National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for factor inputs mining

  1. Abandoned Uranium Mines Report to Congress: LM Wants Your Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is seeking stakeholder input on an abandoned uranium mines report to Congress.

  2. Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wastes Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine Wastes Christopher S. Kim,1 James J. Rytuba,2 Gordon E. Brown, Jr.3 1Department of Physical Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 2U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Introduction Figure 1. Dr. Christopher Kim collects a mine waste sample from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. The

  3. Mining

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supply and cost management–including energy costs–pose key challenges for U.S. mining companies. The industry has worked with AMO to develop a range of resources for increasing energy efficiency and reducing costs.

  4. Refiner Crude Oil Inputs

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series: Refiner Crude Oil Inputs Refiner Gross Inputs Refiner Operable Capacity ... Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, ...

  5. Longwall mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-14

    As part of EIA`s program to provide information on coal, this report, Longwall-Mining, describes longwall mining and compares it with other underground mining methods. Using data from EIA and private sector surveys, the report describes major changes in the geologic, technological, and operating characteristics of longwall mining over the past decade. Most important, the report shows how these changes led to dramatic improvements in longwall mining productivity. For readers interested in the history of longwall mining and greater detail on recent developments affecting longwall mining, the report includes a bibliography.

  6. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  7. African mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference addressing the development of the minerals industry in Africa. Topics covered include: A review - past, present and future - of Zimbabwe's mining industry; Geomorphological processes and related mineralization in Tanzania; and Rock mechanics investigations at Mufulira mine, Zambia.

  8. Program of mining research, 1998--1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    The paper contains: Reflections on 1998; Project summaries; Noise; Injury prevention, ergonomics, and human factors; Surface, sand and gravel, and stone mines; Hazard detection and warning devices; Ground control -- metal/nonmetal mines; Ground control -- coal mines; Explosion and fire detection and suppression; Methane detection; Electrical hazards; Emerging technologies; Surveillance; Construction; Training and education; and Communication activity.

  9. Measuring mine roof bolt strains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steblay, Bernard J.

    1986-01-01

    A mine roof bolt and a method of measuring the strain in mine roof bolts of this type are disclosed. According to the method, a flat portion on the head of the mine roof bolt is first machined. Next, a hole is drilled radially through the bolt at a predetermined distance from the bolt head. After installation of the mine roof bolt and loading, the strain of the mine roof bolt is measured by generating an ultrasonic pulse at the flat portion. The time of travel of the ultrasonic pulse reflected from the hole is measured. This time of travel is a function of the distance from the flat portion to the hole and increases as the bolt is loaded. Consequently, the time measurement is correlated to the strain in the bolt. Compensation for various factors affecting the travel time are also provided.

  10. Prioritization Tool Measurement Input Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BTO encourages stakeholders to recommend updates and improvements to the Prioritization Tool by using the below Measure Input Form.

  11. ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap PDF icon emroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002)

  12. Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

  13. ITP Mining: Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies ITP Mining: Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies PDF icon ccroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals

  14. Exploration and Mining Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-09-01

    This Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap represents the third roadmap for the Mining Industry of the Future. It is based upon the results of the Exploration and Mining Roadmap Workshop held May 10 ñ 11, 2001.

  15. ITP Mining: The Future Begins with Mining - A Vision of the Mining Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Future | Department of Energy The Future Begins with Mining - A Vision of the Mining Industry of the Future ITP Mining: The Future Begins with Mining - A Vision of the Mining Industry of the Future PDF icon vision.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002) ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap

  16. Surface mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    This paper reports on a GAO study of attorney and expert witness fees awarded as a result of litigation brought under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. As of March 24, 1989, a total of about $1.4 million had been awarded in attorney fees and expenses - about $1.3 subject to the provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, a comparison of its features with provisions of ERISA showed that the plan differed from ERISA provisions in areas such as eligibility, funding, and contribution limits.

  17. Appendix A Scoping Input Appendix ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Species Act Correspondence with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Appendix F Section 106 ... December 13, 2013. The following input was received during the Scoping period: * U.S. Fish ...

  18. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap | Department of Energy of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap PDF icon mptroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies ITP Mining: Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry

  19. Generation Inputs Workshop June 25, 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inputs Workshop 25 June 2014 BPA's Centralized Wind Power Forecasting Initiative Scott Winner June 25, 2014 Generation Inputs Workshop Predecisional. For Discussion Purposes Only....

  20. Mining | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mining Mining Supply and cost management-including energy costs-pose key challenges for U.S. mining companies. The industry has worked with AMO to develop a range of resources for increasing energy efficiency and reducing costs. Analytical Studies & Other Publications Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints provide a mapping of energy use, energy loss, and carbon emissions for selected industry sectors. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study (2007) Documents for historical reference Water

  1. Mountaintop mining update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2006-07-15

    In a bad year for the US mining industry's safety record and public image, Morehead State University hosted a public meeting titled 'Mountaintop mining, health and safety forum'. This was a balanced event, with representatives from the mining industry as well as activists from the environmental community. A full account is given of the presentations and debate at the forum. 6 photos.

  2. Occupancy schedules learning process through a data mining framework

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    D'Oca, Simona; Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-12-17

    Building occupancy is a paramount factor in building energy simulations. Specifically, lighting, plug loads, HVAC equipment utilization, fresh air requirements and internal heat gain or loss greatly depends on the level of occupancy within a building. Developing the appropriate methodologies to describe and reproduce the intricate network responsible for human-building interactions are needed. Extrapolation of patterns from big data streams is a powerful analysis technique which will allow for a better understanding of energy usage in buildings. A three-step data mining framework is applied to discover occupancy patterns in office spaces. First, a data set of 16 offices with 10more » minute interval occupancy data, over a two year period is mined through a decision tree model which predicts the occupancy presence. Then a rule induction algorithm is used to learn a pruned set of rules on the results from the decision tree model. Finally, a cluster analysis is employed in order to obtain consistent patterns of occupancy schedules. Furthermore, the identified occupancy rules and schedules are representative as four archetypal working profiles that can be used as input to current building energy modeling programs, such as EnergyPlus or IDA-ICE, to investigate impact of occupant presence on design, operation and energy use in office buildings.« less

  3. Occupancy schedules learning process through a data mining framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Oca, Simona; Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-12-17

    Building occupancy is a paramount factor in building energy simulations. Specifically, lighting, plug loads, HVAC equipment utilization, fresh air requirements and internal heat gain or loss greatly depends on the level of occupancy within a building. Developing the appropriate methodologies to describe and reproduce the intricate network responsible for human-building interactions are needed. Extrapolation of patterns from big data streams is a powerful analysis technique which will allow for a better understanding of energy usage in buildings. A three-step data mining framework is applied to discover occupancy patterns in office spaces. First, a data set of 16 offices with 10 minute interval occupancy data, over a two year period is mined through a decision tree model which predicts the occupancy presence. Then a rule induction algorithm is used to learn a pruned set of rules on the results from the decision tree model. Finally, a cluster analysis is employed in order to obtain consistent patterns of occupancy schedules. Furthermore, the identified occupancy rules and schedules are representative as four archetypal working profiles that can be used as input to current building energy modeling programs, such as EnergyPlus or IDA-ICE, to investigate impact of occupant presence on design, operation and energy use in office buildings.

  4. DOE - Fossil Energy: Coal Mining and Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mining Fossil Energy Study Guides Coal Mining and Transportation Coal Miners - One type of mining, called "longwall mining", uses a rotating blade to shear coal away from the ...

  5. ITP Mining: Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals (December 2002) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals (December 2002) ITP Mining: Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals (December 2002) PDF icon edroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Metal Casting: A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry: 2002 and Beyond Education and Outreach Fact Sheet ITP Mining: Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies

  6. Longwall mining of thin seams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curth, E A

    1981-01-01

    Thin seam operations pose a challenge to the ingenuity of mining engineers to overcome the factor of human inconvenience in the restricted environment and associated high cost production. Surprisingly, low seam longwalls in the Federal Republic of Germany in an average thickness of 35 in. and dipping less than 18/sup 0/ come close to achieving the average production rate of all German longwall operations. They are all plow faces, and a consistent production of 3300 tons per day and a productivity of 40 tons per man shift are reported from one of the thin seam longwalls. These results were attained by reliable high-capacity equipment and roof support by shields that can be collapsed to as low as 22 inches. Maximum mining height for plow operated faces lies at 31.5 inches. Technology for mechanized mining of flat lying coalbeds less than 31.5 inches in thickness without rock cutting is not available, and firmness of coal, undulation of the strata, coalbed thickness variation, and the necessity of cutting rock, particularly through faults, set limits to plow application. The in-web shearer can be used in firm coal to a minimum mining height of 40 inches, and a daily production of 1650 to 2200 tons is reported from a longwall in the Saar district of Germany equipped with such a shearer and shields. Numerous in-web shearers are employed in the United Kingdom; reports as to their success are contradictory. Also, experience in the United States, though limited, has been negative. The steady increase in output from single drum shearer faces in Pennsylvania is a remarkable achievement, and occasional record breaking peaks in production indicate the potential of such mining. Technology development for the future is discussed.

  7. U.S. Weekly Inputs & Utilization

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series Area 031116 031816 032516 040116 040816 041516 View History Refiner Inputs and Utilization Crude Oil Inputs 15,996 15,820 16,234 16,433 15,941 16,104 ...

  8. Recommendation 177: Facilitating Early Public Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE should initiate consultation meetings with stake holders immediately to allow early public input into the planning for IFDP

  9. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap PDF icon mptroadmap.pdf More Documents & ...

  10. About the Uranium Mine Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uranium Mine Team About the Uranium Mine Team Text coming

  11. PRB mines mature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-08-15

    Already seeing the results of reclamation efforts, America's largest surface mines advance as engineers prepare for the future. 30 years after the signing of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act by Jimmy Carter, western strip mines in the USA, especially in the Powder River Basin, are producing more coal than ever. The article describes the construction and installation of a $38.5 million near-pit crusher and overland belt conveyor system at Foundation Coal West's (FCW) Belle Ayr surface mine in Wyoming, one of the earliest PRB mines. It goes on to describe the development by Rio Tinto of an elk conservatory, the Rochelle Hill Conservation Easement, on reclaimed land at Jacobs Ranch, adjacent to the Rochelle Hills. 4 photos.

  12. ,"Maine Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","0930...

  13. ,"Washington Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","09...

  14. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  15. ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Hawaii Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","0930...

  16. ,"Texas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","0930...

  17. Land reclamation beautifies coal mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coblentz, B.

    2009-07-15

    The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

  18. Mine roof support system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culley, D.H.

    1982-01-26

    A mine roof support system is disclosed having sets of laterally spaced pairs of elongated support members adapted to be moved into and out of abutting relation with a mine roof. Wheel supported frames extend between and connect adjacent end portions of each pair of support members with adjacent wheel supported frames at the ends of the support members being in spaced tandem relation and connected to each other by connector members. Extensible prop members are connected to and move the wheel supported frames and the elongated support members connected thereto selectively toward and away from the mine roof.

  19. Coal mine subsidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahall, N.J.

    1991-05-01

    This paper examines the efficacy of the Department of the Interior's Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement's (OSMRE) efforts to implement the federally assisted coal mine subsidence insurance program. Coal mine subsidence, a gradual settling of the earth's surface above an underground mine, can damage nearby land and property. To help protect property owners from subsidence-related damage, the Congress passed legislation in 1984 authorizing OSMRE to make grants of up to $3 million to each state to help the states establish self-sustaining, state-administered insurance programs. Of the 21 eligible states, six Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, West Virginia, and Wyoming applied for grants. This paper reviews the efforts of these six states to develop self-sustaining insurance programs and assessed OSMRE's oversight of those efforts.

  20. Indonesian coal mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-11-15

    The article examines the opportunities and challenges facing the Indonesian coal mining industry and how the coal producers, government and wider Indonesian society are working to overcome them. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart ...

  2. Acid mine drainage: Balancing environmental protection and mining realities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgill, B.J. Jr.; Poland, K.B.

    1995-12-31

    A major environmental concern leading to the enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) was the degradation of streams and waterways from discharges of acid mine drainage (AMD) resulting from coal mining operations. Although SMCRA and its regulatory scheme contains specific provisions addressing the drainage of acidic water from mine sites, as do various other agencies statutes and regulations, AMD from active and abandoned mines remains a major environmental problem in the Appalachian region. The formation of acidic water during coal mining operations is pervasive and some believe impossible to prevent.

  3. The Economic Impact of Coal Mining in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peach, James; Starbuck, C.

    2009-06-01

    The economic impact of coal mining in New Mexico is examined in this report. The analysis is based on economic multipliers derived from an input-output model of the New Mexico economy. The direct, indirect, and induced impacts of coal mining in New Mexico are presented in terms of output, value added, employment, and labor income for calendar year 2007. Tax, rental, and royalty income to the State of New Mexico are also presented. Historical coal production, reserves, and price data are also presented and discussed. The impacts of coal-fired electricity generation will be examined in a separate report.

  4. Wireless, relative-motion computer input device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F.; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2004-05-18

    The present invention provides a system for controlling a computer display in a workspace using an input unit/output unit. A train of EM waves are sent out to flood the workspace. EM waves are reflected from the input unit/output unit. A relative distance moved information signal is created using the EM waves that are reflected from the input unit/output unit. Algorithms are used to convert the relative distance moved information signal to a display signal. The computer display is controlled in response to the display signal.

  5. ORS 517 - Mining and Mining Claims | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Mining and Mining ClaimsLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2013 Legal Citation ORS 517 (2013) DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  6. Moving up down in the mine: Sex segregation in underground coal mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallichet, S.E.

    1991-01-01

    This study employs both individualist theories of human capital and sex-role spillover and structuralist theories from the socialist feminist perspective, emphasizing the formal and informal organizational factors operating within a patriarchal capitalist society to explain job-level sex segregation among underground coal miners. Both quantitative and qualitative data on women in coal mining are used to evaluate these theories. A logistic regression analysis performed on data obtained in 1986 by the US Bureau of Mines demonstrates that while human capital variables are predictive of a miner's job rank, variation in job rank attributed to gender is even greater. For men, training and experience in mining combine to increase the probability of being in a more skilled job in a coal mine. Age and seniority are curvilinearly related to the variation in men's job rank. For women, only age accounts for their advancement such that younger, not older women who have slightly more mining experience, occupy the more skilled positions in the work place. These findings suggest that, in terms of job advancement, men enjoy a greater return on their human capital investments than women, and that factors other than those representing a miner's human capital are affecting women's positions underground more than men's.

  7. U-139: IBM Tivoli Directory Server Input Validation Flaw

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Web Admin Tool does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input.

  8. U-147:Red Hat Enterprise MRG Grid Input Validation Flaw

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The MRG Management Console (Cumin) does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input.

  9. Influential input classification in probabilistic multimedia models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Dennis P.H.; Geng, Shu

    1999-05-01

    Monte Carlo analysis is a statistical simulation method that is often used to assess and quantify the outcome variance in complex environmental fate and effects models. Total outcome variance of these models is a function of (1) the uncertainty and/or variability associated with each model input and (2) the sensitivity of the model outcome to changes in the inputs. To propagate variance through a model using Monte Carlo techniques, each variable must be assigned a probability distribution. The validity of these distributions directly influences the accuracy and reliability of the model outcome. To efficiently allocate resources for constructing distributions one should first identify the most influential set of variables in the model. Although existing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis methods can provide a relative ranking of the importance of model inputs, they fail to identify the minimum set of stochastic inputs necessary to sufficiently characterize the outcome variance. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a novel sensitivity/uncertainty analysis method for assessing the importance of each variable in a multimedia environmental fate model. Our analyses show that for a given scenario, a relatively small number of input variables influence the central tendency of the model and an even smaller set determines the shape of the outcome distribution. For each input, the level of influence depends on the scenario under consideration. This information is useful for developing site specific models and improving our understanding of the processes that have the greatest influence on the variance in outcomes from multimedia models.

  10. Mine roof support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollmann, A.

    1982-01-05

    A mine roof support has a base, a supporting prop extending upwardly from the base, an elongated roof-supporting element having one portion supported by the supporting prop and another portion telescopable relative to the one portion toward a mine face and having a free end formed as a housing with a width corresponding to the width of the one portion, and a thrust prop arranged to support the free end section of the telescopable portion of the roof-supporting element and having a roof-side end section which is forcedly displaceable in the housing in direction of elongation of a mine and pivotable in a substantially vertical plane about an axle arranged in the housing.

  11. Review of South American mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    A general overview is presented of the mining activity and plans for South America. The countries which are presented are Columbia, Argentina, Brazil, Venezuela, Chile, Peru, and Bolivia. The products of the mines include coal, bauxite, gold, iron, uranium, copper and numerous other minor materials. A discussion of current production, support and processing facilities, and mining strategies is also given.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM FOR THE UNDERGROUND MINING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvi H. Meiksin

    2001-04-01

    Progress continued along both subsystems towards an integrated comprehensive wireless communications system for the underground mining industry. Designing an automated continuous self-tuning mechanism that optimizes signal transmission intensity for a given power input enhanced through-the-earth communications. In-mine communications was enhanced through the design of a circuit that eliminates multi-antenna interference, cleaning-up the received signal.

  13. Automation of the longwall mining system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, W.; Aster, R.; Harris, J.; High, J.

    1982-11-01

    The longwall automation study presented is the first phase of a study to evaluate mining automation opportunities. The objective was to identify cost-effective, safe, and technologically sound applications of automation technology to understand coal mining. The prime automation candidates resulting from the industry experience and survey were: (1) the shearer operation, (2) shield and conveyor pan-line advance, (3) a management information system to allow improved mine logistics support, and (4) component fault isolation and diagnostics to reduce untimely maintenance delays. A system network analysis indicated that a 40% improvement in productivity was feasible if system delays associated with all of the above four areas were removed. A technology assessment and conceptual system design of each of the four automation candidate areas showed that state-of-the-art digital computer, servomechanism, and actuator technologies could be applied to automate the longwall system. The final cost benefit analysis of all of the automation areas indicated a total net national benefit (profit) of roughly $200 million to the longwall mining industry if all automation candidates were installed. This cost benefit represented an approximate order of magnitude payback on the research and development (R and D) investment. In conclusion, it is recommended that the shearer operation be automated first because it provides a large number of other sensor inputs required for face alignment (i.e., shields and conveyor). Automation of the shield and conveyor pan-line advance is suggested as the next step since both the shearer and face alignment operations contributed the greatest time delays to the overall system downtime.

  14. Data Mining for Security Information: A Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugger, S T; Kelley, M; Sumikawa, K; Wakumoto, S

    2001-04-19

    This paper will present a survey of the current published work and products available to do off-line data mining for computer network security information. Hundreds of megabytes of data are collected every second that are of interest to computer security professionals. This data can answer questions ranging from the proactive, ''Which machines are the attackers going to try to compromise?'' to the reactive, ''When did the intruder break into my system and how?'' Unfortunately, there's so much data that computer security professionals don't have time to sort through it all. What we need are systems that perform data mining at various levels on this corpus of data in order to ease the burden of the human analyst. Such systems typically operate on log data produced by hosts, firewalls and intrusion detection systems as such data is typically in a standard, machine readable format and usually provides information that is most relevant to the security of the system. Systems that do this type of data mining for security information fall under the classification of intrusion detection systems. It is important to point out that we are not surveying real-time intrusion detection systems. Instead, we examined what is possible when the analysis is done off-line. Doing the analysis off-line allows for a larger amount of data correlation between distant sites who transfer relevant log files periodically and may be able to take greater advantage of an archive of past logs. Such a system is not a replacement for a real-time intrusion detection system but should be used in conjunction with one. In fact, as noted previously, the logs of the real-time IDS may be one of the inputs to the data mining system. We will concentrate on the application of data mining to network connection data, as opposed to system logs or the output of real-time intrusion detection systems. We do this primarily because this data is readily obtained from firewalls or real-time intrusion detectors and it looks the same regardless of the network architecture or the systems that run on the network. This similarity greatly simplifies the data cleansing step and provides a dataset with high orthogonality between multiple sites, increasing the accuracy of the data mining operations. The decision to use connection logs instead of packet logs is discussed below. This paper will survey both the research that has been done in this area to date and publicly available products that perform such tasks.

  15. Agricultural and Environmental Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Rasmuson; K. Rautenstrauch

    2004-09-14

    This analysis is one of 10 technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) (i.e., the biosphere model). It documents development of agricultural and environmental input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the repository at Yucca Mountain. The ERMYN provides the TSPA with the capability to perform dose assessments. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships between the major activities and their products (the analysis and model reports) that were planned in ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the ERMYN and its input parameters.

  16. ITP Mining: Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry ITP Mining: Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry PDF icon water_use_mining.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002) U.S. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap

  17. Development of surface mine cost estimating equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-26

    Cost estimating equations were developed to determine capital and operating costs for five surface coal mine models in Central Appalachia, Northern Appalachia, Mid-West, Far-West, and Campbell County, Wyoming. Engineering equations were used to estimate equipment costs for the stripping function and for the coal loading and hauling function for the base case mine and for several mines with different annual production levels and/or different overburden removal requirements. Deferred costs were then determined through application of the base case depreciation schedules, and direct labor costs were easily established once the equipment quantities (and, hence, manpower requirements) were determined. The data points were then fit with appropriate functional forms, and these were then multiplied by appropriate adjustment factors so that the resulting equations yielded the model mine costs for initial and deferred capital and annual operating cost. (The validity of this scaling process is based on the assumption that total initial and deferred capital costs are proportional to the initial and deferred costs for the primary equipment types that were considered and that annual operating cost is proportional to the direct labor costs that were determined based on primary equipment quantities.) Initial capital costs ranged from $3,910,470 in Central Appalachia to $49,296,785; deferred capital costs ranged from $3,220,000 in Central Appalachia to $30,735,000 in Campbell County, Wyoming; and annual operating costs ranged from $2,924,148 in Central Appalachia to $32,708,591 in Campbell County, Wyoming. (DMC)

  18. U.S. Blender Net Input

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total Input 2,166,784 2,331,109 2,399,318 2,539,812 2,824,480 2,987,634 2005-2015 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ...

  19. Illinois abandoned mined lands reclamation program: a progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmann, T.J.; Jenkusky, S.M.; Massie, S.

    1985-12-01

    The Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands Reclamation Council (AMLRC), created in 1975, is responsible for the abatement of hazardous and environmental problems associated with pre-law abandoned coal mines throughout the State. The availability of federal funds for reclamation, through passage of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), greatly expanded the program. With funds provided through early cooperative agreements and current annual grants from the federal Office of Surface Mining (OSM), the State has reclaimed, or is currently reclaiming, 182 mine sites and has assisted OSM in the abatement of 67 emergency situations. This paper reviews the progress made by the AMLRC in dealing with the State's abandoned mine problems. Specifically, the numbers and types of problem sites reclaimed annually, their costs, and reclamation methods are identified. Progress of the program relative to the entire State's abandoned mine problems is reviewed. The effects of other reclamation factors, such as natural revegetation, remaining privately-funded reclamation, and secondary carbon recovery, on the overall scope of the State's program are also examined. General comments are made concerning grant preparation, State-OSM cooperation and AML-Inventory control. Selected reclamation projects and techniques are also discussed. 11 references, 3 tables.

  20. Modeling Spatial Dependencies and Semantic Concepts in Data Mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2012-01-01

    Data mining is the process of discovering new patterns and relationships in large datasets. However, several studies have shown that general data mining techniques often fail to extract meaningful patterns and relationships from the spatial data owing to the violation of fundamental geospatial principles. In this tutorial, we introduce basic principles behind explicit modeling of spatial and semantic concepts in data mining. In particular, we focus on modeling these concepts in the widely used classification, clustering, and prediction algorithms. Classification is the process of learning a structure or model (from user given inputs) and applying the known model to the new data. Clustering is the process of discovering groups and structures in the data that are ``similar,'' without applying any known structures in the data. Prediction is the process of finding a function that models (explains) the data with least error. One common assumption among all these methods is that the data is independent and identically distributed. Such assumptions do not hold well in spatial data, where spatial dependency and spatial heterogeneity are a norm. In addition, spatial semantics are often ignored by the data mining algorithms. In this tutorial we cover recent advances in explicitly modeling of spatial dependencies and semantic concepts in data mining.

  1. PERSPECTIVES ON A DOE CONSEQUENCE INPUTS FOR ACCIDENT ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    , K; Jonathan Lowrie, J; David Thoman , D; Austin Keller , A

    2008-07-30

    Department of Energy (DOE) accident analysis for establishing the required control sets for nuclear facility safety applies a series of simplifying, reasonably conservative assumptions regarding inputs and methodologies for quantifying dose consequences. Most of the analytical practices are conservative, have a technical basis, and are based on regulatory precedent. However, others are judgmental and based on older understanding of phenomenology. The latter type of practices can be found in modeling hypothetical releases into the atmosphere and the subsequent exposure. Often the judgments applied are not based on current technical understanding but on work that has been superseded. The objective of this paper is to review the technical basis for the major inputs and assumptions in the quantification of consequence estimates supporting DOE accident analysis, and to identify those that could be reassessed in light of current understanding of atmospheric dispersion and radiological exposure. Inputs and assumptions of interest include: Meteorological data basis; Breathing rate; and Inhalation dose conversion factor. A simple dose calculation is provided to show the relative difference achieved by improving the technical bases.

  2. Mine roof support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollmann, A.

    1981-02-24

    A mine roof support has a base and a roof shield pivoted to the base and carrying at its upper end a pivoted cap which is urged upwardly against the mine roof by a hydraulic pit prop reacting between the cap and the base. The lower end of the roof shield is connected to the base by two links each having a pivot cooperating with a pivot on the roof shield, and a pivot cooperating with a pivot on the base. In addition, the base and/or the lower end of the roof shield has an auxiliary for each link and each link has an auxiliary pivot which can be connected with one of the auxiliary pivots of the base or lower end.

  3. GIS-technologies for integrated assessment of the productive mining areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamaraev, R.Y.; Oparin, V.N.; Popov, S.E.; Potapov, V.P.; Pyastunovich,O.L.

    2008-05-15

    The paper describes the bases of a new application of GIS-technologies for integrated assessment and comparison of the productive mining areas, involving a wide range of mining and technological factors, considering mineral properties, mineral occurrence conditions and geographical advantages of a mineral deposit location. The model capabilities are exemplified by a comparison of technological characteristics of coals, transportation and power supply infrastructure of the productive mining areas at the Kuznetsk Coal Basin.

  4. Germany knows mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-11-15

    Whether it is the nuance of precision or robust rock breaking strength, German suppliers have the expertise. Germany has about 120 companies in the mining equipment industry, employing some 16,000 people. The article describes some recent developments of the following companies: DBT, Liebherr, Atlas Copco, BASF, Boart Longyear, Eickhoff, IBS, Maschinenfabrik Glueckauf, Komatsu, TAKRA, Terex O & R, Thyssen Krupp Foerdertechnik and Wirtgen. 7 photos.

  5. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR A RADICALLY SMALLER, HIGHLY ADAPTIVE AND APPLICATION-FLEXIBLE MINING MACHINE FOR UTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT WORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew H. Stern

    2004-12-20

    The aim of this research project was to develop a preliminary ''conceptual design'' for a radically smaller, highly adaptive and application-flexible underground coal mining machine, for performing non-production utility work and/or also undertake limited production mining for the recovery of reserves that would otherwise be lost. Whereas historically, mining philosophies have reflected a shift to increasing larger mechanized systems [such as the continuous miner (CM)], specific mining operations that do not benefit from the economy of the large mining equipment are often ignored or addressed with significant inefficiencies. Developing this prototype concept will create a new class of equipment that can provide opportunities to re-think the very structure of the mining system across a broad range of possibilities, not able to be met by existing machinery. The approach involved pooling the collective input from mining professionals, using a structured listing of desired inputs in the form of a questionnaire, which was used to define the range of desired design specifications. From these inputs, a conceptual specification was blended, by the author, to embody the general concurrence of mission concepts for this machine.

  6. Midwest (PADD 2) Weekly Inputs & Utilization

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,290 3,276 3,258 3,350 3,411 3,475 1992-2016 Gross Inputs 3,294 3,279 3,262 3,353 3,414 3,478 1990-2016 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) 3,882 3,893 3,904 3,915 3,922 3,922 2010-2016 Percent Operable Utilization 84.9 84.3 83.6 85.7 87.0 88.7 2010-2016 Refiner and Blender Net Inputs Motor Gasoline Blending Components 416 444 485 464 486 472 2010-2016 RBOB 51 57 69 56 60 67 2010-2016 CBOB 290 327 361 373 396 348 2010-2016 GTAB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2016 All Other 75 60 55 35 30 56 2010-2016 Fuel

  7. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: • Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes • UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles • Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position,more » and point-tracking • Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO • Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object • Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.« less

  8. Minnesota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Input Supplemental ... Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Minnesota Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas ...

  9. U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks September...

  10. T-693: Symantec Endpoint Protection Manager Input Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting and Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks T-693: Symantec Endpoint Protection Manager Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site...

  11. Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case Study of Probabilist...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case Study of Probabilistic Settlement Evaluations for Soft Zone Collapse at SWPF Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case...

  12. V-150: Apache VCL Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Authenticated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Apache VCL Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-150: Apache VCL Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated...

  13. V-153: Symantec Brightmail Gateway Input Validation Flaw Permits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Symantec Brightmail Gateway Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-153: Symantec Brightmail Gateway Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting...

  14. T-701: Citrix Access Gateway Enterprise Edition Input Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Citrix Access Gateway Enterprise Edition Input Validation Flaw in Logon Portal Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-701: Citrix Access Gateway Enterprise Edition Input...

  15. Tribal Leaders Provide White House with Input on Bolstering Climate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leaders Provide White House with Input on Bolstering Climate Resilience Tribal Leaders Provide White House with Input on Bolstering Climate Resilience January 7, 2015 - 10:29am ...

  16. decreasing water input and waste generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decreasing water input and waste generation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  17. Ground control for highwall mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipf, R.K.; Mark, C.

    2007-09-15

    Perhaps the greatest risk to both equipment and personnel associated with highwall mining is from ground control. The two most significant ground control hazards are rock falls from highwall and equipment entrapment underground. In the central Appalachians, where the majority of highwall mining occurs in the USA, hillseams (or mountain cracks) are the most prominent structure that affects highwall stability. The article discusses measures to minimise the risk of failure associated with hillstreams. A 'stuck' or trapped highwall miner, and the ensuring retrieval or recovery operation, can be extremely disruptive to the highwall mining process. Most entrapment, are due to roof falls in the hole. The options for recovery are surface retrieval, surface excavation or underground recovery. Proper pillar design is essential to maintain highwall stability and prevent entrapments. NIOSH has developed the Analysis of Retreat Mining Pillar stability-Highwall Mining (ARMPS-HWM) computer program to help mine planners with this process. 10 figs.

  18. 1984 Virginia coal mine directory: producers of 100,000 tons or more

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbard, W.R. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this directory is to identify major Virginia coal sources for the use of prospective buyers and other interested parties. It is divided into lists: (1) 1984 Virginia coal production, (2) eighty-five largest companies identified by MSHA, (3) alphabetical listing of Virginia coal mines, (4) alphabetical listing of coal mines by county, and (5) coal mines rated by production figures. The rating order for the last list includes factors affecting productivity such as type of mine, number of injuries, seam thickness, total production, and average employment.

  19. LLNL Input to SNL L2 MS: Report on the Basis for Selection of Disposal Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Halsey, W G

    2011-03-02

    This mid-year deliverable has two parts. The first part is a synopsis of J. Blink's interview of the former Nevada Attorney General, Frankie Sue Del Papa, which was done in preparation for the May 18-19, 2010 Legal and Regulatory Framework Workshop held in Albuquerque. The second part is a series of sections written as input for the SNL L2 Milestone M21UF033701, due March 31, 2011. Disposal of high-level radioactive waste is categorized in this review into several categories. Section II discusses alternatives to geologic disposal: space, ice-sheets, and an engineered mountain or mausoleum. Section III discusses alternative locations for mined geologic disposal: islands, coastlines, mid-continent, and saturated versus unsaturated zone. Section IV discusses geologic disposal alternatives other than emplacement in a mine: well injection, rock melt, sub-seabed, and deep boreholes in igneous or metamorphic basement rock. Finally, Secton V discusses alternative media for mined geologic disposal: basalt, tuff, granite and other igneous/metamorphic rock, alluvium, sandstone, carbonates and chalk, shale and clay, and salt.

  20. Imaging Ahead of Mining | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Imaging Ahead of Mining Imaging Ahead of Mining Radio-Imaging Method (RIM(tm)) Improves Mine Planning and Products Coal mining is becoming more difficult as machines must extract the coal from deeper, thinner, and more geologically complex coal beds. This type of mining also includes the need to reduce risk and costs. To address these mining issues, Stolar Horizon, with support from AMO, redesigned and improved a technology developed twenty years ago. The Radio-Imaging Method (RIM) uses wireless

  1. Hydraulic mining method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huffman, Lester H.; Knoke, Gerald S.

    1985-08-20

    A method of hydraulically mining an underground pitched mineral vein comprising drilling a vertical borehole through the earth's lithosphere into the vein and drilling a slant borehole along the footwall of the vein to intersect the vertical borehole. Material is removed from the mineral vein by directing a high pressure water jet thereagainst. The resulting slurry of mineral fragments and water flows along the slant borehole into the lower end of the vertical borehole from where it is pumped upwardly through the vertical borehole to the surface.

  2. Enterprise Assessments Review of Mine Safety, Stabilization,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mine Safety, Stabilization, and Habitability at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - October 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of Mine Safety, Stabilization, and Habitability at the...

  3. Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-12-01

    This document represents the roadmap for education in the U.S. mining industry. It was developed based on the results of an Education Roadmap Workshop sponsored by the National Mining Association in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies. The Workshop was held February 23, 2002 in Phoenix, Arizona.

  4. Proceedings, 26th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.; Mark, C.; Finfinger, G.

    2007-07-01

    Papers are presented under the following topic headings: multiple-seam mining, surface subsidence, coal pillar, bunker and roadway/entry supports, mine design and highwall mining, longwall, roof bolting, stone and hardrock mining, rock mechanics and mine seal.

  5. PADD 3 Weekly Inputs & Utilization

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8,932 8,698 8,654 8,467 8,531 8,502 1992-2016 Gross Inputs 8,973 8,796 8,658 8,607 8,811 8,490 1990-2016 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) 9,437 9,437 9,437 9,512 9,512 9,512 2010-2016 Percent Operable Utilization 95.1 93.2 91.7 90.5 92.6 89.3 2010-2016 Refiner and Blender Net Inputs Motor Gasoline Blending Components -2,198 -2,086 -2,262 -2,381 -2,286 -2,129 2004-2016 RBOB -454 -429 -442 -405 -342 -355 2010-2016 CBOB -1,777 -1,684 -1,862 -1,882 -1,896 -1,869 2004-2016 GTAB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004-2016

  6. Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Linear Systems Extreme Inputs/Outputs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smallwood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the autospectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the autospectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input autospectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one willmore » result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.« less

  7. Heat transfer analysis in Stirling engine heat input system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, W.; Kim, S.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major factor in commercialization of Stirling engine is mass productivity, and the heat input system including tubular heater is one of the obstacles to mass production because of its complexity in shape and difficulty in manufacturing, which resulted from using oxidation-resistant, low-creep alloys which are not easy to machine and weld. Therefore a heater heat exchanger which is very simple in shape and easy to make has been devised, and a burner system appropriate to this heater also has been developed. In this paper specially devised heat input system which includes a heater shell shaped like U-cup and a flame tube located in the heater shell is analyzed in point of heat transfer processes to find optimum heat transfer. To enhance the heat transfer from the flame tube to the heater shell wall, it is required that the flame tube diameter be enlarged as close to the heater shell diameter as possible, and the flame tube temperature be raised as high as possible. But the enlargement of the flame tube diameter should be restricted by the state of combustion affected by hydraulic resistance of combustion gas, and the boost of the flame tube temperature should be considered carefully in the aspects of the flame tube`s service life.

  8. U.S. Blender Net Input

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History Total Input 248,620 258,292 242,060 252,467 242,396 238,655 2005-2016 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,681 2,789 2,599 2,073 2,044 1,531 2008-2016 Pentanes Plus 111 413 479 223 489 347 2005-2016 Liquid Petroleum Gases 1,570 2,376 2,120 1,850 1,555 1,184 2008-2016 Normal Butane 1,563 2,376 2,120 1,850 1,555 1,184 2005-2016 Isobutane 7 2005-2015 Other Liquids 246,939 255,503 239,461 250,394 240,352 237,124 2008-2016

  9. Radiation View Factor With Shadowing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-24

    FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors as input data to finite element heat transfer analysis codes.

  10. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2007-07-01

    The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) relies on analytical studies to identify large energy reduction opportunities in energy-intensive industries and uses these results to guide its R&D portfolio. The energy bandwidth illustrates the total energy-saving opportunity that exists in the industry if the current processes are improved by implementing more energy-efficient practices and by using advanced technologies. This bandwidth analysis report was conducted to assist the ITP Mining R&D program in identifying energy-saving opportunities in coal, metals, and mineral mining. These opportunities were analyzed in key mining processes of blasting, dewatering, drilling, digging, ventilation, materials handling, crushing, grinding, and separations.

  11. Surface mine regulations complicate reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seltz-Patrash, A.

    1980-09-01

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 is a landmark environmental law intended to protect U.S. lands from stripmining effects. However, coal mine operators claim that some SMCRA regulations are misguidedcosting time and money, but yielding no substantial environmental benefit. Unlike other environmental acts, SMCRA details specifically the goals of reclamation and the methods that must be implemented to meet these goals. Coal industry representatives believe that this discourages innovation, promotes inefficiency by ignoring regional differences among sites, and results in unnecessary expense to the industry. Reclamation practices and progress among western coal mining companies are evaluated. (1 map, 5 photos)

  12. week's Southwest Regional Mine Rescue Competition.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    winning WIPP Blue mine rescue team competes during last week's Southwest Regional Mine Rescue Competition. WIPP UPDATE: April 15, 2016 WIPP Blue Mine Rescue Team Wins Local Competition The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Blue mine rescue team took top honors last week in the Southwest Regional Mine Rescue Contest, held in Carlsbad, NM. The WIPP Blue outdueled five other teams from the region, including the defending national champion WIPP Red team, to win first place overall in the

  13. Connecticut Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  14. Maine Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  15. V-193: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-193: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks July 5, 2013 -...

  16. Clean Energy Investment Center Seeks Input to Enhance Its Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy Investment Center Seeks Input to Enhance Its Services Clean Energy Investment Center Seeks Input to Enhance Its Services March 2, 2016 - 9:21am Addthis On March 1, the ...

  17. U-144:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-144:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks April 10,...

  18. Arizona Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Arizona Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  19. Developing a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    switchgrass feedstock production system utilizing beneficial bacterial endophytes Developing a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock production system utilizing ...

  20. Refinery Input by PADD - Petroleum Supply Annual (2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Table showing refinery input of crude oil and petroleum products by Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD).

  1. U-001:Symantec IM Manager Input Validation Flaws

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Symantec IM Manager Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting, SQL Injection, and Code Execution Attacks.

  2. Input File Creation for the Molecular Dynamics Program LAMMPS.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-05-30

    The program creates an input data file for the molecular dynamics program LAMMPS. The input file created is a liquid mixture between two walls explicitly composed of particles. The liquid molecules are modeled as a bead-spring molecule. The input data file specifies the position and topology of the starting state. The data structure of input allows for dynamic bond creation (cross-linking) within the LAMMPS code.

  3. Analysis of Stochastic Response of Neural Networks with Stochastic Input

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-10-10

    Software permits the user to extend capability of his/her neural network to include probablistic characteristics of input parameter. User inputs topology and weights associated with neural network along with distributional characteristics of input parameters. Network response is provided via a cumulative density function of network response variable.

  4. Westinghouse Earns Mine Safety Award for Exceptional Underground...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On September 19, New Mexico State Inspector of Mines Gilbert Miera and the New Mexico Mining Association presented Westinghouse with the "Mine Operator of the Year" award. The...

  5. Shahe Huada Mining Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shahe Huada Mining Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shahe Huada Mining Co Ltd Place: Hebei Province, China Sector: Biomass Product: Shahe-based private mining company....

  6. Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on...

  7. Proceedings, 27th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.; Mark, C.; Finfinger, G.

    2008-07-01

    Topics covered include: coal bumps and rockbursts, surface subsidence, surface mining, mine seals, longwall mining, pillars, roof bolting, rock mechanics and standing supports.

  8. Input visualization for the Cyclus nuclear fuel cycle simulator: CYClus Input Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, R.; Schneider, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses and demonstrates the methods used for the graphical user interface for the Cyclus fuel cycle simulator being developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Cyclus Input Control (CYCIC) is currently being designed with nuclear engineers in mind, but future updates to the program will be made to allow even non-technical users to quickly and efficiently simulate fuel cycles to answer the questions important to them. (authors)

  9. Technology experience and economics of oil shale mining in Estonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

    1995-11-01

    The exhaustion of fuel-energy resources became an evident problem of the European continent in the 1960s. Careful utilization of their own reserves of coal, oil, and gas (Germany, France, Spain) and assigned shares of imports of these resources make up the strategy of economic development of the European countries. The expansion of oil shale utilization is the most topical problem. The experience of mining oil shale deposits in Estonia and Russia, in terms of the practice and the economic results, is reviewed in this article. The room-and-pillar method of underground mining and the open-cut technology of clearing the ground ensure the fertility of a soil. The economics of underground and open pit oil shale mines is analyzed in terms of natural, organizational, and technical factors. These analyses are used in the planning and management of oil shale mining enterprises. The perspectives of the oil shale mining industry of Estonia and the economic expediency of multiproduction are examined. Recommendations and guidelines for future industrial utilization of oil shale are given in the summary.

  10. Mine roof supporting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, P.F.

    1981-06-23

    A stabilizing arrangement for mine roof support systems of the type in which a series of support units, each including a transverse beam supported at opposite ends by extensible props, are interconnected by extensible struts in a manner to be selfadvancing by alternate retraction of support units from a roof supporting condition and extension of the struts to advance such retracted units relative to others of such units which are in an extended roof engaging condition. The connection of each prop to the beam in a given unit is pivotal to allow deflection of the beam and props of a supporting unit from a normal perpendicular relationship under load. The stabilizing means restores the props and beam to a normal perpendicular relationship for advancing movement of each support unit. The supporting units are further stabilized relative to the struts by prop supporting brackets permitting canting movement of the props from a perpendicular relationship with respect to the struts but maintaining the props in a generally upright position for unit advance.

  11. Crisis in American mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    The crisis in American mining is discussed. The discussion focuses on the outlook for coal in the overall energy picture. Because of the Arab oil embargo of 1973, the Iranian disruption of 1979, and the tenfold increase in oil prices over the past decade, radical changes have taken place in energy supply and demand patterns. Two of the most important of these changes relate to investment. First, large investments have been made in energy-efficient plants, equipment, buildings, and vehicles. Their effect will restrain energy demand growth for the foreseeable future. Second, investments have been made in fuel-switching, from oil to coal and nuclear power. As a result the oil demand at the end of this century will be at approximately the same level as it is today. Natural gas demand is also likely to be flat. Coal demand, on the other hand, is expected to increase steadily over the long term. Recent conditions in the coal industry are reviewed, and a specific 10-year forecast is given.

  12. ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Mining Association are working in partnership to implement the Mining Industry of the Future strategy.

  13. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  14. A modified version of the geomechanics classification for entry design in underground coal mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, D.A.; Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Geomechanics Classification was modified for entry and roof support design in underground room-and-pillar coal mines. Adjustment multipliers were introduced to incorporate the influence of strata weatherability, high horizontal stresses, and the roof support reinforcement factor into the existing classification system. Sixty-two case histories of both standing and fallen mine roof were collected from two mines in the northern Appalachian coalfield. Twenty-seven engineering and geologic parameters were recorded for each case. A partial correlation analysis was carried out on the cases to establish which parameters have a significant impact upon the supported stand-up time of coal mine roof. Survival analysis, a statistical technique used in medical research to assess the effect of a drug or treatment on a patient's life expectancy, was conducted together with stepwise multiple regression to derive values for the adjustment multipliers. A practical example is included to illustrate the application of the modified Geomechanics Classification to underground coal mine design.

  15. Survey of nine surface mines in North America. [Nine different mines in USA and Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, L.G.; Brackett, R.D.; Floyd, F.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents the information gathered by three mining engineers in a 1980 survey of nine surface mines in the United States and Canada. The mines visited included seven coal mines, one copper mine, and one tar sands mine selected as representative of present state of the art in open pit, strip, and terrace pit mining. The purpose of the survey was to investigate mining methods, equipment requirements, operating costs, reclamation procedures and costs, and other aspects of current surface mining practices in order to acquire basic data for a study comparing conventional and terrace pit mining methods, particularly in deeper overburdens. The survey was conducted as part of a project under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023 titled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

  16. Surface mining: State management of abandoned mine land funds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 promotes the reclamation of areas severely damaged in the past by coal mining operations. GAO reviewed the reclamation programs in Colorado, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Wyoming and found that they implemented financial control procedures and practices to ensure that the expenditures of reclamation funds are proper. Only one state, however, is complying with all related grant payment, audit, and inventory requirements. The states are generally reclaiming eligible, high priority projects as required under the act and are managing their reclamation projects in compliance with federal requirements.

  17. Coal mine methane global review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

  18. NIDR (New Input Deck Reader) V2.0 2

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-03-31

    NIDR (New Input Deck Reader) is a facility for processing block-structured input to large programs. NIDR was written to simplify maintenance of DAKOTA (a program for uncertainty quantification and optimization), to provide better error checking of input and to allow use of aliases in the input. While written to support DAKOTA input conventions, NIDR itself is independent of DAKOTA and can be used in many kinds of programs. The initial version of NIDR was copyrightedmore » in 2008. We have since extended NIDR to support a graphical user interface called Jaguar for DAKOTA. In the Review and Approval process for an updated paper on NIDR, the Classification Approver states that a new copyright assertion should be performed.processing input to programs. NIDR is not primarily for military applications.« less

  19. WIPP Takes Second in Mine Rescue Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – EM’s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) mine rescue team placed second in the Southwestern Regional Mine Rescue Competition this past spring in Carlsbad, and it took home more than a trophy.

  20. MINES ParisTech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it. MINES ParisTech was created in 1783, when the exploitation of mines was a high-technology industry. Quite naturally, the skills of the School followed the development of...

  1. Mining Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    largest producer of gold and copper.1 In 2006, the U.S. mining industry processed ... The energy-intensive nature of mining is evident by the recovery ratio of the various ...

  2. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  3. Turnaround team revitalizes mining operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2005-11-01

    Starting from scratch, the Broe Companies' Century Coal trains the next generation. The article describes how the newly created Century Coal LLC, controlled by Denver-based Broe Companies investment firm, is rebuilding and expanding its highwall mining operations, increasing production from a current 1 million tons to 5 to 6 million tons in 2006 and 2007. The company has a $100,000 outreach program with 95% of these funds going to local communities. Present coal mining operations are spread around Bell, Clay, Harlan Knox and Leslie Counties. A priority is the renovation of the WenLar preparation plant in Bell County. 5 photos.

  4. UK mining invests, suppliers profit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-15

    In the midst of a major economic crisis in the United Kingdom, equipment suppliers have been reporting a number of considerable purchases by British coal mining companies. In December 2008, Liebherr-Great Britain delivered the first two of four Rq350 Litronic hydraulic excavators for use at the Broken Cross opencast coal site in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Ten Terex TR100 rigid haulers were delivered to the site in late 2008. Hatfield Colliery at Stainforth, South Yorkshire, has been reopened by PowerFuel. The main equipment for two longwall faces was supplied by Joy Mining Machinery UK Ltd. 2 photos.

  5. Logistics background study: underground mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanslovan, J. J.; Visovsky, R. G.

    1982-02-01

    Logistical functions that are normally associated with US underground coal mining are investigated and analyzed. These functions imply all activities and services that support the producing sections of the mine. The report provides a better understanding of how these functions impact coal production in terms of time, cost, and safety. Major underground logistics activities are analyzed and include: transportation and personnel, supplies and equipment; transportation of coal and rock; electrical distribution and communications systems; water handling; hydraulics; and ventilation systems. Recommended areas for future research are identified and prioritized.

  6. ,"Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities",16,"Monthly","22016","1151985" ,"Release Date:","4292016" ,"Next Release Date:","5312016" ,"Excel File ...

  7. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","0930...

  8. V-192: Symantec Security Information Manager Input Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting, SQL Injection, and Information Disclosure Attacks V-192: Symantec Security Information Manager Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site...

  9. 2008 Underground/Longwall Mining Buyer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-06-15

    The guide lists US companies supplying equipment and services to mines. An index by product category is included.

  10. 2009 underground/longwall mining buyer's guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-15

    The guide lists US companies supplying equipment and services to underground mining operations. An index by product category is included.

  11. Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1999-05-01

    Technology roadmaps are envisioned in several areas, and begin with a Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies.

  12. Robot to the Mine Rescue

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To increase the speed of rescue efforts, scientists and engineers at the Energy Department’s Sandia National Laboratories recently developed a new robot, called the Gemini-Scout Mine Rescue Robot, that quickly finds dangers and provides relief to trapped miners.

  13. The quest data mining system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, R.; Mehta, M.; Shafer, J.; Srikant, R.

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the Quest project at the IBM Almaden Research center is to develop technology to enable a new breed of data-intensive decision-support applications. This paper is a capsule summary of the current functionality and architecture of the Quest data mining System.

  14. Mining into the new millennium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-06-15

    After more than 3 years of production and a billion tons of coal shipped, Foundation Coal West, a subsidiary of Foundation Coal Holding Inc., continues to operate two of the original surface mines in Wyoming's Powder River Basin. The article describes equipment (conveyors, trucks, surface miners etc.) deployed at Belle Ayr and Eagle Butte PRB operations. 3 photos.

  15. Corner-cutting mining assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradley, John A.

    1983-01-01

    A mining assembly includes a primary rotary cutter mounted on one end of a support shaft and four secondary rotary cutters carried on the same support shaft and positioned behind the primary cutters for cutting corners in the hole cut by the latter.

  16. Corner-cutting mining assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradley, J.A.

    1981-07-01

    This invention resulted from a contract with the United States Department of Energy and relates to a mining tool. More particularly, the invention relates to an assembly capable of drilling a hole having a square cross-sectional shape with radiused corners. In mining operations in which conventional auger-type drills are used to form a series of parallel, cylindrical holes in a coal seam, a large amount of coal remains in place in the seam because the shape of the holes leaves thick webs between the holes. A higher percentage of coal can be mined from a seam by a means capable of drilling holes having a substantially square cross section. It is an object of this invention to provide an improved mining apparatus by means of which the amount of coal recovered from a seam deposit can be increased. Another object of the invention is to provide a drilling assembly which cuts corners in a hole having a circular cross section. These objects and other advantages are attained by a preferred embodiment of the invention.

  17. Control Board Digital Interface Input Devices Touchscreen, Trackpad, or Mouse?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Ronald L. Boring; Roger Lew

    2015-08-01

    The authors collaborated with a power utility to evaluate input devices for use in the human system interface (HSI) for a new digital Turbine Control System (TCS) at a nuclear power plant (NPP) undergoing a TCS upgrade. A standalone dynamic software simulation of the new digital TCS and a mobile kiosk were developed to conduct an input device study to evaluate operator preference and input device effectiveness. The TCS software presented the anticipated HSI for the TCS and mimicked (i.e., simulated) the turbine systems responses to operator commands. Twenty-four licensed operators from the two nuclear power units participated in the study. Three input devices were tested: a trackpad, mouse, and touchscreen. The subjective feedback from the survey indicates the operators preferred the touchscreen interface. The operators subjectively rated the touchscreen as the fastest and most comfortable input device given the range of tasks they performed during the study, but also noted a lack of accuracy for selecting small targets. The empirical data suggest the mouse input device provides the most consistent performance for screen navigation and manipulating on screen controls. The trackpad input device was both empirically and subjectively found to be the least effective and least desired input device.

  18. Developing a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    system utilizing beneficial bacterial endophytes | Department of Energy Developing a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock production system utilizing beneficial bacterial endophytes Developing a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock production system utilizing beneficial bacterial endophytes Dr. Chuansheng Mei gave this presentation at the Symbiosis Conference. PDF icon symbiosis_conference_mei.pdf More Documents & Publications Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference:

  19. Spatial and Spatiotemporal Data Mining: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shekhar, Shashi; Vatsavai, Raju; Celik, Mete

    2008-01-01

    Explosive growth in geospatial data and the emergence of new spatial technologies emphasize the need for automated discovery of spatial knowledge. Spatial data mining is the process of discovering interesting and previously unknown, but potentially useful patterns from large spatial databases. The complexity of spatial data and intrinsic spatial relationships limits the usefulness of conventional data mining techniques for extracting spatial patterns. In this chapter we explore the emerging field of spatial data mining, focusing on four major topics: prediction and classification, outlier detection, co-location mining, and clustering. Spatiotemporal data mining is also briefly discussed.

  20. Mines in the Four Corners anticipate growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2008-02-15

    Productive mines in the southwest deplete reserves, while the government drags its heels on new power projects. Production in Arizona and New Mexico has fallen 18% over the last four years to 34.1 million tons. With Chevron Mining's McKinley mine rapidly depleting its reserves the industry will continue to contract. In the last three years at least three large mines in the Four Corners have terminated operations. Three others remain captive operations: BHP Billiton's San Juan Underground and Navajo Surface operations and Peabody Energy's Kayenta surface mine. In 2006 the Black Mesa mine stopped producing coal. These four mines are isolated from the national railways. Peabody's new El Segundo surface mine near Grants, NM is increasing production. If the planned $3 billion Desert Rock coal-fired power plant is built this will present a new market for the Navajo mine. The article gives details about the state of the aforementioned mines and of the new King II coal mine on the northern periphery of the San Juan basin and discusses the state of plans for the Desert Rock Energy Project. 5 photos.

  1. Mines Welcomes Middle School Students | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mines Welcomes Middle School Students Denver middle school students at Mines. Denver middle school students at Mines museum. Denver middle school students watch chemistry show at Mines. CMI partner Colorado School of Mines welcomed 180 sixth and seventh grade students from the Denver School of Science and Technology. The students spent the day at Mines to learn about Earth, energy, the environment, critical materials and mining. The students enjoyed a chemistry show by professor Jim Horan, and

  2. INFRASTRUCTURE FOR INTEGRATED DATA ENVIRONMENTS AND ANALYSIS (IIDEA) FOR MINING AND PROCESSING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dessureault, Sean

    2007-06-29

    Almost all the high-production businesses face a problem of having terabytes of data but very little information is extracted from them. Efforts are being made continuously to bring the raw data into a usable format so that the meaningful information can be inferred. Once the knowledge discovery is done, proper action can be taken accordingly. The data mining and process modeling approach are used in many business sectors to better understand the process interactions within production chains by analyzing huge data repositories. A decade of intense investment in information technology by mining companies as resulted in vast quantities of underutilized data. Other industries have undergone fundamental changes through the innovative application of IT and business intelligence. This project was to undertake the investigation of the tools and techniques that would bring such data mining and requisite business processes to the mining industry. Phase I of this project was to establish the research infrastructure for Phase II and to pilot the tools and techniques through the development of an Energy Consumption Model (ECM) to predict the energy consumption in the material handling processes based on the key input variables like distance, elevation, tons hauled etc. Data mining techniques that can extract meaningful information from a raw data is available. The model developed as part of this research is an example of how energy consumption can be estimated from fundamental data.

  3. Mining Industry of the Future Vision: The Future Begins with Mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1998-09-01

    The Mining Industry of the Future was started in June 1998 when the Chairman of the National Mining Association and the Secretary of Energy entered into a Compact to pursue a collaborative technology research partnership. After the Compact signing, the mining industry developed its vision document, The Future Begins with Mining, A Vision of the Mining Industry of the Future, in September 1998. This vision document lists long-term goals for the mining industry. Stemming from this vision document, targeted technology roadmaps were developed that describe pathways of research to achieve the vision goals.

  4. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Richard P.; Paris, Robert D.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  5. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.; Paris, R.D.; Feldman, M.

    1993-02-23

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  6. Mining machine having vibration sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, C.R.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes a mining machine having means for sensing property variations of the materials associated with a seam of a mine comprising: a cutting tool including a member rotatable about an axis, at least one cutter carried by the rotatable member at a point spaced from the axis for cutting material from the seam, a conductor rod carried by the rotatable member and held in releasable engagement with the cutter, the rod extending to the axis of the rotatable member to conduct to the axis, strain waves which are induced by variations in cutter vibration as the cutter encounters property variations of the materials associated with the seam, and a transducer located at the axis of the rotatable member in communication with the conductor rod to convert the strain waves in the rod to electric signals.

  7. WIRELESS MINE-WIDE TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvi H. Meiksin

    2004-03-01

    A comprehensive mine-wide, two-way wireless voice and data communication system for the underground mining industry was developed. The system achieves energy savings through increased productivity and greater energy efficiency in meeting safety requirements within mines. The mine-wide system is comprised of two interfaced subsystems: a through-the-earth communications system and an in-mine communications system. The mine-wide system permits two-way communication among underground personnel and between underground and surface personnel. The system was designed, built, and commercialized. Several systems are in operation in underground mines in the United States. The use of these systems has proven they result in considerable energy savings. A system for tracking the location of vehicles and people within the mine was also developed, built and tested successfully. Transtek's systems are being used by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in their underground mine rescue team training program. This project also resulted in a spin-off rescue team lifeline and communications system. Furthermore, the project points the way to further developments that can lead to a GPS-like system for underground mines allowing the use of autonomous machines in underground mining operations, greatly reducing the amount of energy used in these operations. Some products developed under this program are transferable to applications in fields other than mining. The rescue team system is applicable to use by first responders to natural, accidental, or terrorist-caused building collapses. The in-mine communications system can be installed in high-rise buildings providing in-building communications to security and maintenance personnel as well as to first responders.

  8. Data mining and visualization techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Chung; Whitney, Paul; Thomas, Jim

    2004-03-23

    Disclosed are association rule identification and visualization methods, systems, and apparatus. An association rule in data mining is an implication of the form X.fwdarw.Y where X is a set of antecedent items and Y is the consequent item. A unique visualization technique that provides multiple antecedent, consequent, confidence, and support information is disclosed to facilitate better presentation of large quantities of complex association rules.

  9. V-139: Cisco Network Admission Control Input Validation Flaw...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PROBLEM: Cisco Network Admission Control Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Users Inject SQL Commands PLATFORM: Cisco NAC Manager versions prior to 4.8.3.1 and 4.9.2 ABSTRACT: A...

  10. Summary of Stakeholder Input From May 2015 Request for Information...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary of Stakeholder Input From May 2015 Request for Information The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sought FY15 feedback through issuance of a Request for Information from ...

  11. Table A56. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"RSE" "SIC",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1 20,"FOOD and KINDRED PRODUCTS"

  12. DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Liabilities | Department of Energy Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities March 27, 2007 - 12:10pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced in the Federal Register that it is seeking public comment on how to address the increasing costs and liabilities of contractor employee pension and medical benefits. Under the Department of Energy's unique

  13. T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The software does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input.

  14. V-193: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several scripts do not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input via several parameters

  15. Injury experience in coal mining, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1986. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 1 fig., 46 tabs.

  16. Injury experience in coal mining, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1987. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  17. Injury experience in coal mining, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1988. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 23 tabs.

  18. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  19. Injury experience in stone mining, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of stone mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  20. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1991. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  1. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1987. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 44 tabs.

  2. Injury experience in coal mining, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1990. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  3. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1990. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  4. Injury experience in coal mining, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reich, R.B.; Hugler, E.C.

    1994-05-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  5. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States of 1988. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 refs.

  6. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1990. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  7. Injury experience in stone mining, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of stone mining in the united States for 1990. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  8. Injury experience in coal mining, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This Mine and Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1989. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  9. Injury experience in stone mining, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of stone mining in the United States for 1986. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  10. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1986. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, natured of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  11. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the the United States for 1989. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. Injury experience in stone mining, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail occupational injury and illness experience of stone mining in the United States for 1989. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  13. ORS 517.705 Exploration Permit Regulations for Mining and Mining...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .705 Exploration Permit Regulations for Mining and Mining Claims Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: ORS 517.705...

  14. Bauma returns with a large mining component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casteel, K.

    2007-04-15

    The world's largest construction trade fair is also a major mining show covering equipment from excavation to product load out. This comprehensive preview of the bauma 2007 exposition (23-29 April 2007) describes construction equipment which will be displayed, concentrating on mining equipment. It includes drilling equipment; earthmoving, excavation and grading machinery; loading and hauling machines; underground mining equipment; crushing and screening equipment; conveyors; and pumps. 25 photos.

  15. Injury experience in coal mining, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1984. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report.

  16. Injury experience in coal mining, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in details the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1985. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. Data used in compiling this report were reported by operators of coal mines and preparation plants on a mandatory basis as required under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, Public Law 91-173 as amended by Public Law 95-164. Since January 1, 1978, operators of mines or preparation plants or both which are subject to the act have been required under 30 CFR, Part 50 to submit reports of injuries, occupational illnesses, and related data. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  17. Injury experience in coal mining, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1991. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. Data used in compiling this report were reported by operators of coal mines and preparation plants on a mandatory basis as required under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, Public Law 91-173,as amended by Public Law 95-164. Since January 1, 1978, operators of mines or preparation plants or both which are subject to the Act have been required under 30 CFR, Part 50, to submit reports of injuries, occupational illnesses, and related data.

  18. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1985. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. Data used in compiling this report were reported by operators of metallic mineral mines and preparation plants on a mandatory basis as required under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, Public Law 91-173 as amended by Law 95-164. Since January 1, 1978, operators of mines or preparation plants or both which are subject to the Act have been required under 30 CFR, Part 50, to submit reports of injuries, occupational illnesses, and related data. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  19. Injury experience in coal mining, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1980. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injuried, nature of injury, occupation, and bituminous or anthracite coal. Correlative information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. For ease of correlation between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of the report. Data used in compiling this report were reported by operators of coal mines and preparation plants on a mandatory basis as required under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, Public Law 91-173 as amended by Public Law 95-164. Since January 1, 1978, operators of mines or preparation plants or both which are subject to the Act have been required under 30 CFR, Part 50 to submit reports of injuries, occupational illnesses, and related data. Only data reported by operators are utilized in this report. The statistical measures for injury experience adopted by MSHA in 1978 compare closely with the measures used in the Office of Occupational Safety and Health Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics, US Department of Labor. Therefore, beginning with 1978 data the mining industry can be compared on a standard basis with other United States industries.

  20. WIPP Mine Rescue Team Wins Colorado Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado Competition CARLSBAD, N.M., July 11, 2001 - The Silver Mine Rescue Team from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) placed first in the recent Western Regional Mine Rescue Competition. It was the first victory by a WIPP team in this competition in five years. The Colorado State Mine Inspector's Office, in conjunction with the Colorado School of Mines, hosted the Western Regional, June 12-14 in Golden, Colorado. The WIPP Silver Team defeated seven teams,

  1. WIPP Mine Rescue Team Wins, Retires Trophy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wins, Retires Trophy CARLSBAD, N.M., April 9, 2001 - For the third consecutive year, a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) mine rescue has team won the Southwestern Regional Mine Rescue Competition. The competition was April 5-6 at the Pecos River Village in Carlsbad. The WIPP Blue Mine Rescue team has been designated the best in New Mexico by winning the New Mexico State Mine Inspector's Traveling Trophy three years in a row to retire the trophy. Second place was awarded to FMC Corporation from

  2. Self advancing mine roof supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seddon, J.; Jones, F.

    1985-03-19

    A self-advancing mine-roof-support for use in or aligned with a main roadway or gate has a floor-engaging part and a roof engaging part spaced apart by extensible load-bearing prop or jack means, and engagement means for a face-conveyor and a transversely acting transfer conveyor whereby their relative positions are constrained to facilitate discharge of mineral from one conveyor to the other. The engagement means for the face conveyor comprises sliding anchor beams that assure maintenance of the relative attitudes of the support and the face conveyor and the transfer conveyor is held fore and aft of the support.

  3. Data mining for ontology development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, George S.; Strasburg, Jana; Stampf, David; Neymotin,Lev; Czajkowski, Carl; Shine, Eugene; Bollinger, James; Ghosh, Vinita; Sorokine, Alexandre; Ferrell, Regina; Ward, Richard; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2010-06-01

    A multi-laboratory ontology construction effort during the summer and fall of 2009 prototyped an ontology for counterfeit semiconductor manufacturing. This effort included an ontology development team and an ontology validation methods team. Here the third team of the Ontology Project, the Data Analysis (DA) team reports on their approaches, the tools they used, and results for mining literature for terminology pertinent to counterfeit semiconductor manufacturing. A discussion of the value of ontology-based analysis is presented, with insights drawn from other ontology-based methods regularly used in the analysis of genomic experiments. Finally, suggestions for future work are offered.

  4. Optical device with conical input and output prism faces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brunsden, Barry S.

    1981-01-01

    A device for radially translating radiation in which a right circular cylinder is provided at each end thereof with conical prism faces. The faces are oppositely extending and the device may be severed in the middle and separated to allow access to the central part of the beam. Radiation entering the input end of the device is radially translated such that radiation entering the input end at the perimeter is concentrated toward the output central axis and radiation at the input central axis is dispersed toward the output perimeter. Devices are disclosed for compressing beam energy to enhance drilling techniques, for beam manipulation of optical spatial frequencies in the Fourier plane and for simplification of dark field and color contrast microscopy. Both refracting and reflecting devices are disclosed.

  5. Zhangjiajie Guinie Mining Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zhangjiajie Guinie Mining Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhangjiajie Guinie Mining Co Ltd Place: Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province, China Product: Miner, refiner and processor...

  6. PP-85-A Westmin Mines, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Westmin Mines, Inc. to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. -Canada Border. PDF icon PP-85-A Westmin Mines, Inc. More Documents & ...

  7. Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Web Site: Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website Abstract Provides access to digital information on Montana's geology. Author Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology...

  8. Colorado School of Mines Technology Marketing Summaries - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado School of Mines Technology Marketing Summaries Here you'll find marketing summaries for technologies available for licensing from the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). The...

  9. Colorado School of Mines - Colorado Energy Research Institute...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mines - Colorado Energy Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Colorado School of Mines - Colorado Energy Research Institute Address: 1500 Illinois Street Place:...

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colorado School of Mines...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    for Colorado School of Mines, Golden Colorado; Circa 1987 CO.01-3 - DOE Memorandum; Bauer to Liverman; Subject: Colorado School of Mines Cursory Radiological Survey; December...

  11. Inner Mongolia Fengwei New Energy Mining Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fengwei New Energy Mining Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Inner Mongolia Fengwei New Energy Mining Co Ltd Place: Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China Product:...

  12. Longwall mining thrives in Colorado's North Fork Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2006-08-15

    With mining units poised for record-setting capacity and rail service restored, these mines in Colorado's North Fork valley are ready to cut coal. 4 photos.

  13. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grid Implementation Input | Department of Energy US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input. Comments relevant to the following two sections of the RFI: "Long Term Issues: Managing a Grid with High Penetration of New

  14. South Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 74 184 63 73 62 87 31 22 191 201 1990's 17 47 26 34 154 62 178 10 0 18 2000's 63 6 3 15 2 86 75 0 2010's 0 0 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  15. Virginia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 127 443 454 375 209 414 75 141 643 428 1990's 59 240 245 538 1,195 445 716 350 148 179 2000's 493 239 124 368 145 192 39 89 89 247 2010's 159 89 48 130 301 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  16. Table 3. U.S. Inputs to biodiesel production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Inputs to biodiesel production" "million pounds" ,"Feedstock inputs" ,"Vegetable oils",,,,,,,,,,,,"Animal fats" "Period","Canola oil",,"Corn oil",,"Cottonseed oil",,"Palm oil",,"Soybean oil",,"Other",,"Poultry",,"Tallow" 2014 "January",35.75,,72.72,,"W",,"W",,273,,"W",,2,,15

  17. Georgia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 24 57 151 84 28 121 124 248 241 292 1990's 209 185 166 199 123 130 94 14 16 12 2000's 73 51 7 14 5 0 3 2 52 2010's 732 701 660 642 635 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  18. New Hampshire Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 774 720 582 328 681 509 362 464 492 592 1990's 205 128 96 154 160 90 147 102 103 111 2000's 180 86 66 58 91 84 92 9 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  19. Louisiana Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 249 435 553 560 517 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Louisiana Supplemental Supplies of

  20. Maryland Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 484 498 984 352 332 373 155 136 743 899 1990's 24 72 126 418 987 609 882 178 80 498 2000's 319 186 48 160 124 382 41 245 181 170 2010's 115 89 116 107 809 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  1. Coal mine directory: United States and Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    The directory gives a state-by-state listing of all US and Canadian coal producers. It contains contact information as well as the type of mine, production statistics, coal composition, transportation methods etc. A statistical section provides general information about the US coal industry, preparation plants, and longwall mining operations.

  2. Statistically significant relational data mining :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Jonathan W.; Leung, Vitus Joseph; Phillips, Cynthia Ann; Pinar, Ali; Robinson, David Gerald; Berger-Wolf, Tanya; Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Casleton, Emily; Kaiser, Mark; Nordman, Daniel J.; Wilson, Alyson G.

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the project (3z(BStatitically significant relational data mining.(3y (BThe goal of the project was to add more statistical rigor to the fairly ad hoc area of data mining on graphs. Our goal was to develop better algorithms and better ways to evaluate algorithm quality. We concetrated on algorithms for community detection, approximate pattern matching, and graph similarity measures. Approximate pattern matching involves finding an instance of a relatively small pattern, expressed with tolerance, in a large graph of data observed with uncertainty. This report gathers the abstracts and references for the eight refereed publications that have appeared as part of this work. We then archive three pieces of research that have not yet been published. The first is theoretical and experimental evidence that a popular statistical measure for comparison of community assignments favors over-resolved communities over approximations to a ground truth. The second are statistically motivated methods for measuring the quality of an approximate match of a small pattern in a large graph. The third is a new probabilistic random graph model. Statisticians favor these models for graph analysis. The new local structure graph model overcomes some of the issues with popular models such as exponential random graph models and latent variable models.

  3. Injury experience in stone mining, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of stone mining in the United States for 1987. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  4. DOE Seeks Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Energy Department’s prime contractor, Fluor-B&W Portsmouth (FBP), managing the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP), issued a request for Expressions of Interest (EOI) seeking industry input to support the development of an acquisition strategy for potential disposition of DOE nickel.

  5. Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 28, 2013, the Deputy Secretary issued the attached memorandum to the Department's senior officials requiring any Fee Determining Official whose contract falls under the cognizance of an Acquisition Executive to brief and obtain the input of that Acquisition Executive before determining earned fee under the contract.

  6. Feasibility of high recovery highwall mining equipment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Three equipment systems exhibited significant promise: the RSV Miner, a surface longwall using standard underground equipment, and the variable angle auger. Other equipment systems showing considerable merit were the surface shortwall, and the two extended depth augers. Of the three most significant systems, the RSV Miner exhibits the greatest versatility and adaptability. It may be used competently in many surface mining applications and readily adapts to geologic anomalies and changing seam heights. The machine employs steering and guidance equipment and provides the necessary capabilities for extended depth operation. Safety is good, as no men are required to work underground. However, most important is the system's recovery factor of approximately 75% to 80% of the in-situ coal reserve within reach. The surface longwall system using standard underground equipment (preferably a ranging drum shearer in conjunction with shield supports) is most suited to either a trench mining or a modified area mining application. Both applications would allow the length of the face to be held constant. Another important consideration is legal requirements for a tailgate entry, which would necessitate additional equipment for development in a modified area mining application. When compared to surface shortwall, surface longwall exhibits higher productivity, a far greater equipment selection which allows system tailoring to geologic conditions, and greater roof control due to the significantly smaller section of overburden that must be supported. Recovery should approach, and possibly exceed, 90% of the coal in-place. The variable angle auger, which is currently only a concept, fills a very real need for which no other equipment is available at this time.

  7. Procedure for developing biological input for the design, location, or modification of water-intake structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    To minimize adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems resulting from the operation of water intake structures, design engineers must have relevant information on the behavior, physiology and ecology of local fish and shellfish. Identification of stimulus/response relationships and the environmental factors that influence them is the first step in incorporating biological information in the design, location or modification of water intake structures. A procedure is presented in this document for providing biological input to engineers who are designing, locating or modifying a water intake structure. The authors discuss sources of stimuli at water intakes, historical approaches in assessing potential/actual impact and review biological information needed for intake design.

  8. Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, M.V.; Lacy, S.B.; Lowe, G.D.; Nussbaum, A.M.; Walter, K.M.; Willens, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The engineering, economic, and environmental feasibility of the use of low and moderate temperature geothermal heat in the mining and processing of tungsten ore is explored. The following are covered: general engineering evaluation, design of a geothermal energy system, economics, the geothermal resource, the institutional barriers assessment, environmental factors, an alternate geothermal energy source, and alternates to geothermal development. (MHR)

  9. Method of underground mining by pillar extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ray J. (1879 Delann, Salt Lake City, UT 84121); Bowen, William R. (1636 Sunnydale La., Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

    1980-08-12

    A method of sublevel caving and pillar and top coal extraction for mining thick coal seams includes the advance mining of rooms and crosscuts along the bottom of a seam to a height of about eight feet, and the retreat mining of the top coal from the rooms, crosscuts and portions of the pillars remaining from formation of the rooms and cross-cuts. In the retreat mining, a pocket is formed in a pillar, the top coal above the pocket is drilled, charged and shot, and then the fallen coal is loaded by a continuous miner so that the operator remains under a roof which has not been shot. The top coal from that portion of the room adjacent the pocket is then mined, and another pocket is formed in the pillar. The top coal above the second pocket is mined followed by the mining of the top coal of that portion of the room adjacent the second pocket, all by use of a continuous miner which allows the operator to remain under a roof portion which has not been shot.

  10. Mined land reclamation in Wisconsin since 1973

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    Reclamation has long been recognized as an essential action necessary to mitigate the degradation of land caused by mining activities. But, it is only within the past several decades that reclamation has become an integral component of the mineral extraction process. While the Metallic Mining Reclamation Act (MMRA) was passed in 1973, Wisconsin is yet to enact comprehensive state-wide reclamation requirements for mining other than metallic minerals and the code for metallic mining has yet to establish procedures and standards for reclamation success, specifically revegetation and postmining land use. This study integrates several interdisciplinary methodologies including a history of reclamation; an inventory and status report of mined lands; a critique and comparison of existing reclamation policy with previous state and current federal reclamation policies; in-field case studies of revegetation parameters, procedures, and performance standards; and an economic analysis of reclamation technology. This study makes three major recommendations: (1) The metallic mining code should be amended to establish vegetation parameters, measuring methods, and performance standards for revegetation success similar to those contained in the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA); (2) The metallic mining code should be amended to resolve semantic loopholes by clearly defining the endpoints of terms such as restoration, reclamation, and rehabilitation and by utilizing the reclamation continuum as a planning tool for determining acceptable postmining land use alternatives; and (3) Mandatory statewide nonmetallic legislation should be enacted to strengthen the mineral resource management program in Wisconsin by systematically and uniformly regulating the mining and reclamation of nonmetallic minerals, the state's most important mineral resource.

  11. Injury experience in coal mining, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1979. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and bituminous or anthracite coal. Correlative information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. For ease of correlation between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included. Data were reported by operators of coal mines and preparation plants on a mandatory basis as required under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, Public Law 91-173 as amended by Public Law 95-164. Since January 1, 1978, operators of mines or preparation plants or both which are subject to the Act have been required under 30 CFR, Part 50 to submit reports of injuries, occupational illnesses, and related data. The statistical measures for injury experience adopted by MSHA in 1978 compare closely with the measures used in the Office of Occupational Safety and Health Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics, US Department of Labor. Therefore, beginning with 1978 data the mining industry can be compared on a standard basis with other United States industries. The statistical data the work experience of all personnel engaged in exploration development, production, maintenance, repair, and construction work, including supervisory and technical personnel, working partners, and onsite officeworkers. The terminology used throughout this report is that generally used by the mineral-extractive industries and by MSHA.

  12. Are surface coal mine sediment ponds working

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poe, M.L.; Betson, R.P.

    1985-12-09

    Flowrates and storm generated water quality data were collected at sedimentation ponds on four surface mines in the states of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and West Virginia. The water quality data were analyzed for suspended solids and settleable solids content, and particle size distribution. The results were compared to the effluent limitations guidelines for total suspended solids as promulgated under the Clean Water Act for Coal Mining Point Source Category and adopted under the Surface Mine Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 and the resulting state regulatory programs. 3 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  13. Method of locating underground mines fires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laage, Linneas; Pomroy, William

    1992-01-01

    An improved method of locating an underground mine fire by comparing the pattern of measured combustion product arrival times at detector locations with a real time computer-generated array of simulated patterns. A number of electronic fire detection devices are linked thru telemetry to a control station on the surface. The mine's ventilation is modeled on a digital computer using network analysis software. The time reguired to locate a fire consists of the time required to model the mines' ventilation, generate the arrival time array, scan the array, and to match measured arrival time patterns to the simulated patterns.

  14. Paramont's Black Bear No. 4 mine does it right, again

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanda, A.

    2007-07-15

    The Paramont Coal Company Virginia, LLC, a subsidiary of Alpha Natural Resources, recently won the '2007 overall award for excellence in mining and reclamation from the Virginia Division of Mined Land Reclamation and the Virginia Mining Association. Coal People Magazine recently visited Black Bear No. 4 mine where a settling pond was being removed and stream bed placed to drain the area, part of the 451-acre award winning reclamation project. The article recounts discussions with mining engineers about the company's operations with emphasis on the Black Bear No. 4 mine. Black Bear No. 1 mine won five state and national awards last year for conservation and land management practices. 8 photos.

  15. Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 257 951 718 594 102 130 182 109 391 219 1990's 51 92 155 126 0 27 42 18 1 1 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  16. South Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 9 24 50 1 0 0 0 0 10 16 1990's 10 3 10 9 61 37 87 30 4 5 2000's 13 5 3 57 5 4 0 1 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next

  17. Tennessee Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 12 42 90 39 25 36 13 26 36 78 1990's 3 8 12 13 84 33 73 19 4 11 2000's 13 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next

  18. Texas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 0 1 14 2 9 19 4 4 9 1990's 1,240 1,076 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 17 2000's 0 1,505 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release

  19. Vermont Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Vermont Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 6 3 4 9 4 5 6 0 1 2000's 7 104 2 10 12 9 2 2 1 2 2010's 1 2 3 3 5 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  20. Washington Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 15 13 15 11 11 9 10 21 79 154 1990's 181 154 180 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next

  1. Wisconsin Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 2 4 13 2 6 14 1 1 2 5 1990's 1 1 1 3 5 2 21 5 21 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  2. Arkansas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 7 8 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  3. Delaware Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 55 135 56 20 13 12 9 0 2 18 1990's 4,410 4,262 3,665 3,597 3,032 1 1 2 0 0 2000's 6 0 0 7 17 0 W 5 2 2 2010's 1 0 6 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016

  4. District of Columbia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 2 1 46 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016

  5. Florida Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 1 3 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  6. Hawaii Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Hawaii Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,190 2,993 2,899 2,775 2,449 2,655 2,630 2,461 2,801 2,844 1990's 2,817 2,725 2,711 2,705 2,831 2,793 2,761 2,617 2,715 2,752 2000's 2,769 2,689 2,602 2,602 2,626 2,606 2,613 2,683 2,559 2,447 2010's 2,472 2,467 2,510 2,658 2,743 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  7. Illinois Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 36,713 29,509 19,005 19,734 17,308 19,805 22,980 12,514 9,803 9,477 1990's 8,140 6,869 8,042 9,760 7,871 6,256 3,912 4,165 2,736 2,527 2000's 1,955 763 456 52 14 15 13 11 15 20 2010's 17 1 1 63 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  8. Indiana Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 1,602 5,056 3,496 4,142 4,027 2,711 2,351 3,890 4,243 3,512 1990's 3,015 3,077 3,507 3,232 2,457 3,199 3,194 3,580 3,149 5,442 2000's 5,583 5,219 1,748 2,376 2,164 1,988 1,642 635 30 1 2010's 1 5 1 6 69 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  9. Iowa Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 57 64 68 23 53 45 44 40 34 82 1990's 81 46 45 84 123 96 301 137 17 12 2000's 44 39 23 143 30 31 46 40 27 3 2010's 2 1 0 0 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  10. New Jersey Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) New Jersey Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 9,574 11,504 9,786 9,896 8,616 13,421 12,099 13,774 14,846 14,539 1990's 9,962 14,789 14,362 14,950 7,737 7,291 6,778 6,464 9,082 5,761 2000's 8,296 12,330 3,526 473 530 435 175 379 489 454 2010's 457 392 139 255 530 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  11. New Mexico Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  12. New York Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 3,226 4,722 2,350 1,646 1,792 1,797 707 416 728 1,239 1990's 385 678 1,190 1,638 1,460 1,490 1,259 881 699 459 2000's 858 970 1 18 8 14 4 13 7 6 2010's 2 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  13. North Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 7 42 58 59 60 43 43 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 2 4 3 0 0 0 0 21 2000's 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next

  14. North Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 196 417 102 0 8,335 40,370 49,847 51,543 49,014 54,408 1990's 53,144 52,557 58,496 57,680 57,127 57,393 55,867 53,179 54,672 53,185 2000's 49,190 51,004 53,184 53,192 47,362 51,329 54,361 51,103 50,536 53,495 2010's 54,813 51,303 52,541 45,736 48,394 - = No

  15. Ohio Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 69,169 69,850 64,812 62,032 43,866 24,444 5,182 18 44 348 1990's 849 891 1,051 992 1,432 904 1,828 1,423 1,194 1,200 2000's 1,442 1,149 79 1,002 492 579 423 608 460 522 2010's 353 296 366 416 641 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  16. Oregon Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 24 3 6 6 10 10 6 3 1990's 3 4 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 2000's 2 2 5 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  17. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 3,127 10,532 5,621 3,844 82 221 196 247 254 305 1990's 220 222 132 110 252 75 266 135 80 119 2000's 261 107 103 126 131 132 124 145 123 205 2010's 4 2 2 3 20 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  18. Kentucky Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 42 2 131 259 94 4 1 0 6 44 1990's 2 2 5 16 50 6 45 24 2 3 2000's 10 2 1 98 0 15 3 124 15 18 2010's 5 8 1 29 52 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next

  19. Massachusetts Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 15,366 21,828 17,586 10,732 6,545 3,668 2,379 1,404 876 692 1990's 317 120 105 61 154 420 426 147 68 134 2000's 26 16 137 324 80 46 51 15 13 10 2010's 0 3 8 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  20. Michigan Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 3 3,038 2,473 2,956 2,773 2,789 2,754 2,483 2,402 2,402 1990's 19,106 15,016 14,694 12,795 13,688 21,378 21,848 22,238 21,967 20,896 2000's 12,423 4,054 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld

  1. Missouri Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 65 60 2,129 1,278 326 351 1 1 2 1,875 1990's 0 0 0 0 371 4 785 719 40 207 2000's 972 31 62 1,056 917 15 78 66 6 10 2010's 18 172 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  2. Nebraska Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 9 1,838 63 2,006 2,470 2,689 2,142 2,199 1,948 2,088 1990's 2,361 2,032 1,437 791 890 15 315 134 11 4 2000's 339 6 1 13 39 16 19 33 28 18 2010's 12 9 4 2 376 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  3. Nevada Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 4 0 2 2 2 4 11 11 32 37 1990's 125 0 30 38 9 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  4. Microchannel cross load array with dense parallel input

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Stefan P.

    2004-04-06

    An architecture or layout for microchannel arrays using T or Cross (+) loading for electrophoresis or other injection and separation chemistry that are performed in microfluidic configurations. This architecture enables a very dense layout of arrays of functionally identical shaped channels and it also solves the problem of simultaneously enabling efficient parallel shapes and biasing of the input wells, waste wells, and bias wells at the input end of the separation columns. One T load architecture uses circular holes with common rows, but not columns, which allows the flow paths for each channel to be identical in shape, using multiple mirror image pieces. Another T load architecture enables the access hole array to be formed on a biaxial, collinear grid suitable for EDM micromachining (square holes), with common rows and columns.

  5. Alabama Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 50 23 91 9 54 14 3 2 17 16 1990's 320 332 171 410 69 0 18 21 2 4 2000's 0 0 0 22 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next

  6. Wyoming Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 124 222 518 373 271 316 339 303 291 167 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next

  7. U-050: Adobe Flex SDK Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flex applications created using the Flex SDK may not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input.

  8. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS Wei Tang, Jian Chen, Xinghua Yu, David A. Frederick, Zhili Feng Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Keywords: Eurofer'97, friction stir welding, microstructure, microhardness Abstract Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation

  9. Knight Hawk adapts highwall mining for Southern Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-10-15

    A few years ago while planning their first underground operation and trying to decide how to mine shallow seams, Knight Hawk purchased a 'Superior Highwall Miner' (SHM). Since then this small innovative company has been pioneering the use of highwall mining in a trenching application in for example the Illinois Basin. Highwall mining is very suitable for contour mining in Appalachia. The article discusses the recent improvements and the advantages of SHM mining systems. 3 photos.

  10. U.S. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study U.S. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study PDF icon mining_bandwidth.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002) ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Steel: Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study September 2005

  11. Methods to Register Models and Input/Output Parameters for Integrated Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G.; Whelan, Gene; Tryby, Michael E.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Taira, Randal Y.; Dorow, Kevin E.

    2010-07-10

    Significant resources can be required when constructing integrated modeling systems. In a typical application, components (e.g., models and databases) created by different developers are assimilated, requiring the framework’s functionality to bridge the gap between the user’s knowledge of the components being linked. The framework, therefore, needs the capability to assimilate a wide range of model-specific input/output requirements as well as their associated assumptions and constraints. The process of assimilating such disparate components into an integrated modeling framework varies in complexity and difficulty. Several factors influence the relative ease of assimilating components, including, but not limited to, familiarity with the components being assimilated, familiarity with the framework and its tools that support the assimilation process, level of documentation associated with the components and the framework, and design structure of the components and framework. This initial effort reviews different approaches for assimilating models and their model-specific input/output requirements: 1) modifying component models to directly communicate with the framework (i.e., through an Application Programming Interface), 2) developing model-specific external wrappers such that no component model modifications are required, 3) using parsing tools to visually map pre-existing input/output files, and 4) describing and linking models as dynamic link libraries. Most of these approaches are illustrated using the widely distributed modeling system called Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES). The review concludes that each has its strengths and weakness, the factors that determine which approaches work best in a given application.

  12. Fuelcell-Hybrid Mine loader (LHD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James L Dippo; Tim Erikson; Kris Hess

    2009-07-10

    The fuel cell hybrid mine loader project, sponsored by a government-industry consortium, was implemented to determine the viability of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells in underground mining applications. The Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored this project with cost-share support from industry. The project had three main goals: (1) to develop a mine loader powered by a fuel cell, (2) to develop associated metal-hydride storage and refueling systems, and (3) to demonstrate the fuel cell hybrid loader in an underground mine in Nevada. The investigation of a zero-emissions fuel cell power plant, the safe storage of hydrogen, worker health advantages (over the negative health effects associated with exposure to diesel emissions), and lower operating costs are all key objectives for this project.

  13. The Silicon Mine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    produce solar grade polysilicon suitable for the production of wafers or as the base material for the manufacture of solar cells. References: The Silicon Mine1 This article is a...

  14. Rock mechanics design in mining and tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the design process as applied to rock mechanics aspects of underground mining and tunneling. Topics covered include a historical perspective, the design process in engineering, empirical methods of design, observational methods of design, and guided design.

  15. WIPP Receives Top Mine Safety Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Top Mine Safety Award CARLSBAD, N.M., September 18, 2013 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received top safety honors from the New Mexico...

  16. Contaminant transport in unconfined aquifer, input to low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, A.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-14

    This report describes briefly the Hanford sitewide groundwater model and its application to the Low-Level Tank Waste Disposal (LLTWD) interim Performance Assessment (PA). The Well Intercept Factor (WIF) or dilution factor from a given areal flux entering the aquifer released from the LLTWD site are calculated for base case and various sensitivity cases. In conjunction with the calculation for released fluxes through vadose zone transport,the dose at the compliance point can be obtained by a simple multiplication. The relative dose contribution from the upstream sources was also calculated and presented in the appendix for an equal areal flux at the LLTWD site. The results provide input for management decisions on remediation action needed for reduction of the released fluxes from the upstream facilities to the allowed level to meet the required dose criteria.

  17. Dragline mining returns to western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-05-15

    Armstrong Coal Co. now owns three Page draglines-one now operating at the Midway Surface mine, one due to go into operation at the Equality surface mine and a third that is being rebuilt also for use there. Armstrong is banking on the economics of scale to once again prove that these older machines are still the most efficient way to move large volumes of overburden. 4 photos.

  18. Human factors: a necessary tool for industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starcher, K.O.

    1984-03-09

    The need for human factors (ergonomics) input in the layout of a ferroelectric ceramics laboratory is presented as an example of the overall need for human factors professionals in industry. However, even in the absence of one trained in human factors, knowledge of a few principles in ergonomics will provide many possibilities for improving performance in the industrial environment.

  19. Coal mining and the environment: Does SMCRA give regulators appropriate enforcement tools?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), 30 U.S.C. 1201 et seq (1990), reshaped the regulation of coal mining and affored government regulators a comprehensive set of enforcement tools. Major controveries remain, such as the definitions haping the Application Violator System, and the extent of federal authority to oversee the states` primary enforcement responsibility. Despite these contentious issues the federal and state programs have fundamentally succeeded in enforcing SMCRA and have successfully altered the landscape of coal mining. The structure of SMCRA`s enforcement provisions is a critical factor in this success. The article discusses in more detain the following areas: the core of SMCRA: permits and Bonds; Maintaining Standards: inspections and sanction for noncompliance; the applicant violator system; other enforcement tools.

  20. Improved design of room and pillar coal mining. Final technical report, October 1, 1978-March 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1982-06-30

    The objective of this research grant was to improve upon the design of roof spans and coal pillars in a coal mining technique known as room-and-pillar mining. Essentially, the project consisted of three aspects: determination of stable roof spans; determination of the strength of coal pillars; and determination of safety factors for room-and-pillar coal mining conditions in the United States. The study included a critical review of the available pillar design formulas as well as the design methods for selecting stable roof spans. Three novel approaches were utilized: (1) the petite sismique technique was assessed for possible determination of coal pillar deformability; this was the first use of this technique in the United States since its development in France; (2) the Geomechanics Classification was extended for determination of safe roof spans in room-and-pillar coal mining; and (3) a national survey of the current design practice as well as of the stable and failed coal pillars and roof spans was performed with the aim of determining factors of safety in room-and-pillar coal mining. Research investigations included field studies, laboratory testing and analytical computer simulations. The final outcome of the project is a proposal for a design code for room-and-pillar coal mining in the United States. In the course of this research, seven publications were prepared and three M.S. theses were completed. Practical applications of this research are discussed.

  1. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J.

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  2. ESF Mine Power Center Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.A. Misiak

    2000-02-10

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to structurally evaluate the existing Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) mine power center (MPC) support frames and to design service platforms that will attach to the MPC support frames. This analysis follows the Development Plan titled ''Produce Additional Design for Title 111 Evaluation Report'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This analysis satisfies design recommended in the ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Power System'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b, Section 7.6) and concurred with in the ''System Safety Evaluation of Title 111 Evaluation Reports Recommended Work'' (Gwyn 1999, Section 10.1.1). This analysis does not constitute a level-3 deliverable, a level-4 milestone, or a supporting work product. This document is not being prepared in support of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Site Recommendation (SR), Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), or License Application (LA) and should not be cited as a reference in the MGR SR, EIS, or LA.

  3. Method of validating measurement data of a process parameter from a plurality of individual sensor inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for generating a validated measurement of a process parameter at a point in time by using a plurality of individual sensor inputs from a scan of said sensors at said point in time. The sensor inputs from said scan are stored and a first validation pass is initiated by computing an initial average of all stored sensor inputs. Each sensor input is deviation checked by comparing each input including a preset tolerance against the initial average input. If the first deviation check is unsatisfactory, the sensor which produced the unsatisfactory input is flagged as suspect. It is then determined whether at least two of the inputs have not been flagged as suspect and are therefore considered good inputs. If two or more inputs are good, a second validation pass is initiated by computing a second average of all the good sensor inputs, and deviation checking the good inputs by comparing each good input including a present tolerance against the second average. If the second deviation check is satisfactory, the second average is displayed as the validated measurement and the suspect sensor as flagged as bad. A validation fault occurs if at least two inputs are not considered good, or if the second deviation check is not satisfactory. In the latter situation the inputs from each of all the sensors are compared against the last validated measurement and the value from the sensor input that deviates the least from the last valid measurement is displayed.

  4. Remining to reclaim abandoned mined lands: Virginia`s initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipper, C.E.; Lambert, B.

    1998-12-31

    Abandoned Mined Lands (AML) are lands that were mined prior to implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) in 1977, but were inadequately reclaimed. Re-mining of AML is being conducted on a routine basis by coal-mining operations in eastern states such as Virginia. Re-mining is a potentially important means of reclaiming AML. However, under current policies, re-mining operations often fail to permit and reclaim priority 1, 2, and 3 AML, especially those areas which present the most severe environmental problems. This paper describes policy issues which affect the potential for AML reclamation by re-mining operations in mountainous mining areas, such as Virginia; efforts underway in Virginia which seek to resolve those issues; and progress achieved to date under that initiative.

  5. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  6. Alaska Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas Alaska Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual

  7. Summary of Input Request for Information DE-FOA-0001346 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Input Request for Information DE-FOA-0001346 Summary of Input Request for Information DE-FOA-0001346 PDF icon September 2015 More Documents & Publications Summary of Stakeholder Input From May 2015 Request for Information Summary of Input Request for Information DE-FOA-0001346 DE-FOA-0001346 -- Request for Information (RFI) Summary of Input Request for Information DE-FOA-0001346

  8. Residential oil burners with low input and two stages firing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, T.; Krajewski, R.; Leigh, R.

    1997-12-31

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized, retention head burner. At low firing rates pressure atomizing nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the small internal passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. To overcome the low input limitations of conventional burners, a low pressure air-atomized burner has been developed watch can operate at fining rates as low as 0.25 gallons of oil per hour (10 kW). In addition, the burner can be operated in a high/low fining rate mode. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at a fixed input rate of 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination. At the test home, instrumentation was installed to measure fuel and energy flows and record trends in system temperatures. Laboratory efficiency testing with water heaters and boilers has been completed using standard single purpose and combined appliance test procedures. The tests quantify benefits due to low firing rates and other burner features. A two stage oil burner gains a strong advantage in rated efficiency while maintaining capacity for high domestic hot water and space heating loads.

  9. Colorado Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 9,868 9,133 8,877 7,927 9,137 8,934 8,095 8,612 10,322 9,190 1990's 15,379 6,778 7,158 8,456 8,168 7,170 6,787 6,314 5,292 4,526 2000's 4,772 5,625 5,771 5,409 5,308 5,285 6,149 6,869 6,258 7,527 2010's 5,148 4,268 4,412 4,077 4,120 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  10. RF Input Power Couplers for High Current SRF Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, V. F.; Anders, W.; Burrill, Andrew; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Neumann, Axel; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-12-01

    High current SRF technology is being explored in present day accelerator science. The bERLinPro project is presently being built at HZB to address the challenges involved in high current SRF machines with the goal of generating and accelerating a 100 mA electron beam to 50 MeV in continuous wave (cw) mode at 1.3 GHz. One of the main challenges in this project is that of handling the high input RF power required for the photo-injector as well as booster cavities where there is no energy recovery process. A high power co-axial input power coupler is being developed to be used for the photo-injector and booster cavities at the nominal beam current. The coupler is based on the KEK–cERL design and has been modified to minimise the penetration of the coupler tip in the beam pipe without compromising on beam-power coupling (Qext ~105). Herein we report on the RF design of the high power (115 kW per coupler, dual couplers per cavity) bERLinPro (BP) coupler along with initial results on thermal calculations. We summarise the RF conditioning of the TTF-III couplers (modified for cw operation) performed in the past at BESSY/HZB. A similar conditioning is envisaged in the near future for the low current SRF photo-injector and the bERLinPro main linac cryomodule.

  11. Regulating for the long term: SMCRA and acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    With the passage of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), regulators and industry representatives expected to solve the problem of pollution of the Nation`s waterways caused by acidic discharges from coal mines. Eighteen years after the passage of SMCRA, hard issues of predicting, regulating and treating acid mine drainage remain. Acid mine drainage is most common in the coal seams of the Midwest and Appalachia: Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Illinois, and Tennessee. This article discusses regulation of coal mines and acid mine drainage for the long term.

  12. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

    2006-03-31

    Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and reclamation practice. In addition, experiments were integrated within the reforestation effort to address specific questions pertaining to sequestration of carbon (C) on these sites.

  13. Noise exposures in US coal mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiler, J.P.; Valoski, M.P.; Crivaro, M.A.

    1994-05-01

    Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) inspectors conduct full-shift environmental noise surveys to determine the occupational noise levels to which coal miners are exposed. These noise surveys are performed to determine compliance with the noise standard promulgated under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. Data from over 60,000 full-shift noise surveys conducted from fiscal year 1986 through 1992 were entered into a computer data base to facilitate analysis. This paper presents the mean and standard deviation of over 60,000 full-shift noise dose measurements for various underground and surface coal mining occupations. Additionally, it compares and contrasts the levels with historical noise exposure measurements for selected coal mining occupations that were published in the 1970`s. The findings were that the percentage of miners surveyed that were subjected to noise exposures above 100%, neglecting personal hearing protectors, were 26.5% and 21.6% for surface and underground mining, respectively. Generally, the trend is that the noise exposures for selected occupations have decreased since the 1970`s.

  14. Active mines in Arizona - 1993. Directory 40

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, K.A.; Niemuth, N.J.; Bain, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    A directory of the active mines in Arizona is presented. The directory was compiled in November, 1992 from field visits and information received by the Department's technical staff. For the purpose of this directory, an active mine is defined as a mine in continuous operation, either in production or under full-time development for production. Custom milling operations that are active or available on a full-time basis are also included in the directory. It is acknowledged that there are additional mines not listed that are in an exploration, evaluation, or part-time development phase. There are others where production is on an intermittent basis that are not listed. The report is dependent on the cooperation of government agencies, private industry, and individuals who voluntarily provide information on their projects and activities. The directory is arranged alphabetically by company name. Each listing includes corporate addresses, mine name and location, operation description, and key personnel. The listing for the sand and gravel operations include name, address, and phone number.

  15. Graph Mining Meets the Semantic Web

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sangkeun; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Lim, Seung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The Resource Description Framework (RDF) and SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) were introduced about a decade ago to enable flexible schema-free data interchange on the Semantic Web. Today, data scientists use the framework as a scalable graph representation for integrating, querying, exploring and analyzing data sets hosted at different sources. With increasing adoption, the need for graph mining capabilities for the Semantic Web has emerged. We address that need through implementation of three popular iterative Graph Mining algorithms (Triangle count, Connected component analysis, and PageRank). We implement these algorithms as SPARQL queries, wrapped within Python scripts. We evaluate the performance of our implementation on 6 real world data sets and show graph mining algorithms (that have a linear-algebra formulation) can indeed be unleashed on data represented as RDF graphs using the SPARQL query interface.

  16. MULTIPLE INPUT BINARY ADDER EMPLOYING MAGNETIC DRUM DIGITAL COMPUTING APPARATUS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke-Yarborough, E.H.

    1960-12-01

    A digital computing apparatus is described for adding a plurality of multi-digit binary numbers. The apparatus comprises a rotating magnetic drum, a recording head, first and second reading heads disposed adjacent to the first and second recording tracks, and a series of timing signals recorded on the first track. A series of N groups of digit-representing signals is delivered to the recording head at time intervals corresponding to the timing signals, each group consisting of digits of the same significance in the numbers, and the signal series is recorded on the second track of the drum in synchronism with the timing signals on the first track. The multistage registers are stepped cyclically through all positions, and each of the multistage registers is coupled to the control lead of a separate gate circuit to open the corresponding gate at only one selected position in each cycle. One of the gates has its input coupled to the bistable element to receive the sum digit, and the output lead of this gate is coupled to the recording device. The inputs of the other gates receive the digits to be added from the second reading head, and the outputs of these gates are coupled to the adding register. A phase-setting pulse source is connected to each of the multistage registers individually to step the multistage registers to different initial positions in the cycle, and the phase-setting pulse source is actuated each N time interval to shift a sum digit to the bistable element, where the multistage register coupled to bistable element is operated by the phase- setting pulse source to that position in its cycle N steps before opening the first gate, so that this gate opens in synchronism with each of the shifts to pass the sum digits to the recording head.

  17. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

  18. WIPP’s Mine Rescue Teams Lead Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant’s (WIPP) two mine rescue teams recently led the field of 13 groups competing in the Southwest Regional Mine Rescue Contest.

  19. Westinghouse Earns Mine Safety Award for 16th Consecutive Year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was recently awarded the "Mine Operator of the Year Award" at the annual New Mexico Mining Association Convention held in Silver City, N.M. WTS, the management and operating...

  20. Microsoft Word - Mine Rescue Team Wins Best Overall at Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) judge each team's response skills. Joe Baca won first place in the Benchman's Contest. The benchman's job on a mine rescue team is...

  1. Colorado School of Mines | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Mines Home CSM's picture Submitted by CSM(5) Member 14 May, 2014 - 21:59 Travis Brown and Kamran Baksh, Final Submission Colorado School of Mines Waunita Hot Springs...

  2. Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mining Land and Water Jump to: navigation, search Name: Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Address: 550 W. 7th Ave., Suite 1260 Place: Anchorage, Alaska Zip: 99501-3557 Phone...

  3. Colorado School of Mines Researchers Win Patent | Critical Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News News releases CMI in the news News archive CMI social media Colorado School of Mines Researchers Win Patent The Coloroado School of Mines 2013 highlights include news that...

  4. Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Co 3M | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mining and Manufacturing Co 3M Jump to: navigation, search Name: Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Co (3M) Place: Saint Paul, Minnesota Zip: MN 55144-1000 Product: US-based...

  5. Framework for autonomous navigation of a continuous mining machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    This report includes a discussion of the navigational tasks performed by operators of mobile mining equipment, with the focus on the navigational information and guidance techniques required by continuous mining machine operators. Some previous research and attempts in remote and autonomous navigation of continuous mining machines are mentioned. Issues of research in autonomous navigation of various other mobile robots are presented, with attention focused on their applicability to a continuous mining machine navigating in the mining environment. Conclusions are stated on methods of automating the navigational tasks of a contionuous mining machine, and a decision to concentrate intitial attempts on the tasks of autonomous face navigation is defended. This report includes a presentation of the Bureau's proposed solution for autonomous face navigation of a continous mining machine, which includes the employment of a mobile roof support as a reference for guidance in the face area, and a navigational guidance system for the continuous mining machine.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Abandoned Uranium Mines

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Uranium Mines Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management completed a report on defense-related uranium mines in consultation with...

  7. Conversion of Coal Mine Gas to LNG

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conversion of Coal Mine Gas to LNG Final Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date Reporting Period End Date Report issued October 01, 2000 March 31, 2013 February 5, 2016 Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00NT40978 Submitted by: Appalachian-Pacific Coal Mine Methane Power Company 5053 Glenbrook Terrace NW Washington, DC 20016-2602 1 DISCLAIMER: "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor

  8. High pressure water jet mining machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  9. Coal mine ground control. 3rd ed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.

    2008-09-15

    The third edition not only completely revises and updates the original subject areas, but also is broadened to include a number of new topics such as high horizontal stresses, computer modeling, and highwall stability. The subject areas covered in this book define the current field of coal mine ground control, except for the recently emerging topic of mine seals and some conventional subjects such as coal/rock cutting and impoundment dams. It contains 1,134 references from all published sources, and archived since 1876.

  10. Major manufacturing and mining investment projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book lists manufacturing and mining investment projects with development costs of $5 million or more. Manufacturing projects are classified in accordance with the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Australian Standard Industrial Classification (ASIC) and mining projects by broad mineral categories. The book includes information on the nature of each project, its location and timing, the company of joint venture name, whether the investment is at a new site or at an existing site, the type of product, the value of the annual output, production, employment, past and future costs and the composition (structure and plant) of the investment.

  11. WIPP Mine Rescue Team Wins Regional Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Competition CARLSBAD, N.M., May 31, 2001 - The Blue Mine Rescue Team from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) placed first in the recent Southern Regional Mine Rescue Competition, continuing a winning streak in regional contests. The WIPP Blue Team led throughout the competition, May 17-19 in New Iberia, Louisiana. Faced with solving problems in the field, deciphering a map, and taking a written exam, the Blue Team excelled in each category. This was

  12. WIPP Mine Rescue Team Sweeps Southeast Missouri Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Team Sweeps Southeast Missouri Competition CARLSBAD, N.M., October 15, 2001 - The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Blue Mine Rescue Team captured first place in all three categories at the 19 th Annual Southeast Missouri Mine Rescue Competition held October 3-5 at the University of Missouri at Rolla. The WIPP Blue Team outscored mining industry teams from Louisiana, New Mexico, Mississippi and Missouri in the competition, which took place in a mine maintained by the University of Missouri at

  13. WIPP's Mine Rescue Team Wins Top Honors at National Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 8, 2015 WIPP's Mine Rescue Team Wins Top Honors at National Competition The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Blue Mine Rescue team competed in the Missouri Regional Underground Mine Rescue Competition last week bringing home top honors in the field and first aid competitions. They also took the "Best Out of State" and the Governor's traveling trophy. The competition included 22 nationally ranked mine rescue teams representing Nevada, Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas, Missouri,

  14. Time dependence in atmospheric carbon inputs from drainage of organic soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rojstaczer, S.; Deverel, S.J. )

    1993-07-09

    The authors report the results of a study in the San Joaquin-Sacramento Delta of CO[sub 2] emission from drained soils relative to the rate of subsidence of the land. Their interest is in quantifying the rate carbon is freed from soils which are being drained, primarily for agricultural purposes, relative to the observed subsidence rates. This information is one of the inputs in the global carbon cycle. It is argued that most subsidence is the result of carbon oxidation. The fact that subsidence rates correlate with carbon dioxide emission rates supports this argument. In this Delta, subsidence rates have been decreasing in recent years, and measurements indicate that present carbon dioxide emission rates are lower than previous estimates by a factor or 3 or 4.

  15. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  16. Coal recovery from mine wastes of the historic longwall mining district of north-central illinois. Illinois mineral notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, L.A.; Berggren, D.J.; Camp, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Recovery of coal from mine wastes produced by historic longwall mines in northeastern Illinois was studied as part of a project undertaken in 1982 for the Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands Reclamation Council. About 100 of these mines operated in the Wilmington and La Salle Districts of the Illinois Coal Field between about 1870 and 1940; all worked the Colchester (No. 2) Coal Seam, using a manual high-extraction mining method. Large samples of the three major kinds of mine waste - gray mining gob, preparation gob, and preparation slurry - were collected from deposits at nine of the larger mine sites and analyzed to determine their general ranges of sulfur, ash, and heating values. Preparation gob and slurry from six of the sites had significant combustible contents, and were evaluated by a simple procedure in which ash analyses and wet-screening tests were used to determine the washability and yield of combustibles to recovery processes.

  17. Rock mass response to the decline in underground coal mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holub, K.

    2006-01-15

    Geomechanical problems of mining in the Ostrava-Karvina Coal Basin were studied on the basis of longterm experience gained from seismological observations. They could serve as reasonable models of rock-mass response to temporary reduction and gradual decline in mining activities and mine closure.

  18. SOLUTION MINING IN SALT DOMES OF THE GULF COAST EMBAYMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, G. B.

    1981-02-01

    Following a description of salt resources in the salt domes of the gulf coast embayment, mining, particularly solution mining, is described. A scenario is constructed which could lead to release of radioactive waste stored in a salt dome via inadvertent solution mining and the consequences of this scenario are analyzed.

  19. Benthic invertebrate metals exposure, accumulation, and community-level effects downstream from a hard-rock mine site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beltman, D.J.; Lipton, J.; Cacela, D.; Clements, W.H.

    1999-02-01

    This study quantitatively evaluated the relationships among As, Co, and Cu concentrations in exposure media (surface water, sediment, and aufwuchs), As, Co, and Cu concentrations in aquatic macroinvertebrates, and invertebrate community structure in a mine-affected stream. Concentrations of As, Co, and Cu were significantly elevated in both exposure media and invertebrate tissue downstream from the mine. Copper in invertebrates was significantly correlated only with Cu in aufwuchs, and Co in invertebrates was significantly correlated only with dissolved Co in water, suggesting different mechanisms of invertebrate accumulation for these two metals. The invertebrate community was severely affected downstream from the mine, with a loss of metals-sensitive species and reductions in both total biomass and number of species. Total abundance was not affected. Principal components analysis was performed on the invertebrate community data to develop a simplified description of community response to mine inputs. Based on this index, metal concentrations in invertebrates were poor predictors of community structure. Copper concentrations in water, combined with an estimate of invertebrate drift from clean tributaries, were statistically significant predictors of community structure.

  20. Disaster risk management in prospect mining area Blitar district, East Java, using microtremor analysis and ANP (analytical network processing) approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parwatiningtyas, Diyan E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com; Ambarsari, Erlin Windia E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com; Marlina, Dwi E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com; Wiratomo, Yogi E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com

    2014-03-24

    Indonesia has a wealth of natural assets is so large to be managed and utilized, either from its own local government and local communities, especially in the mining sector. However, mining activities can change the state of the surface layer of the earth that have a high impact disaster risk. This could threaten the safety and disrupt human life, environmental damage, loss of property, and the psychological impact, sulking to the rule of law no 24 of 2007. That's why we strive to manage and minimize the risk of mine disasters in the region, how to use the method of calculation of Amplification Factor (AF) from the analysis based microtremor sulking Kanai and Nakamura, and decision systems were tested by analysis of ANP. Based on the amplification factor and Analytical Network Processing (ANP) obtained, some points showed instability in the surface layer of a mining area include the site of the TP-7, TP-8, TP-9, TP-10, (Birowo2). If in terms of structure, location indicated unstable due to have a sloping surface layer, resulting in the occurrence of landslides and earthquake risk is high. In the meantime, other areas of the mine site can be said to be a stable area.

  1. V-168: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-168: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks May 31, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis...

  2. T-602: BlackBerry Enterprise Server Input Validation Flaw in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    02: BlackBerry Enterprise Server Input Validation Flaw in BlackBerry Web Desktop Manager Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-602: BlackBerry Enterprise Server Input Validation...

  3. V-124: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-124: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks April 2, 2013 - 1:13am Addthis...

  4. U-144:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The VPN management interface does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input. A remote user can cause arbitrary scripting code to be executed by the target user's browser.

  5. V-112: Microsoft SharePoint Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Denial of Service Attacks V-112: Microsoft SharePoint Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Denial...

  6. BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends in Small Engines BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends in Small Engines June 22, 2015 - ...

  7. Geotechnical considerations in surface mine reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhn, A.K.

    1999-07-01

    Most attention in surface mine reclamation is given to agronomic soils and revegetation, but reclamation success depends on the geotechnical characteristics of the underlying earth. If the soil and rock that underline the surface are not stable, surface treatments lack the dependable foundation needed for them to succeed. Reclamation practioners need to understand those geotechnical considerations--material properties, structure, and processes--that affect stability. properties of rock and soil are altered by mining, and those altered materials together with water and processing waste form often-complex mixtures of materials that must be stabilized in reclamation. Surface mining alters existing landforms and creates new ones such as pit walls, spoil and waste rock piles, tailings impoundments, and earthfills. those structures need to be constructed or stabilized so that they can endure and support successful reclamation. processes that affect material properties and landforms include mechanical breakage, accelerated weathering, erosion, and mass movements. Mechanical breakage and the resulting accelerated weathering combine to change material properties, usually expressed as degraded strength, that can lead to instability of landforms. Erosion, especially that related to extreme storm events, and mass movements in the form of slop failures are the most problematic processes that must be taken into account in reclaiming mined lands. These geotechnical considerations are essential in successful reclamation, and practioners who overlook them may find their work literally sliding down a slippery slope.

  8. WIRELESS MINE-WIDE TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvi H. Meiksin

    2004-01-01

    A prototype tracking system was built and tested. Moving vehicles were detected by the tracking system when a vehicle was 20 to 30 feet away from a location sensor. The identity of the vehicle was transmitted to Transtek's in-mine communications system and relayed to a desktop computer.

  9. Motor technology for mining applications advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-08-15

    AC motors are steadily replacing DC motors in mining and mineral processing equipment, requiring less maintenance. The permanent magnet rotor, or the synchronous motor, has enabled Blador to introduce a line of cooling tower motors. Synchronous motors are soon likely to take over from the induction motor. 1 photo.

  10. Generating power with drained coal mine methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-01

    The article describes the three technologies most commonly used for generating electricity from coal mine methane: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and microturbines. The most critical characteristics and features of these technologies, such as efficiency, output and size are highlighted. 5 refs.

  11. A study of mining-induced seismicity in Czech mines with longwall coal exploitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holub, K.

    2007-01-15

    A review is performed for the data of local and regional seismographical networks installed in mines of the Ostrava-Karvina Coal Basin (Czech Republic), where underground anthracite mining is carried out and dynamic events occur in the form of rockbursts. The seismological and seismoacoustic observations data obtained in panels that are in limiting state are analyzed. This aggregate information is a basic for determining hazardous zones and assigning rockburst prevention measures.

  12. Preliminary report on LLNL mine seismicity deployment at the Twentymile Coal Mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W.R.; Hunter, S.L.; Glenn, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the preliminary results of a just completed experiment at the Twentymile Coal Mine, operated by the Cyprus Amax Coal Company near Oak Creek, CO. The purpose of the experiment was to obtain local and regional seismic data from roof caves associated with long-wall mining activities and to use this data to help determine the effectiveness with which these events can be discriminated from underground nuclear explosions under a future Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  13. EVALUATION OF A METHOD USING COLLOIDAL GAS APHRONS TO REMEDIATE METALS-CONTAMINATED MINE DRAINAGE WATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Williams Grimes

    2002-06-01

    Experiments were conducted in which three selected metals-contaminated mine drainage water samples were treated by chemical precipitation followed by flotation using colloidal gas aphrons (CGAs) to concentrate the precipitates. Drainage water samples used in the experiments were collected from an abandoned turn-of-the-century copper mine in south-central Wyoming, an inactive gold mine in Colorado's historic Clear Creek mining district, and a relatively modern gold mine near Rapid City, South Dakota. The copper mine drainage sample was nearly neutral (pH 6.5) while the two gold mine samples were quite acidic (pH {approx}2.5). Metals concentrations ranged from a few mg/L for the copper mine drainage to several thousand mg/L for the sample from South Dakota. CGAs are emulsions of micrometer-sized soap bubbles generated in a surfactant solution. In flotation processes the CGA microbubbles provide a huge interfacial surface area and cause minimal turbulence as they rise through the liquid. CGA flotation can provide an inexpensive alternative to dissolved air flotation (DAF). The CGA bubbles are similar in size to the bubbles typical of DAF. However, CGAs are generated at ambient pressure, eliminating the need for compressors and thus reducing energy, capital, and maintenance costs associated with DAF systems. The experiments involved precipitation of dissolved metals as either hydroxides or sulfides followed by flotation. The CGAs were prepared using a number of different surfactants. Chemical precipitation followed by CGA flotation reduced contaminant metals concentrations by more than 90% for the copper mine drainage and the Colorado gold mine drainage. Contaminant metals were concentrated into a filterable sludge, representing less than 10% of the original volume. CGA flotation of the highly contaminated drainage sample from South Dakota was ineffective. All of the various surfactants used in this study generated a large sludge volume and none provided a significant concentration factor with this sample. For the two samples where CGA flotation was effective, the separation was very rapid and the concentrate volume was reduced when compared to gravity separation under similar conditions. Effective separations were achieved with very low chemical dosages and low residence times, suggesting the possibility of economic viability for processes based on this concept. The CGA flotation experiments described in the following report were conducted to provide preliminary data with which to assess the technical feasibility of using the method for remediation of metals-contaminated mine drainage waters. The experiments were conducted using common, low-cost, precipitating reagents and CGA prepared from several surfactants. Results were evaluated in terms of metals concentration reduction, reagent consumption, and concentrate volume. The results of these preliminary experiments indicate that CGA flotation may be a useful tool for the treatment of some types of mine drainage.

  14. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    English, R.E. Jr.; Johnson, S.A.

    1994-10-11

    An interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams in the form of illumination bar to the lasing zone of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier. The preferred interface module includes an optical fiber array having a plurality of optical fibers arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source, and their proximal ends delivered into a relay structure. The proximal ends of the optical fibers are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array delivered from the optical fiber array is acted upon by an optical element array to produce an illumination bar which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window. The illumination bar is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout. 5 figs.

  15. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    English, Jr., Ronald E.; Johnson, Steve A.

    1994-01-01

    An interface module (10) for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams (36) in the form of illumination bar (54) to the lasing zone (18) of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier (12). The preferred interface module (10) includes an optical fiber array (30) having a plurality of optical fibers (38) arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends (44) receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source (46), and their proximal ends (4) delivered into a relay structure (3). The proximal ends (42) of the optical fibers (38) are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array (36) delivered from the optical fiber array (30) is acted upon by an optical element array (34) to produce an illumination bar (54) which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window (18). The illumination bar (54) is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout.

  16. Geological input to reservoir simulation, Champion Field, offshore Brunei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, R.; Salahudin, S.; Ho, T.C.

    1994-07-01

    Brunei Shell Petroleum's giant Champion field is in a mature stage of development with about 23 yr of production history to date. The field comprises a complex sequence of Miocene shallow marine and deltaic layered clastic reservoirs cut by numerous growth faults. This study was aimed at providing a quantified estimate of the effect of lateral and vertical discontinuities within the I and J reservoirs on the recovery for both depletion drive and in a waterflood, with a view to identifying the optimal method of completing the development of the oil reserves in this area. Geological input to the ECLIPSE simulator was aimed at quantifying two key parameters: (1) STOIIP connected to the well bore and (2) permeability contrast. Connected STOIIP is a function of the domain size of interconnected sand bodies, and this parameter was quantified by the use of detailed sedimentology resulting in sand-body facies maps for each reservoir sublayer. Permeability contrast was quantified by using a wireline-log based algorithm, calibrated against core data, which improved the existing accuracy of permeability estimates in this part of the field. Results of simulation runs illustrate the importance of quantifying geologic heterogeneity and provide valuable information for future field development planning.

  17. Reduction of fire hazards on large mining equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maria I. De Rosa

    2008-09-15

    Although standards and regulations are in place to prevent large mining equipment fires, recent analyses of mine accident data show that mining equipment fires still occur with alarming frequency and grave consequences, particularly at all surface mines and in underground metal/nonmetal mines. Recently technological advances in fire protection, combined with the statistical data on equipment fires, led NIOSH to reinvestigate this and to improve operator safety. NIOSH demonstrated that newly developed technologies, such as dual cab fire inerting systems and engine compartment fire barriers, can greatly enhance operator safety and lessen the damage of property during large mobile equipment fires. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Expert systems - An overview and a mining example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, J.L.; Ramani, R.V.; Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1986-01-01

    The knowledge-based expert systems (KBES) is a potentially powerful technique to the mining engineer in traditional areas of mine design and operations, as well as in the emerging areas of mining automation and robotics. Since KBES is still experimental in many respects, caution must be exercised as this ''high tech'' tool is developed and applied to mining. The objective of this paper is to demystify expert systems by introducing the elements of KBES, discussing the strengths and weaknesses, and identifying some areas of application in mining, based on the authors' experiences.

  19. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficientmore » (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.« less

  20. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficient (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.

  1. Dynamic Slope Stability Analysis of Mine Tailing Deposits: the Case of Raibl Mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberto, Meriggi; Marco, Del Fabbro; Erica, Blasone; Erica, Zilli

    2008-07-08

    Over the last few years, many embankments and levees have collapsed during strong earthquakes or floods. In the Friuli Venezia Giulia Region (North-Eastern Italy), the main source of this type of risk is a slag deposit of about 2x10{sup 6} m{sup 3} deriving from galena and lead mining activity until 1991 in the village of Raibl. For the final remedial action plan, several in situ tests were performed: five boreholes equipped with piezometers, four CPTE and some geophysical tests with different approaches (refraction, ReMi and HVSR). Laboratory tests were conducted on the collected samples: geotechnical classification, triaxial compression tests and constant head permeability tests in triaxial cell. Pressure plate tests were also done on unsaturated slag to evaluate the characteristic soil-water curve useful for transient seepage analysis. A seepage analysis was performed in order to obtain the maximum pore water pressures during the intense rainfall event which hit the area on 29th August 2003. The results highlight that the slag low permeability prevents the infiltration of rainwater, which instead seeps easily through the boundary levees built with coarse materials. For this reason pore water pressures inside the deposits are not particularly influenced by rainfall intensity and frequency. Seismic stability analysis was performed with both the pseudo-static method, coupled with Newmark's method, and dynamic methods, using as design earthquake the one registered in Tolmezzo (Udine) on 6{sup th} May 1976. The low reduction of safety factors and the development of very small cumulative displacements show that the stability of embankments is assured even if an earthquake of magnitude 6.4 and a daily rainfall of 141.6 mm occur at the same time.

  2. Ergonomics - Using Ergonomics to Enhance Safe Production at a Surface Coal Mine - A Case Study with Powder Crews

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torma-Krajewski, J.; Wiehagen, W.; Etcheverry, A.; Turin, F.; Unger, R.

    2009-07-01

    Job tasks that involve exposure to work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) risk factors may impact both the risk of injury and production downtime. Common WMSD risks factors associated with mining tasks include forceful exertions, awkward postures, repetitive motion, jolting and jarring, forceful gripping, contact stress, and whole body and segmental vibration. Mining environments that expose workers to temperature/humidity extremes, windy conditions, and slippery and uneven walking surfaces also contribute to injury risk. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) researchers worked with powder crew members from the Bridger Coal Company to identify and rank routine work tasks based on perceived exposure to WMSD risk factors. This article presents the process followed to identify tasks that workers believed involved the greatest exposure to risk factors and discusses risk reduction strategies. Specifically, the proposed prill truck design changes addressed cab ingress/egress, loading blast holes, and access to the upper deck of the prill truck.

  3. Methane modeling: predicting the inflow of methane gas into coal mines. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1982-June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, C.M. II; Hoysan, P.M.; Pavone, A.M.; Richmond, O.; Schwerer, F.C.; Smelser, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Work on Phase I of the Contract program is essentially complete and was reported in the Phase I Technical Report which has been reviewed and accepted by the Contract Technical Project Officer. Phase I work included a survey of relevant technical literature and development, demonstration and documentation of a computer model, MINE1D, for flow of methane and water in coal strata for geometries corresponding to an advancing mine face and to a mine pillar. The Phase I models are one-dimensional in the space variable but describe time-dependent (nonsteady) phenomena and include gas sorption phenomena. Some revisions have been made to input/output sections of MINE1D and the documentation has been expanded. These modifications will be reported in the next Quarterly Technical Report. Preliminary test scenarios have been formulated and reviewed with the Contract Technical Project Officer for measurement of emissions during room-and-pillar and longwall mining operations. These preliminary scenarios are described in this report. A mathematical model has been developed to describe the increased stresses on the coal seam near mine openings. The model is based on an approximate elastic/plastic treatment of the coal seam and an elastic treatment of surrounding strata. In this model, elastic compaction of the coal seam decreases porosity and permeability, whereas plastic deformation increases the porosity of the natural fracture network and thereby increases the permeability. The model takes into account the effect of changes in pore fluid pressure (in the natural fracture network of the coal seam) on the deformation of the coal seam. This model is described in this report, and will be programmed for inclusion in revised versions of MINE1D and for use in the two-dimensional computer models now under development. 8 figures.

  4. The SCALE Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data - VALID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, William BJ J; Rearden, Bradley T

    2013-01-01

    The Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) at ORNL contains high quality, independently reviewed models and results that improve confidence in analysis. VALID is developed and maintained according to a procedure of the SCALE quality assurance (QA) plan. This paper reviews the origins of the procedure and its intended purpose, the philosophy of the procedure, some highlights of its implementation, and the future of the procedure and associated VALID library. The original focus of the procedure was the generation of high-quality models that could be archived at ORNL and applied to many studies. The review process associated with model generation minimized the chances of errors in these archived models. Subsequently, the scope of the library and procedure was expanded to provide high quality, reviewed sensitivity data files for deployment through the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Sensitivity data files for approximately 400 such models are currently available. The VALID procedure and library continue fulfilling these multiple roles. The VALID procedure is based on the quality assurance principles of ISO 9001 and nuclear safety analysis. Some of these key concepts include: independent generation and review of information, generation and review by qualified individuals, use of appropriate references for design data and documentation, and retrievability of the models, results, and documentation associated with entries in the library. Some highlights of the detailed procedure are discussed to provide background on its implementation and to indicate limitations of data extracted from VALID for use by the broader community. Specifically, external users of data generated within VALID must take responsibility for ensuring that the files are used within the QA framework of their organization and that use is appropriate. The future plans for the VALID library include expansion to include additional experiments from the IHECSBE, to include experiments from areas beyond criticality safety, such as reactor physics and shielding, and to include application models. In the future, external SCALE users may also obtain qualification under the VALID procedure and be involved in expanding the library. The VALID library provides a pathway for the criticality safety community to leverage modeling and analysis expertise at ORNL.

  5. Reflection seismic mapping of an abandoned coal mine, Belleville, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, N.; Hinds, R.; Roark, M.

    1997-10-01

    Old mine location maps (1958 vintage) indicate that the northwestern part of an undeveloped property near the town of Belleville, St. Clair County, Illinois, is situated above an abandoned and now water-filled, room-and-pillar type coal mine. The central and southeast parts of the Belleville property are shown as overlying intact (non-mined) coal. The coal unit mined at the Belleville site, the Herrin No. 6 is Pennsylvanian in age and about 2.5 m thick at a depth of around 40 m. The current owners of the Belleville property want to construct a large building on the central and southeast parts of the site, but have been concerned about the accuracy of the old mine location maps because of recent mine-related surface subsidence in areas designated on the maps as not mined. To ensure that the proposed new development is located on structurally stable ground, a grid of ten high-resolution reflection seismic lines was acquired on-site. On these reflection seismic data, mined-out areas can be visually identified and differentiated from non-mined areas. The interpretation of the reflection seismic data was constrained and validated by 15 test boreholes. These seismic and borehole data confirm that the central and southeast parts of the property have not been mined extensively. Development of the Belleville site has proceeded with confidence.

  6. Site selection report: characterization of subsidence over longwall mining panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-20

    We have completed our evaluation of candidate longwall mines available for study in the Rocky Mountain Coal Province. This report summarizes our views and evaluation of two candidate mines, the Allen Mine in Weston, Colorado, and the Hawk's Nest Mine in Somerset, Colorado. WCC visited the Allen and the Hawk's Nest Mines, and rated them in order of preference for subsidence monitoring according to criteria given in this report. Based on these evaluations and related discussions with the Technical Project Officer, the Hawk's Nest Mine appears to be the preferred mine for subsidence monitoring, because it is the only candidate mine offering two adjacent longwall panels for monitoring wherein a full subsidence profile may be obtained for at least one of the panels. Selection of this mine requires that provisions be made for monitoring 2000 ft of overburden, whereas our proposal addressed a mine with 600 ft of overburden. Changes in instrumentation which may permit the project to remain within the current budget were investigated and are discussed.

  7. Marine clathrate mining and sediment separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borns, David J.; Hinkebein, Thomas E.; Lynch, Richard W.; Northrop, David A.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for mining of hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon-containing clathrate such as is found on the ocean floor. The hydrocarbon containing clathrate is disaggregated from sediment by first disrupting clathrate-containing strata using continuous mining means such as a rotary tilling drum, a fluid injector, or a drill. The clathrate-rich portion of sediment thus disrupted from the sea floor strata are carried through the apparatus to regions of relative lower pressure and/or relative higher temperature where the clathrate further dissociates into component hydrocarbons and water. The hydrocarbon is recovered with the assistance of a gas that is injected and buoys the hydrocarbon containing clathrate helping it to rise to regions of lower pressure and temperature where hydrocarbon is released. The sediment separated from the hydrocarbon returns to the ocean floor.

  8. Mining landforms - A renewable energy development opportunity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A {open_quotes}landforming{close_quotes} land development opportunity unique to metals mining is described. {open_quotes}Landforming{close_quotes}, wherein the earth`s surface is reconfigured with mining waste rock and tails for the capture of renewable energy, is proposed by the United States Bureau of Mines (USBM) to be ecologically acceptable and, in selected cases, economically superior to conventional mineral extraction, reclamation, and minesite abandonment practices. Landforming is primary land construction that uses mining waste and applies the principles of land overlay architecture. Landforms can be layered, shaped, and configured through the use of binders and plastic sheeting to the engineering specifications necessary for the support of physical structures and passage or retention of fluids. Landforms that are terraced and south facing (in the Northern Hemisphere) are an ideal mount for sun-tracking mirror (heliostat) arrays. In {open_quotes}blue sky{close_quotes}. solar-rich environments, the mirrors can be targeted on a common area to form a {open_quotes}solar furnace.{close_quotes} The heat generated at the focal point of the solar array can be used to flash generate steam and run a turbine electric generator. The solar steam power generation cycle coproducers distilled water that can be sprayed onto the surfaces of the landform to create {open_quotes}greenscape.{close_quotes} Waters not consumed or evaporated in the site greening process percolate into and are stored by the landform if it is underlain with plastic. The landform serves, in effect as a shallow aquifer. The terrace-landform development of mineral properties in remote, infrastructurally destitute areas creates renewable energy, sustainable, electric power-water {open_quotes}oases.{close_quotes} The landform development of mineral properties adjacent to metropolitan areas creates utilities expansions and recreational {open_quotes}greenspace{close_quotes} in areas of growing urban need.

  9. Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    i Analysis of Potential Impacts of Uranium Transfers on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries May 1, 2015 ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The Department of Energy ("Department" or "DOE") plans to transfer the equivalent of up to 2,100 metric tons ("MTU") of natural uranium per year (with a higher total for calendar year 2015, mainly because of transfers already executed or under way before today's determination). These transfers would include

  10. Cutting sound enhancement system for mining machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leigh, Michael C.; Kwitowski, August J.

    1992-01-01

    A cutting sound enhancement system (10) for transmitting an audible signal from the cutting head (101) of a piece of mine machinery (100) to an operator at a remote station (200), wherein, the operator using a headphone unit (14) can monitor the difference in sounds being made solely by the cutting head (101) to determine the location of the roof, floor, and walls of a coal seam (50).

  11. Innovative secondary support technologies for western mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barczak, T.M.; Molinda, G.M.

    1996-12-01

    With the development of the shield support, the primary requirement for successful ground control in longwall mining is to provide stable gate road and bleeder entries. Wood cribbing has been the dominant form of secondary support. However, the cost and limited availability of timber, along with the poor performance of softwood crib supports, has forced western U.S. mines to explore the utilization of other support systems. The recent success of cable bolts has engendered much interest from western operators. Several innovative freestanding support systems have been developed recently including: (1) {open_quotes}The Can{close_quotes} support by Burrell Mining Products International, Inc., (2) Hercules and Link-N-Lock wood cribs and Propsetter by Strata Products (USA) Inc., (3) Variable Yielding Crib and Power Crib supports by Mountainland Support Systems, (4) the Confined Core Crib developed by Southern Utah Fuels Corporation; and (5) the MEGA prop by MBK Hydraulik. This paper assesses design considerations and compares the performance and application of these alternative secondary support systems.

  12. An evaluation of health risk to the public as a consequence of in situ uranium mining in Wyoming, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2015-08-30

    In the United States there is considerable public concern regarding the health effects of in situ recovery uranium mining. These concerns focus principally on exposure to contaminants mobilized in groundwater by the mining process. However, the risk arising as a result of mining must be viewed in light of the presence of naturally occurring uranium ore and other constituents which comprise a latent hazard. The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed new guidelines for successful restoration of an in situ uranium mine by limiting concentrations of thirteen groundwater constituents: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, nitrate (asmore » nitrogen), molybdenum, radium, total uranium, and gross α activity. We investigated the changes occurring to these constituents at an ISR uranium mine in Wyoming, USA by comparing groundwater quality at baseline measurement to that at stability (post-restoration) testing. Of the groundwater constituents considered, only uranium and radium-226 showed significant (p < 0.05) deviation from site-wide baseline conditions in matched-wells. Uranium concentrations increased by a factor of 5.6 (95% CI 3.6–8.9 times greater) while radium-226 decreased by a factor of about one half (95% CI 0.42–0.75 times less). Change in risk was calculated using the RESRAD (onsite) code for an individual exposed as a resident-farmer; total radiation dose to a resident farmer decreased from pre-to post-mining by about 5.2 mSv y–1. As a result, higher concentrations of uranium correspond to increased biomarkers of nephrotoxicity, however the clinical significance of this increase is unclear.« less

  13. DISPOSAL OF FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION ASH IN AN UNDERGROUND MINE TO CONTROL ACID MINE DRAINAGE AND SUBSIDENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-10-01

    This project evaluated the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with coal combustion byproducts. Success was measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). Phase 1 of the project was completed in September 1995 and was concerned with the development of the grout and a series of predictive models. These models were verified through the Phase II field phase and will be further verified fin the large scale field demonstration of Phase III. The verification allows the results to be packaged in such a way that the technology can be easily adapted to different site conditions. Phase II was successfully completed with 1000 cubic yards of grout being injected into Anker Energy's Fairfax mine. The grout flowed over 600 feet from a single injection borehole. The grout achieved a compressive strength of over 1000 psi (twice the level that is needed to guarantee subsidence control). Phase III was a full scale test at Anker's eleven acre Longridge mine site. The CCB grout replaced what was an open mine void with a solid so that the groundwater tends to flow around and through the pillars rather than through the previously mined areas. The project has demonstrated that CCBs can be successfully disposed in underground mines. Additionally, the project has shown that filling an abandoned underground mine with CCBs can lead to the reduction and elimination of environmental problems associated with underground mining such as acid mine drainage and subsidence. The filling of the Longridge Mine with 43,000 cubic yards of CCB grout resulted in a 97% reduction in acid mine drainage coming from the mine.

  14. Long term contracts, expansion, innovation and stability: North Dakota's lignite mines thrive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-08-15

    North Dakota's lignite coal industry is mainly located in three countries in the central part of the state. Its large surface lignite mines are tied through long-term (20-40 years) contracts to power plants. The article talks about operations at three of the most productive mines - the Freedom mine, Falkirk mine and Center Mine. 4 figs.

  15. The mine management professions in the twentieth-century Scottish coal mining industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perchard, A.

    2007-07-01

    This book seeks to redress the exclusion of colliery managers and other mining professionals from the history of British, and particularly Scottish, coal industries. This is accomplished by examining these groups within the most crucial period of their ascendancy in the Scottish coal mining industry, 1930-1966. This work seeks to place such persons within their context and to examine their roles, statuses and behaviours through their relationships with employees and the execution of their functions, also examining their terms and conditions of employment, the outlook of their professional associations, and that of their union. Through all this, Dr. Perchard illustrates how this growing consciousness amongst managerial employees in the industry was accompanied by an intense public discussion, within the mining professions, over their future shape, principles and occupational standards.

  16. Tribology of earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Rick D.

    2001-01-01

    Earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing each involve frequent, and often severe, mechanical interactions between metals, and between metals and abrasive nonmetallic and metallic materials (i.e., mineral bearing ores). The abrasive nature of ores causes significant wear to extracting, handling, and processing equipment. Consequently, wear in earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing operations results in the removal of large amounts of material from the wear surfaces of scraping, digging, and ore processing equipment. From an energy point of view, material wear of this nature is classified as an indirect tribological loss (Imhoff et al., 1985). Additionally, a significant amount of energy is expended to overcome frictional forces in the operation of all earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing machinery (i.e., a direct tribological loss). However, in these particular processes, wear losses are more than five times those of frictional losses. In general, the amount of material lost from a particular component in these operations, before it becomes unserviceable, is far greater than that which can be tolerated in typical metal-to-metal wear situations (e.g., lubricated bearing-shaft wear couples in machinery). Consequently, much of the equipment used in earthmoving, mining, and ore processing makes use of easily replaceable or repairable, and preferably low-cost, wear components. The mechanisms by which metal-to-metal and abrasive wear occurs, and the relationships between material properties and wear behavior, are reasonably well-understood in general terms. However, the specific wear mechanisms/wear material interactions that occur during earthmoving, digging, and the processing of ore are more complex, and depend on the wear material, and on the nature of abrasive, the type of loading, and the environment. As a result of this general knowledge, reliable predictions can be made regarding the performance of particular materials under a range of in-service operating conditions. This knowledge has allowed the rational selection of wear-resistant materials for use as earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing components, and new wear-resistant materials can be designed using our knowledge of the impact and abrasion mechanisms encountered in the day-to-day operation of components used in these operations.

  17. Injury experience in sand and gravel mining, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of sand and gravel mining in the United States for 1990. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, and occupation. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  18. Injury experience in coal mining, 1983. Informational report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1983. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in the report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of the report.

  19. Injury experience in stone mining, 1991. Information report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of stone mining in the united States for 1991. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  20. Injury experience in sand and gravel mining, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reich, R.B.; Hugler, E.C.

    1994-05-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of sand and gravel mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, and occupation. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  1. Injury experience in sand and gravel mining, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of sand and gravel mining in the United States for 1990. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, and occupation. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  2. Injury experience in sand and gravel mining, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of sand and gravel mining in the United States for 1991. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, and occupation. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  3. Injury experience in sand and gravel mining, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of sand and gravel mining in the United States for 1989. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, and occupation. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 38 tabs.

  4. Instrumentation plan for characterization of subsidence over longwall mining panels at Allen Mine, Weston, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rourke, J.

    1980-01-01

    The program includes surface, subsurface, and mine-level instrumentation to monitor subsidence characteristics over two adjacent longwall mining panels, situated in mountainous topography in southern Colorado. An installation plan has been detailed to show numbers and arrangements of instruments in and over the panels, and includes pertinent installation details. The appendix contains technical descriptions of standard features of some of the instrument systems, though in certain cases standard instruments will be modified by Woodward-Clyde Consultants (WCC) or the manufacturer to suit site specific installation requirements detailed on attached drawings. Technical discussions on the application of the instrument arrangements and data monitored to subsidence modeling are given in the report.

  5. Human Resources at Colorado School of Mines | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado School of Mines Employment at Colorado School of Mines Office of Human Resources: 1500 Illinois St., Suite 110 Golden, CO 80401 (303) 273-3250 (303) 384-2025 FAX Mike Dougherty mdougher@imines.edu Associate Vice President and Director (303)273-3554 Veronica Graves vgraves@mines.edu Assistant Director (303)-273-3056 Link to Office of Human Resources Link to Job Openings

  6. CMI Education Partner: Colorado School of Mines | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Education Partner: Colorado School of Mines Colorado School of Mines offers courses in several areas: Geology Engineering/Geochemistry Mining Engineering Metallurgical Engineering/Materials Science Chemistry Engineering Mineral Economics and Business Geology Engineering/Geochemistry GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 Hours. (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the

  7. CMI at Mines Hosts 160 Sixth Graders | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Mines Hosts 160 Sixth Graders Colorado School of Mines graduate student Mandi Hutchinson shows a compact fluorescent light bulb as she discusses the use of critical materials and rare earths in current technologies. The Denver School of Science and Technology's (DSST) College View sixth graders visited the Colorado School of Mines campus on Wednesday, July 8, for their fourth annual visit. More than 160 students enjoyed critical materials and energy presentations delivered by the Critical

  8. Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David LaRose

    2006-07-01

    This document details progress on the project ''Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity'' during the period from November 15, 2005 to May 14, 2006. Highlights include significant improvements in the accuracy and reliability of computer-vision based vulcanized splice detection, deployment of the vulcanized splice detection algorithms for daily use in two working mines, and successful demonstration of an early prototype of a Smart-Camera based system for on-site mechanical splice detection in coal mine installations.

  9. Enterprise Assessments Review of Mine Safety, Stabilization, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Habitability at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - October 2015 | Department of Energy Review of Mine Safety, Stabilization, and Habitability at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - October 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of Mine Safety, Stabilization, and Habitability at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - October 2015 October 2015 Review of Mine Safety, Stabilization, and Habitability at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA)

  10. Determining the research needs of the surface coal mining industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zell, L.M.

    1982-12-01

    This paper reveals avenues open to the coal industry to help gain technology and research information needed to meet the requirements of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. It discusses projects of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Coal Mining and the Mining and Reclamation Council of America (MARC) to help meet the environmental needs as well as the coal industry needs.

  11. Failure of man-made cavities in salt and surface subsidence due to sulfur mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, G.K.; Lee, C.A.; McClain, W.C.; Senseny, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    An engineering data base relevant to subsidence due to sulfur mining and to structural failure of cavities in salt is established, evaluated and documented. Nineteen failure events are discussed. Based on these documented failure events, capabilities of and inputs to a mathematical model of cavity failure are determined. Two failure events are adequately documented for use in model verification studies. A conclusion of this study that is pertinent to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve is that cavity failures in dome salt are fairly rare, but that as the number of large cavities (especially those having large roof spans) increases, failures will probably be more common unless stability and failure mechanisms of cavities are better understood.

  12. BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends in Small

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engines | Department of Energy Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends in Small Engines BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends in Small Engines June 22, 2015 - 4:39pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office has released a Request for Information (RFI) seeking stakeholder input on the following topics related to the use of advanced biofuel blends in small engines:

  13. DOE Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory DOE Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory March 9, 2007 - 10:28am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking input from industry representatives on the safe disposition of approximately 15,300 tons of nickel scrap recovered from uranium enrichment process equipment at the Department's Oak Ridge, TN, and Paducah, KY, facilities. The Expression of Interest (EOI), released today, will

  14. DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it is seeking public and industry input on how to best achieve the goals and meet the requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) demonstration project work at DOE's Idaho National Laboratory. DOE today issued a Request for Information and Expressions of Interest

  15. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers | Department of Energy A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers Comment that a requirement to reduce the BTU input rate of existing decorative

  16. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratorys Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  17. Rail-to-rail differential input amplification stage with main and surrogate differential pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr., Charles Lanier; Smith, Stephen Fulton

    2007-03-06

    An operational amplifier input stage provides a symmetrical rail-to-rail input common-mode voltage without turning off either pair of complementary differential input transistors. Secondary, or surrogate, transistor pairs assume the function of the complementary differential transistors. The circuit also maintains essentially constant transconductance, constant slew rate, and constant signal-path supply current as it provides rail-to-rail operation.

  18. BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on Achieving High Yields from Algal Feedstocks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Seeks Stakeholder Input on Achieving High Yields from Algal Feedstocks BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on Achieving High Yields from Algal Feedstocks September 3, 2015 - 4:09pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) has released a Request for Information (RFI) titled "High Yields through Productivity and Integration Research." BETO is seeking input from industry, academia,

  19. MineSeis - A MATLAB@ GUI Program to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    i MineSeis - A MATLAB@ GUI Program to Calculate Synthetic Seismograms from a Linear, ... The program was written with MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI) technique ...

  20. Westinghouse Earns 15th Consecutive Mine Safety Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for profit. This award recognizes Westinghouse's close attention to safety in a mining environment. WTS is the management and operating contractor for the DOE at the Waste...

  1. Nippon Mining Holdings Inc aka Shinnikko | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Nippon Mining Holdings Inc (aka Shinnikko) Place: Tokyo, Japan Zip: 105-0001 Product: Japanese holding company engaged in oil, metals, and...

  2. Abandoned Uranium Mine Technical Services and Cleanup Industry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abandoned Uranium Mine Technical Services and Cleanup Industry Day In January 2015, the United States (U.S.) and the Anadarko Litigation Trust ("Litigation Trust") entered into a...

  3. Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Act, this statute encompasses both hard rock mining and oil and gas and established modern federal policy regarding mineral resources in the United States. The Act articulates a...

  4. Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Drilling Activity Date 2005 - 2005...

  5. Famur delivers longwall system to Russian coal mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-08-15

    The first complete Polish longwall system that was recently delivered to Russia for mining coal seams with a thickness exceeding 5 m is described. 2 photos.

  6. Alternative Fuels - A New Field For Mine Surveying | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    more importance. As far as Germany is concerned, geothermal energy and coal bedmine methane are considered as mineral resources according to the German mining law. This demands...

  7. General Mining Act of 1872 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1872 Year 1890 Url Generalmininglaw1872.jpg Description The seminal law regarding mineral management on federal lands in the United States. References General Mining Act of 18721...

  8. Vendors boot up a new generation of mining software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, R.A.

    2008-10-15

    From complete mine management down to the smallest detail of process or machine design, the latest programs are claimed to process and display data easier, faster, and more accurately. MINExpo 2008 held in Las Vegas in September offered a bonanza of information on complete mine management to specilaized financial modules. Gemcom Software introduced new versions of five of its key products - Surpac 6.1, GEMS 6.2, Minex 5.3, MinerSched 6.0 and Whittle 4.2. Lerca Geosystems launched its Jigsaw 360 mine management suite, encompassing GPS navigation. Products launched by Modular Mining systems, Carlson Software, DEM Solutions and Logimine are also mentioned. 2 figs.

  9. Application of the directional hydraulic fracturing at Berezovskaya Mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekontsev, Y.M.; Sazhin, P.V.

    2008-05-15

    The paper analyzes the experimental research of the directional hydraulic fracturing applied for weakening of rocks at Berezovskaya Mine (Kuznetsk Coal Basin) in 2005-2006.

  10. Complementary influence functions for predicting subsidence caused by mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, H.J.; Munson, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    Surface subsidence caused by underground mining is described through complementary influence functions. The complementary functions developed here differ from the simple functions previously used in that the surface displacement is the result of the combined contributions of the mined and unmined zones. This eliminates computational difficulties experienced with the simple functions in determining the deflections above the rib side and in the eventual application of influence functions to complex room-and-pillar configurations. Although the analysis framework presented is intended for predicting subsidence over complex mine configurations, use of the complementary functions is illustrated adequately by application to a longwall panel of the Old Ben No. 24 coal mine.

  11. Ex Parte Communications with Caterpillar Global Mining LLC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mr. Medenwaldt inquired, by emails on August 7 and 8, 2012, whether the proposed energy conservation standards rulemaking would affect above ground mobile mining equipment that would have...

  12. SRTC input to DOE-HQ R and D database for FY99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, L.R. Jr.

    2000-01-05

    This is a database of the Savannah River Site input to the DOE Research and Development database. The report contains approximately 50 project abstracts.

  13. Summary of Input to DOE Request for Information DE-FOA-0000225

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Sumary of Input to DOE Request for Information DE-FOA-0000225 - U.S. DOE Fuel Cells Technology Program

  14. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed ... among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. ...

  15. [Composite analysis E-area vaults and saltstone disposal facilities]. PORFLOW and FACT input files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.

    1997-09-01

    This diskette contains the PORFLOW and FACT input files described in Appendix B of the accompanying report `Composite Analysis E-Area Vaults and Saltstone Disposal Facilities`.

  16. Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building ...

  17. Role of the nonperturbative input in QCD resummed Drell-Yan Q...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Role of the nonperturbative input in QCD ... Sponsoring Org: (US) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 ...

  18. Table A55. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity ... Industry","Total(b)","Bed Boilers","Heat Recovery","Turbines","Heat Recovery","Processes",...

  19. T-670: Skype Input Validation Flaw in 'mobile phone' Profile Entry Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The software does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input in the The "mobile phone" profile entry before displaying the input.

  20. Improving mine safety technology and training in the U.S. recommendations of the Mine Safety Technology and Training Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grayson, R. Larry

    2008-09-15

    The key issues studied focused on underground coal mining and included (1) prevention of explosions in sealed areas, (2) better emergency preparedness and response, (3) improvement of miners' ability to escape, (4) better protection of miners before and after a fire or explosion, (5) improved provision of oxygen, and (6) development and implementation of more robust post-incident communication. The U.S. Congress passed the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006, which mandated new laws to address the issues. Concurrent with investigations and congressional deliberations, the National Mining Association formed the independent Mine Safety Technology and Training Commission to study the state-of-the-art relative to technology and training that could address the vulnerabilities exposed by the mine disasters. As discussed, the report outlined persistent vulnerabilities linked with significant hazards in underground coal mines, and made recommendations to provide a path for addressing them. Overall the commission report made 75 recommendations in the areas of risk-based design and management, communications technology, emergency response and mine rescue procedures, training for preparedness, and escape and protection strategies. In its deliberations, the commission importantly noted that mine safety in the U.S. needs to follow a new paradigm for ensuring mine safety and developing a culture of prevention that supports safe production at the business core. In the commission's viewpoint, the bottom line in protecting coal miners is not only adopting a culture of prevention but also systematically pursuing mitigation of significant risks. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Gauging apparatus and method, particularly for controlling mining by a mining machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.A.; Moynihan, D.J.

    1980-04-29

    Apparatus for and method are claimed for controlling the mining by a mining machine of a seam of material (e.g., coal) overlying or underlying a stratum of undesired material (e.g., clay) to reduce the quantity of undesired material mined with the desired material, the machine comprising a cutter movable up and down and adapted to cut down into a seam of coal on being lowered. The control apparatus comprises a first electrical signal constituting a slow-down signal adapted to be automatically operated to signal when the cutter has cut down into a seam of desired material generally to a predetermined depth short of the interface between the seam and the underlying stratum for slowing down the cutting rate as the cutter approaches the interface, and a second electrical signal adapted to be automatically operated subsequent to the first signal for signalling when the cutter has cut down through the seam to the interface for stopping the cutting operation, thereby to avoid mining undesired material with the desired material. Similar signalling may be provided on an upward cut to avoid cutting into the overlying stratum.

  2. Patent data mining method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyack, Kevin W.; Grafe, V. Gerald; Johnson, David K.; Wylie, Brian N.

    2002-01-01

    A method of data mining represents related patents in a multidimensional space. Distance between patents in the multidimensional space corresponds to the extent of relationship between the patents. The relationship between pairings of patents can be expressed based on weighted combinations of several predicates. The user can select portions of the space to perceive. The user also can interact with and control the communication of the space, focusing attention on aspects of the space of most interest. The multidimensional spatial representation allows more ready comprehension of the structure of the relationships among the patents.

  3. Options for developing countries in mining development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walrond, G.W.; Kumar, R.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a study of the issues that developing countries face in planning and implementing mineral development, taking as case studies Botswana, Sierra Leone, Zambia, Tanzania, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea and the developed states of Quebec and Western Australia. The authors consider the major aspects of the matter including organization and administration; regulation; taxation and surplus distribution; the dynamics of such instruments as royalty, rent resource tax and capital allowances under various cost/price scenarios; and selected mining agreements and their key provisions. They stress throughout the need for foreign investment while maximizing the economic benefits reaped from exhaustible resources.

  4. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackman, Terry E.; Place, John M.

    1987-01-01

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  5. Inflatable partition for fighting mine fires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conti, Ronald S.; Lazzara, Charles P.

    1995-01-01

    The seal is a lightweight, inflatable, bag which may be inflated by a portable air generator and is used to seal a burning mine passage. A collapsible tube-like aperture extends through the seal and allows passage of high expansion foam through the seal in a feed tube. The foam fills the passageway and extinguishes the fire. In other embodiments, the feed tubes incorporate means to prevent collapse of the aperture. In these embodiments a shroud connects the feed tube to a foam generator. This seal allows creation of a high expansion foam fire fighting barrier even in upward sloping passages.

  6. MSHA (Mine Safety and Health Administration) approved mine rescue - training module (coal): fires, fire fighting, and explosions. Mine rescue team series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Mine rescue teams frequently must fight fires and guard against the propagation of fires or explosions during a rescue and recovery operation. The team's ability to fight fires depends a great deal on hands-on experience with different fire fighting agents and equipment. The team's work includes an assessment of fire conditions, mine fire gases and other potential hazards associated with fire fighting activity. This training module covers the underlying principles of the fire triangle and the different methods for controlling, containing and extinguishing fires in a mine. The manual also covers fire-fighting equipment, considerations involved in a sealing operation and the cause-effect of explosions.

  7. Mining industry and US government cooperative research: Lessons learned and benefits to mining industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W.; Phillips, W.S.; Martin, R.; Anderson, D.P.

    1997-09-01

    Since 1994, various mines in the US have cooperated with research scientists at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories to address issues related to verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The CTBT requires that no country may conduct any nuclear explosion in the future. While the CTBT is a significant step toward reducing the global nuclear danger, verifying compliance with the treat requires that the monitoring system be able to detect, locate and identify much larger numbers of smaller amplitude seismic events than had been required previously. Large mining blasts conducted world-wide will be of sufficient amplitude to trigger the monitoring system at the lower threshold. It is therefore imperative that research into the range various blasting practices employed, the relationship of yield to seismic magnitude, and identification of anomalous blasting results be performed. This paper will describe a suite of experiments funded by the Department of Energy and conducted by the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories in cooperation with the US mining industry. Observations of cast blasting, underground long wall generated coal bumps, stoping, and explosively induced collapse of room and pillar panels will be presented. Results of these dual use experiments which are of interest to the mining community will be discussed. These include (1) variation of amplitude of seismic energy at various azimuths from cast blasts, (2) identification of the extent of back failure following explosive removal of pillars, and (3) the use of single fired shots for calibration of the monitoring system. The wealth of information and discovery described in this paper is a direct result of mutual cooperation between the US Government and the US Mining Industry.

  8. WIPP's Mine Rescue Teams Win Big in Contest | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WIPP's Mine Rescue Teams Win Big in Contest WIPP's Mine Rescue Teams Win Big in Contest April 27, 2016 - 12:50pm Addthis The WIPP Blue Mine Rescue Team moves through the course in the field competition of the Southwest Regional Mine Rescue Contest. The WIPP Blue Mine Rescue Team moves through the course in the field competition of the Southwest Regional Mine Rescue Contest. WIPP’s Red Mine Rescue Team took first place in the first aid competition. WIPP's Red Mine Rescue Team took first

  9. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-12-009 Colorado School of Mines.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 SECTION A. Project Title: Upgrades to the Colorado School of Mines Neutron Imaging Beam-Line SECTION B. Project Description The Colorado School Mines project has three...

  10. Temporal Shifts in the Geochemistry and Microbial Community Structure of an Ultradeep Mine Borehole Following Isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Duane P. ); Onstott, T C.; Fredrickson, Jim K. ); Brockman, Fred J. ); Balkwill, David L.; Drake, G R.; Pfiffner, S; White, D C.; Takai, K Project Japan); Pratt, L M.; Fong, J; Lollar, B S.; Slater, G; Phelps, T J. ); Spoelstra, N ); Deflaun, M; Southam, G; Welty, A T.; Baker, B J.; Hoek, J

    2003-12-01

    A borehole draining a water-bearing dyke fracture at 3.2 km depth in a South African Au mine was isolated from the open mine environment...

  11. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

    2010-09-30

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

  12. Mining Bug Databases for Unidentified Software Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumidu Wijayasekara; Milos Manic; Jason Wright; Miles McQueen

    2012-06-01

    Identifying software vulnerabilities is becoming more important as critical and sensitive systems increasingly rely on complex software systems. It has been suggested in previous work that some bugs are only identified as vulnerabilities long after the bug has been made public. These vulnerabilities are known as hidden impact vulnerabilities. This paper discusses the feasibility and necessity to mine common publicly available bug databases for vulnerabilities that are yet to be identified. We present bug database analysis of two well known and frequently used software packages, namely Linux kernel and MySQL. It is shown that for both Linux and MySQL, a significant portion of vulnerabilities that were discovered for the time period from January 2006 to April 2011 were hidden impact vulnerabilities. It is also shown that the percentage of hidden impact vulnerabilities has increased in the last two years, for both software packages. We then propose an improved hidden impact vulnerability identification methodology based on text mining bug databases, and conclude by discussing a few potential problems faced by such a classifier.

  13. Bioreactor for acid mine drainage control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaluski, Marek H.; Manchester, Kenneth R.

    2001-01-01

    A bioreactor for reacting an aqueous heavy metal and sulfate containing mine drainage solution with sulfate reducing bacteria to produce heavy metal sulfides and reduce the sulfuric acid content of the solution. The reactor is an elongated, horizontal trough defining an inlet section and a reaction section. An inlet manifold adjacent the inlet section distributes aqueous mine drainage solution into the inlet section for flow through the inlet section and reaction section. A sulfate reducing bacteria and bacteria nutrient composition in the inlet section provides sulfate reducing bacteria that with the sulfuric acid and heavy metals in the solution to form solid metal sulfides. The sulfate reducing bacteria and bacteria nutrient composition is retained in the cells of a honeycomb structure formed of cellular honeycomb panels mounted in the reactor inlet section. The honeycomb panels extend upwardly in the inlet section at an acute angle with respect to the horizontal. The cells defined in each panel are thereby offset with respect to the honeycomb cells in each adjacent panel in order to define a tortuous path for the flow of the aqueous solution.

  14. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

    2014-12-31

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine® Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine® process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

  15. Subsidence vulnerability in shallow room-and-pillar mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Missavage, R.

    1985-07-01

    Concern over mining-related subsidence is inhibiting the development of surface land uses in previously mined areas and is constraining the recovery of coal resources in areas with established land uses that might be impacted by subsequent subsidence. The determination of subsidence vulnerability of mined-out areas (especially abandoned mine areas) can be a useful tool in the design and location of surface structures. A model has been developed for assessing subsidence vulnerability in shallow room-and-pillar mines based on the flexural rigidity and strength characteristics of the overlying strata. The model does not predict the subsidence profile or when the subsidence will occur. It only predicts those areas that are likely to subside. This paper briefly describes the model and its testing.

  16. Electric shovels meet the demands for mining operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-03-15

    Rugged, intelligent shovels offer better productivity and help mine operators avoid costly downtime in a very tight market. In 2007 P & H Mining Equipment began to produce a new breed of electric mining shovels designed to help reduce operating cost in coal and other mining operations. These were designated the P & H C-Series. All have an advanced communication, command and control system called the Centurion system. Coal mining applications for this series include 4100XPCs in Australia, China and Wyoming, USA. The Centurion system provides information on shovel performance and systems health which is communicated via graphic user interface terminals to the operators cab. Bucyrus International is developing a hydraulic crowd mechanism for its electric shovels and is now field testing one for its 495 series shovel. The company has also added greater capability in the primary software in the drive system for troubleshooting and fault identification to quickly diagnose problems onboard or remotely. 4 photos.

  17. Concept for the Intermountain Center for Mining Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-06-01

    The Intermountain Center for Mining Research and Development (ICMRD) was established with the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as the cornerstone, and with regional universities, mining schools, and the Western mining industry as full members. In aggregate, the members provide the strong mining research and development capabilities and knowledge that are essential to the success of such a research center. The ICMRD is an organization that identifies technical needs, partially funds, and provides project management for research projects. The ICMRD will primarily serve the nine Intermountain States, but will not restrict other regions, research organizations, or academic institutions from membership. The ICMRD's nine primary states are: Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, Arizona, Alaska, and New Mexico. The business and project management functions of the ICMRD will be located at INL. Research projects may be performed by INL, one of the member research organizations, academic institutions, mining companies/suppliers, or preferably, by a partnership of several of these institutions. Teaming among members will be essential in providing quality R&D. The ICMRD will accomplish its research goals by creating partnerships between the research organizations, federal and state agencies, and the mining industry. The ICMRD will provide project management, technical and financial support, and technology transfer opportunities. The ICMRD, through its associated academic partners, will provide a base for development and testing of mining, metallurgical, and environmental technologies in the laboratory through pilot-scale environments. Through these partnerships, the ICMRD will provide a vehicle to achieve its objectives of developing innovative mining technologies, enhancing the capabilities of the regional mining schools and universities, and improving the global competitiveness of the U.S. mining industry.

  18. Investigation of subsidence damages above abandoned mine lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Po-Ming.

    1988-01-01

    Abandoned mine lands (AML) subsidence is one of the most hazardous problems for personal property and community development. In order to improve the technique for subsidence diagnosis and the effectiveness of remedial measures, several methods and techniques have been developed in this research. A subsidence site investigation checklist is developed to guide the investigators with or without hands-on experience to collect a complete and necessary information for subsidence analysis during site investigation. A subsidence cause identification system is developed to streamline the process of analysis and for subsidence cause differentiation and identification over AML. A damage severity system is developed to evaluate the intensity of the damage to structures. A subsidence deduction model is developed based on the probability function integration method to reconstruct subsidence profile and subsurface failure zone for AML subsidence. The study is based on the case studies which include site investigation, surface subsidence survey, subsurface instrumentation, damage severity evaluation, subsidence deduction and statistical analysis. The results show that geologic conditions such as seam depth, seam height, ratios of strong and weak rocks do affect the subsidence damage area, subsidence factor, and damage severity. The relationship between above parameters can be expressed by a second order polynomial with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.7 to 0.9.

  19. Role of the nonperturbative input in QCD resummed Drell-Yan Q{sub T}

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    distributions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Role of the nonperturbative input in QCD resummed Drell-Yan Q{sub T} distributions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Role of the nonperturbative input in QCD resummed Drell-Yan Q{sub T} distributions We analyze the role of the nonperturbative input in the Collins-Soper-Sterman (CSS) b-space QCD resummation formalism for Drell-Yan transverse momentum (Q{sub T}) distributions, and

  20. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

    2000-01-12

    Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Today’s symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

  1. Stability analysis of a backfilled room-and-pillar mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesarik, D.R.; Seymour, J.B.; Yanske, T.R.; McKibbin, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    Displacement and stress changes in cemented backfill and ore pillars at the Buick Mine, near Boss, MO, were monitored by engineers from the US Bureau of Mines and The Doe Run Co., St. Louis, MO. A test area in this room-and-pillar mine was backfilled to provide support when remnant ore pillars were mined. Objectives of this research were to evaluate the effect of backfill on mine stability, observe backfill conditions during pillar removal, and calibrate a numerical model to be used to design other areas of the mine. Relative vertical displacements in the backfill were measured with embedment strain gauges and vertical extensometers. Other types of instruments used were earth pressure cells (to identify loading trends in the backfill), borehole extensometers (to measure relative displacement changes in the mine roof and support pillars), and biaxial stressmeters (to measure stress changes in several support pillars and abutments). Two- and three-dimensional numeric codes were used to model the study area. With information from these codes and the installed instruments, two failed pillars were identified and rock mass properties were estimated.

  2. Surface and groundwater management in surface mined-land reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evoy, B.; Holland, M.

    1990-06-01

    This report provides information on surface water and groundwater management for use in the mined-land reclamation planning process in California. Mined-land reclamation, as defined by the California Surface Mining and Reclamation Act, is the combination of land treatments which prevent or minimize water degradation, air pollution, damage to aquatic or wildlife habitat, and erosion resulting from a surface mining operation. Surface water and groundwater management play an integral role in nearly every reclamation plan. Groundwater and surface water runoff (both onto and off of the site) must often be evaluated (1) to design flooding and erosion protection measures such as drainage channels, levees, culverts, or riprap; (2) to prepare and carry out a successful revegetation program; (3) to design stable final slopes; (4) to maximize potential available water for the operation and reclamation stages; (5) to prevent the discharge of contaminants from mine processes or from mined areas; and (6) to limit long-term leachate formation and movement from tailings, pit, or waste rock disposal areas. This report is a guide for mine operators, local government, planners, and plan reviewers.

  3. A waterjet mining machine for use in room and pillar mining operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    A new mining machine is constructed for use in room and pillar mining operations. This machine uses the action of computer controlled, centrally located high pressure cutting lances to cut deep slots in a coal face. These slots stress relieve the coal ahead of the machine and outline blocks of coal. The movement forward of the machine then wedges up the lower block of coal. This wedging action is assisted by the gathering arms of the loader section of the machine, and by underlying oscillating waterjets which create a slot ahead of the loading wedge as it advances. Finally the top section of coal is brought down by the sequential advance of wedge faced roof support members, again assisted by the waterjet action from the central cutting arms. The machine is designed to overcome major disadvantages of existing room and pillar mining machines in regard to a reduction in respirable dust, the creation of an immediate roof support, and an increase in product size, with concomitant reduction in cleaning costs.

  4. GASFLOW comparisons with bureau of mines experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy and Westinghouse Hanford Company, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the flammability of mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and air. The tests were performed in a spherical chamber under quiescent and turbulent conditions. This paper describes combustion calculations using the GASFLOW code and compares the calculated pressure ratios with experiments mentioned above. GASFLOW is a finite-volume computer code that solves the transient, three-dimensional, compressible fluid, Navier-Stokes equations with multiple species coupled with finite-rate chemical kinetics. The computational results show good agreement with the experimental data and confirm GASFLOW to be a valuable tool for evaluating the above combustion process.

  5. Exploration and mining geology. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    Using the concepts and practices of applied geology as its central theme, here is a balanced and comprehensive treatment of the geological, geochemical, geophysical, and economic elements of exploration and mining. The author offers an overview of the methods and aims in mineral exploration and production and gives coverage of the geologic principles of ore deposits and the geomorphic environment. The text deals with ''hard'' minerals and the nonfluid sources of materials and energy in the continental masses and in ocean basins. This edition has been expanded to include recent advances in applications of satellite imagery, lithogeochemical surveys, isotope geochemistry, and other developments in the field. It also covers current uses of computers in mineral exploration programs and features case histories, a current references section, and financial data.

  6. Parallel object-oriented data mining system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamath, Chandrika; Cantu-Paz, Erick

    2004-01-06

    A data mining system uncovers patterns, associations, anomalies and other statistically significant structures in data. Data files are read and displayed. Objects in the data files are identified. Relevant features for the objects are extracted. Patterns among the objects are recognized based upon the features. Data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) sky survey was used to search for bent doubles. This test was conducted on data from the Very Large Array in New Mexico which seeks to locate a special type of quasar (radio-emitting stellar object) called bent doubles. The FIRST survey has generated more than 32,000 images of the sky to date. Each image is 7.1 megabytes, yielding more than 100 gigabytes of image data in the entire data set.

  7. Mining Machine Control Signal Processing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fecitt, G.J.

    1984-01-31

    A signal processing system for an underground mining machine having a steerable mineral cutter and a sensor which senses natural radiation emitted from rock strata overlaying the radiation absorbing mineral and which derives a sensor signal representative of the cutting horizon of the cutter, comprises processing means for receiving and processing the sensor signal to derive an operational signal indicative of the cutter horizon of the cutter, calibration means for accepting a fed in calibration signal representative of a known existing condition of the cutting horizon and comparator means for comparing the derived operational signal with the calibration signal to determine an error in the derived operational signal and for instructing the processing means to apply a suitable correction to the derived operational signal.

  8. Capture and Use of Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deborah Kosmack

    2008-10-31

    CONSOL Energy Inc., in conjunction with MEGTEC Systems, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, designed, built, and operated a commercial-size thermal flow reversal reactor (TFRR) to evaluate its suitability to oxidize coal mine ventilation air methane (VAM). Coal mining, and particularly coal mine ventilation air, is a major source of anthropogenic methane emissions, a greenhouse gas. Ventilation air volumes are large and the concentration of methane in the ventilation air is low; thus making it difficult to use or abate these emissions. This test program was conducted with simulated coal mine VAM in advance of deploying the technology on active coal mine ventilation fans. The demonstration project team installed and operated a 30,000 cfm MEGTEC VOCSIDIZER oxidation system on an inactive coal mine in West Liberty, WV. The performance of the unit was monitored and evaluated during months of unmanned operation at mostly constant conditions. The operating and maintenance history and how it impacts the implementation of the technology on mine fans were investigated. Emission tests showed very low levels of all criteria pollutants at the stack. Parametric studies showed that the equipment can successfully operate at the design specification limits. The results verified the ability of the TFRR to oxidize {ge}95% of the low and variable concentration of methane in the ventilation air. This technology provides new opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by the reduction of methane emissions from coal mine ventilation air. A large commercial-size installation (180,000 cfm) on a single typical mine ventilation bleeder fan would reduce methane emissions by 11,000 to 22,100 short tons per year (the equivalent of 183,000 to 366,000 metric tonnes carbon dioxide).

  9. Restoration of abandoned mine lands through cooperative coal resource evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoskins, D.M.; Smith, M.

    1996-12-31

    The public reclamation cost of reclaiming all of Pennsylvania`s abandoned mine lands is estimated at $15 billion. Drainage from abandoned mines poses another $5 billion water pollution clean-up problem. Although it is unlikely that public reclamation alone could ever tackle these problems, much can be done to alleviate the nuisances through the remining of previously mined areas to recover remaining reserves, restore the land and improve water quality in the same process. Remining of priority areas is encouraged through a new Pennsylvania policy which provides incentives to mining companies. One incentive, initiated under Pennsylvania`s comprehensive mine reclamation strategy, is to identify and geologically map reminable coal resources in selected watersheds, and then to expedite mine permitting in these watersheds. At present, two such priority watersheds, Little Toby Creek in Elk County and Tangascootak Creek in Clinton County, are the focus of geologic map compilation based on recent quadrangle mapping, or new, directed, geologic mapping, including new research core drilling to establish the geologic stratigraphic framework. In order to maximize environmental benefits the comprehensive mine reclamation strategy identifies watersheds which are affected by acid mine drainage (AMD), but that are reasonably capable of restoration, if sufficient coal reserves remain. Pennsylvania`s geochemical quality database of rock overburden, in combination with detailed coal resource mapping by the Pennsylvania Geological Survey, and the cooperation of coal companies and leaseholders, is being used by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to identify and design remining projects which will not only allow the recovery of coal resources, but will also improve the water quality through a variety of innovative mining techniques.

  10. 87th regular meeting of the Rocky Mountain Coal Mining Institute: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finnie, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    Eleven papers are included in these proceedings. Topics include management of coal mining operations, improving mine health and safety, new technologies for longwall mining, coal haulage, coal drying, a demonstration of the LFC process, and state of the art in mining automation. All eleven papers have been processed for inclusion on the data base.

  11. U-255: Apache Wicket Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in ajax links before displaying the input. A remote user can create a specially crafted URL that, when loaded by a target user, will cause arbitrary scripting code to be executed...

  12. Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The study entitled, “Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input,” focuses on the issue of showing compliance with given...

  13. V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks August ... Addthis Related Articles V-211: IBM iNotes Multiple Vulnerabilities U-198: IBM Lotus ...

  14. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers' and Worker Representatives' Input to Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Tom McQuiston, Dr. P.H., United Steelworkers - Tony Mazzocchi Center for Health, Safety and Environmental Education. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers’ and Worker Representatives’ Input in Work Planning and Control.

  15. Tribes Provide Input on 10-Year Plan for Renewable Energy in the Arctic Region

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Office of Indian Energy hosted a second round of tribal consultations and outreach meetings throughout Alaska in February and March to gather input on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR).

  16. DOE Seeks Further Public Input on How Best To Streamline Existing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Seeks Further Public Input on How Best To Streamline Existing Regulations December 7, 2011 - 12:34pm Addthis The Department of Energy (DOE) has announced a further step to ...

  17. 14. International conference on ground control in mining: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.

    1995-11-01

    This volume contains the 38 papers presented at the conference. Papers have been divided into the following sections: Innovative longwall tailgate support; Effects of high horizontal stresses; Pillar recovery; Pillar design; Prop support; Roof and rib bolting; Floor stability; Surface subsidence; Longwall operations; Longwall entry stability; and Multiple seam mine design. Except for two papers, one on iron ore mining and the second on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, all papers deal with underground coal mining. Thirty-seven papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  18. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Page, Steven J.; Mal, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  19. Mine seismicity and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiappetta, F.; Heuze, F.; Walter, W.; Hopler, R.; Hsu, V.; Martin, B.; Pearson, C.; Stump, B.; Zipf, K.

    1998-12-09

    Surface and underground mining operations generate seismic ground motions which are created by chemical explosions and ground failures. It may come as a surprise to some that the ground failures (coal bumps, first caves, pillar collapses, rockbursts, etc.) can send signals whose magnitudes are as strong or stronger than those from any mining blast. A verification system that includes seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide sensors is being completed as part of the CTBT. The largest mine blasts and ground failures will be detected by this system and must be identified as distinct from signals generated by small nuclear explosions. Seismologists will analyze the seismic records and presumably should be able to separate them into earthquake-like and non earthquake-like categories, using a variety of so-called seismic discriminants. Non-earthquake essentially means explosion- or implosion-like. Such signals can be generated not only by mine blasts but also by a variety of ground failures. Because it is known that single-fired chemical explosions and nuclear explosion signals of the same yield give very similar seismic records, the non-earthquake signals will be of concern to the Treaty verification community. The magnitude of the mine-related events is in the range of seismicity created by smaller nuclear explosions or decoupled tests, which are of particular concern under the Treaty. It is conceivable that legitimate mining blasts or some mine-induced ground failures could occasionally be questioned. Information such as shot time, location and design parameters may be all that is necessary to resolve the event identity. In rare instances where the legitimate origin of the event could not be resolved by a consultation and clarification procedure, it might trigger on On-Site Inspection (OSI). Because there is uncertainty in the precise location of seismic event as determined by the International Monitoring System (IMS), the OSI can cover an area of up to 1,000 squared kilometers. In active mining districts this area could include several different mining operations. So, an OSI could be disruptive both to the mining community and to the US Government which must host the foreign inspection team. Accordingly, it is in the best interest of all US parties to try and eliminate the possible occurrence of false alarms. This can be achieved primarily by reducing the ambiguity of mine-induced seismic signals, so that even if these remain visible to the IMS they are clearly consistent with recognizable mining patterns.

  20. Environmental regulation of coal mining, SMCRA`s second decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElfish, J.M.; Beier, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This controversial book examines environmental regulation of coal mining in the United States over the 1979-1989 period. The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) established federal regulation of the environmental effects of coal mining. The permanent regulatory program implementing SMCRA was initiated in 1979. This book looks at the first ten years of SMCRA, seeking to draw lessons from experience that will improve regulation, so that the objectives of the law may be achieved in SMCRA`s second decade.

  1. Wyoming coal mining. A wage and employment survey, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The Wyoming Department of Labor and Statistics initiated a wage and employment survey of the State's coal mining industry during the first quarter of 1982. The survey was designed to update the statistics obtained in the 1979 survey of Wyoming's coal mines. Specifically, data were collected to: (1) estimate the number of workers in selected occupational categories; (2) determine the average straight-time hourly wage in each occupational category; (3) determine the number of workers covered by a collective bargaining agreement in each occupational category; (4) review the employer contributions to employee fringe benefit programs; (5) establish bench mark data for Wyoming's underground coal mines.

  2. Active mines in Arizona and Arizona exploration offices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book is a directory that lists 91 mining operations and 107 sand and gravel operations. It lists the company name, address, key personnel, mine, mill, or smelter location, and a description of the operation. A map plotting the locations of all the active mines is also available ($2). Arizona Exploration Offices is a directory that lists 68 exploration companies in Arizona, 80% of whom list gold or silver as their principal exploration target. Other exploration companies are searching for industrial minerals, uranium, beryllium, rare earths, ferroalloys, and sulfur.

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - OTT RFI Summary of Input_Public_Oct 2015

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Input Request for Information DE-FOA-0001346 September 2015 Prepared for the Office of Technology Transitions and Technology Transfer Policy Board 1 Note: the views expressed in this document solely reflect the input received from the RFI respondents and do not necessarily represent DOE's perspective. 13 10 8 7 6 5 4 2 24% 18% 15% 13% 11% 9% 7% 4% 0 5 10 15 Industry National Labs Funding Contractors Academic Tech commercialization consultants Independent Research Organizations Other Number of

  4. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS (Conference) | SciTech Connect HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed

  5. USDA, Departments of Energy and Navy Seek Input from Industry to Advance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels for Military and Commercial Transportation | Department of Energy Departments of Energy and Navy Seek Input from Industry to Advance Biofuels for Military and Commercial Transportation USDA, Departments of Energy and Navy Seek Input from Industry to Advance Biofuels for Military and Commercial Transportation August 30, 2011 - 12:23pm Addthis WASHINGTON, Aug. 30, 2011 -Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, and Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus today

  6. First QER Report Incorporates Tribal Input on U.S. Transmission System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updates | Department of Energy First QER Report Incorporates Tribal Input on U.S. Transmission System Updates First QER Report Incorporates Tribal Input on U.S. Transmission System Updates April 23, 2015 - 1:16pm Addthis Affordable, clean, and secure energy and energy services are essential for improving U.S. economic productivity, enhancing quality of life, protecting the environment, and ensuring national security. To help the federal government meet these energy goals, President Obama

  7. DOE Seeks Further Public Input on How Best To Streamline Existing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulations | Department of Energy Further Public Input on How Best To Streamline Existing Regulations DOE Seeks Further Public Input on How Best To Streamline Existing Regulations December 7, 2011 - 12:34pm Addthis The Department of Energy (DOE) has announced a further step to implementing the President's Executive Order on Improving Regulatory Review. The Executive Order directs federal agencies to review existing regulations and determine whether they are still necessary and crafted

  8. Microsoft Word - SmartGrid - NRC Input to DOE Requestrvjcomments.docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information/RFI (Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 180 / Friday, September 17, 2010/Pages 57006-57011 / Notices) / Smart Grid Implementation Input - NRC Contact: Kenn A. Miller, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, 301-415-3152 Comments relevant to the following two sections of the RFI: "Long Term Issues: Managing a Grid with High Penetration of New Technologies" and "Reliability and Cyber-Security," Page 57010. Nuclear

  9. Acid mine drainage: Common law, SMCRA, and the Clean Water Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henrich, C.

    1995-12-31

    Acid mine drainage is a major problem related to coal mining which, if unabated, can severely damage the aquatic environment. Damage resulting from acid mine drainage was first addressed by common law and riparian principles. As societal laws changed, common law principles alone could not effectively control this problem. Preventing and controlling pollution including acid mine drainage are important goals of the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act (SMCRA) and the Clean Water Act (CWA). This article examines how common law, SMCRA, and the CWA address the acid mine drainage issue independently, and how improvements in the control of acid mine drainage can be achieved.

  10. Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich-Mahoney, John; Donnelly, Ellen

    2009-12-31

    This project demonstrated that developing environmental credits on private land—including abandoned mined lands—is dependent on a number of factors, some of them beyond the control of the project team. In this project, acid mine drainage (AMD) was successfully remediated through the construction of a passive AMD treatment system. Extensive water quality sampling both before and after the installation of the passive AMD treatment system showed that the system achieved removal efficiencies and pollutant loading reductions for acidity, iron, aluminum and manganese that were consistent with systems of similar size and design. The success of the passive AMD treatment system should have resulted in water credits if the project had not been terminated. Developing carbon sequestration credits, however, was much more complex and was not achieved in this project. The primary challenge that the project team encountered in meeting the full project objectives was the unsuccessful attempt to have the landowner sign a conservation easement for his property. This would have allowed the project team to clear and reforest the site, monitor the progress of the newly planted trees, and eventually realize carbon sequestration credits once the forest was mature. The delays caused by the lack of a conservation easement, as well as other factors, eventually resulted in the reforestation portion of the project being cancelled. The information in this report will help the public make more informed decisions regarding the potential of using water and carbon, and other credits to support the remediation of minded lands through out the United States. The hope is that by using credits that more mined lands with be remediated.

  11. Rare earth element components in atmospheric particulates in the Bayan Obo mine region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lingqing Liang, Tao Zhang, Qian; Li, Kexin

    2014-05-01

    The Bayan Obo mine, located in Inner Mongolia, China, is the largest light rare earth body ever found in the world. The research for rare earth elements (REEs) enrichment in atmospheric particulates caused by mining and ore processing is fairly limited so far. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM{sub 10}) were collected around the Bayan Obo mine region, in August 2012 and March 2013, to analyze the levels and distributions of REEs in particles. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 149.8 and 239.6 ng/m{sup 3}, and those for PM{sub 10} were 42.8 and 68.9 ng/m{sup 3}, in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factor was calculated for all 14 REEs in the TSP and PM{sub 10} and the results indicated that REEs enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in springtime. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient concentration in the prevailing wind direction. REE chondrite normalized patterns of TSP and PM{sub 10} were similar and the normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light REEs and heavy REE, which supported by the chondrite normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La{sub N}/Yb{sub N}, La{sub N}/Sm{sub N}, Gd{sub N}/Yb{sub N}). - Highlights: • TSP and PM{sub 10} samples were collected to analyze the levels and distributions of REE. • Enrichment factors indicated that REE enrichment was caused by anthropogenic sources. • The distribution of REEs showed a strong gradient in the prevailing wind direction. • Obvious fractionation between LREEs and HREEs is observed in atmospheric particulates.

  12. DATA MINING AT THE NEBRASKA OIL & GAS COMMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Weber

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study of the hearing records is to identify factors that are likely to impact the performance of a waterflood in the Nebraska panhandle. The records consisted of 140 cases. Most of the hearings were held prior to 1980. Many of the records were incomplete, and data believed to be key to estimating waterflood performance such as Dykstra-Parson permeability distribution or relative permeability were absent. New techniques were applied to analyze the sparse, incomplete dataset. When information is available, but not clearly understood, new computational intelligence tools can decipher correlations in the dataset. Fuzzy ranking and neural networks were the tools used to estimate secondary recovery from the Cliff Farms Unit. The hearing records include 30 descriptive entries that could influence the success or failure of a waterflood. Success or failure is defined by the ratio of secondary to primary oil recovery (S/P). Primary recovery is defined as cumulative oil produced at the time of the hearing and secondary recovery is defined as the oil produced since the hearing date. Fuzzy ranking was used to prioritize the relevance of 6 parameters on the outcome of the proposed waterflood. The 6 parameters were universally available in 44 of the case hearings. These 44 cases serve as the database used to correlate the following 6 inputs with the respective S/P. (1) Cumulative Water oil ratio, bbl/bbl; (2) Cumulative Gas oil ratio, mcf/bbl; (3) Unit area, acres; (4) Average Porosity, %; (5) Average Permeability, md; (6) Initial bottom hole pressure, psi. A 6-3-1 architecture describes the neural network used to develop a correlation between the 6 input parameters and their respective S/P. The network trained to a 85% correlation coefficient. The predicted Cliff Farms Unit S/P is 0.315 or secondary recovery is expected to be 102,700 bbl.

  13. LM Progressing with Uranium Mines Report to Congress

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As reported in an earlier Program Update newsletter, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is compiling data for a Report to Congress on defense-related uranium mines...

  14. Colorado School of Mines: Spring 2016 Career Day | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Day Colorado School of Mines: Spring 2016 Career Day February 9, 2016 11:00AM to 5:00PM EST 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, CO 80401 Website Link Contact Kimberly Chappell andor...

  15. Salinity gradient solar pond technology applied to potash solution mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martell, J.A.; Aimone-Martin, C.T.

    2000-06-12

    A solution mining facility at the Eddy Potash Mine, Eddy County, New Mexico has been proposed that will utilize salinity gradient solar pond (SGSP) technology to supply industrial process thermal energy. The process will include underground dissolution of potassium chloride (KCl) from pillars and other reserves remaining after completion of primary room and pillar mining using recirculating solutions heated in the SGSP. Production of KCl will involve cold crystallization followed by a cooling pond stage, with the spent brine being recirculated in a closed loop back to the SGSP for reheating. This research uses SGSP as a renewable, clean energy source to optimize the entire mining process, minimize environmental wastes, provide a safe, more economical extraction process and reduce the need for conventional processing by crushing, grinding and flotation. The applications of SGSP technology will not only save energy in the extraction and beneficiation processes, but also will produce excess energy available for power generation, desalination, and auxiliary structure heating.

  16. New Mexico Department of Fish and Game Mining Guidelines webpage...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico Department of Fish and Game Mining Guidelines webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: New Mexico Department of Fish and Game...

  17. Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund - a view from the West

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Congress created the Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund (AML) in 1977 as part of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. The AML is funded by a special tax on coal mining. About one-third of AML fees will be paid by coal operators in the western states. The author examines the disbursement of AML funds under the Reagan Administration. He describes how the western state governments expected a generous portion of the AML funds for coal and non-coal reclamation, as well as community impact assistance projects in their states. Finally, the author shows how the Office of Surface Mining has largely frustrated the western expectations through its interpretation of the AML disbursement priorities.

  18. Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Banded, epithermal quartz-adularia veins have produced about 1.5 million ounces of gold and 7 million ounces of silver from the Bodie mining district, eastern California. The...

  19. Proceedings of the 15. annual national meeting of the American Society for Surface Mining and Reclamation. Mining -- Gateway to the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Throgmorton, D.; Nawrot, J.; Mead, J.; Galetovic, J.; Joseph, W.

    1998-12-31

    The 124 papers of these proceedings are arranged under the following topical sections: Minerals education; Hydrology--Characterization and monitoring; Tailings--Reclamation; Reforestation; Mine drainage--Biogeochemical processes; Mine drainage--Treatment, general; Mine drainage--Passive treatment, wetlands; Mine drainage--Prediction and monitoring; Acid soils--Reclamation practices; Wildlife and fisheries habitat; Subsidence--Engineering practices and environmental effects; OSM acid forming materials mini workshops; RUSLE--Erosion prediction techniques on mined construction and reclaimed lands; IDNR wetlands technology transfer program; Mine planning and postmining land use; Vegetation establishment--Principles and practices; Vegetation establishment--Warm season grasses; Coal combustion by-products--General; Coal combustion by-products--Mine drainage treatment; and Prime farmland reclamation and mine soils management. Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  20. Surface coal mining in Alaska: an investigation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 in relation to Alaskan conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report was written in response to a mandate in section 708 of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 which required the study of surface coal mining conditions in the State of Alaska, in order to determine which, if any, of the provisions of the Act should be modified with respect to surface coal mining operations in Alaska. The report discusses both surface mining and the surface effects of underground mining. The report examines not only the impact of mining at the site of operations but also the effects that extend beyond the mine itself, including effects on social institutions, the economy, the physical well-being of people, and the use of land. The report considers Alaska conditions primarily from the perspective of a potential increase in coal development, not of mining limited to meeting local needs of energy.

  1. In a mining accident, first responders are working against

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a mining accident, first responders are working against the clock and against a myriad of dangers such as debris, poisonous gases, flooding, explosive vapors, and unstable structures to assess the situation and rescue trapped miners. These unknown and potentially deadly conditions create a challenge for first responders and often limit their ability to assess the situation and respond in a timely matter. There is a need for a robotic system that could be used to support a mine rescue team,

  2. Mining Graphs for Understanding Time-Varying Volumetric Data (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Mining Graphs for Understanding Time-Varying Volumetric Data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mining Graphs for Understanding Time-Varying Volumetric Data Authors: Gu, Yi ; Wang, Chaoli ; Peterka, Tom ; Jacob, Robert ; Kim, Seung Hyun Publication Date: 2016-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1249546 DOE Contract Number: AC02-06CH11357 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: IEEE Transactions on

  3. Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs Mercury toxicity generates environmental concerns in diverse aquatic systems because methylmercury enters the water column in diverse ways then biomagnifies through food webs. At the apex of many freshwater food webs, piscivorous fish can then extend that trophic transfer and potential for neurotoxicity to wildlife and humans. Mining activities, particularly those associated with the San Francisco Bay region, can generate

  4. Dr. George Ansell, President Colorado School of Mines Research Institute

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dr. George Ansell, President Colorado School of Mines Research Institute Golden, Colorado 80403 Dear Dr. Ansell: As you may know, the Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized under the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Comnission (AEC) during the early years of nuclear development to determine whether they need remedial action. Mr. J. Krause of the Colorado School of Mines Research Institute was notified by letter (Mott

  5. Effective Conveyer Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David LaRose

    2006-11-14

    This document details progress on the project ''Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity'' during the period from May 15, 2006 to November 14, 2006. Progress during this period includes significant advances in development of a Smart Camera based prototype system for on-site mechanical splice detection, and continued deployment of both the mechanical splice detection system and the vulcanized splice detection system in area coal mines.

  6. Environmental regulation of coal mining. SMCRA`s Second Decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElfish, J.M.; Beier, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    If you find yourself involved in the workings of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), let ELI`s guide take you through SMCRA`s second decade. Environmental Regulation of Coal mining: SMCRA`s Second Decade gives you a clear picture of SMCRA`s statutory and regulatory requirements, and identifies the key policy disputes and problems that will be confronted in the years ahead.

  7. Defense‐Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress (August 2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 3151 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Secretary of the Interior and the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), to undertake a review of, and prepare a report on, abandoned uranium mines in the United States that provided uranium ore for atomic energy defense activities of the United States (the mines).

  8. Douglas Factors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as “Douglas Factors” and have been incorporated into the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Personnel Management System and various FAA Labor Agreements.

  9. Development of a Mine Rescue Drilling System (MRDS) :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, David W.; Gaither, Katherine N.; Polsky, Yarom; Knudsen, Steven D.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Costin, Laurence S.

    2014-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has a long history in developing compact, mobile, very high-speed drilling systems and this technology could be applied to increasing the rate at which boreholes are drilled during a mine accident response. The present study reviews current technical approaches, primarily based on technology developed under other programs, analyzes mine rescue specific requirements to develop a conceptual mine rescue drilling approach, and finally, proposes development of a phased mine rescue drilling system (MRDS) that accomplishes (1) development of rapid drilling MRDS equipment; (2) structuring improved web communication through the Mine Safety & Health Administration (MSHA) web site; (3) development of an improved protocol for employment of existing drilling technology in emergencies; (4) deployment of advanced technologies to complement mine rescue drilling operations during emergency events; and (5) preliminary discussion of potential future technology development of specialized MRDS equipment. This phased approach allows for rapid fielding of a basic system for improved rescue drilling, with the ability to improve the system over time at a reasonable cost.

  10. Teleoperated control system for underground room and pillar mining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayercheck, William D. (New Stanton, PA); Kwitowski, August J. (Clairton, PA); Brautigam, Albert L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Mueller, Brian K. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01

    A teleoperated mining system is provided for remotely controlling the various machines involved with thin seam mining. A thin seam continuous miner located at a mining face includes a camera mounted thereon and a slave computer for controlling the miner and the camera. A plurality of sensors for relaying information about the miner and the face to the slave computer. A slave computer controlled ventilation sub-system which removes combustible material from the mining face. A haulage sub-system removes material mined by the continuous miner from the mining face to a collection site and is also controlled by the slave computer. A base station, which controls the supply of power and water to the continuous miner, haulage system, and ventilation systems, includes cable/hose handling module for winding or unwinding cables/hoses connected to the miner, an operator control module, and a hydraulic power and air compressor module for supplying air to the miner. An operator controlled host computer housed in the operator control module is connected to the slave computer via a two wire communications line.

  11. Reactivation of landslides by surface subsidence from longwall mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iannacchione, A.T.; Ackman, T.E.

    1984-12-01

    Subsidence research by the US Bureau of Mines has identified and documented the occurrence of landslides over a longwall mining area in the Dunkard basin. Mining by longwall methods has been observed or produce a gradual surface subsidence profile of up to 60% of the thickness of the mined coal bed. The gradual subsidence of panels averaging 600 x 5000 ft (180 x 1525 m) can cause reactivation of older landslide deposits by decreasing the support to the landslide toe area. Examination of surficial features over a longwall mining area comprised of nine panels has led to the identification of several reactivated landslides. The two largest landslides occurred above a thin sandstone member with several associated springs. The largest landslides ranged from 100 to 300 ft (30 to 90 m) in length and from 100 to 200 ft (30 to 60 m) in width. Maximum scarp-slope displacements were approximately 7 ft (2 m). Less significant mass wasting was also observed over the longwall panels. Identification of landslides was accomplished through examination of premining aerial photographs and geologic field investigation. Characterization of reactivated zones was achieved through evaluation of current aerial 2-ft (0.6-m) surface contour map and field surveys. Recognition of problem areas will make civic and mining personnel aware of the landslide potential so that damage in such areas can be minimized.

  12. Effects of surface mining on aquatic resources in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starnes, L.B.; Gasper, D.C.

    1995-05-01

    Surface mining is highly visible land use because it temporarily eliminates surface vegetation and can permanently change topography as with mountain-top removal and valley fill operations. It also permanently and drastically alters soil and subsurface geologic structure and disrupts surface and subsurface hydrologic regimes. The American Fisheries Society (AFS) encourages energy conservation, use of renewable resources, and recycling to minimize the need for non-renewable minerals and fuels that are obtained through mining processes. When mining occurs, it is AFS policy to encourage legislation and diligent regulation of all surface mining by local, state, province, and federal government to provide adequate protection for aquatic resources. Federal legislation provides uniformity of standards nationwide. While the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act has attempted to minimize environmental impacts from coal mining, similar legislation and enforcement should be encourages for other minerals. The Society encourages its members to become involved in this process by providing technical information essential for protection and continued propagation of fishery resources to policy makers so decisions are made on a scientific, rather than emotional or political basis.

  13. Small surface coal mine operators handbook. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tourbier, J.T.; Westmacott, R.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to interpret the Regulations of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-87) (hereafter referred to as the Act) as they affect the operators of small surface coal mines. Further, the purpose of this handbook is to make it easier for the small operator to compare his operation with the act in order to determine compliance with the regulations. Part 795 of the Regulations deals specifically with the Small Operator Assistance Program. This program relieves the operator of the cost of carrying out certain hydrologic and geologic analyses required by the Regulations. The emphasis of this handbook is on the protection of water resources during mining and reclamation operations. As almost all the operations in surface mining directly or indirectly affect water the authors have included some operations which may only marginally affect water quality or hydrology. Anthracite mining, lignite mining, coal processing, refuse disposal, and slurry disposal are not covered in this handbook.

  14. T-701: Citrix Access Gateway Enterprise Edition Input Validation Flaw in Logon Portal Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Citrix Access Gateway Enterprise Edition Input Validation Flaw in Logon Portal Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks.

  15. Field measurement of moisture-buffering model inputs for residential buildings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woods, Jason; Winkler, Jon

    2016-02-05

    Moisture adsorption and desorption in building materials impact indoor humidity. This effect should be included in building-energy simulations, particularly when humidity is being investigated or controlled. Several models can calculate this moisture-buffering effect, but accurate ones require model inputs that are not always known to the user of the building-energy simulation. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model. The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative-humidity profile, measure all of the moisture-transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air-conditioner condensate), and calculate the onlymore » unmeasured term—the moisture sorption into the materials. We validated this method with laboratory measurements, which we used to measure the EMPD model inputs of two houses. After deriving these inputs, we measured the humidity of the same houses during tests with realistic latent and sensible loads and demonstrated the accuracy of this approach. Furthermore, these results show that the EMPD model, when given reasonable inputs, is an accurate moisture-buffering model.« less

  16. Hydromechanical transmission with two planetary assemblies that are clutchable to both the input and output shafts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1979-01-01

    A power transmission having two planetary assemblies, each having its own carrier and its own planet, sun, and ring gears. A speed-varying module is connected in driving relation to the input shaft and in driving relationship to the two sun gears, which are connected together. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being connected in driving relation to the input shaft, the other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, being connected in driving relation to the sun gears. A brake grounds the first carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output shaft through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode, the first ring gear being rigidly connected to the output shaft. The input shaft also is clutchable to either the carrier or the ring gear of the second planetary assembly. The output shaft is also clutchable to the carrier of the second planetary assembly when the input is clutched to the ring gear of the second planetary assembly, and is clutchable to the ring gear of the second planetary assembly when the input is clutched to the carrier thereof.

  17. An evaluation of health risk to the public as a consequence of in situ uranium mining in Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2015-08-30

    In the United States there is considerable public concern regarding the health effects of in situ recovery uranium mining. These concerns focus principally on exposure to contaminants mobilized in groundwater by the mining process. However, the risk arising as a result of mining must be viewed in light of the presence of naturally occurring uranium ore and other constituents which comprise a latent hazard. The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed new guidelines for successful restoration of an in situ uranium mine by limiting concentrations of thirteen groundwater constituents: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, nitrate (as nitrogen), molybdenum, radium, total uranium, and gross α activity. We investigated the changes occurring to these constituents at an ISR uranium mine in Wyoming, USA by comparing groundwater quality at baseline measurement to that at stability (post-restoration) testing. Of the groundwater constituents considered, only uranium and radium-226 showed significant (p < 0.05) deviation from site-wide baseline conditions in matched-wells. Uranium concentrations increased by a factor of 5.6 (95% CI 3.6–8.9 times greater) while radium-226 decreased by a factor of about one half (95% CI 0.42–0.75 times less). Change in risk was calculated using the RESRAD (onsite) code for an individual exposed as a resident-farmer; total radiation dose to a resident farmer decreased from pre-to post-mining by about 5.2 mSv y–1. As a result, higher concentrations of uranium correspond to increased biomarkers of nephrotoxicity, however the clinical significance of this increase is unclear.

  18. Hydraulically operated mine prop with safety valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koppers, M.; Marr, P.

    1981-02-24

    A mine prop is disclosed that is provided with an overpressure valve of large flowthrough section which opens when excessive forces suddenly act on the prop to discharge pressure fluid from the interior of the prop. The overpressure valve comprises a hollow cylindrical housing forming at one end a valve seat communicating with the fluid-filled inner space of the prop and a valve member axially guided in the housing for movement between a closed position engaging the valve seat and an open position. The fluid-filled space of the prop communicates with channels leading to the outside of the prop. The valve member is normally maintained in the closed position by a gas pillow under high pretension confined in a pressure space delimited peripherally by the wall of the valve housing and at opposite ends respectively by the valve member and a plug fluid tightly mounted in and closing the other end of the housing. The valve member and the plug are both formed from metal and are both provided at facing ends with annular slender sealing lips of triangular cross-section tapering toward each other, the outer surfaces of which are pressed into engagement with the inner peripheral surface of the housing by the pressure of the gas pillow.

  19. Input-output model for MACCS nuclear accident impacts estimation¹

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Outkin, Alexander V.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Vargas, Vanessa N

    2015-01-27

    Since the original economic model for MACCS was developed, better quality economic data (as well as the tools to gather and process it) and better computational capabilities have become available. The update of the economic impacts component of the MACCS legacy model will provide improved estimates of business disruptions through the use of Input-Output based economic impact estimation. This paper presents an updated MACCS model, bases on Input-Output methodology, in which economic impacts are calculated using the Regional Economic Accounting analysis tool (REAcct) created at Sandia National Laboratories. This new GDP-based model allows quick and consistent estimation of gross domestic product (GDP) losses due to nuclear power plant accidents. This paper outlines the steps taken to combine the REAcct Input-Output-based model with the MACCS code, describes the GDP loss calculation, and discusses the parameters and modeling assumptions necessary for the estimation of long-term effects of nuclear power plant accidents.

  20. Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Philip, J.

    1995-04-01

    The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

  1. The Kelastic variable wall mining machine. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-12

    This machine cuts coal along a longwall face extending up to 500 feet by a rotating auger with bits. The machine also transports the coal that is cut acting as screw conveyor. By virtue of an integral shroud comprising part of the conveyor the machine is also amenable to a separation of the zones where men work from air being contaminated by dust and methane gas by the cutting action. Beginning as single intake air courses, the air separates at the working section where one split provides fresh air to the Occupied Zone (OZ) for human needs and the other split purges and carries away dust and methane from face fragmentation in the Cutting Zone (CZ). The attractiveness of the Variable Wall Mining Machine is that it addresses the limitations of current longwall mining equipment: it can consistently out-produce continuous mining machines and most longwall shearing machines. It also is amenable to configuring an environment, the dual-duct system, where the air for human breathing is separated from dust-laden ventilating air with methane mixtures. The objective of the research was to perform a mathematical and experimental study of the interrelationships of the components of the system so that a computer model could demonstrate the workings of the system in an animation program. The analysis resulted in the compilation of the parameters for three different configurations of a dual aircourse system of ventilating underground mines. In addressing the goal of an inherently safe mining system the dual-duct adaptation to the Variable Wall Mining Machine appears to offer the path to solution. The respirable dust problem is solvable; the explosive dust problem is nearly solvable; and the explosive methane problem can be greatly reduced. If installed in a highly gassy mine, the dual duct models would also be considerably less costly.

  2. Input for solar annual merit review. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Input for solar annual merit review. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Input for solar annual merit review. Abstract not provided. Authors: Siegel, Nathan Phillip Publication Date: 2008-05-01 OSTI Identifier: 1145749 Report Number(s): SAND2008-3333C 518639 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Solar annual merit review held April 21-24, 2008 in austin, TX.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the solar annual merit

  3. BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines December 17, 2015 - 9:48am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) have released a request for information (RFI) titled "Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines" (Optima). BETO and VTO are

  4. V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attacks | Department of Energy 9: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks August 28, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Several vulnerabilities were reported in IBM Lotus iNotes PLATFORM: IBM Lotus iNotes 8.5.x ABSTRACT: IBM Lotus iNotes 8.5.x contains four cross-site scripting vulnerabilities REFERENCE LINKS: Security Tracker Alert ID 1028954 IBM Security Bulletin 1647740

  5. EERE Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy EERE Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines EERE Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines December 18, 2015 - 1:00pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) have released a request for information (RFI) titled "Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines" (Optima). BETO and VTO are

  6. Probabilistic Density Function Method for Stochastic ODEs of Power Systems with Uncertain Power Input

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Peng; Barajas-Solano, David A.; Constantinescu, Emil; Abhyankar, S.; Ghosh, Donetta L.; Smith, Barry; Huang, Zhenyu; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2015-09-22

    Wind and solar power generators are commonly described by a system of stochastic ordinary differential equations (SODEs) where random input parameters represent uncertainty in wind and solar energy. The existing methods for SODEs are mostly limited to delta-correlated random parameters (white noise). Here we use the Probability Density Function (PDF) method for deriving a closed-form deterministic partial differential equation (PDE) for the joint probability density function of the SODEs describing a power generator with time-correlated power input. The resulting PDE is solved numerically. A good agreement with Monte Carlo Simulations shows accuracy of the PDF method.

  7. ,"Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input",16,"Monthly","2/2016","1/15/2010" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  8. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-04-01

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  9. Development of a Low Input and sustainable Switchgrass Feedstock Production System Utilizing Beneficial Bacterial Endophytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Chuansheng; Nowak, Jerzy; Seiler, John

    2014-10-24

    Switchgrass represents a promising feedstock crop for US energy sustainability. However, its broad utilization for bioenergy requires improvements of biomass yields and stress tolerance. In this DOE funded project, we have been working on harnessing beneficial bacterial endophytes to enhance switchgrass performance and to develop a low input feedstock production system for marginal lands that do not compete with the production of food crops. We have demonstrated that one of most promising plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize roots and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, greenhouse, as well as field conditions. Furthermore, PsJN bacterization improved growth and development of switchgrass seedlings, significantly stimulated plant root and shoot growth, and tiller number in the field, and enhanced biomass accumulation on both poor (p<0.001) and rich (p<0.05) soils, with more effective stimulation of plant growth in low fertility soil. Plant physiology measurements showed that PsJN inoculated Alamo had consistently lower transpiration, lower stomatal conductance, and higher water use efficiency in greenhouse conditions. These physiological changes may significantly contribute to the recorded growth enhancement. PsJN inoculation rapidly results in an increase in photosynthetic rates which contributes to the advanced growth and development. Some evidence suggests that this initial growth advantage decreases with time when resources are not limited such as in greenhouse studies. Additionally, better drought resistance and drought hardening were observed in PsJN inoculated switchgrass. Using the DOE-funded switchgrass EST microarray, in a collaboration with the Genomics Core Facility at the Noble Foundation, we have determined gene expression profile changes in both responsive switchgrass cv. Alamo and non-responsive cv. Cave-in-Rock (CR) following PsJN bacterization. With the MapMan software to analyze microarray data, the number of up- and down-regulated probes was calculated. The number of up-regulated probes in Alamo was 26, 14, 14, and 12% at 0.5, 2, 4 and 8 days after inoculation (DAI) with PsJN, respectively while the corresponding number in CR was 24, 22, 21, and 19%, respectively. In both cultivars, the largest number of up-regulated probes occurred at 0.5 DAI. Noticeable differences throughout the timeframe between Alamo and CR were that the number was dramatically decreased to half (12%) in Alamo but remained high in CR (approximately 20%). The number of down regulated genes demonstrated different trends in Alamo and CR. Alamo had an increasing trend from 9% at 0.5 DAI to 11, 17, and 28% at 2, 4, and 8 DAI, respectively. However, CR had 13% at 0.5 and 2 DAI, and declined to 10% at 4 and 8 DAI. With the aid of MapMan and PageMan, we mapped the response of the ID probes to the observed major gene regulatory network and major biosynthetic pathway changes associated with the beneficial bacterial endophyte infection, colonization, and early growth promotion process. We found significant differences in gene expression patterns between responsive and non-responsive cultivars in many pathways, including redox state regulation, signaling, proteolysis, transcription factors, as well as hormone (SA and JA in particular)-associated pathways. Form microarray data, a total of 50 key genes have been verified using qPCR. Ten of these genes were chosen for further functional study via either overexpression and/or RNAi knockout technologies. These genes were calmodulin-related calcium sensor protein (CAM), glutathione S-transferase (GST), histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (H-221), 3 different zinc finger proteins (ZF-371, ZF131 and ZF242), EF hand transcription factor (EF-622), peroxidase, cellulose synthase catalytic submit A2 (CESA2), and Aux/IAA family. A total of 8 overexpression and 5 RNAi transgenic plants have been regenerated, and their gene expression levels determined using qPCR. Consequently high, medium and low expression lines were propagated in vitro for gene function study. When adequate numbers of individual transgenic lines were obtained, they were challenged with PsJN to see if PsJN promotes or inhibits growth of transgenic plants. Our results demonstrated that EF-622 overexpression, ZF-371, GST, H-221 and CAM RNAi transgenic lines lost responses to PsJN, i.e. PsJN had no growth promotive effects on these transgenic plants. Further study needs to be done to characterize this loss of responsiveness to PsJN. During this funding period, we have done more work related to this funded project and established collaborations with other institutions and obtained some interesting results, building a foundation for further research projects. For example, we isolated a naturally-occurring bacterium from surface-sterilized switchgrass seeds, identified as a unique Panteoa agglomerans species, and named strain PaKM. PaKM has been proved to be an efficient growth promoter of switchgrass over a broad spectrum of genotypes and has potential in applications with low input and sustainable production systems on marginal lands. In collaboration with Dr. Shuijin Hu (North Carolina State University), we conducted experiments on how endophyte-inoculated switchgrass affects soil N and P availability and the number of AMF in roots. Our preliminary results showed that PsJN increased AMF infection of switchgrass roots, and enhanced soil N availability and soil N mineralization on a low nutrient field. Further study of this phenomenon on different soils, over longer time periods, is needed to assess its potential impact on the productivity and longevity of switchgrass stands.

  10. Mine subsidence in Illinois: facts for the homeowner considering insurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuMontelle, P.B.; Bradford, S.C.; Bauer, R.A.; Killey, M.M.

    1981-08-01

    Subsidence is the sinking of land surface, commonly resulting from underground mining. In Illinois, property damage has been sufficiently severe that a state law was enacted to provide subsidence insurance for homeowners. This publication has been prepared for homeowners in Illinois: (1) to inform them whether they live in subsidence-prone areas, (2) to aid them in understanding some frequently encountered effects of mine subsidence as well as problems sometimes mistaken for mine subsidence, and (3) to suggest further sources of information. Although the new subsidence insurance program for homeowners in mining areas prompted the writing of this report, we do not attempt to explain the details of the insurance program. Our purpose is to explain the causes and the nature of subsidence and discuss ways to minimize damage caused by subsidence. About 750,000 acres of Illinois land have been undermined for coal, and many homeowners are concerned about the effects underground mining may d at nine areas alalitative methods are presented. Chapter Five presents conclusions and suggestions for future research.

  11. Summary, Attendee Input, and Day 1 Wrap Up | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Day 1 Wrap Up Summary, Attendee Input, and Day 1 Wrap Up Addthis Description Summary and wrap up of day 1 presentations and preview of day 2 by DOE Integrated Safety Management Co-champions Patricia R. Worthington, HSS Director, Office of Health and Safety; and and Ray J. Corey, Assistant Manager for Safety and Environment, DOE Richland Operations Office

  12. Summary, Attendee Input, and Final Day 2 Wrap up | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Final Day 2 Wrap up Summary, Attendee Input, and Final Day 2 Wrap up Addthis Description Summary and wrap up by DOE Integrated Safety Management Co-champions Patricia R. Worthington, HSS Director, Office of Health and Safety; and and Ray J. Corey, Assistant Manager for Safety and Environment, DOE Richland Operations Office of day 2 presentations and discussions

  13. DOE Seeks Public Input on an Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application Process for Transmission Authorizations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Request for Information (RFI) seeking public input for a draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-application (IIP) Process was published in the Federal Register on August 29, 2013. The Federal Register Notice is available now for downloading. Comments must be received on or before September 29, 2013. As comments are received, they will be posted online.

  14. U-195: PHPlist Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting and SQL Injection Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 'public_html/lists/admin' pages do not properly validate user-supplied input in the 'sortby' parameter [CVE-2012-2740]. A remote authenticated administrative user can supply a specially crafted parameter value to execute SQL commands on the underlying database.

  15. Using Economic Input/Output Tables to Predict a Countrys Nuclear Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimar, Mark R.; Daly, Don S.; Wood, Thomas W.

    2010-07-15

    Both nuclear power and nuclear weapons programs should have (related) economic signatures which are detectible at some scale. We evaluated this premise in a series of studies using national economic input/output (IO) data. Statistical discrimination models using economic IO tables predict with a high probability whether a country with an unknown predilection for nuclear weapons proliferation is in fact engaged in nuclear power development or nuclear weapons proliferation. We analyzed 93 IO tables, spanning the years 1993 to 2005 for 37 countries that are either members or associates of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The 2009 OECD input/output tables featured 48 industrial sectors based on International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) Revision 3, and described the respective economies in current country-of-origin valued currency. We converted and transformed these reported values to US 2005 dollars using appropriate exchange rates and implicit price deflators, and addressed discrepancies in reported industrial sectors across tables. We then classified countries with Random Forest using either the adjusted or industry-normalized values. Random Forest, a classification tree technique, separates and categorizes countries using a very small, select subset of the 2304 individual cells in the IO table. A nations efforts in nuclear power, be it for electricity or nuclear weapons, are an enterprise with a large economic footprint -- an effort so large that it should discernibly perturb coarse country-level economics data such as that found in yearly input-output economic tables. The neoclassical economic input-output model describes a countrys or regions economy in terms of the requirements of industries to produce the current level of economic output. An IO table row shows the distribution of an industrys output to the industrial sectors while a table column shows the input required of each industrial sector by a given industry.

  16. Coal mining and the resource community cycle: A longitudinal assessment of the social impacts of the Coppabella coal mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockie, S.; Franettovich, M.; Petkova-Timmer, V.; Rolfe, J.; Ivanova, G.

    2009-09-15

    Two social impact assessment (SIA) studies of Central Queensland's Coppabella coal mine were undertaken in 2002-2003 and 2006-2007. As ex post studies of actual change, these provide a reference point for predictive assessments of proposed resource extraction projects at other sites, while the longitudinal element added by the second study illustrates how impacts associated with one mine may vary over time due to changing economic and social conditions. It was found that the traditional coupling of local economic vitality and community development to the life cycle of resource projects - the resource community cycle - was mediated by labour recruitment and social infrastructure policies that reduced the emphasis on localised employment and investment strategies. and by the cumulative impacts of multiple mining projects within relative proximity to each other. The resource community cycle was accelerated and local communities forced to consider ways of attracting secondary investment and/or alternative industries early in the operational life of the Coppabella mine in order to secure significant economic benefits and to guard against the erosion of social capital and the ability to cope with future downturns in the mining sector.

  17. Potential highwall use by raptors in coal mine reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waage, B.

    1990-12-31

    In 1982, Western Energy Company`s Rosebud Mine, located in southeastern Montana, received legal exception, {open_quotes}a first{close_quotes} in Montana to leave a standing mine highwall extending a native bluff. This bluff extension stands 110 feet high and 900 feet long. Normally, all highwalls by law are reduced to a 5:1 slope. This legal exception was accomplished with the support of several governmental agencies and was justified on the highwalls potential value for raptors. Enhancement measures undertaken on the highwall included the construction of three artificial eryies and the release of young prairie falcons (Falco mexicanus) employing hacking methods of the Peregrine Fund. The hack is now in its fourth year with a total of 46 young falcons having been released. Opportunities exist for creating a more diverse habitat for raptors and other cliff obligate species on reclaimed mine lands in the west. It is believed that this practical approach should be explored.

  18. York Canyon mine evaluation. Monthly technical progress report No. 39, October 1-31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggieri, S.K.

    1984-11-19

    The York Canyon mine evaluation has been completed and sent out for review and comment. Several mining companies including Consol, Plateau, and Emery have been contacted regarding future testing. York Canyon has also expressed interest in continuing the investigation. Further analysis of the York Canyon data has indicated several unknowns which should be identified during the next evaluation. Among them are the centrality of sensor position with respect to both cross and along the face axes. Also, it is felt that separation of other spatially related dust sources (e.g., conveyor, crusher, gob consolidation and air patterns) is important. In order to conduct the new headgate cutout tests, the existing longwall gallery was modified. A fan and duct work were added to simulate gob leakage in line with the headgate entry. Tracer gas concentration profiles, smoke tracers, and air velocity measurements have been taken. Primary airflows of 12,000 cfm with gob leakage of 5000 cfm and primary airflow of 7000 cfm without gob leakage gave similar results. The airflow along the face was the prime factor and not the primary airflow. The wing curtain did not have a significant impact on the tailgate operator and drum zones. It did have a marginal effect at the headgate operator zone. The use of shearer clearer spray system did have a large impact on improving the tracer gas pattern along the face, but at the same time adversely deteriorated the tailgate operator zone in two ways: higher tracer gas concentrations and water mist.

  19. XsunX Inc formerly Sun River Mining Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    XsunX Inc formerly Sun River Mining Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: XsunX Inc (formerly Sun River Mining Inc) Place: Aliso Viejo, California Zip: 92656 Product: US-based...

  20. APUI Incubateur de l Ecole des Mines de Douai | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    APUI Incubateur de l Ecole des Mines de Douai Jump to: navigation, search Name: APUI Incubateur de l'Ecole des Mines de Douai Place: France Sector: Services Product: General...

  1. Performance potential of the coal strip mining in the east of Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheskidov, V.I.

    2007-07-15

    The potentialities of the leading mining districts in Russia to improve coal production by strip mining are analyzed. The operational issues of the Erunakovskiy (Kuzbass), Kansko-Achinskiy and South Yakutia territorial production complexes are considered.

  2. NPDES compliance monitoring report: Silver bell mine, Pima County, Arizona. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganter, W.

    1992-10-01

    This presents the findings of a compliance evaluation inspection of the Silver Bell Mine in Pima County, Arizona, conducted on August 19, 1992. It is part of a series of inspections of uncontrolled discharges of mine drainage.

  3. NPDES compliance monitoring report: Oracle Ridge Mine, San Manuel, Arizona. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, J.

    1992-11-03

    This presents the findings of a compliance evaluation inspection of the Oracle Ridge Copper Mine near San Manuel, Arizona, conducted on August 17, 1992. It is part of a series of inspections of uncontrolled discharges of mine drainage.

  4. Televised remote control system of a continuous mining machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lansberry, J.B.

    1981-08-04

    A method of recovering particulate material from a seam of such material within the earth bounded above and below by different material which comprises the steps of positioning in mining relation to the seam a continuous mining machine having a power driven mechanism thereon for moving the machine through successive seam material cutting cycles which include an advancing movement along a mined entry within the seam in a direction toward the working face of the seam; illuminating portions of the space surrounding the continuous mining machine including portions of the working face disposed forwardly thereof and adjacent portions of the roof, floor and side walls of the mined entry rearwardly of the working face; establishing electromagnetic signals indicative of the appearance of the illuminated portions of the working face of the seam and the adjacent portions of the roof, floor and side walls; transmitting the established electromagnetic signals to a remote control station; converting at the remote control station the transmitted electromagnetic signals to a continuous picture of the appearance of at least a selected portion of the illuminated portions of the working face of the seam and the adjacent portions of the roof, floor and side walls; and controlling from the remote control station the cutting cycle of the continuous mining machine so that the material cut during a cycle is cut from the seam up to the different material defining the roof and down to the different material defining the floor based upon visually distinguishing between the material of the seam and the different material which forms the roof and floor by viewing the continuous picture provided at the remote control station and apparatus for carrying out the method.

  5. Update on use of mine pool water for power generation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-30

    In 2004, nearly 90 percent of the country's electricity was generated at power plants using steam-based systems (EIA 2005). Electricity generation at steam electric plants requires a cooling system to condense the steam. With the exception of a few plants using air-cooled condensers, most U.S. steam electric power plants use water for cooling. Water usage occurs through once-through cooling or as make-up water in a closed-cycle system (generally involving one or more cooling towers). According to a U.S. Geological Survey report, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 136 billion gallons per day of fresh water in 2000 (USGS 2005). This is almost the identical volume withdrawn for irrigation purposes. In addition to fresh water withdrawals, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 60 billion gallons per day of saline water. Many parts of the United States are facing fresh water shortages. Even areas that traditionally have had adequate water supplies are reaching capacity limits. New or expanded steam electric power plants frequently need to turn to non-traditional alternate sources of water for cooling. This report examines one type of alternate water source-groundwater collected in underground pools associated with coal mines (referred to as mine pool water in this report). In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) funded Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to evaluate the feasibility of using mine pool water in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. That report (Veil et al. 2003) identified six small power plants in northeastern Pennsylvania (the Anthracite region) that had been using mine pool water for over a decade. It also reported on a pilot study underway at Exelon's Limerick Generating Station in southeastern Pennsylvania that involved release of water from a mine located about 70 miles upstream from the plant. The water flowed down the Schuylkill River and augmented the natural flow so that the Limerick plant could withdraw a larger volume of river water. The report also included a description of several other proposed facilities that were planning to use mine pool water. In early 2006, NETL directed Argonne to revisit the sites that had previously been using mine pool water and update the information offered in the previous report. This report describes the status of mine pool water use as of summer 2006. Information was collected by telephone interviews, electronic mail, literature review, and site visits.

  6. Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act: A Utah perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielson, D.

    1989-01-01

    The authority to regulate the coal industry at the state level, under state statute and rules, the importance of the coal industry to the state, the importance of an environmentally sound regulatory program, and the benefit of a state-managed abandoned mine reclamation program, in short the ability of the state to manage its own natural resources, make state primacy a necessity, not an option. Implementation of SMCRA cannot be measured in the myriad of oversight statistics. Effectiveness means cost-effective, timely reclamation of abandoned sites; consistent, workable rules and regulatory practices; responsive program management; and compliance which is internalized in the mine's operations.

  7. Wyoming coal mining: a wage and employment survey, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wessel, L.E.

    1984-05-01

    The Wyoming Department of Labor and Statistics initiated a wage and employment survey of the State's coal mining industry during the first quarter of 1984. The survey was designed to update the statistics obtained in the 1982 survey of Wyoming's coal mines. Specifically, data were collected to: (1) estimate the number of workers in selected occupational categories; (2) determine the average straight-time hourly wage in each occupational category; (3) determine the number of workers covered by a collective bargaining agreement in each occupational category; and (4) review the employer contributions to employee fringe benefit programs. 11 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  8. Nature-oriented open coal mining technologies using mined-out space in an open-pit. Part II: A method for selecting rational sequence of mining flat dipping stratified deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molotilov, S.G.; Norri, V.K.; Cheskidov, V.I.; Mattis, A.R.

    2007-01-15

    A method is proposed for selecting a rational mining sequence with internal dumping for flat stratified deposits, using new principles of the open-pit process-space formation and development. The main criteria for substantiating the mining sequence are geometrical form and development direction of the open-pit space, structure of the working wall and transportation network, internal dumping capacities and mining earthworks volumes.

  9. In-mine evaluation of catalyzed diesel particulate filters at two underground metal mines. Report of investigations/1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, W.F.; Cantrell, B.K.; Bickel, K.L.; Olson, K.S.; Rubow, K.L.

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines evaluated the performance of a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF) and a CDPF combined with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) at two metal mines. This paper describes the results from the two field evaluations. The CDPF/DOC was installed on an Elphinstone load-haul-dump (LHD) powered by a Caterpillar 3306 prechambered, turbocharged engine. The CDPF was installed on a Tamrock diesel-hydraulic roof-bolting jumbo, powered by a Deutz F6L912W engine. The underground evaluation at this mine was more difficult because of frequent movement by the roof-bolting jumbo, variation in the daily workload, tremendous fluctuation in ventilation air flow rate and the use of a high sulfur diesel fuel, which promotes the formation of sulfate particles, decreases filtration efficiency, and hastens the deterioration of the catalyst.

  10. A non-linear dimension reduction methodology for generating data-driven stochastic input models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2008-06-20

    Stochastic analysis of random heterogeneous media (polycrystalline materials, porous media, functionally graded materials) provides information of significance only if realistic input models of the topology and property variations are used. This paper proposes a framework to construct such input stochastic models for the topology and thermal diffusivity variations in heterogeneous media using a data-driven strategy. Given a set of microstructure realizations (input samples) generated from given statistical information about the medium topology, the framework constructs a reduced-order stochastic representation of the thermal diffusivity. This problem of constructing a low-dimensional stochastic representation of property variations is analogous to the problem of manifold learning and parametric fitting of hyper-surfaces encountered in image processing and psychology. Denote by M the set of microstructures that satisfy the given experimental statistics. A non-linear dimension reduction strategy is utilized to map M to a low-dimensional region, A. We first show that M is a compact manifold embedded in a high-dimensional input space R{sup n}. An isometric mapping F from M to a low-dimensional, compact, connected set A is contained in R{sup d}(d<input in the solution of stochastic partial differential equations that describe the evolution of dependant variables. A sparse grid collocation strategy (Smolyak algorithm) is utilized to solve these stochastic equations efficiently. We showcase the methodology by constructing low-dimensional input stochastic models to represent thermal diffusivity in two-phase microstructures. This model is used in analyzing the effect of topological variations of two-phase microstructures on the evolution of temperature in heat conduction processes.

  11. U.S. Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 154,590 175,702 144,811 131,894 109,977 126,363 113,189 101,382 101,134 106,745 1990's 122,806 112,606 117,919 118,999 110,826 110,290 109,455 103,153 102,189 98,249 2000's 90,000 86,312 67,980 67,706 60,365 63,691 66,058 63,132 60,889 65,259 2010's 64,575 60,088 61,366 54,650 59,528 59,689 - = No Data

  12. Method and apparatus for smart battery charging including a plurality of controllers each monitoring input variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2013-10-15

    A method for managing the charging and discharging of batteries wherein at least one battery is connected to a battery charger, the battery charger is connected to a power supply. A plurality of controllers in communication with one and another are provided, each of the controllers monitoring a subset of input variables. A set of charging constraints may then generated for each controller as a function of the subset of input variables. A set of objectives for each controller may also be generated. A preferred charge rate for each controller is generated as a function of either the set of objectives, the charging constraints, or both, using an algorithm that accounts for each of the preferred charge rates for each of the controllers and/or that does not violate any of the charging constraints. A current flow between the battery and the battery charger is then provided at the actual charge rate.

  13. Steering and focusing effects in TESLA cavity due to high order mode and input couplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piot, P.; /Fermilab; Dohlus, M.; Flottmann, K.; Marx, M.; Wipf, S.G.; /DESY

    2005-05-01

    Many state-of-art electron accelerator proposals incorporate TESLA-type superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities [1]. These standing wave rf cavities include rf input couplers and a pair of high order mode (HOM) couplers to absorb the energy associated to HOM field excited as the bunch passes through the cavity. In the present paper we investigate, using numerical simulations, the impact of the input and HOM couplers on the beam dynamics to zeroth and first order in initial position, and present parametric studies of the strength of these effects for various incoming beam energies. We finally study the impact of this asymmetric field on the beam dynamics, taking as an example the low energy section of the X-ray FEL injector.

  14. Method for guessing the response of a physical system to an arbitrary input

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolpert, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Stacked generalization is used to minimize the generalization errors of one or more generalizers acting on a known set of input values and output values representing a physical manifestation and a transformation of that manifestation, e.g., hand-written characters to ASCII characters, spoken speech to computer command, etc. Stacked generalization acts to deduce the biases of the generalizer(s) with respect to a known learning set and then correct for those biases. This deduction proceeds by generalizing in a second space whose inputs are the guesses of the original generalizers when taught with part of the learning set and trying to guess the rest of it, and whose output is the correct guess. Stacked generalization can be used to combine multiple generalizers or to provide a correction to a guess from a single generalizer.

  15. High-Frequency Matrix Converter with Square Wave Input - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Geothermal Geothermal Energy Storage Energy Storage Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search High-Frequency Matrix Converter with Square Wave Input DOE Grant Recipients Contact GRANT About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication 8995159.pdf (1,648 KB) Technology Marketing Summary As the use of renewable energy sources increase, there is an increasing need for power converters capable of

  16. Table A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy Management Program, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and

  17. Table A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy-Management Program, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,"RSE" "SIC",,,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  18. 2012 Congestion Study Webinars to Present Preliminary Findings and Receive Input from Stakeholders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy will host three webinars in August 2012 to present the preliminary findings of the 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study and to receive input and suggestions from state officials, industry representatives, and other stakeholders. Two of the webinars will be designed to discuss with state officials the initial findings of the DOE 2012 congestion analysis. The third webinar will be for industry representatives and other interested parties, although stakeholders may dial into any of the three meetings.

  19. A New Ensemble of Perturbed-Input-Parameter Simulations by the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C; Brandon, S; Bremer, P T; Domyancis, D; Garaizar, X; Johannesson, G; Klein, R; Klein, S A; Lucas, D D; Tannahill, J; Zhang, Y

    2011-10-27

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) is a fundamental challenge in the numerical simulation of Earth's weather and climate, and other complex systems. It entails much more than attaching defensible error bars to predictions: in particular it includes assessing low-probability but high-consequence events. To achieve these goals with models containing a large number of uncertain input parameters, structural uncertainties, etc., raw computational power is needed. An automated, self-adapting search of the possible model configurations is also useful. Our UQ initiative at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has produced the most extensive set to date of simulations from the US Community Atmosphere Model. We are examining output from about 3,000 twelve-year climate simulations generated with a specialized UQ software framework, and assessing the model's accuracy as a function of 21 to 28 uncertain input parameter values. Most of the input parameters we vary are related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other sub-grid scale processes. Our simulations prescribe surface boundary conditions (sea surface temperatures and sea ice amounts) to match recent observations. Fully searching this 21+ dimensional space is impossible, but sensitivity and ranking algorithms can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination. Bayesian statistical constraints, employing a variety of climate observations as metrics, also seem promising. Observational constraints will be important in the next step of our project, which will compute sea surface temperatures and sea ice interactively, and will study climate change due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  20. Significance of microbial asynchronous anabolism to soil carbon dynamics driven by litter inputs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fan, Zhaosheng; Liang, Chao

    2015-04-02

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. However, it remains largely unknown how plant litter inputs impact magnitude, composition and source configuration of the SOC stocks over long term through microbial catabolism and anabolism, mostly due to uncoupled research on litter decomposition and SOC formation. This limits our ability to predict soil system responses to changes in land-use and climate. Here, we examine how microbes act as a valve controlling carbon sequestrated from plant litters versus released to the atmosphere in natural ecosystems amended with plant litters varying in quantity and quality. We findmore » that litter quality – not quantity – regulates long-term SOC dynamics under different plausible scenarios. Long-term changes in bulk SOC stock occur only when the quality of carbon inputs causes asynchronous change in a microbial physiological trait, defined as ‘‘microbial biosynthesis acceleration’’ (MBA). This is the first theoretical demonstration that the response of the SOC stocks to litter inputs is critically determined by the microbial physiology. Our work suggests that total SOC at an equilibrium state may be an intrinsic property of a given ecosystem, which ultimately is controlled by the asynchronous MBA between microbial functional groups.« less