperature dependence of $\\eta$ for different equations of state in neutron star cores, and compare $\\eta$ with the bulk viscosity in the core and with the shear viscosity in the crust.

  18. BUILDING A NETWORK FOR NEUTRON SCATTERING EDUCATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pynn, Roger [ORNL; Baker, Shenda Mary [ORNL; Louca, Despo A [ORNL; McGreevy, Robert L [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL; Anderson, Ian S [ORNL

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a concerted effort supported by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Commerce, and the Department of Energy, the United States is rebuilding its leadership in neutron scattering capability through a significant investment in U.S. neutron scattering user facilities and related instrumentation. These unique facilities provide opportunities in neutron scattering to a broad community of researchers from academic institutions, federal laboratories, and industry. However, neutron scattering is often considered to be a tool for 'experts only' and in order for the U.S. research community to take full advantage of these new and powerful tools, a comprehensive education and outreach program must be developed. The workshop described below is the first step in developing a national program that takes full advantage of modern education methods and leverages the existing educational capacity at universities and national facilities. During March 27-28, 2008, a workshop entitled 'Building a Network for Neutron Scattering Education' was held in Washington, D.C. The goal of the workshop was to define and design a roadmap for a comprehensive neutron scattering education program in the United States. Successful implementation of the roadmap will maximize the national intellectual capital in neutron sciences and will increase the sophistication of research questions addressed by neutron scattering at the nation's forefront facilities. (See Appendix A for the list of attendees, Appendix B for the workshop agenda, Appendix C for a list of references. Appendix D contains the results of a survey given at the workshop; Appendix E contains summaries of the contributed talks.) The workshop brought together U.S. academicians, representatives from neutron sources, scientists who have developed nontraditional educational programs, educational specialists, and managers from government agencies to create a national structure for providing ongoing neutron scattering education. A concerted effort was made to involve representatives from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and minority educational institutions (MEIs). The roadmap contained herein provides the path to a national infrastructure for education of students, faculty, and professional researchers who wish to make use of national neutron scattering facilities but do not have (or do not believe they have) the educational background to do so. Education of other stakeholders, including the public, students in kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12), and policy makers is also included. The opening sessions of the workshop provided the current status of neutron scattering education in North America, Europe, and Australia. National neutron sources have individually developed outreach and advertising programs aimed at increasing awareness among researchers of the potential applications of neutron scattering. However, because their principal mission is to carry out scientific research, their outreach efforts are necessarily self-limiting. The opening session was designed to build awareness that the individual programs need to be coupled with, and integrated into, a broader education program that addresses the complete range of experience, from the student to the experienced researcher, and the wide range of scientific disciplines covered by neutron scattering. Such a program must also take full advantage of existing educational programs and expertise at universities and expand them using modern distance learning capabilities, recognizing that the landscape of education is changing.

  19. Benchmark on neutron capture extracted from $(d,p)$ reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Mukhamedzhanov; F. M. Nunes; P. Mohr

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct neutron capture reactions play an important role in nuclear astrophysics and applied physics. Since for most unstable short-lived nuclei it is not possible to measure the $(n, \\gamma)$ cross sections, $(d,p)$ reactions have been used as an alternative indirect tool. We analyze simultaneously $^{48}{\\rm Ca}(d,p)^{49}{\\rm Ca}$ at deuteron energies $2, 13, 19$ and 56 MeV and the thermal $(n,\\gamma)$ reaction at 25 meV. We include results for the ground state and the first excited state of $^{49}$Ca. From the low-energy $(d,p)$ reaction, the neutron asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) is determined. Using this ANC, we extract the spectroscopic factor (SF) from the higher energy $(d,p)$ data and the $(n, \\gamma)$ data. The SF obtained through the 56 MeV $(d,p)$ data are less accurate but consistent with those from the thermal capture. We show that to have a similar dependence on the single particle parameters as in the $(n, \\gamma)$, the (d,p) reaction should be measured at 30 MeV.

  20. /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method has been tested in a wide variety of experiments that have indicated the broad range of applicability of the method. The neutron multiplication factor k/sub eff/ has been satisfactorily detemined for a variety of materials including uranium metal, light water reactor fuel pins, fissile solutions, fuel plates in water, and interacting cylinders. For a uranyl nitrate solution tank which is typical of a fuel processing or reprocessing plant, the k/sub eff/ values were satisfactorily determined for values between 0.92 and 0.5 using a simple point kinetics interpretation of the experimental data. The short measurement times, in several cases as low as 1 min, have shown that the development of this method can lead to a practical subcriticality monitor for many in-plant applications. The further development of the method will require experiments oriented toward particular applications including dynamic experiments and the development of theoretical methods to predict the experimental observables.

  1. Neutron observables from inclusive lepton scattering on nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinat, A. S.; Taragin, M. F. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze new data from Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) for inclusive electron scattering on various targets. Computed and measured total inclusive cross sections in the range 0.3 < or approx. x < or approx. 0.95 show reasonable agreement on a logarithmic scale for all targets. However, closer inspection of the quasielastic components reveals serious discrepancies. European Muon Collaboration (EMC) ratios with conceivably smaller systematic errors fare the same. As a consequence, the new data do not enable the extraction of the magnetic form factor G{sub M}{sup n} and the structure function F{sub 2}{sup n} of the neutron, although the application of exactly the same analysis to older data had been successful. We incorporate in the above analysis older CLAS Collaboration data on F{sub 2}{sup 2H}. Removal of some scattered points from those makes it appear possible to obtain the desired neutron information. We compare our results with others from alternative sources. Special attention is paid to the A=3 isodoublet cross sections and EMC ratios. Present data exist only for {sup 3}He, but the available input in combination with charge symmetry enables computations for {sup 3}H. Their average is the computed isoscalar part and is compared with the empirical modification of {sup 3}He EMC ratios toward a fictitious A=3 isosinglet.

  2. Relativistic outflow from two thermonuclear shell flashes on neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zand, Jean in 't; Cavecchi, Yuri

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the exceptionally short (32-41 ms) precursors of two intermediate-duration thermonuclear X-ray bursts observed with RXTE from the neutron stars in 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549. They exhibit photon fluxes that surpass those at the Eddington limit later in the burst by factors of 2.6 to 3.1. We are able to explain both the short duration and the super-Eddington flux by mildly relativistic outflow velocities of 0.1$c$ to 0.3$c$ subsequent to the thermonuclear shell flashes on the neutron stars. These are the highest velocities ever measured from any thermonuclear flash. The precursor rise times are also exceptionally short: about 1 ms. This is inconsistent with predictions for nuclear flames spreading laterally as deflagrations and suggests detonations instead. This is the first time that a detonation is suggested for such a shallow ignition column depth ($y_{\\rm ign}$ = 10$^{10}$ g cm$^{-2}$). The detonation would possibly require a faster nuclear reaction chain, such as bypassing the alpha-capture on $^...

  3. YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron experiments : data processing and spatial corrections.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The YALINA-Booster experiments and analyses are part of the collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory of USA and the Joint Institute for Power & Nuclear Research - SOSNY of Belarus for studying the physics of accelerator driven systems for nuclear energy applications using low enriched uranium. The YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly is utilized for studying the kinetics of accelerator driven systems with its highly intensive D-T or D-D pulsed neutron source. In particular, the pulsed neutron methods are used to determine the reactivity of the subcritical system. This report examines the pulsed-neutron experiments performed in the YALINA-Booster facility with different configurations for the subcritical assembly. The 1141 configuration with 90% U-235 fuel and the 1185 configuration with 36% or 21% U-235 fuel are examined. The Sjoestrand area-ratio method is utilized to determine the reactivities of the different configurations. The linear regression method is applied to obtain the prompt neutron decay constants from the pulsed-neutron experimental data. The reactivity values obtained from the experimental data are shown to be dependent on the detector locations inside the subcritical assembly and the types of detector used for the measurements. In this report, Bell's spatial correction factors are calculated based on a Monte Carlo model to remove the detector dependences. The large differences between the reactivity values given by the detectors in the fast neutron zone of the YALINA-Booster are reduced after applying the spatial corrections. In addition, the estimated reactivity values after the spatial corrections are much less spatially dependent.

  4. Radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb: New coolant and neutron moderator for innovative nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, G. G.; Kryuchkov, E. F.; Apse, V. A.; Kulikov, E. G. [National Research Nuclear Univ. MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse, 31, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advantages of radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb as a reactor coolant with respect to natural lead are caused by unique nuclear properties of {sup 208}Pb which is a double-magic nucleus with closed proton and neutron shells. This results in significantly lower micro cross section and resonance integral of radiative neutron capture by {sup 208}Pb than those for numerous light neutron moderators. The extremely weak ability of {sup 208}Pb to absorb neutrons results in the following effects. Firstly, neutron moderating factor (ratio of scattering to capture cross sections) is larger than that for graphite and light water. Secondly, age and diffusion length of thermal neutrons are larger than those for graphite, light and heavy water. Thirdly, neutron lifetime in {sup 208}Pb is comparable with that for graphite, beryllium and heavy water what could be important for safe reactor operation. The paper presents some results obtained in neutronics and thermal-hydraulics evaluations of the benefits from the use of radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb instead of natural lead as a coolant of fast breeder reactors. The paper demonstrates that substitution of radiogenic lead for natural lead can offer the following benefits for operation of fast breeder reactors. Firstly, improvement of the reactor safety thanks to the better values of coolant temperature reactivity coefficient and, secondly, improvement of some thermal-hydraulic reactor parameters. Radiogenic lead can be extracted from thorium sludge without isotope separation as {sup 208}Pb is a final isotope in the decay chain of {sup 232}Th. (authors)

  5. A neutron imaging device for sample alignment in a pulsed neutron scattering instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grazzi, F.; Scherillo, A.; Zoppi, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron-imaging device for alignment purposes has been tested on the INES beamline at ISIS, the pulsed neutron source of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (U.K.). Its use, in conjunction with a set of movable jaws, turns out extremely useful for scattering application to complex samples where a precise and well-defined determination of the scattering volume is needed.

  6. Neutron Diffraction and Neutron Vibrational Spectroscopy Studies of Hydrogen Adsorption in the Prussian Blue Analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The transition to an energy infrastructure based upon hydrogen as an energy carrier is critically dependent uponNeutron Diffraction and Neutron Vibrational Spectroscopy Studies of Hydrogen Adsorption, Berkeley, California 94720-1460 ReceiVed April 13, 2006 The adsorption of molecular hydrogen

  7. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  8. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, Woo Y. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, James L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nigg, David W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  9. The effect of a paraffin screen on the neutron dose at the maze door of a 15 MV linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krmar, M.; Kuzmanovi?, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad 21000 (Serbia)] [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad 21000 (Serbia); Nikoli?, D. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada)] [National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Kuzmanovi?, Z. [International Medical Centers, Banja Luka 78000, Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina)] [International Medical Centers, Banja Luka 78000, Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Ganezer, K. [Physics Department, California State University Dominguez Hills, Carson, California 90747 (United States)] [Physics Department, California State University Dominguez Hills, Carson, California 90747 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a paraffin screen located at various positions in the maze on the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door.Methods: The neutron dose equivalent was measured at the maze door of a room containing a 15 MV linear accelerator for x-ray therapy. Measurements were performed for several positions of the paraffin screen covering only 27.5% of the cross-sectional area of the maze. The neutron dose equivalent was also measured at all screen positions. Two simple models of the neutron source were considered in which the first assumed that the source was the cross-sectional area at the inner entrance of the maze, radiating neutrons in an isotropic manner. In the second model the reduction in the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door due to the paraffin screen was considered to be a function of the mean values of the neutron fluence and energy at the screen.Results: The results of this study indicate that the equivalent dose at the maze door was reduced by a factor of 3 through the use of a paraffin screen that was placed inside the maze. It was also determined that the contributions to the dosage from areas that were not covered by the paraffin screen as viewed from the dosimeter, were 2.5 times higher than the contributions from the covered areas. This study also concluded that the contributions of the maze walls, ceiling, and floor to the total neutron dose equivalent were an order of magnitude lower than those from the surface at the far end of the maze.Conclusions: This study demonstrated that a paraffin screen could be used to reduce the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door by a factor of 3. This paper also found that the reduction of the neutron dose equivalent was a linear function of the area covered by the maze screen and that the decrease in the dose at the maze door could be modeled as an exponential function of the product ?·E at the screen.

  10. The new cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlers, G.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Niedziela, J. L.; Iverson, E. B. [Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Sokol, P. E. [Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  11. The new Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source -- Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlers, Georg [ORNL; Podlesnyak, Andrey A [ORNL; Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL; Sokol, Paul E [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  12. Determination of Godiva`s effective delayed neutron fraction using newly calculated delayed neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spriggs, G.D.; Campbell, J.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Busch, R.D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When calculating the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}{sub eff} for a given reactor system, the assumed delayed neutron group spectra and the assumed number of delayed neutrons born per fission {nu}{sub d} can have a major impact on the final value. Over the years, the recommended values for the delayed neutron spectra and for {nu}{sub d} have slowly changed. To ascertain whether or not these changes have increased the accuracy of {beta}{sub eff} calculations in fast {sup 235}U systems, the authors have reevaluated {beta}{sub eff} for the benchmark system Godiva-I using newly calculated delayed neutron spectra and Tuttle`s recommended values of {nu}{sub d} for both {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U.

  13. Low-energy parameters of neutron-neutron interaction in the effective-range approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (Ukraine)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the mass difference between the charged and neutral pions on the low-energy parameters of nucleon-nucleon interaction in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state is studied in the effective-range approximation. On the basis of experimental values of the singlet parameters of neutron-proton scattering and the experimental value of the virtual-state energy for the neutron-neutron systemin the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state, the following values were obtained for the neutron-neutron scattering length and effective range: a{sub nn} = -16.59(117) fm and r{sub nn} = 2.83(11) fm. The calculated values agree well with present-day experimental results.

  14. Computational characterization and experimental validation of the thermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy research at the University of Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broekman, J. D. [University of Missouri, Research Reactor Center, 1513 Research Park Drive, Columbia, MO 65211-3400 (United States); Nigg, D. W. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Hawthorne, M. F. [University of Missouri, International Institute of Nano and Molecular Medicine, 1514 Research Park Dr., Columbia, MO 65211-3450 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameter studies, design calculations and neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline constructed for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. Validation protocols based on neutron activation spectrometry measurements and rigorous least-square adjustment techniques show that the beam produces a neutron spectrum that has the anticipated level of thermal neutron flux and a somewhat higher than expected, but radio-biologically insignificant, epithermal neutron flux component. (authors)

  15. A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Papka, P. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nuclear Physics group, iThemba labs, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dobson, R. T. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

  16. Neutron Scattering Experiment Automation with Python

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolnierczuk, Piotr A [ORNL] [ORNL; Riedel, Richard A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory currently holds the Guinness World Record as the world most powerful pulsed spallation neutron source. Neutrons scattered off atomic nuclei in a sample yield important information about the position, motions, and magnetic properties of atoms in materials. A neutron scattering experiment usually involves sample environment control (temperature, pressure, etc.), mechanical alignment (slits, sample and detector position), magnetic field controllers, neutron velocity selection (choppers) and neutron detectors. The SNS Data Acquisition System (DAS) consists of real-time sub-system (detector read-out with custom electronics, chopper interface), data preprocessing (soft real-time) and a cluster of control and ancillary PCs. The real-time system runs FPGA firmware and programs running on PCs (C++, LabView) typically perform one task such as motor control and communicate via TCP/IP networks. PyDas is a set of Python modules that are used to integrate various components of the SNS DAS system. It enables customized automation of neutron scattering experiments in a rapid and flexible manner. It provides wxPython GUIs for routine experiments as well as IPython command line scripting. Matplotlib and numpy are used for data presentation and simple analysis. We will present an overview of SNS Data Acquisition System and PyDas architectures and implementation along with the examples of use. We will also discuss plans for future development as well as the challenges that have to be met while maintaining PyDas for 20+ different scientific instruments.

  17. High Pressure Neutron Powder Diffraction Study of Superhydrated Natrolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colligan,M.; Lee, Y.; Vogt, T.; Celestian, A.; Parise, J.; Marshall, W.; Hriljac, J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron powder diffraction data were collected on a sample of natrolite and a 1:1 (v/v) mixture of perdeuterated methanol and water at a pressure of 1.87(11) GPa. The natrolite sample was superhydrated, with a water content double that observed at ambient pressure. All of the water deuterium atoms were located and the nature and extent of the hydrogen bonding elucidated for the first time. This has allowed the calculation of bond valence sums for the water oxygen atoms, and from this, it can be deduced that the key energetic factor leading to loss of the additional water molecule upon pressure release is the poor coordination to sodium cations within the pores.

  18. Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

  19. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

  20. Models of neutron star atmospheres enriched with nuclear burning ashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nättilä, Joonas; Kajava, Jari J E; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-mass X-ray binaries hosting neutron stars (NS) exhibit thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts, which are powered by unstable nuclear burning of helium and/or hydrogen into heavier elements deep in the NS "ocean". In some cases the burning ashes may rise from the burning depths up to the NS photosphere by convection, leading to the appearance of the metal absorption edges in the spectra, which then force the emergent X-ray burst spectra to shift toward lower energies. These effects may have a substantial impact on the color correction factor $f_c$ and the dilution factor $w$, the parameters of the diluted blackbody model $F_E \\approx w B_E(f_c T_{eff})$ that is commonly used to describe the emergent spectra from NSs. The aim of this paper is to quantify how much the metal enrichment can change these factors. We have developed a new NS atmosphere modeling code, which has a few important improvements compared to our previous code required by inclusion of the metals. The opacities and the internal partition func...

  1. Neutron Scattering Studies of Vortex Matter in Type-II Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xinsheng Ling

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed program is an experimental study of the fundamental properties of Abrikosov vortex matter in type-II superconductors. Most superconducting materials used in applications such as MRI are type II and their transport properties are determined by the interplay between random pinning, interaction and thermal fluctuation effects in the vortex state. Given the technological importance of these materials, a fundamental understanding of the vortex matter is necessary. The vortex lines in type-II superconductors also form a useful model system for fundamental studies of a number of important issues in condensed matter physics, such as the presence of a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the presence of random pinning. Recent advances in neutron scattering facilities such as the major upgrade of the NIST cold source and the Spallation Neutron Source are providing unprecedented opportunities in addressing some of the longstanding issues in vortex physics. The core component of the proposed program is to use small angle neutron scattering and Bitter decoration experiments to provide the most stringent test of the Bragg glass theory by measuring the structure factor in both the real and reciprocal spaces. The proposed experiments include a neutron reflectometry experiment to measure the precise Q-dependence of the structure factor of the vortex lattice in the Bragg glass state. A second set of SANS experiments will be on a shear-strained Nb single crystal for testing a recently proposed theory of the stability of Bragg glass. The objective is to artificially create a set of parallel grain boundaries into a Nb single crystal and use SANS to measure the vortex matter diffraction pattern as a function of the changing angle between the applied magnetic field to the grain boundaries. The intrinsic merits of the proposed work are a new fundamental understanding of type-II superconductors on which superconducting technology is based, and a firm understanding of phases and phase transitions in condensed matter systems with random pinning. The broader impact of the program includes the training of future generation of neutron scientists, and further development of neutron scattering and complementary techniques for studies of superconducting materials. The graduate and undergraduate students participating in this project will learn the state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques, acquire a wide range of materials research experiences, and participate in the frontier research of superconductivity. This should best prepare the students for future careers in academia, industry, or government.

  2. Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); INTEGRIS Cancer Insititute, 5911 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment conditions, the H/D value per uncollimated beam size for uniform scanning beams was slightly lower than that from a passive scattering beam and higher than that from a pencil beam scanning beam, within a factor of 2. Minimizing beam scanning area could effectively reduce neutron dose equivalent for uniform scanning beams, down to the level close to pencil beam scanning.

  3. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  4. Derivation of a Stochastic Neutron Transport Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward J. Allen

    2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic difference equations and a stochastic partial differential equation (SPDE) are simultaneously derived for the time-dependent neutron angular density in a general three-dimensional medium where the neutron angular density is a function of position, direction, energy, and time. Special cases of the equations are given such as transport in one-dimensional plane geometry with isotropic scattering and transport in a homogeneous medium. The stochastic equations are derived from basic principles, i.e., from the changes that occur in a small time interval. Stochastic difference equations of the neutron angular density are constructed, taking into account the inherent randomness in scatters, absorptions, and source neutrons. As the time interval decreases, the stochastic difference equations lead to a system of Ito stochastic differential equations (SDEs). As the energy, direction, and position intervals decrease, an SPDE is derived for the neutron angular density. Comparisons between numerical solutions of the stochastic difference equations and independently formulated Monte Carlo calculations support the accuracy of the derivations.

  5. Neutron Stars Opacity and Proton Fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. N. Alcain; C. O. Dorso

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: In neutron stars the nucleons are submitted to extreme conditions. The study of this natural occurring objects can lead to further understanding of the behaviour of nuclear matter in highly asymmetric nuclei. Among the characteristics of neutron stars, its neutrino absorption - associated to structural inhomoegeneities - stands out as one of the possible magnitudes linked to an observable. Purpose: We have carried out a systematic study of this neutrino absorption for different thermodynamic conditions in order to assess the impact that the structure has on it. Method: We study the dynamics of nucleons in conditions according to the neutron star crust with a semiclassical molecular dynamics model, for different densities, proton fractions and temperature, we calculate the long range opacity and the cluster distribution. Results: The neutrino absorption, the main mechanism for neutron stars cooldown, takes its highest value for temperatures and densities low compared with the inner crust, and a proton fraction is close to the symmetric case $x=0.5$. Conclusions: Within the used model the neutrinos are absorbed mostly close to the surface of the neutron star. Also, for high temperatures, a large cluster still exists, but the appearance of several small-sized clusters smears out the very long range order needed for neutrino absorption.

  6. ORNL Neutron Sciences Annual Report for 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Ian S [ORNL; Horak, Charlie M [ORNL; Counce, Deborah Melinda [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first annual report of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate for calendar year 2007. It describes the neutron science facilities, current developments, and future plans; highlights of the year's activities and scientific research; and information on the user program. It also contains information about education and outreach activities and about the organization and staff. The Neutron Sciences Directorate is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Spallation Neutron Source. The main highlights of 2007 were highly successful operation and instrument commissioning at both facilities. At HFIR, the year began with the reactor in shutdown mode and work on the new cold source progressing as planned. The restart on May 16, with the cold source operating, was a significant achievement. Furthermore, measurements of the cold source showed that the performance exceeded expectations, making it one of the world's most brilliant sources of cold neutrons. HFIR finished the year having completed five run cycles and 5,880 MWd of operation. At SNS, the year began with 20 kW of beam power on target; and thanks to a highly motivated staff, we reached a record-breaking power level of 183 kW by the end of the year. Integrated beam power delivered to the target was 160 MWh. Although this is a substantial accomplishment, the next year will bring the challenge of increasing the integrated beam power delivered to 887 MWh as we chart our path toward 5,350 MWh by 2011.

  7. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  8. The neutron star mass distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiziltan, Bülent [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kottas, Athanasios; De Yoreo, Maria [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Thorsett, Stephen E., E-mail: bkiziltan@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California and UCO/Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the number of pulsars with secure mass measurements has increased to a level that allows us to probe the underlying neutron star (NS) mass distribution in detail. We critically review the radio pulsar mass measurements. For the first time, we are able to analyze a sizable population of NSs with a flexible modeling approach that can effectively accommodate a skewed underlying distribution and asymmetric measurement errors. We find that NSs that have evolved through different evolutionary paths reflect distinctive signatures through dissimilar distribution peak and mass cutoff values. NSs in double NS and NS-white dwarf (WD) systems show consistent respective peaks at 1.33 M {sub ?} and 1.55 M {sub ?}, suggesting significant mass accretion (?m ? 0.22 M {sub ?}) has occurred during the spin-up phase. The width of the mass distribution implied by double NS systems is indicative of a tight initial mass function while the inferred mass range is significantly wider for NSs that have gone through recycling. We find a mass cutoff at ?2.1 M {sub ?} for NSs with WD companions, which establishes a firm lower bound for the maximum NS mass. This rules out the majority of strange quark and soft equation of state models as viable configurations for NS matter. The lack of truncation close to the maximum mass cutoff along with the skewed nature of the inferred mass distribution both enforce the suggestion that the 2.1 M {sub ?} limit is set by evolutionary constraints rather than nuclear physics or general relativity, and the existence of rare supermassive NSs is possible.

  9. Neutrons measure phase behavior in pores at Angstrom size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardoel, Agatha A [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers have measured the phase behavior of green house gases in pores at the Angstrom-level, using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor. Yuri Melnichenko, an instrument scientist on the General Purpose Small Angle Neutron Scattering (GP SANS) Diffractometer at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor, his postdoctoral associate Lilin He and collaborators Nidia Gallego and Cristian Contescu from the Material Sciences Division (ORNL) were engaged in the work. They were studying nanoporous carbons to assess their attractiveness as storage media for hydrogen, with a view to potential use for on-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications. Nanoporous carbons can also serve as electrode material for supercapacitors and batteries. The researchers successfully determined that the most efficiently condensing pore size in a carbon nanoporous material for hydrogen storage is less than one nanometer. In a paper recently published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the collaborators used small angle neutron scattering to study how hydrogen condenses in small pores at ambient temperature. They discovered that the surface-molecule interactions create internal pressures in pores that may exceed the external gas pressure by a factor of up to 50. 'This is an exciting result,' Melnichenko said, 'as you achieve extreme densification in pores 'for free', i.e. without spending any energy. These results can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored to maximize hydrogen storage capacities.' Another important factor that defines the adsorption capacity of sub-nanometer pores is their shape. In order to get accurate structural information and maximize sorption capacity, it is important that pores are small and of approximately uniform size. In collaboration with Drexel University's Yury Gogotsi who supplied the samples, Melnichenko and his collaborators used the GP SANS instrument to study how the size and shape of pores in sub-nanometer porous carbons varies, depending on the manufacturing conditions. While small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can do the job too, Melnichenko says, the SANS method broke new ground in analyzing the shape and behavior of pores at subnanometer size, when subjected to varying synthesis temperature. 'We found that these very small pores are in fact spherical, and that when we change the synthesis conditions, they become elongated, even 'slit-like', and all of this on a subnanometer scale,' Melnichenko said.

  10. A Lack of Radio Emission from Neutron Star Low Mass X-ray Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Muno; Tomaso Belloni; Vivek Dhawan; Edward H. Morgan; Ronald A. Remillard; Michael P. Rupen

    2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report strict upper limits to the radio luminosities of three neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries obtained with the Very Large Array while they were in hard X-ray states as observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer: 1E 1724-307, 4U 1812-12, and SLX 1735-269. We compare these upper limits to the radio luminosities of several black hole binaries in very similar hard states, and find that the neutron star systems are as faint as or fainter than all of the black hole candidates. The differences in luminosities can partly be attributed to the lower masses of the neutron star systems, which on theoretical and observational grounds are expected to decrease the radio luminosities as M^0.8. However, there still remains a factor of 30 scatter in the radio luminosities of black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries, particularly at X-ray luminosities of a few percent Eddington. We find no obvious differences in the X-ray timing and spectral properties that can be correlated with the radio luminosity. We discuss the implications of these results on current models for the relationship between accretion and jets.

  11. Neutron spectrometry - An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackinnon, A J; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Cerjan, C; Clancy, T J; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Capenter, A; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hachett, S P; McKernan, M; Jones, O; Lepape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Moran, M; Moses, E; Munro, D; McNaney, J; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Spears, B; Springer, P; Yeamans, C; Farrell, M; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J; Glebov, V; Sangster, T; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Moran, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the redundancy required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined from the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) x dsr{sub 10-12 MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration. The spectrometers are now performing to the required accuracy, as indicated by the good agreement between the different measurements over several commissioning shots. In addition, recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx) which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

  12. Physics design of a cold neutron source for KIPT neutron source facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Kellogg, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of a neutron source facility. It is based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility with low enriched uranium fuel, using the existing electron accelerators at KIPT of Ukraine [1]. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100-KW electron beam, which has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, with a natural uranium target [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron beam experiments and material studies are also included. Over the past two-three decades, structures with characteristic lengths of 100 {angstrom} and correspondingly smaller vibrational energies have become increasingly important for both science and technology [3]. The characteristic dimensions of the microstructures can be well matched by neutrons with longer vibrational wavelength and lower energy. In the accelerator-driven subcritical facility, most of the neutrons are generated from fission reactions with energy in the MeV range. They are slowed down to the meV energy range through scattering reactions in the moderator and reflector materials. However, the fraction of neutrons with energies less than 5 meV in a normal moderator spectrum is very low because of up-scattering caused by the thermal motion of moderator or reflector molecules. In order to obtain neutrons with energy less than 5 meV, cryogenically cooled moderators 'cold neutron sources' should be used to slow down the neutrons. These cold moderators shift the neutron energy spectrum down because the thermal motion of moderator molecules as well as the up-scattering is very small, which provides large gains in intensity of low energy neutrons, E < 5 meV. The accelerator driven subcritical facility is designed with a provision to add a cryogenically cooled moderator system. This cold neutron source could provide the neutrons beams with lower energy, which could be utilized in scattering experiment and material structures analysis. This study describes the performed physics analyses to define and characterize the cold neutron source of the KIPT neutron source facility. The cold neutron source is designed to optimize the cold neutron brightness to the experimental instruments outside the radial heavy concrete shield of the facility. Liquid hydrogen or solid methane with 20 K temperature is used as a cold moderator. Monte Carlo computer code MCNPX [4], with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data libraries, is utilized to calculate the cold neutron source performance and estimate the nuclear heat load to the cold moderator. The surface source generation capability of MCNPX code has been used to provide the possibility of analyzing different design configurations and perform design optimization analyses with reasonable computer resources. Several design configurations were analyzed and their performance were characterized and optimized.

  13. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. K.; Robertson, J. L.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Riemer, Bernard W. [Instrument and Source Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Instrument and Source Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter)

  14. absolute neutron spectrum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    indicate that the use of this design should increase the neutron flux of prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis significantly. Zhang, Jinzhao 2013-01-01 188 New...

  15. accelerator neutron source: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    indicate that the use of this design should increase the neutron flux of prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis significantly. Zhang, Jinzhao 2013-01-01 37 Detection of...

  16. average neutron total: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Total Cross Sections for Neutron Scattering Nuclear Theory (arXiv) Summary: Measurements of neutron total...

  17. angle neutron diffractometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    steel Low alloy ferritic steel Alloy 52 L0 L d0 d Bandara, Arosha 6 SANS -Small Angle Neutron Scattering Tcnica de difrao Chemistry Websites Summary: SANS - Small Angle Neutron...

  18. Horizontal Beam Tubes - HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Tubes The reactor has four horizontal beam tubes that supply the neutrons to the neutron scattering instruments. Details for each beam tube and instrument can be found on...

  19. Neutron stars and strong-field effects of general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Kluzniak

    2000-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic observed properties of neutron stars are reviewed. I suggest that neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries are the best of all known sites for testing strong-field effects of general relativity.

  20. Cryogenic Neutron Protein Crystallography: routine methods and potential benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Kevin L [ORNL; Tomanicek, Stephen J [ORNL; NG, Joseph D [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of cryocooling in neutron diffraction has been hampered by several technical challenges such as the need for specialized equipment and techniques. Recently we have developed and deployed equipment and strategies that allow for routine neutron data collection on cryocooled crystals using off the shelf components. This system has several advantages, compared to a closed displex cooling system such as fast cooling coupled with easier crystal mounting and centering. The ability to routinely collect cryogenic neutron data for analysis will significantly broaden the range of scientific questions that can be examined by neutron protein crystallography. Cryogenic neutron data collection for macromolecules has recently become available at the new Biological Diffractometer BIODIFF at FRM II and the Macromolecular Diffractometer (MaNDi) at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. To evaluate the benefits of a cryocooled neutron structure we collected a full neutron data set on the BIODIFF instrument on a Toho-1 lactamase structure at 100K.

  1. Hand Held Neutron Detector Development for Physics and Security Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Caitlin E

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    neutrons are slowed to thermal using hydrogenous material such as polyethylene where the thermal neutrons are easily captured by either a gadolinium or boron source. Both boron and gadolinium release ionizing radiation in the form of alpha and gammas upon...

  2. Gamma Spectrum from Neutron Capture on Tungsten Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurst, Aaron

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FROM NEUTRON CAPTURE ON TUNGSTEN ISOTOPES A. M. HURST ?1,2 ,capture on the stable tungsten isotopes is presented, withknown decay schemes of the tungsten isotopes from neutron

  3. Instrumentation development for neutron scattering at high pressure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Junwei

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron scattering at extremes of pressure is a powerful tool for studying the response of structural and magnetic properties of materials on microscopic level to applied stresses. However, experimental neutron studies ...

  4. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Highlights | In situ neutron diffraction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In situ neutron diffraction study of CO clathrate hydrate The structure of a CO clathrate hydrate has been studied for the first time using high-P low-T neutron diffraction....

  5. PRODUCTION AND APPLICATIONS OF NEUTRONS USING PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David L. Chichester

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in neutron science have gone hand in hand with the development and of particle accelerators from the beginning of both fields of study. Early accelerator systems were developed simply to produce neutrons, allowing scientists to study their properties and how neutrons interact in matter, but people quickly realized that more tangible uses existed too. Today the diversity of applications for industrial accelerator-based neutron sources is high and so to is the actual number of instruments in daily use is high, and they serve important roles in the fields where they're used. This chapter presents a technical introduction to the different ways particle accelerators are used to produce neutrons, an historical overview of the early development of neutron-producing particle accelerators, a description of some current industrial accelerator systems, narratives of the fields where neutron-producing particle accelerators are used today, and comments on future trends in the industrial uses of neutron producing particle accelerators.

  6. accreting neutron stars: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a typical noise of 10-23 Hz-12. S. Bonazzola; E. Gourgoulhon 1996-06-20 13 Thermonuclear Burning on Rapidly Accreting Neutron Stars Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Neutron...

  7. accreting neutron star: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a typical noise of 10-23 Hz-12. S. Bonazzola; E. Gourgoulhon 1996-06-20 13 Thermonuclear Burning on Rapidly Accreting Neutron Stars Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Neutron...

  8. accreted neutron star: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a typical noise of 10-23 Hz-12. S. Bonazzola; E. Gourgoulhon 1996-06-20 13 Thermonuclear Burning on Rapidly Accreting Neutron Stars Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Neutron...

  9. aerial neutron detection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (clutter) using neutron beams from Cf-252 (more) Johll, Mark 2009-01-01 50 An aerogel Cherenkov detector for multi-GeV photon detection with low sensitivity to neutrons...

  10. Systems and methods for detecting neutrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for detecting neutrons. One or more neutron-sensitive scintillators can be configured from a plurality of nano-sized particles, dopants and an extruded plastic material, such as polystyrene. The nano-sized particles can be compounded into the extruded plastic material with at least one dopant that permits the plastic material to scintillate. One or more plastic light collectors can be associated with a neutron-sensitive scintillator, such that the plastic light collector includes a central hole thereof. A wavelength-shifting fiber can then be located within the hole. The wavelength shifting (WLS) fiber absorbs scintillation light having a wavelength thereof and re-emits the light at a longer wavelength.

  11. Nuclear-spectroscopy problems studied with neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear spectroscopy with neutrons continues to have a major impact on the progress of nuclear science. Neutrons, being uncharged, are particularly useful for the study of low energy reactions. Recent advances in time-of-flight spectroscopy, as well as in the gamma ray spectroscopy following neutron capture, have permitted precision studies of unbound and bound nuclear levels and related phenomena. By going to new energy domains, by using polarized beams and targets, through the invention of new kinds of detectors, and through the general improvement in beam quantity and quality, new features of nuclear structure and reactions have been obtained that are not ony interesting per se but are also grist for old and new theory mills. The above technical advances have opened up new opportunities for further discoveries.

  12. Imprinted spiral structures as neutron polarizers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohstroh, W.

    1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron diffraction from magnetic spiral structures is governed by strong selection rules for the polarization of the outgoing beam. When the sample is entirely of one chirality--for instance a right handed spiral--the neutrons diffracted by some Bragg reflections are fully polarized. While the scattering theory has been formulated long ago, attempts to controllably modify the population of left handed and right handed spiral domains in natural magnetic structures (which for instance occur in some rare earth metals) have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, we have been able to imprint helical magnetic structures in La/Fe multilayers (each layer approximately 30 {angstrom} thick) simply by rotating the growing sample in a weak external field (30e). A first estimate is given of the efficiency of these multilayers as polarizers of neutron beams.

  13. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Kang, Misun [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-Lin [ORNL; Horita, Jusuke [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  14. Neutron shell structure and deformation in neutron-drip-line nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikuko Hamamoto

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron shell-structure and the resulting possible deformation in the neighborhood of neutron-drip-line nuclei are systematically discussed, based on both bound and resonant neutron one-particle energies obtained from spherical and deformed Woods-Saxon potentials. Due to the unique behavior of weakly-bound and resonant neutron one-particle levels with smaller orbital angular-momenta $\\ell$, a systematic change of the shell structure and thereby the change of neutron magic-numbers are pointed out, compared with those of stable nuclei expected from the conventional j-j shell-model. For spherical shape with the operator of the spin-orbit potential conventionally used, the $\\ell_{j}$ levels belonging to a given oscillator major shell with parallel spin- and orbital-angular-momenta tend to gather together in the energetically lower half of the major shell, while those levels with anti-parallel spin- and orbital-angular-momenta gather in the upper half. The tendency leads to a unique shell structure and possible deformation when neutrons start to occupy the orbits in the lower half of the major shell. Among others, the neutron magic-number N=28 disappears and N=50 may disappear, while the magic number N=82 may presumably survive due to the large $\\ell =5$ spin-orbit splitting for the $1h_{11/2}$ orbit. On the other hand, an appreciable amount of energy gap may appear at N=16 and 40 for spherical shape, while neutron-drip-line nuclei in the region of neutron number above N=20, 40 and 82, namely N $\\approx$ 21-28, N $\\approx$ 41-54, and N $\\approx$ 83-90, may be quadrupole-deformed though the possible deformation depends also on the proton number of respective nuclei.

  15. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Coates, Leighton [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Kidder, Michelle [ORNL

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  16. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.H. (ed.); Selby, D.L.; Harrington.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses project management, research and development, design, and safety at the Advanced Neutron Source facility.

  17. Spallation-Driven Cold Neutron Sources Dr. Bradley J. Micklich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrons were produced by spallation/fission by 450MeV protons striking depleted uranium target Proton

  18. Rapid Cooling of the Neutron Star in Cassiopeia A Triggered by Neutron Superfluidity in Dense Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dany Page; Madappa Prakash; James M. Lattimer; Andrew W. Steiner

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that the observed cooling of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A is due to enhanced neutrino emission from the recent onset of the breaking and formation of neutron Cooper pairs in the 3P2 channel. We find that the critical temperature for this superfluid transition is ~0.5x10^9 K. The observed rapidity of the cooling implies that protons were already in a superconducting state with a larger critical temperature. Our prediction that this cooling will continue for several decades at the present rate can be tested by continuous monitoring of this neutron star.

  19. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arimoto, Y; Igarashi, Y; Iwashita, Y; Ino, T; Katayama, R; Kitahara, R; Kitaguchi, M; Matsumura, H; Mishima, K; Oide, H; Otono, H; Sakakibara, R; Shima, T; Shimizu, H M; Sugino, T; Sumi, N; Sumino, H; Taketani, K; Tanaka, G; Tanaka, M; Tauchi, K; Toyoda, A; Yamada, T; Yamashita, S; Yokoyama, H; Yoshioka, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  20. Computing the moments of the neutron population using deterministic neutron transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fichtl, E. D.; Baker, R. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Computational Physics and Methods, CCS-2, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM, 87544 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to treat the inherent stochasticity of the fission process in systems where the behavior of the system is stochastic. This occurs when there are few neutrons in the system, or when the neutron source is weak. In order to characterize such systems, the capability to compute the first four moments of the neutron population distribution has been added to the deterministic neutral particle transport code, PARTISN. The moments are then fitted to probability density functions from the Pearson family. PARTISN is compared against MCNP6, with which it agrees well. (authors)

  1. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Arimoto; N. Higashi; Y. Igarashi; Y. Iwashita; T. Ino; R. Katayama; R. Kitahara; M. Kitaguchi; H. Matsumura; K. Mishima; H. Oide; H. Otono; R. Sakakibara; T. Shima; H. M. Shimizu; T. Sugino; N. Sumi; H. Sumino; K. Taketani; G. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; K. Tauchi; A. Toyoda; T. Yamada; S. Yamashita; H. Yokoyama; T. Yoshioka

    2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  2. Neutron absorbers and methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guillen, Donna P; Porter, Douglas L; Swank, W David; Erickson, Arnold W

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber include combining a first material and a second material to form a compound, reducing the compound into a plurality of particles, mixing the plurality of particles with a third material, and pressing the mixture of the plurality of particles and the third material. One or more components of neutron absorbers may be formed by such methods. Neutron absorbers may include a composite material including an intermetallic compound comprising hafnium aluminide and a matrix material comprising pure aluminum.

  3. Recent advances in neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction to cancer radiotherapy (Neutron Capture therapy, or NCT) has intrigued investigators since the discovery of the neutron. This paper briefly summarizes data describing recently developed boronated compounds with evident tumor specificity and extended biological half-lives. The implication of these compounds to NCT is evaluated in terms of Therapeutic Gain (TG). The optimization of NCT using band-pass filtered beams is described, again in terms of TG, and irradiation times with these less intense beams are estimated. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Neutron scattering measurements at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Olsson; J. Blomgren; E. Ramstrom

    The study of elastic neutron scattering at intermediate energies is essential for the understanding of the isovector term in the nucleon-nucleus interaction, as well as for the development of macroscopic and microscopic optical potentials at these energies. The techniques used for neutron scattering measurements is presented in this paper, as well as the di culties encountered. The few facilities that have been used are reviewed, and a newly installed setup for such measurements in Uppsala is described. Finally, the normalization problem is speci cally addressed. 1

  5. Prompt Neutron Lifetime for the NBSR Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2012-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the proposed conversion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, certain point kinetics parameters must be calculated. We report here values of the prompt neutron lifetime that have been calculated using three independent methods. All three sets of calculations demonstrate that the prompt neutron lifetime is shorter for the LEU fuel when compared to the HEU fuel and longer for the equilibrium end-of-cycle (EOC) condition when compared to the equilibrium startup (SU) condition for both the HEU and LEU fuels.

  6. Method for manufacture of neutron absorbing articles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, D.

    1980-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-step curing method for the manufacture of a neutron absorbing article which comprises irreversibly curing, in desired article form, a form-retaining mixture of boron carbide particles, curable phenolic resin in solid state and in particula te form and a minor proportion of a liquid medium, which boils at a temperature below 200*c., at an elevated temperature so as to obtain bonding of the irreversibly cured phenolic polymer resulting to the boron carbide particles and production of the neutron absorbing article in desired form.

  7. Neutron single target spin asymmetries in SIDIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evaristo Cisbani

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experiment E06-010 in Hall A at Jefferson Lab took data between November 2008 and February 2009 to directly measure, for the first time, the pion (and kaon) single "neutron" target-spin asymmetry (SSA) in semi-inclusive DIS from a polarized 3He target. Collins, Sivers (and Pretzelosity) neutron asymmetries are going to be extracted from the measured SSA. Details of the experiment are described together with the preliminary results of the ongoing analysis. Near future Hall A experiments on transverse nucleon spin structure are shorty reviewed.

  8. Neutron activation analysis applied to perspiration electrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAndrew, Robert Gavin

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In the choice of the polyethylene sheeting used, nine commercial polyethylene sheets or bags were analyzed for their sodium content by neutron activation analysis. A small sax:. .pie of each material was weighed and then irradiated in the reactor for one... 3. 46 3. 76 4. 2 1. 15 1. 16 . 59 1. 19 1. 82 1. 89 1. 50 . 54 1. 88 . 74 1. 20 1. 29 43 which were irradiated unshielded by cadmium in the center tube of the reactor where the fast neutron flux was much greater than at the reactor...

  9. Total Cross Sections for Neutron Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Chinn; Ch. Elster; R. M. Thaler; S. P. Weppner

    1994-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of neutron total cross-sections are both extensive and extremely accurate. Although they place a strong constraint on theoretically constructed models, there are relatively few comparisons of predictions with experiment. The total cross-sections for neutron scattering from $^{16}$O and $^{40}$Ca are calculated as a function of energy from $50-700$~MeV laboratory energy with a microscopic first order optical potential derived within the framework of the Watson expansion. Although these results are already in qualitative agreement with the data, the inclusion of medium corrections to the propagator is essential to correctly predict the energy dependence given by the experiment.

  10. Neutron Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin; Schillinger, Burkhard [FRM-II, Technische Universitaet Munchen; Schulz, Michael [FRM-II, Technische Universitaet Munchen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents nondestructive neutron computed tomography (nCT) measurements of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) as a method to measure ash and soot loading in the filters. Uncatalyzed and unwashcoated 200cpsi cordierite DPFs exposed to 100% biodiesel (B100) exhaust and conventional ultra low sulfur 2007 certification diesel (ULSD) exhaust at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP) are compared to a brand new (never exposed) filter. Precise structural information about the substrate as well as an attempt to quantify soot and ash loading in the channel of the DPF illustrates the potential strength of the neutron imaging technique.

  11. Singular perturbation applications in neutron transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Losey, D.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Lee, J.C. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a paper on singular perturbation applications in neutron transport for submission at the next ANS conference. A singular perturbation technique was developed for neutron transport analysis by postulating expansion in terms of a small ordering parameter {eta}. Our perturbation analysis is carried, without approximation, through {Omicron}({eta}{sup 2}) to derive a material interface correction for diffusion theory. Here we present results from an analytical application of the perturbation technique to a fixed source problem and then describe and implementation of the technique in a computational scheme.

  12. Neutron Captures in the r-Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Rauscher

    2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The r-process involves neutron-rich nuclei far off stability for which no experimental cross sections are known. Therefore, one has to rely on theory. The difficulties in the predictions are briefly addressed. To investigate the impact of altered rates, a comparison of r-process production in hot bubble models with largely varied rates is shown. Due to the (n,gamma)-(gamma,n) equilibrium established at the onset of the r-process, only late-time neutron captures are important which mainly modify the abundances around the third r-process peak.

  13. Polarized Neutron Reflectometry of Nickel Corrosion Inhibitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Mary. H.; Welbourn, Rebecca J. L.; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Gutfreund, Philipp; Clarke, Stuart M.

    2015-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    and cosurfactant on the protecting corrosion for nickel. Acta. Phys-Chim. Sin. 2000, 16, 899–905. (22) Vezvaie, M.; Noel, J. J.; Tun, Z.; Shoesmith, D. W. Hydrogen absorption into titanium under cathodic polarisation: an in-situ neutron reflometry and EIS study... , 378 (1), 152–158. (42) Wang, X.; Lee, S. Y.; Miller, K.; Stocker, I.; Clarke, S.; Casford, M.; Gutfreund, P.; Skoda, M. W. A. Cation bridging studied by specular neutron reflection. Langmuir 2013, 29, 5520–5527. (43) Aquino, L. I. A. J. A.; Tunega...

  14. Neutron scattering and extra short range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.

  15. Neutrons used to study model vascular systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3,NeutronNeutrons provide newATHENA

  16. Neutrons used to study model vascular systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3,NeutronNeutrons provide

  17. Chiral Limit of Nucleon Lattice Electromagnetic Form Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, W; Liu Ke Feng; Wilcox, Walter; Draper, Terrence; Liu, Keh-Fei

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate electric and magnetic form factors of protons and neutrons in quenched Monte Carlo lattice QCD on a $16^3\\times 24$ lattice at $\\beta = 6.0$ using Wilson fermions. We employ a method which characterizes one of the nucleon fields as a fixed zero-momentum secondary source. Extrapolating the overall data set to the chiral limit, we find acceptable fits for either dipole or monopole forms and extract proton and neutron magnetic moments, the magnitude of which are $10$ to $15\\%$ low compared to experiment. In the extrapolation of the dipole fit of the form factors, we find that the dipole to nucleon mass ratio is about $7\\%$ low compared to experiment. In addition, we obtain positive values of the neutron electric form factor, which, however, are poorly represented by a popular phenomenological form at intermediate to small $\\kappa$ values. A zero-momentum technique for extracting hadron magnetic moments is briefly discussed and shown to yield unrealistically small magnetic moment values.

  18. Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids Tonya L. Kuhla)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhl, Tonya L.

    Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE-12, MS H805, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE-12, MS H805, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 William Hamilton Neutron Scattering Section, Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National

  19. Secondary neutrons in clinical proton radiotherapy: A charged issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    -body neutron dose, due to interactions of the protons with the scattering and collimating beam elements radiotherapy; Secondary neutrons; Second cancers; Passive scattering The development of hospital-based proton on establishing the neutron doses involved [7­20], there is still no agree- ment about whether these scattered

  20. Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography of Stable Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the development of a new molecular imaging technique using inelastic scattering of fast neutrons. Earlier studies characteristic gamma photons through inelastic scattering of an external neutron beam. These stable isotopes canNeutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography of Stable Isotopes Carey E. Floyd Jr.*ab , Calvin

  1. High efficiency proportional neutron detector with solid liner internal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kisner, Roger Allen; Holcomb, David Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A tube-style neutron detector, a panel-style neutron detector incorporating a plurality of tube-style neutron detectors, and a panel-style neutron detector including a plurality of anode wires are provided. A plurality of channels is provided in a neutron detector such that each channel has an inner surface of a coating layer including a neutron-absorbing material. A wire anode is provided at end of each channel so that electrons generated by a charged daughter particle generated by a neutron are collected to detect a neutron-matter interaction. Moderator units can be incorporated into a neutron detector to provide improved detection efficiencies and/or to determine neutron energy spectrum. Gas-based proportional response from the neutron detectors can be employed for special nuclear material (SNM) detection. This neutron detector can provide similar performance to .sup.3He-based detectors without requiring .sup.3He and without containing toxic, flammable, or high-pressure materials.

  2. Transition density and pressure in hot neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in neutrino-trapped neutron stars than in neutrino-free neutron stars. Furthermore, both are found to decrease with increasing temperature of a neutron star as well as increasing slope parameter of the nuclear symmetry energy, except that the transition...

  3. Calibration Issues of the TFTR Multichannel Neutron Collimator.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Calibration Issues of the TFTR Multichannel Neutron Collimator. S. von Goeler, L. C. Johnson 08540. Abstract: The calibration procedures for the detectors in the Neutron Collimator are reviewed. The absolute calibration was performed for the NE451 detectors, in situ, by moving a DT neutron generator

  4. Calibration Issues of the TFTR Multichannel Neutron Collimator.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ 1 ­ Calibration Issues of the TFTR Multichannel Neutron Collimator. S. von Goeler, L. C. Johnson 08540. Abstract: The calibration procedures for the detectors in the Neutron Collimator are reviewed. The absolute calibration was performed for the NE451 detectors, in situ, by moving a DT neutron generator

  5. A neutron diffraction study of nano-crystalline graphite oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and regions containing oxidized chain-like structures. The neutron scattering pair distribution function is heterogeneous, the total neutron scattering data presented in this paper gives a statistically averagedA neutron diffraction study of nano-crystalline graphite oxide J.A. Johnsona,b,*, C.J. Benmoreb , S

  6. Disorder resistivity of solid neutron-star matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Jones

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lower limits are found for the disorder resistivity of solid neutron-star matter in the neutron-drip region which is amorphous and heterogeneous in nuclear charge. This temperature-independent resistivity, large compared with that produced by phonon scattering, has direct consequences for theories of neutron-star magnetic field generation and evolution.

  7. Neutron Scattering Society of America Purpose and New Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    1 Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA) Purpose and New Initiatives www.neutronscattering.org SNS/ANL School on Neutron and X-Ray Scattering June 2010 Visit us now on Facebook #12;2 What and provide a focal point for the neutron scattering community in the USA To identify the needs

  8. Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 12 - 25, 2012 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  9. Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothroyd, Andrew

    Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites Graeme Eoin Johnstone A Thesis submitted are performed using a variety of neutron scattering and x-ray scattering techniques. The electronic ground for analysing the results of the polarised neutron scattering experiment. There are a large number of people who

  10. Nitrogen Contamination in Elastic Neutron Scattering Songxue Chi,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynn, Jeffrey W.

    Nitrogen Contamination in Elastic Neutron Scattering Songxue Chi,ab Jeffrey W. Lynn,a* Ying Chen a neutron scattering measurement is a contribution to the background, especially in inelastic measurements of having N2 in the sample environment system during elastic neutron scattering measurements on a single

  11. Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering September 24 - October 11, 2008 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  12. Neutron Scattering Society of America Purpose and New Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA) Purpose and New Initiatives www.neutronscattering.org SNS/ANL School on Neutron and X-Ray Scattering June 2011 Visit us now on Facebook #12;2 What and provide a focal point for the neutron scattering community in the USA To identify the needs

  13. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    15th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10 - 24, 2013 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  14. TUTORIAL / ARTICLE DIDACTIQUE Neutron scattering study of the classical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Dominic

    TUTORIAL / ARTICLE DIDACTIQUE Neutron scattering study of the classical antiferromagnet MnF2: a perfect hands-on neutron scattering teaching course1 Z. Yamani, Z. Tun, and D.H. Ryan Abstract: We present of neutron scattering concepts. The nature of antiferromagnetism and the magnetic Hamiltonian in this classi

  15. SANS -Small Angle Neutron Scattering Tcnica de difrao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    SANS - Small Angle Neutron Scattering Técnica de difração informações sobre tamanho e forma de- Neutrons are created in the centre of the target station when the beam of high energy protons collides by evaporating nuclear particles, mainly neutrons, in all directions. Each proton produces approximately 15

  16. Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 11 ­ June 25, 2011 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  17. LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering: Materials at the Mesoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 11th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering: Materials at the Mesoscale Lujan Center Los Alamos. Please name the applicant for admission to the 11th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering: Last, First LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering including: drive and motivation, ability to work with others

  18. The Neutron Scattering Society www.neutronscattering.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    The Neutron Scattering Society of America www.neutronscattering.org Press Release February 11, 2008 The Neutron Scattering Society of America is pleased to announce the election as Fellows of the Society of in application of neutron scattering to studies of surfaces and crystal field excitations as well as his

  19. Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 14-28, 2014 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Suzanne G.E. te Velthuis, Esen Ercan Alp

  20. Neutron scattering in magnetic fields (*) W. C. Koehler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    691 Neutron scattering in magnetic fields (*) W. C. Koehler Solid State Division, Oak Ridge. Abstract 2014 The use of magnetic fields in neutron scattering experimentation is reviewed briefly. Two of the scattering sample ; in the second the field acts on the neutron itself. Several examples are discussed

  1. Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 12 ­ June 26, 2010 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  2. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering May 30 ­ June 13, 2009 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  3. Neutron scattering at high pressure D. B. McWhan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    715 Neutron scattering at high pressure D. B. McWhan Room 1D-234, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974, U scattering at steady-state and pulsed sources are reviewed. The pressure cells available at most neutron 10 GPa have been made. For elastic scattering, a comparison is made between neutron scattering and X

  4. A Java-based Science Portal for Neutron Scattering Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan

    A Java-based Science Portal for Neutron Scattering Experiments Sudharshan S. Vazhkudai James A scattering facility recently commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The neutron beam produced (SNS) [14] is a large-scale leading- edge neutron scattering facility that hopes to fundamen- tally

  5. ORNL Neutron Scattering School May 30 -June 5, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ORNL Neutron Scattering School May 30 - June 5, 2009 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, 2009, for the first week of the Neutron Xray Scattering School. Please be certain to bring photo for Neutron Scattering Users · Radiological Worker Training for HFIR and SNS Users In addition

  6. Possible Constraints on Neutron Electric Dipole Moment from Pulsar Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Even if only a small fraction of neutron dipole moments are aligned in a neutron star, observed pulsar radiation loses provide a stringent limit on the neutron electric dipole moment of <10-29 ecm, more stringent than best current experimental limits.

  7. Theory of Neutron Noise in a Temporally Fluctuating Multiplying Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    Theory of Neutron Noise in a Temporally Fluctuating Multiplying Medium Lénárd Pál KFKI Atomic, respec- tively. In this paper we develop a theory of neutron fluctuations in a medium randomly varying place in a time-varying environment. I. INTRODUCTION The theory of neutron fluctuations in multiplying

  8. Flavor decomposition of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors at low $Q^2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qattan, I A; Alsaad, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial distribution of charge and magnetization within the proton is encoded in the elastic form factors. These have been precisely measured in elastic electron scattering, and the combination of proton and neutron form factors allows for the separation of the up- and down-quark contributions. In this work, we extract the proton and neutron form factors from world's data with an emphasis on precise new data covering the low-momentum region, which is sensitive to the large-scale structure of the nucleon. From these, we separate the up- and down-quark contributions to the proton form factors. We combine cross section and polarization measurements of elastic electron-proton scattering to separate the proton form factors and two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions. We combine the proton form factors with parameterization of the neutron form factor data and uncertainties to separate the up- and down-quark contributions to the proton's charge and magnetic form factors. The extracted TPE corrections are compare...

  9. Experimental results of neutron fluence outside an iron shield in the forward direction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, M.M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Elwyn, A.J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Fein, D.; James, E.; Johns, K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Davis, W. [Ball State Univ., Muncie, IN (United States); Ciampa, D.P. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Mierkiewicz, E. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of both lateral shielding measurements and Monte Carlo calculations for beam stop geometry for incident hadrons at energies between 10 GeV and 10 TeV suggests that the dose equivalent can be represented by the expression H = H{sub 0}(E)e{sup -r/{lambda}}/r{sup 2} where H, is the source term, r is the radial distance to the point of interest in the shield, and {lambda} is the effective interaction length, or absorption mean free path. However, unlike the lateral shielding case, there is no similarly simple analytical expression that can be used to describe the on-axis longitudinal cascade development. In this study the results from the measurement in the forward direction of neutron fluence spectra (and the derived quantity dose equivalent) for 25 to 150 GeV pions incident on an iron beam stop as a function of thickness of iron are presented. The observed dependence of both fluence and dose equivalent on shield thickness and hadron energy was then quantified in terms of an expression in which a build up factor as well as an attenuation term was included. On the basis of this analysis the conversion factor from fluence to dose equivalent was also determined for these forward going neutrons. This work represents the first systematic study at an high energy accelerator of the depth dependence of neutron fluence in longitudinal shielding.

  10. New application of the superthermal Ultra-Cold Neutron source. The search for the neutron electric dipole moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    L-321 New application of the superthermal Ultra-Cold Neutron source. I 2014 The search causes. Abstract. 2014 A superthermal Ultra-Cold Neutron source containing a dilute solution of polarized~'ments [1-3] have confirmed the principles of the superthermal source of Ultra- Cold Neutrons j4-6] it now

  11. 8-group relative delayed neutron yields for monoenergetic neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piksaikin, V M; Kazakov, L E; Korolev, G G; Roshchenko, V A; Tertychnyj, R G

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy dependence of the relative yield of delayed neutrons in an 8-group model representation was obtained for monoenergetic neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu. A comparison of this data with the available experimental data by other was made in terms of the mean half-life of the delayed neutron precursors.

  12. Experimental neutronics tests for a neutron activation system for the European ITER TBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klix, A.; Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gehre, D. [Technical University of Dresden, IKTP, Zellescher Weg 19, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Kleizer, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany and Budapest University of Technology and Economics, M?egyetem rkp. 3-9. H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Raj, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany and Université Paris-Sud, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, F-91405 Paris (France); Rovni, I. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, M?egyetem rkp. 3-9. H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Ruecker, Tom [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany and University of Applied Sciences Zittau-Goerlitz, Theodor-Körner-Allee 16, D-02754 Zittau (Germany)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We are investigating methods for neutron flux measurement in the ITER TBM. In particular we have tested sets of activation materials leading to induced gamma activities with short half-lives of the order of tens of seconds up to minutes and standard activation materials. Packages of activation foils have been irradiated with the intense neutron generator of Technical University of Dresden in a pure DT neutron field as well as in a neutronics mock-up of the European ITER HCLL TBM. An important aim was to check whether the gamma activity induced in the activation foils in these packages could be measured simultaneously. It was indeed possible to identify gamma lines of interest in gamma-ray measurements immediately after extraction from the irradiation.

  13. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosko, Andrey

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    among nuclear pharmacies and clinics in many countries; it is compact and reliable; it produces protons with energies high enough to produce neutrons with appropriate energy and fluence rate for BNCT and it does not require significant changes in design...

  14. A High Count Rate Neutron Beam Monitor for Neutron Scattering Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Amanda [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Diawara, Yacouba [ORNL; Hayward, J P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hayward, Jason P [ORNL; Menhard, Kocsis [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Sedov, Vladislav N [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Beam monitors are an important diagnostic tool in neutron science facilities. Present beam monitors use either ionization chambers in integration mode, which are slow and have no timing information, or pulse counters which can easily be saturated by high beam intensities. At high flux neutron scattering facilities, neutron beam monitors with very low intrinsic efficiency (10-5) are presently selected to keep the counting rate within a feasible range, even when a higher efficiency would improve the counting statistics and yield a better measurement of the incident beam. In this work, we report on a high count rate neutron beam monitor. This beam monitor offers good timing with an intrinsic efficiency of 10-3 and a counting rate capability of over 1,000,000 cps without saturation.

  15. A note on the ultracold neutrons production by neutron deceleration on clusters in liquid helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Pokotilovski

    2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of slow neutrons deceleration through their interaction with nanoclusters in liquid helium is performed. It is shown that process is strongly suppresed if the clusters are bound by the van der Waals interaction.

  16. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert; Kovash, Michael; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems both with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).

  17. Proposal for a 30-T Pulsed Magnet Suitable for Neutron Scattering Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson Eyssa Schneider-Muntau; R. A. Robinson (a; Y. M. Eyssa (b; H. J. Schneider-muntau (b; H. J. Boenig (a

    this paper, we describe a conceptual design for a 30-T pulsed magnet that could be used in conjunction with neutron-scattering apparatus, along with the scientific opportunities that such a magnet might open up. Neutron diffraction has long been the technique of choice for determining the arrangements (magnetic structures) of magnetic moments in solids, the spatial extent of the magnetic electrons around their parent ions (form factors) and the full moment-density distribution function in real space. The proposed 30-T magnet would enable one to study such spatial aspects of many field-induced phase transitions for the first time, whether they are driven by competing exchange interactions, single-ion anisotropy, or a more radical change, say from an itinerant to a localised state. Inelastic Neutron Scattering, on the other hand, is the best general-purpose tool for the study of magnetic excitations like spin waves, crystal-field levels and spin fluctuations. These excitations manifest themselves in the imaginary part of the generalised magnetic susceptibility c"(Q,w), which is measured directly in a neutron scattering experiment. A field of 30T acting on a moment of 1 B corresponds to an energy of 1.7 meV, and we should be able to generate splittings or close gaps of this order. The present generation of spectrometers at spallation neutron sources have both sufficient resolution (as good as 10 eV) and sufficient dynamic range (up to 2 eV) to cover the effects that might be induced by such a field.

  18. A solenoidal electron spectrometer for a precision measurement of the neutron $?$-asymmetry with ultracold neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Plaster; R. Carr; B. W. Filippone; D. Harrison; J. Hsiao; T. M. Ito; J. Liu; J. W. Martin; B. Tipton; J. Yuan

    2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an electron spectrometer designed for a precision measurement of the neutron $\\beta$-asymmetry with spin-polarized ultracold neutrons. The spectrometer consists of a 1.0-Tesla solenoidal field with two identical multiwire proportional chamber and plastic scintillator electron detector packages situated within 0.6-Tesla field-expansion regions. Select results from performance studies of the spectrometer with calibration sources are reported.

  19. Neutron occupancy of the 0d5/2 orbital and the N=16 shell closure in 24O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Tshoo; Y. Satou; C. A. Bertulani; H. Bhang; S. Choi; T. Nakamura; Y. Kondo; S. Deguchi; Y. Kawada; Y. Nakayama; K. N. Tanaka; N. Tanaka; Y. Togano; N. Kobayashi; N. Aoi; M. Ishihara; T. Motobayashi; H. Otsu; H. Sakurai; S. Takeuchi; K. Yoneda; F. Delaunay; J. Gibelin; F. M. Marqués; N. A. Orr; T. Honda; T. Kobayashi; T. Sumikama; Y. Miyashita; K. Yoshinaga; M. Matsushita; S. Shimoura; D. Sohler; J. W. Hwang; T. Zheng; Z. H. Li; Z. X. Cao

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One-neutron knockout from 24O leading to the first excited state in 23O has been measured for a proton target at a beam energy of 62 MeV/nucleon. The decay energy spectrum of the neutron unbound state of 23O was reconstructed from the measured four momenta of the 22O fragment and emitted neutron. A sharp peak was found at Edecay=50$\\pm$3 keV, corresponding to an excited state in 23O at 2.78$\\pm$0.11 MeV, as observed in previous measurements. The longitudinal momentum distribution for this state was consistent with d -wave neutron knockout, providing support for a J{\\pi} assignment of 5/2+. The associated spectroscopic factor was deduced to be C2S(0d5/2)=4.1$\\pm$0.4 by comparing the measured cross section (View the MathML source) with a distorted wave impulse approximation calculation. Such a large occupancy for the neutron 0d5/2 orbital is in line with the N=16 shell closure in 24O.

  20. Gamma neutron assay method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, J.D.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Greenwood, R.C.

    1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma neutron assay technique is an alternative method to standard safeguards techniques for the identification and assaying of special nuclear materials in a field or laboratory environment, as a tool for dismantlement and destruction of nuclear weapons, and to determine the isotopic ratios for a blend-down program on uranium. It is capable of determining the isotopic ratios of fissionable material from the spontaneous or induced fission of a sample to within approximately 0.5%. This is based upon the prompt coincidence relationships that occur in the fission process and the proton conservation and quasi-conservation of nuclear mass (A) that exists between the two fission fragments. The system is used in both passive (without an external neutron source) and active (with an external neutron source) mode. The apparatus consists of an array of neutron and gamma-ray detectors electronically connected to determine coincident events. The method can also be used to assay radioactive waste which contains fissile material, even in the presence of a high background radiation field. 7 figures.