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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visitors Visitors /community-environment/visitors/_assets/images/icon-visitors-orange-paper-plane.jpg Visitors Coming to Los Alamos? Need badging information? Need local resources or housing? This is the place. Badge Office» Education Office Housing» Living in Los Alamos» Bradbury Science Museum» LOOK INTO LANL - highlights of our science, people, technologies close Scholarship fund changes lives Life-changing experience: springboard to a career in exercise science and physical therapy. READ MORE Jacob Leyba, recipient of the Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund Domenici scholarship Jacob Leyba, recipient of the Senator Pete Domenici Endowed Scholarship Fund. Contact Us Community Programs Manager Carole Rutten Community Programs Office (505) 665-4400 Email More Like This

2

Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visitors Visitors Visitors MUSEUM HOURS Tuesday through Saturday, 10-5 Sunday and Monday. 1-5 Open: Federal Holidays Closed: Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years Day Admission is free. Planning your visit Most visitors spend between one and a half and two hours at the Museum, although many mention they wish they had allowed more time. The exhibits and science demonstrations are geared for school-age children through adults. Accessibility The building is accessible to those with special needs, and assisted listening devices or captions are available for most films. Camera policy Bring your camera - we allow photographs and videos inside the Museum for personal use. Media If you're with the media, please contact the Laboratory's Communications Office for prior approval and to make arrangements.

3

ARM - Historical Visitor Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Usage (October 1995 - Present) Historical Visitor Statistics As a national user facility, ARM is required to report facility use for actual visitors and for active user...

4

ALS Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy. March 2010 ALS Project Manager Steve Rossi hosted a group of visitors from Kazakhstan on Friday, March 5. The visitors, including a representative from the Kazakhstan...

5

For Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Visitors For Visitors For Visitors A repository for images for those visiting Los Alamos and Northern New Mexico. Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Northern New Mexico Northern New Mexico Summer lightning storms in Northern New Mexico Summer lightning storms in Northern New Mexico The Ancient Ladder The Ancient Ladder Tent Rocks, New Mexico Tent Rocks, New Mexico Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta El Santuario de Chimayo El Santuario de Chimayo Sandia peak Sandia peak Valles Caldera in New Mexico Valles Caldera in New Mexico Cathedral Basilica of St-Francis in Santa Fe Cathedral Basilica of St-Francis in Santa Fe Christmas Lights Christmas Lights Santa Fe - Palace of the Governors

6

ALS Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Visitors ALS Visitors ALS Visitors Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 ALS staff members host a variety of scientific, educational, government, and community-related tours each month. November 2013 poneman U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman visited Berkeley Lab on Friday, Nov. 15, during a brief stay in the Bay Area. Glenn Mara of the University of California Office of the President and Aundra Richards of the DOE Berkeley Site Office joined Deputy Laboratory Director Horst Simon's welcome. They updated Poneman on the lab's future initiatives and current capital projects and heard briefings on cyber security, computing, and the Joint BioEnergy Institute. As second-in-command at DOE, Poneman is responsible for assisting the Secretary of Energy in the management and operations of the agency and acting on his behalf when necessary.During his tour of the ALS, Poneman (right) spoke with Ken Goldberg (Materials Sciences Division) at the CXRO beamline.

7

NIST Visitor Information Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST Tours; Other Useful Links; DC Convention and Visitors Bureau; Montgomery County Conference and Visitors Bureau; ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

ALS Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Visitors Print ALS Visitors Print ALS staff members host a variety of scientific, educational, government, and community-related tours each month. November 2013 poneman U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman visited Berkeley Lab on Friday, Nov. 15, during a brief stay in the Bay Area. Glenn Mara of the University of California Office of the President and Aundra Richards of the DOE Berkeley Site Office joined Deputy Laboratory Director Horst Simon's welcome. They updated Poneman on the lab's future initiatives and current capital projects and heard briefings on cyber security, computing, and the Joint BioEnergy Institute. As second-in-command at DOE, Poneman is responsible for assisting the Secretary of Energy in the management and operations of the agency and acting on his behalf when necessary.During his tour of the ALS, Poneman (right) spoke with Ken Goldberg (Materials Sciences Division) at the CXRO beamline.

9

ALS Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quick Facts Quick Facts ALS Visitors Print ALS staff members host a variety of scientific, educational, government, and community-related tours each month. November 2013 poneman U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman visited Berkeley Lab on Friday, Nov. 15, during a brief stay in the Bay Area. Glenn Mara of the University of California Office of the President and Aundra Richards of the DOE Berkeley Site Office joined Deputy Laboratory Director Horst Simon's welcome. They updated Poneman on the lab's future initiatives and current capital projects and heard briefings on cyber security, computing, and the Joint BioEnergy Institute. As second-in-command at DOE, Poneman is responsible for assisting the Secretary of Energy in the management and operations of the agency and acting on his behalf when necessary.During his tour of the ALS, Poneman (right) spoke with Ken Goldberg (Materials Sciences Division) at the CXRO beamline.

10

Visitor Information, Boulder Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Visitors must wear a visitor badge at all times while on the NIST campus. Hotels/Motels, NIST Boulder Tours. Food/Dining. Local restaurants. Weather ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

11

Berkeley Lab Visitor Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Relations Maps and Directions Bay Area Transit Info * Visitor Pass Request Accommodations and Housing Restaurants in the Bay Area UC Berkeley Campus Map City of Berkeley...

12

Fermilab Education Office - Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physicists Students Visitors Fermilab Ed Site Search Google Custom Search Tours, Prairie Programs, Public Lectures and More You are welcome to tour Fermilab and visit the Lederman...

13

Lederman Science Center: Visitor's Handout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Students Visitors Fermilab Ed Site Search Google Custom Search Lederman Science Center: Visitor's Handout Read this to make your visit to the exhibits at the Science Center...

14

PNNL: Contacts: Visitor Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visitor Information Visitor Information Park in Richland Richland, Washington, enjoys more than 300 days of sunshine a year and one of the lowest costs of living in the state. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is located in north Richland, Washington, and is served by the Tri-Cities Airport in Pasco. Richland, Pasco and Kennewick make up the Tri-Cities, where the Columbia, Snake and Yakima Rivers meet before heading to the Pacific Ocean. Directions From the Tri-Cities Airport From Seattle, Washington From Spokane, Washington From Portland, Oregon Maps Airport to Richland PNNL Main Campus Badging Invited U.S. citizens will need valid photo identification to receive access badges. Foreign nationals should arrange with their hosts for appropriate approval procedures (please allow two weeks). All foreign

15

Visitors Far and Wide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Visitors Far and Wide From left: Minister Danilov-Daniljan, Evan Mills (Assistant Director, Center for Building Science), Victoria Mats (interpreter and Soviet energy analyst), and Len Grossman (PG&E Energy Center) tour the PG&E Energy Center in San Francisco. The Russian Minister of Ecology and Natural Resources, Victor I. Danilov-Daniljan, spent three days in California as the Center's guest. The Minister presented information on current Soviet energy and environmental dilemmas and participated in a day-long roundtable discussion with representatives of major utilities, manufacturers of energy-efficient technologies, energy regulators, nongovernmental organizations, and Center scientists. Julian Aizenberg, one of the former Soviet Union's (FSU) foremost lighting

16

Y campusmap Mead Visitor Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& applied science law school graduate school Mason Lab Helen Hadley Hall Leet Oliver Watson Hall Malone left. The Visitor Center is on the left in the middle of the first block, across from the New Haven 203.432.2798 www.library.yale.edu Yale Bowl 81 Central Ave From downtown New Haven, go west on Chapel

17

Visitor Guide to Smart Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Visitor Guide to Smart Security The following articles are prohibited on LANL property, including and are not allowed in Limited Security Areas or above: · personal computers and associated media (including palm- top capabilities, unless disabled). Note 1: Government cell phones are allowed into Security Areas as long

18

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Visitors Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ohio > Fernald > Visitors Center > Visitors Center Ohio > Fernald > Visitors Center > Visitors Center Fernald Preserve, Ohio Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Fernald Visitors Center Fernald Preserve Home Page Visitors Center Directions Event Calendar Community Meeting Room Guided Tour Educational Field Trip Speaker Request Brochures Fact Sheets Presentations BioBlitz Geocaching Pets Policy The Fernald Preserve Visitors Center is a 10,000-square-foot green building that celebrates the rich and varied history of the Fernald site. Information on the site's natural, Native American, settlement and farming, uranium production, and environmental cleanup eras, as well as the recent ecological restoration and legacy management mission, is presented through a series of exhibits. Admission to the Visitors Center is free, and

19

APS Visitor Registration Form | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Visitor Registration Form APS Visitor Registration Form To request access as a visitor who will not do hands-on work, please complete this form. For assistance, contact the APS User Office by phone at (630) 252-9090 or by email at apsuser@aps.anl.gov. Please request access directly by contacting the APS User Office by phone at (630) 252-9090 or by email at apsuser@aps.anl.gov. If you are concerned about sending your passport and visa information, leave those fields blank and fax a letter to (630) 252-9250. To Request APS Visitor Registration, please enter the following: * indicates required field First Name*: Middle Initial/Name*: Last Name*: Title: Organization*: Department: Address 1*: Address 2: City*: State*: Zip Code*: Country: Phone*: Fax: E-mail Address*: Gender*: Female

20

PIA - HSS Electronic Visitor Management System (HSEVMS) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home PIA - HSS Electronic Visitor Management System (HSEVMS) PIA - HSS Electronic Visitor Management...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

B Reactor Tour Registration Opens March 2 - Visitors Have Come...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Reactor Tour Registration Opens March 2 - Visitors Have Come From 60 Countries Worldwide B Reactor Tour Registration Opens March 2 - Visitors Have Come From 60 Countries...

22

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Visitor Dosimeter Badge Tracking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Visitor Visitor Dosimeter Badge Tracking PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetexUneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 11, 2009 Deparbnental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Building 616 Willow Creek Building Name of Information Visitor Dosimeter Badge Tracking System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 217975 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title I Contact Information Phone, Email Lynn Rockhold System Owner I' 1\ I \ \ ( y P II 114 I' "I

23

BERA Recreational Facilities for FREE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RETIREES are welcome to use the BERA Recreational Facilities for FREE CONGRATULATIONS on your retirement Retirees are requested to use the recreational facilities during off...

24

BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with Brookhaven National Laboratory Working with Brookhaven National Laboratory The Guest, User, Visitor Center (GUV Center) welcomes researchers from universities, government laboratories, and industry from within the US and abroad who are interested in visiting Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) or performing experiments at one of their scientific user facilities. The GUV Center is a central contact point for services for all guest, users, and visitors and is staffed with employees who know BNL well and can assist you in answering any questions you may have or directing you to individuals who can. Please feel free to contact them at guvcenter@bnl.gov or via phone at 631-344-3333. Access requirements depend upon the nature of your visit to BNL so if you are participating in a meeting your requirements will be different than

25

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Buses Shuttle Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on AddThis.com... Oct. 13, 2012 Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine W atch how travelers in Bar Harbor, Maine, rely on propane-powered shuttle buses. For information about this project, contact Maine Clean Communities.

26

Extended-term Visitors to CECM 1996-2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Visitors to CECM. and Colloquium ... August 10-August 23, 1998: Dominik Noll, Toulouse: Optimization, Medical Imaging. August 25-August 28, 1998:...

27

User Facilities for Industry 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite!Workshop!10!-!User!Facilities!for!Industry!101! Satellite!Workshop!10!-!User!Facilities!for!Industry!101! Organizers:+Andreas+Roelofs+(CNM),+Jyotsana+Lal+(APS),+Katie+Carrado+Gregar+(CNM),+and+Susan+Strasser+ (APS)! ! In! order! to! increase! awareness! of! the! industrial! community! to! Argonne! National! Laboratory! user! facilities,!the!Advanced!Photon!Source!(APS),!the!Center!for!Nanoscale!Materials!(CNM)!and!the!Electron! Microscopy!Center!(EMC)!welcomed!industrial!scientists,!engineers!and!related!professionals!to!a!oneC day! workshop! to! learn! more! about! Argonne's! National! Laboratory! and! the! capabilities/techniques! available! for! their! use.! The! workshop! showcased! several! successful! industrial! user! experiments,! and! explained! the! different! ways! in! which! industrial! scientists! can! work! at! Argonne! or! with! Argonne!

28

ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management

29

Solar Decathlon 2011: The Visitor's Perspective | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decathlon 2011: The Visitor's Perspective Decathlon 2011: The Visitor's Perspective Solar Decathlon 2011: The Visitor's Perspective September 26, 2011 - 12:48pm Addthis Each house has personalized details--like Florida International's etchings inscribed on the deck floor. Each house has personalized details--like Florida International's etchings inscribed on the deck floor. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs This past Sunday morning I boarded a shuttle headed towards West Potomac Park, site of this year's Solar Decathlon competition. I wanted to experience the event, now in its 5th iteration, from the visitor's perspective-so I grabbed a map of the Solar Village and joined a line of fellow sightseers. I should note that D.C.'s quasi-monsoon season (relentless rain and

30

Wood for energy at Bedgebury Forest Bedgebury visitor centre's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an educational room, café, visitor information office and toilet and shower facilities. A self-contained bike is stored outside but stacked off the ground to allow air to circulate. It is essential that the chips

31

Dark tourism: understanding visitor motivation at sites of death and disaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

People are fascinated with death and disaster. One simply has to watch traffic slow to a crawl when passing a car accident to understand this. However, this fascination goes beyond the side of a highway and enters the realm of tourism. Today, numerous sites of death and disaster attract millions of visitors from all around the world: Auschwitz-Birkenau, Anne Frank's House, Graceland, Oklahoma City, Gettysburg, Vimy Ridge, the Somme, Arlington National Cemetery. The list grows each year as exhibited by the recent creation of an apartheid museum in Johannesburg, South Africa. Due to the increasing popularity of this tourism product, a small number of academics have begun studying the phenomenon. Leading the field are Lennon and Foley who labeled it Dark Tourism, Seaton who coined the term Thanatourism, and Rojek who developed the concept of Black Spots. However, despite ongoing study, there has been a paucity in understanding what actually motivates individuals to sites of dark tourism. Yet understanding motivation is imperative, particularly given the subject and sensitivity of these sites. Some are slowly decaying, and visitors play a large role in their preservation. Subsequently, without proper management, visitor influxes can further deteriorate sites or induce friction with the locals. Knowledge then, also provides administrators the necessary tools to properly manage the varying stakeholders. Although many feel an interest in death and disaster simply stems from morbidity, the range of factors involved extend from an interest in history and heritage to education to remembrance. To begin this study, a list of possible motivations was compiled. Then, to get a better comprehension of these motivations, visitors to the Holocaust Museum Houston were surveyed as a case study. As a commodified, synthetic site of death and atrocity, the museum fits the definitions of a dark tourism site as established by lead academics. Therefore, by asking visitors to the museum what motivated them to the site, the results will hopefully give some acumen into the wants and needs of certain stakeholders. Finally, this research sought to discover if motivation at the museum could shed light on motivation to other sites of dark tourism.

Yuill, Stephanie Marie

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Certification Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Certification October 16, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Acting Deputy Secretary Kupfer Thank you, Mike, for that introduction and to both you and Jane for hosting this event. You both have been instrumental in the dramatic transformation of this site. We made a commitment more than a decade ago to do three things here at Fernald: to close it, to clean it up and to give it back to the community. I'm proud to say we have fulfilled that commitment safely and ahead of schedule. Less than two years ago, I was here with Secretary Bodman as he announced the completion of a $4.4 billion clean up operation. Since then, we have

33

Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Certification Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Certification October 16, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Acting Deputy Secretary Kupfer Thank you, Mike, for that introduction and to both you and Jane for hosting this event. You both have been instrumental in the dramatic transformation of this site. We made a commitment more than a decade ago to do three things here at Fernald: to close it, to clean it up and to give it back to the community. I'm proud to say we have fulfilled that commitment safely and ahead of schedule. Less than two years ago, I was here with Secretary Bodman as he announced the completion of a $4.4 billion clean up operation. Since then, we have

34

NP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

NP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors Deputy Director for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Contact Information Deputy Director for Science Programs U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5316 F: (301) 903-7780 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov

35

HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors Deputy Director for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Contact Information Deputy Director for Science Programs U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5316 F: (301) 903-7780 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov

36

WDTS Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

WDTS Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Deputy Director for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Contact Information Deputy Director for Science Programs U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5316 F: (301) 903-7780 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov

37

FES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

FES Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors Deputy Director for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Contact Information Deputy Director for Science Programs U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5316 F: (301) 903-7780 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov

38

BER Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BER Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors Deputy Director for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Contact Information Deputy Director for Science Programs U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5316 F: (301) 903-7780 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov

39

BES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BES Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors Deputy Director for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Contact Information Deputy Director for Science Programs U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5316 F: (301) 903-7780 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov

40

ASCR Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASCR Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors Deputy Director for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Contact Information Deputy Director for Science Programs U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5316 F: (301) 903-7780 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Committees of Visitors Committees of Visitors Deputy Director for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Contact Information Deputy Director for Science Programs U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5316 F: (301) 903-7780 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov

42

Refactoring Composite to Visitor and Inverse Transformation in Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe how to use refactoring tools to transform a Java program conforming to the Composite design pattern into a program conforming to the Visitor design pattern with the same external behavior. We also describe the inverse transformation. We use the refactoring tools provided by IntelliJ IDEA and Eclipse.

Ajouli, Akram

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

US ITER Project Providing a Facility for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US ITER Project Providing a Facility for Burning Plasma Research Ned Sauthoff Project Manager, US to position the US for Burning Plasma Research #12;U.S. ITER / Sauthoff Slide 2 Structure of the Talk... ITER

44

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

The epidemiology and etiology of visitor injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. National Park Service has recognized visitor health and safety as an important component of protected area management. Despite this recognition, research investigating visitor health and safety issues in national parks is lacking. In order to improve the understanding of the factors contributing to visitor injuries, the purpose of this study was to: 1) identify the distribution of injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, 2) examine the relationship between visitor factors and the severity of visitor injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, 3) examine the relationship between environmental factors and the severity of visitor injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, and 4) determine the effectiveness of sign placement and indirect supervision on controlling visitor injuries in the park. Data for this study consisted of 5,947 incident reports recorded in Hawaii Volcanoes between January 1, 1993 and December 31, 2002. The results found that even though 26% of the injuries in the park occur in frontcountry regions, 53% of all visitor injuries took place at the Eruption Site. As well, 130 of the 268 (49%) fatalities occurred on roadway environments and 1,179 of the 1,698 (69%) severe injuries occurred at the Eruption Site. Logistic regression analysis used to examine the relationship between visitor factors and injury severity in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park found that female visitors, visitors wearing minimal footwear and clothing, and visitors carrying no flashlight and minimal drinking water are factors significantly associated with fatal injuries. Visitors wearing minimal footwear and clothing, visitors carrying no flashlight and minimal drinking water, visitors entering restricted areas, visitors with pre-existing health conditions, and visitors aged 50-59 years of age are factors significantly associated with severe injuries. Logistic regression analysis found no built environment factor to be significantly associated with visitor fatalities or severe injuries. However, darkness and rugged terrain were significantly associated with visitor fatalities. Chi-square tests of independence found the combined treatment of sign placement and indirect supervision to have no effect on reducing the frequency and severity of visitor injuries at the Eruption Site.

Heggie, Travis Wade

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Host for international visitors. Progress report, January 1-July 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report sets forth the rationale and need for the task. It provides SERI's program statement, activities engaged in, and a discussion of the several visits with accompanying names of international visitors. Approximately 80 international visitors representing 38 countries visited SERI for purposes of information exchange during the reporting period.

Bracken, R B

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

NIST SURF Beamline 3: Facility for Irradiance Calibration ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Beamline 3 is home to the Facility for Irradiance Calibration Using ... Source of Uncertainty, Nominal Value, Relative Uncertainty, Sensitivity Coefficient, ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

48

Before Getting There: Potential and Actual Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the concepts of Actual and Potential Collaboration Spaces. The former applies to the space where collaborative activities are performed, while the second relates to the initial space where opportunities for collaboration are ... Keywords: Doc2U, PIAS, casual and informal interactions, potential and actual collaboration spaces, potential collaboration awareness

Alberto L. Morn; Jess Favela; Ana Mara Martnez Enrquez; Dominique Decouchant

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) The first edition of this report, released in October 1982, presented physical-characteristic information for the various DOE radiologic-instrument calibration facilities located throughout the U.S. Three subsequent editions have been released in an effort to update information regarding the current status of the facilities. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) More Documents & Publications Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)

50

Highlighting high performance: Zion National Park Visitor Center, a sustainable building for the future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zion National Park Visitor Center incorporated a variety of energy-efficient features into its design to address Zion's specific needs. The design blended with the canyon's unique qualities and will save energy and operation costs at the center.

Torcellini, P.

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

51

Highlighting high performance: Zion National Park Visitor Center, a sustainable building for the future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zion National Park Visitor Center incorporated a variety of energy-efficient features into its design to address Zion's specific needs. The design blended with the canyon's unique qualities and will save energy and operation costs at the center.

Torcellini, P.

2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

52

Highlighting High Performance: National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Visitors Center, Golden, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory Visitors Center, also known as the Dan Schaefer Federal Building, is a high-performance building located in Golden, Colorado. The 6,400-square-foot building incorporates passive solar heating, energy-efficient lighting, an evaporative cooling system, and other technologies to minimize energy costs and environmental impact. The Visitors Center displays a variety of interactive exhibits on energy efficiency and renewable energy, and the building includes an auditorium, a public reading room, and office space.

Burgert, S.

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

53

Development of a Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility for Long...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility for Long Term Animal Exposures at Colorado State University Michael Weil Colorado State University Abstract A low dose rate irradiation facility...

54

Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Foundation Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 2007 Long Range Plan and the 2003 DOE report, "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook." A Funding...

55

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) The first edition of this report, released in October 1982, presented physical-characteristic information for the various DOE radiologic-instrument calibration facilities located throughout the U.S. Three subsequent editions have been released in an effort to update information regarding the current status of the facilities. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) More Documents & Publications Calibration Model Assignments expressed as U3O8, Summary Table ES-1 Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,

56

Fact Sheet: Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection Fact Sheet: Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection December 11, 2008 - 8:51am Addthis Based on the analyses and recommendations over the last decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science determined that the establishment of a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a high priority for the future of U.S. nuclear science research. This determination and supporting rationale are reflected in the DOE/ National Science Foundation Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 2007 Long Range Plan and the 2003 DOE report, "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook." A Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) was used to solicit applications for the conceptual design and establishment of FRIB in order

57

ASCR Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Committees Committees of Visitors Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (85KB) ASCR Budget ASCR Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information » About ASCR Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research - ASCR Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) 2012

58

BES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BES BES Committees of Visitors Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) BESAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (41KB) BES Committees of Visitors BES Home BES Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) 2013 BESAC COV Report on Energy Frontier Research Centers and Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis Energy Innovation Hub (EFRC and JCAP) .pdf file (1.6MB) BES Response to BESAC COV Report on EFRC and JCAP .pdf file (30KB) BESAC COV Report on Division of Scientific User Facilities (SUF) .pdf file (398KB) BES Response to BESAC COV Report on SUF .pdf file (86KB) 2012 BESAC COV Report on Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering

59

NP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

NP Committees NP Committees of Visitors Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (629KB) NP Committees of Visitors NP Home NP Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) 2013 NSAC COV Report on NP Program .pdf file (1.8MB) NP Response to NSAC COV Report on NP .pdf file (56KB) 2010 NSAC COV Report on NP Program .pdf file (410KB) NP Response to NSAC COV Report on NP .pdf file (32KB) 2007 NSAC COV Report on NP Program .pdf file (185KB) NP Response to NSAC COV Report on NP .pdf file (103KB) 2004 NSAC COV Report on NP Program .pdf file (148KB) NP Response to NSAC COV Report on NP .pdf file (292KB) Last modified: 5/10/2013 3:44:25

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NP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Committees of Committees of Visitors Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (32KB) NP Budget NP Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Labs & Universities Nuclear Physics Related Brochures Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » About NP Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) 2013 NSAC COV Report on NP Program .pdf file (1.8MB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

BER Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BER BER Committees of Visitors Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (40KB) BER Committees of Visitors BER Home BER Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) 2013 BERAC COV Report on Division of Climate and Environmental Science (CES) .pdf file (1.7MB) BER Response to BERAC COV Report on CES .pdf file (20KB) 2011 BERAC COV Report on Division of Biological Systems Science (BSS) .pdf file (228KB) BER Response to BERAC COV Report on BSS .pdf file (22KB) 2010 BERAC COV Report on Division of CES .pdf file (300KB) BER Response to BERAC COV Report on CES .pdf file (71KB)

62

HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Committees of Committees of Visitors High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (170KB) HEP Budget HEP Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs University Research & National Labs Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » About HEP Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) 2010 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (547KB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (29KB)

63

FES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

FES FES Committees of Visitors Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) FESAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (140KB) FES Committees of Visitors FES Home FES Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) 2010 FESAC COV Report on FES Program .pdf file (707KB) FES Response to FESAC COV Report on FES .pdf file (43KB) 2006 FESAC COV Report on Tokamak Research and Enabling Technologies .pdf file (41KB) FES Response to FESAC COV Report on Tokamak Research and Enabling Technologies .pdf file (35KB) 2005 FESAC COV Report on Innovative Confinement, General Plasma Physics, and Inertial Confinement Programs .pdf file (105KB) FES Response to the FESAC COV Report on Innovative Confinement,

64

BER Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Committees of Committees of Visitors Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (172KB) BER Budget BER Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » About BER Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

65

BES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Committees of Committees of Visitors Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (51KB) BES Budget BES Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Organizational History Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » About BES Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) 2013 BESAC COV Report on Energy Frontier Research Centers and Joint

66

B Reactor Tour Registration Opens March 2 - Visitors Have Come From 60  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Reactor Tour Registration Opens March 2 - Visitors Have Come From B Reactor Tour Registration Opens March 2 - Visitors Have Come From 60 Countries Worldwide B Reactor Tour Registration Opens March 2 - Visitors Have Come From 60 Countries Worldwide February 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will open online registration for the B Reactor National Historic Landmark's 2013 tour season on March 2 at noon. Families with children above the age of 12, along with middle schools and high schools, are invited to sign up for the coveted tour slots. A portion of tour slots will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis through an online registration system at http://manhattanprojectbreactor.hanford.gov/, or by calling (509) 376-1647 or stopping by the B Reactor Tour Headquarters located at 2000 Logston

67

HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HEP HEP Committees of Visitors High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home HEP Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) 2013 HEPAP COV Charge .pdf file (486KB) 2010 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (547KB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (29KB) 2007 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (516KB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (16KB) 2004 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (2.4MB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (98KB) Last modified: 9/9/2013 4:01:05 PM

68

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

69

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

70

Improving Industrial Refrigeration System Efficiency - Actual Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses actual design and modifications for increased system efficiency and includes reduced chilled liquid flow during part load operation, reduced condensing and increased evaporator temperatures for reduced system head, thermosiphon cycle cooling during winter operation, compressor intercooling, direct refrigeration vs. brine cooling, insulation of cold piping to reduce heat gain, multiple screw compressors for improved part load operation, evaporative condensers for reduced system head and pumping energy, and using high efficiency motors.

White, T. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Next Generation Light Source Facility for LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Next Generation Light Source Facility for LBNL NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be updated until Congress...

72

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...

73

Modeling visitors' profiles: A study to investigate adaptation aspects for museum learning technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time restrictions that apply in museum learning increase the need for adaptive and/or adaptable technologies. However, deriving a visitor's profile is not an easy task, since most common ways (asking direct questions, recording user actions) are ... Keywords: Adaptability, adaptivity, design guidelines, education, museum, museum adaptive learning technologies

Angeliki Antoniou; George Lepouras

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

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Medical/Repatriation/Evacuation Program (ACE Insurance) Under the exchange visitor program, the United States Department of State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical/Repatriation/Evacuation Program (ACE Insurance) Under the exchange visitor program, the United States Department of State requires exchange visitors to have coverage for medical benefits, repatriation of remains in the case of death, and expenses associated with medical evacuation. Coverage by ACE

76

Indonesia-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Indonesia-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures (TRANSfer) Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures (TRANSfer) Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Adaptation, Low emission development planning Website http://transferproject.org/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References Transfer Project[1] Low-carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles[2] Program Overview The increasing levels of greenhouse gas emissions produced by road traffic in developing countries are becoming a greater problem in efforts to

77

Haiti-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haiti-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Haiti-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures (TRANSfer) Jump to: navigation, search Name Haiti-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures (TRANSfer) Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Adaptation, Low emission development planning Website http://transferproject.org/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Haiti Caribbean References Transfer Project[1] Low-carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles[2] Program Overview The increasing levels of greenhouse gas emissions produced by road traffic in developing countries are becoming a greater problem in efforts to prevent climate change. The project aims to provide practical support to

78

Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Fact Sheet: Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.11.08 Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Based on the analyses and recommendations over the last decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science determined that the establishment of a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a high priority for the future of U.S. nuclear science research. This determination and supporting rationale are reflected in the DOE/ National

79

Colombia-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Colombia-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures (TRANSfer) Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures (TRANSfer) Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Adaptation, Low emission development planning Website http://transferproject.org/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Colombia South America References Transfer Project[1] Low-carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles[2] Program Overview The increasing levels of greenhouse gas emissions produced by road traffic in developing countries are becoming a greater problem in efforts to

80

VISITOR'S GUIDE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Culvers 541 Plainfield Rd. 734-0400 Teddy's Red Hots 737 Plainfield Rd. 789-8580 Thai O'Cha 737 Plainfield Rd. 794-9268 McDonalds 809 Plainfield Rd. 969-7690 Home Run Inn...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ALS Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Denes then provided an overview of the potential scientific opportunities of the Nest Generation Light Source. February 2013 Congressman Eric Swalwell visited Berkeley Lab on...

82

Ground test facility for nuclear testing of space reactor subsystems  

SciTech Connect

Two major reactor facilities at the INEL have been identified as easily adaptable for supporting the nuclear testing of the SP-100 reactor subsystem. They are the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) and the Loss of Fluid Test Reactor (LOFT). In addition, there are machine shops, analytical laboratories, hot cells, and the supporting services (fire protection, safety, security, medical, waste management, etc.) necessary to conducting a nuclear test program. This paper presents the conceptual approach for modifying these reactor facilities for the ground engineering test facility for the SP-100 nuclear subsystem. 4 figs.

Quapp, W.J.; Watts, K.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

84

EIS-0385: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0385: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi EIS-0385: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum...

85

Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor Experience at Historic Reactor Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor Experience at Historic Reactor May 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL (509) 376-6773 Andre_l_Armstrong@rl.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - Two locomotives that hauled irradiated fuel around the Hanford Site for a half-century will reach their final stop this week when they are delivered to the Historic B Reactor for preservation and public display. The two locomotives are among 16 railcars from Hanford's 200 North Area being removed by Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL).

86

WDTS Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Committees Committees of Visitors Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) WDTS Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (24KB) Education Links WDTS Budget WDTS Committees of Visitors Jobs Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) Community College Internships (CCI) DOE Office of Science Graduate Fellowship (SCGF) Program External link Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship (AEF) Program Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) at DOE Laboratories DOE National Science Bowl® (NSB) Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP) Outreach Contact Information Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-8842 F: (202) 586-0019 E: sc.wdts@science.doe.gov

87

Solar energy system installed at Mount Rushmore National Visitor Center in Keystone, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Information is provided on the system description, the design, and installation of the solar energy system installed at the Mount Rushmore Visitor Center. The system is designed to furnish about 45 percent of the heating for the total facility and about 53 percent partial cooling for the 2000 square-foot observatory. Such items as Acceptance Test Data, a complete set of as-build drawings, system performance data, problems, pictures, and other pertinent materials are included.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Mobile Visitors in Particular to Note Web Upgrade | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mobile Visitors in Particular to Note Web Upgrade Mobile Visitors in Particular to Note Web Upgrade Mobile Visitors in Particular to Note Web Upgrade November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - DOE recently launched changes to Energy.gov, which includes the public website for EM. Smartphone and tablet users are especially likely to notice the differences. The major Energy.gov upgrade features an expanded focus on consumer-oriented content and a responsive design that automatically optimizes the browsing experience on desktop computers and laptops as well as smartphones and tablets. Read more about the changes here. Addthis Related Articles Energy.gov now provides a browsing experience tailored to the device you're using. Introducing a More Responsive Energy.gov The Energy Department's main site, Energy.gov and its contents, are now available on the go. This allows users to access the Energy Departments' resources over a variety of mobile devices such as smart phones and tablets.

89

Closed Loop Test Facility for hot dirty gas valves  

SciTech Connect

A design study of a closed loop test facility for eight-inch hot dirty gas valves is presented. The objective of the facility is to quality valves for use in coal gasifiers, combined cycle plants, and pressurized fluid bed combustors. Outline sketches and estimated costs are presented for the selected design.

Not Available

1980-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

90

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)

91

Contruction of User Facilities for the Proton Beam Utilization of PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contruction of User Facilities for the Proton Beam Utilization of PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project)

Kim, K R; Lee, H R; Nam, K Y; Park, B S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 CFR Ch. X (1-1-12 Edition) Pt. 1022 D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE Siting, construction or expansion, and op- eration of disposal facilities for transuranic (TRU) waste and TRU mixed waste (TRU waste also containing hazardous waste as designated in 40 CFR part 261). D12 INCINERATORS Siting, construction, and operation of in- cinerators, other than research and develop- ment incinerators or incinerators for non- hazardous solid waste (as designated in 40 CFR 261.4(b)). PART 1022-COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND EN- VIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIRE- MENTS Subpart A-General Sec. 1022.1 Background. 1022.2 Purpose and scope. 1022.3 Policy. 1022.4 Definitions. 1022.5 Applicability. 1022.6 Public inquiries. Subpart B-Procedures for Floodplain and

93

Cryogenic distribution for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams  

SciTech Connect

The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a new National User Facility for nuclear science funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science and operated by Michigan State University. The FRIB accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) cavities operating at 2 K and SC magnets operating at 4.5 K all cooled by a large scale cryogenic refrigeration system. A major subsystem of the cryogenic system will be the distribution system whose primary components will include a distribution box, the transfer lines and the interconnect valve boxes at each cryogenic device. An overview of the conceptual design of the distribution system including engineering details, capabilities and schedule is described.

S. Jones, Dana Arenius, Adam Fila, P. Geutschow, Helmut Laumer, Matt Johnson, Cory S. Waltz, J. G. Weisend II

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)"...

95

A Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The future accelerator facility for beams of ions and antiprotons at Darmstadt will provide antiproton beams of intensities that are two orders of magnitude higher than currently available. Within the foreseen scheme, antiprotons can be decelerated to 30 MeV. The low-energy antiproton community has recently formed a users group to make use of this opportunity to create a next-generation low-energy antiproton facility called FLAIR, which will be able to provide cooled antiproton beams well below 100 keV kinetic energy. This talk gives an overview of the layout and physics program of the proposed facility.

E. Widmann

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

96

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

97

BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center | About the Guest Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is Guest Central? What is Guest Central? It is one central location that provides all the hyper links that guests, users, and visitors routinely utilize. You can request a boarding pass, notify BNL of your arrival plans, determine if your guest appointment is valid, determine if you have any outstanding training requirements, notify BNL of changes in your personal information, request an extension of your guest appointment, or see what USCIS documents are on file at BNL. The following provides a summary of how to access this portal and what resources are available. How Do I Access Guest Central? To obtain access to Guest Central you will need to set-up a user account and log-in. To create an account, you will need a valid guest number. If you do not have a guest number, please request one. Once you have access,

98

Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures (TRANSfer) Jump to: navigation, search Name Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures (TRANSfer) Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Adaptation, Low emission development planning Website http://transferproject.org/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Colombia, Haiti, Indonesia, South Africa South America, Caribbean, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Africa References Transfer Project[1] Low-carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles[2] Program Overview The increasing levels of greenhouse gas emissions produced by road traffic in developing countries are becoming a greater problem in efforts to

99

Major Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines Major Materials Facilities Committee Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, DC 1984 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance. This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to procedures approved by a Report Review Committee con- sisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National

100

A facility for creating Python extensions in C++  

SciTech Connect

Python extensions are usually created by writing the glue that connects Python to the desired new functionality in the C language. While simple extensions do not require much effort, to do the job correctly with full error checking is tedious and prone to errors in reference counting and to memory leaks, especially when errors occur. The resulting program is difficult to read and maintain. By designing suitable C++ classes to wrap the Python C API, we are able to produce extensions that are correct and which clean up after themselves correctly when errors occur. This facility also integrates the C++ and Python exception facilities. This paper briefly describes our package for this purpose, named CXX. The emphasis is on our design choices and the way these contribute to the construction of accurate Python extensions. We also briefly relate the way CXX's facilities for sequence classes allow use of C++'s Standard Template Library (STL) algorithms on C++ sequences.

Dubois, P F

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Experimental test facility for evaluation of solar control strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental solar heating and cooling system has been constructed at LBL. It was designed to serve as a test system to check out the operation of an LBL-developed solar controller that looked promising in terms of its commercialization potential. Improvements were made in the experimental heating and cooling system to enable quantitative determination of the auxiliary energy savings made possible by using this type of controller. These improvements consisted of installation and calibration of accurate instrumentation, data acquisition capabilities, and development of simulated input and output devices that would allow repeated experiments using the same running conditions. In addition, the possibilities of further development of the heating and cooling system into an experimental test facility for a wide range of solar control strategies have been investigated.

Majteles, M.; Lee, H.; Wahlig, M.; Warren, M.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 999...

103

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002...

104

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,200...

105

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011...

106

Predicted vs. Actual Energy Savings of Retrofitted House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of actual energy savings and the predicted energy savings of retrofitted one-story house located in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The process started with modeling the house prior to retrofitting and after retrofitting. The monthly metered energy consumption is acquired from the electric company archives for seven years prior to retrofitting and recording the actual monthly energy consumption of the post retrofitting. The house model is established on DOE 2.1. Actual monthly energy consumption is used to calibrate and fine-tuning the model until the gap between actual and predicted consumption was narrowed. Then the Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) are entered into the modeled house according to the changes in thermo-physical properties of the envelope and the changes in schedules and number of users. In order to account for those differences, electrical consumption attributed to A/C in summer was isolated and compared. The study followed the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP) in assessing the impact of energy conservation measures on actual, metered, building energy consumption. The study aimed to show the predicted savings by the simulated building model and the actual utility bills' analysis in air conditioning consumption and peak at monthly load due to building envelope.

Al-Mofeez, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Evaluation of the Low-Energy Design Process and Energy Performance of the Zion National Park Visitor Center: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Paper discusses NREL's role in the participation of the design process of the Zion National Park Visitor Center Complex and the results documented from monitoring the energy performance of the building for several years. Paper includes PV system and Trombe wall description and lessons learned in the design, construction, and commissioning of the building.

Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Pless, S.; Judkoff, R.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A Central Laser Facility for the Cherenkov Telescope Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Central Laser Facility is a system often used in astroparticle experiments based on arrays of fluorescence or Cherenkov light detectors. The instrument is based on a laser source positioned at a certain distance from the array, emitting fast light pulses in the vertical direction with the aim of calibrating the array and/or measuring the atmospheric transmission. In view of the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a similar device could provide a calibration of the whole installation, both relative, i.e. each individual telescope with respect to the rest of the array, and absolute, with a precision better than 10%, if certain design requirements are met. Additionally, a precise monitoring of the sensitivity of each telescope can be made on time-scales of days to years. During calibration runs of the central laser facility, all detectors will be pointed towards the same portion of the laser beam at a given altitude. Simulations of the possible configurations of a Central Laser Facility for CTA (varying la...

Gaug, Markus; Cilmo, Marco; Di Pierro, Federico; Tonachini, Aurelio; Vallania, Piero

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

SEM Facility for Examination of Reactive and Radioactive Materials  

SciTech Connect

A scanning electron microscope (SEM) facility for the examination of tritium-containing materials is operational at Mound Laboratory. The SEM is installed with the sample chamber incorporated as an integral part of an inert gas glovebox facility to enable easy handling of radioactive and pyrophoric materials. A standard SEM (ETEC Model B-1) was modified to meet dimensional, operational, and safety-related requirements. A glovebox was designed and fabricated which permitted access with the gloves to all parts of the SEM sample chamber to facilitate detector and accessory replacement and repairs. A separate console combining the electron optical column and specimen chamber was interfaced to the glovebox by a custom-made, neoprene bellows so that the vibrations normally associated with the blowers and pumps were damped. Photomicrographs of tritiated pyrophoric materials show the usefulness of this facility. Some of the difficulties involved in the investigation of these materials are also discussed. The SEM is also equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (ORTEC) and a Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (3M) attachments. This latter attachment allows analysis of secondary ions with masses ranging from 1-300 amu.

Downs, G. L.; Tucker, P. A.

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Modeling and analysis of a heat transport transient test facility for space nuclear systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis is to design a robust test facility for a small space nuclear power system and model its physical behavior under (more)

[No author

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level

112

Energy-Efficient Retrofits at the Carl Hayden Visitors Center; Federal Energy Management Program: Technical Assistance, Case Study (Fact sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance Case Study FEM? . . ( 1 , Energy-Efficient Retrofits at the Carl Hayden Visitors Center With help from FEMP, the Bureau of Reclamation retrofits the Carl Hayden Visitors Center at Glan Canyon Dam- saving energy, waterr and money. Located on the north end o f the Grand Canyon, the Glen Canyon Dam is one of the 20th cen ing marvelb, drawing lion tourists from around t h e world The Carl Hayden Viitom Center was built in 1966 to accommodate these visitms Sittingatop one of the country's most impressive sources of hydropower, the 2l,OC@qmre-foot (1951 square metem) building houses exhibits, gift shops, bathrooms, an audiiorium, and administr ative affices. In 1993, B w u of Reclamation officials saw oppoaUnities to improve energy efficiency and reduce water

113

Energy-Efficient Retrofits at the Carl Hayden Visitors Center; Federal Energy Management Program: Technical Assistance, Case Study (Fact sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assistance Case Study FEM? . . ( 1 , Energy-Efficient Retrofits at the Carl Hayden Visitors Center With help from FEMP, the Bureau of Reclamation retrofits the Carl Hayden Visitors Center at Glan Canyon Dam- saving energy, waterr and money. Located on the north end o f the Grand Canyon, the Glen Canyon Dam is one of the 20th cen ing marvelb, drawing lion tourists from around t h e world The Carl Hayden Viitom Center was built in 1966 to accommodate these visitms Sittingatop one of the country's most impressive sources of hydropower, the 2l,OC@qmre-foot (1951 square metem) building houses exhibits, gift shops, bathrooms, an audiiorium, and administr ative affices. In 1993, B w u of Reclamation officials saw oppoaUnities to improve energy efficiency and reduce water

114

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft July 9, 2009 Draft July 9, 2009 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2009 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

115

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO 1996",,,937,942,954,962,983,990,1004,1017,1027,1033,1046,1067,1070,1071,1074,1082,1087 "AEO 1997",,,,948,970,987,1003,1017,1020,1025,1034,1041,1054,1075,1086,1092,1092,1099,1104 "AEO 1998",,,,,1009,1051,1043.875977,1058.292725,1086.598145,1084.446655,1089.787109,1096.931763,1111.523926,1129.833862,1142.338257,1148.019409,1159.695312,1162.210815,1180.029785

116

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 AEO 1997 6636 6694 6826 6953 7074 7183 7267 7369 7461 7548 7643 7731 7793 7833 7884 7924 AEO 1998 6895 6906 7066 7161 7278 7400 7488 7597 7719 7859 7959 8074 8190 8286 8361 AEO 1999 6884 7007 7269 7383 7472 7539 7620 7725 7841 7949 8069 8174 8283 8351 AEO 2000 7056 7141 7266 7363 7452 7578 7694 7815 7926 8028 8113 8217 8288

117

Table 6. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2935 3201 3362 3504 3657 3738 3880 3993 4099 4212 4303 4398 4475 4541 4584 4639 4668 4672 AEO 1995 2953 3157 3281 3489 3610 3741 3818 3920 4000 4103 4208 4303 4362 4420 4442 4460 4460 AEO 1996 3011 3106 3219 3398 3519 3679 3807 3891 3979 4070 4165 4212 4260 4289 4303 4322 4325 AEO 1997 3099 3245 3497 3665 3825 3975 4084 4190 4285 4380 4464 4552 4617 4654 4709 4760 AEO 1998 3303 3391 3654 3713 3876 4053 4137 4298 4415 4556 4639 4750 4910 4992 5087 AEO 1999 3380 3442 3888 4022 4153 4238 4336 4441 4545 4652 4780 4888 4999 5073 AEO 2000 3599 3847 4036 4187 4320 4465 4579 4690 4780 4882 4968 5055 5113

118

Tropical Africa: Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Closed Forests (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Land Use Maximum Potential Biomass Density Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By Country) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1960 (By Administrative Unit)

119

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final July 01, 2010 Final July 01, 2010 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2010 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

120

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.983258692,2.124739238,2.26534793,2.409252566,2.585728477,2.727400662,2.854942053,2.980927152,3.13861755,3.345819536,3.591100993,3.849544702,4.184279801,4.510016556,4.915074503,5.29147351,5.56022351,5.960471854 "AEO 1995",,1.891706924,1.998384058,1.952818035,2.064227053,2.152302174,2.400016103,2.569033816,2.897681159,3.160088567,3.556344605,3.869033816,4.267391304,4.561932367,4.848599034,5.157246377,5.413405797,5.660917874 "AEO 1996",,,1.630674532,1.740334763,1.862956911,1.9915856,2.10351261,2.194934146,2.287655669,2.378991658,2.476043002,2.589847464,2.717610782,2.836870306,2.967124845,3.117719429,3.294003735,3.485657428,3.728419409

122

Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rising steam costs and a high failure rate on the Joliet Plants standard steam trap, a testing and evaluation program was begun to find a steam trap that would work at Olin-Joliet. The basis was to conduct the test on the actual process equipment and that a minimum life be achieved. This paper deals with the history of the steam system/condensate systems, the setting up of the testing procedure, which traps were and were not tested and the results of the testing program to date.

Feldman, A. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

124

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO Dollar Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1992,1.9399,2.029,2.1099,2.1899,2.29,2.35,2.39,2.42,2.47,2.55,2.65,2.75,2.89,3.01,3.17,3.3,3.35,3.47 "AEO 1995",1993,,1.85,1.899,1.81,1.87,1.8999,2.06,2.14,2.34,2.47,2.69,2.83,3.02,3.12,3.21,3.3,3.35,3.39 "AEO 1996",1994,,,1.597672343,1.665446997,1.74129355,1.815978527,1.866241336,1.892736554,1.913619637,1.928664207,1.943216205,1.964540124,1.988652706,2.003382921,2.024799585,2.056392431,2.099974155,2.14731431,2.218094587

125

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1995 1993 6.80 6.80 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 AEO 1996 1994 7.09 6.99 6.94 6.93 6.96 6.96 6.96 6.97 6.98 6.97 6.98 6.95 6.95 6.94 6.96 6.95 6.91 AEO 1997 1995 6.94 6.89 6.90 6.91 6.86 6.84 6.78 6.73 6.66 6.60 6.58 6.54 6.49 6.48 6.45 6.36

126

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO 1995",,6398.45,6544.45,6555.4,6675.85,6745.2,6821.85,6887.55,6964.2,7048.15,7146.7,7245.25,7336.5,7405.85,7471.55,7537.25,7581.05,7621.2 "AEO 1996",,,6489.7,6526.2,6606.5,6708.7,6781.7,6854.7,6942.3,7008,7084.65,7175.9,7259.85,7329.2,7383.95,7449.65,7500.75,7544.55,7581.05 "AEO 1997",,,,6635.7,6694.1,6825.5,6953.25,7073.7,7183.2,7267.15,7369.35,7460.6,7548.2,7643.1,7730.7,7792.75,7832.9,7884,7924.15

127

Table 10. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2.02,2.4,2.66,2.74,2.81,2.85,2.89,2.93,2.95,2.97,3,3.16,3.31,3.5,3.57,3.63,3.74,3.85 "AEO 1995",,2.46,2.54,2.8,2.87,2.87,2.89,2.9,2.9,2.92,2.95,2.97,3,3.03,3.19,3.35,3.51,3.6 "AEO 1996",,,2.56,2.75,2.85,2.88,2.93,2.98,3.02,3.06,3.07,3.09,3.12,3.17,3.23,3.29,3.37,3.46,3.56 "AEO 1997",,,,2.82,2.96,3.16,3.43,3.46,3.5,3.53,3.58,3.64,3.69,3.74,3.78,3.83,3.87,3.92,3.97 "AEO 1998",,,,,2.95,3.19,3.531808376,3.842532873,3.869043112,3.894513845,3.935930967,3.976293564,4.021911621,4.062207222,4.107616425,4.164502144,4.221304417,4.277039051,4.339964867

128

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041 1054 1075 1086 1092 1092 1099 1104 AEO 1998 1009 1051 1044 1058 1087 1084 1090 1097 1112 1130 1142 1148 1160 1162 1180 AEO 1999 1040 1075 1092 1109 1113 1118 1120 1120 1133 1139 1150 1155 1156 1173 AEO 2000 1053 1086 1103 1124 1142 1164 1175 1184 1189 1194 1199 1195 1200 AEO 2001 1078 1112 1135 1153 1165 1183 1191 1220 1228 1228 1235 1240

129

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

130

Table 16. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual (billion kilowatt-hours) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2364 2454 2534 2626 2708 2811 AEO 1983 2318 2395 2476 2565 2650 2739 3153 AEO 1984 2321 2376 2461 2551 2637 2738 3182 AEO 1985 2317 2360 2427 2491 2570 2651 2730 2808 2879 2949 3026 AEO 1986 2363 2416 2479 2533 2608 2706 2798 2883 2966 3048 3116 3185 3255 3324 3397 AEO 1987 2460 2494 2555 2622 2683 2748 2823 2902 2977 3363 AEO 1989* 2556 2619 2689 2760 2835 2917 2994 3072 3156 3236 3313 3394 3473 AEO 1990 2612 2689 3083 3488.0 3870.0 AEO 1991 2700 2762 2806 2855 2904 2959 3022 3088 3151 3214 3282 3355 3427 3496 3563 3632 3704 3776 3846 3916 AEO 1992 2746 2845 2858 2913 2975 3030 3087 3146 3209 3276 3345 3415 3483 3552 3625 3699 3774 3847 3921 AEO 1993 2803 2840 2893 2946 2998 3052 3104 3157 3214 3271 3327

131

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

132

Direct quantum communication without actual transmission of the message qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently an orthogonal state based protocol of direct quantum communication without actual transmission of particles is proposed by Salih \\emph{et al.}{[}Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{110} (2013) 170502{]} using chained quantum Zeno effect. As the no-transmission of particle claim is criticized by Vaidman {[}arXiv:1304.6689 (2013){]}, the condition (claim) of Salih \\emph{et al.} is weaken here to the extent that transmission of particles is allowed, but transmission of the message qubits (the qubits on which the secret information is encoded) is not allowed. Remaining within this weaker condition it is shown that there exists a large class of quantum states, that can be used to implement an orthogonal state based protocol of secure direct quantum communication using entanglement swapping, where actual transmission of the message qubits is not required. The security of the protocol originates from monogamy of entanglement. As the protocol can be implemented without using conjugate coding its security is independent of non-commutativity.

Chitra Shukla; Anirban Pathak

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

133

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",17.71,17.68,17.84,18.12,18.25,18.43,18.58,18.93,19.28,19.51,19.8,19.92,20.13,20.18,20.38,20.35,20.16,20.19 "AEO 1995",,18.28,17.98,17.92,18.21,18.63,18.92,19.08,19.2,19.36,19.52,19.75,19.94,20.17,20.28,20.6,20.59,20.88 "AEO 1996",,,18.9,19.15,19.52,19.59,19.59,19.65,19.73,19.97,20.36,20.82,21.25,21.37,21.68,22.11,22.47,22.83,23.36 "AEO 1997",,,,19.1,19.7,20.17,20.32,20.54,20.77,21.26,21.9,22.31,22.66,22.93,23.38,23.68,23.99,24.25,24.65 "AEO 1998",,,,,18.85,19.06,20.34936142,20.27427673,20.60257721,20.94442177,21.44076347,21.80969238,22.25416183,22.65365219,23.176651,23.74545097,24.22989273,24.70069313,24.96691322

134

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.94 2.03 2.11 2.19 2.29 2.35 2.39 2.42 2.47 2.55 2.65 2.75 2.89 3.01 3.17 3.30 3.35 3.47 AEO 1995 1993 1.85 1.90 1.81 1.87 1.90 2.06 2.14 2.34 2.47 2.69 2.83 3.02 3.12 3.21 3.30 3.35 3.39 AEO 1996 1994 1.60 1.67 1.74 1.82 1.87 1.89 1.91 1.93 1.94 1.96 1.99 2.00 2.02 2.06 2.10 2.15 2.22

135

EIS-0385: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the 85: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi EIS-0385: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi Overview DOE announced the cancellation of a supplemental environmental impact statement for certain facilities associated with the 2007 selection of Richton, Mississippi, as the location of a new storage site for expanding the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 9, 2011 EIS-0385-S1: Notice of Cancellation of a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi March 21, 2008

136

Summary of informal workshop on state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research  

SciTech Connect

The present state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research in the United States is assessed by means of a questionnaire and informal workshop. Recommendations for future facilities are given. 3 refs.

Jones, K.W.; Cocke, C.L.; Datz, S.; Kostroun, V.

1984-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part III: Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part III of a series of papers describing the extended time high-cloud observations from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) supporting the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) ...

Kenneth Sassen; Jennifer M. Comstock

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

IKNO, a user facility for coherent terahertz and UV synchrotron radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IKNO is a real multi-user facility that accommodates a largeIKNO, a user facility for coherent terahertz and UVis a proposal for a multi-user facility based on an electron

Sannibale, Fernando

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nonlinear excitations in DNA: Aperiodic models vs actual genome sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of the sequence on the propagation of nonlinear excitations in simple models of DNA in which we incorporate actual DNA sequences obtained from human genome data. We show that kink propagation requires forces over a certain threshold, a phenomenon already found for aperiodic sequences [F. Dom\\'\\i nguez-Adame {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 52}, 2183 (1995)]. For forces below threshold, the final stop positions are highly dependent on the specific sequence. The results of our model are consistent with the stick-slip dynamics of the unzipping process observed in experiments. We also show that the effective potential, a collective coordinate formalism introduced by Salerno and Kivshar [Phys. Lett. A {\\bf 193}, 263 (1994)] is a useful tool to identify key regions in DNA that control the dynamical behavior of large segments. Additionally, our results lead to further insights in the phenomenology observed in aperiodic systems.

Sara Cuenda; Angel Sanchez

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

140

VISITOR & INFORMATION PROGRAMS Visitor Guide &Map  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as ways you can experience arts, sciences and athletic events. We are delighted you chose to spend time Stadium features great places to eat, as well as spaces to relax, see movies, hear bands, bowl and just

Sheridan, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

142

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

143

Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 7.58 7.45 7.12 6.82 6.66 7.09 AEO 1983 5.15 5.44 5.73 5.79 5.72 5.95 6.96 AEO 1984 4.85 5.11 5.53 5.95 6.31 6.59 8.65 AEO 1985 4.17 4.38 4.73 4.93 5.36 5.72 6.23 6.66 7.14 7.39 7.74 AEO 1986 5.15 5.38 5.46 5.92 6.46 7.09 7.50 7.78 7.96 8.20 8.47 8.74 9.04 9.57 9.76 AEO 1987 5.81 6.04 6.81 7.28 7.82 8.34 8.71 8.94 8.98 10.01 AEO 1989* 6.28 6.84 7.49 7.96 8.53 8.83 9.04 9.28 9.60 9.64 9.75 10.02 10.20 AEO 1990 7.20 7.61 9.13 9.95 11.02 AEO 1991 7.28 7.25 7.34 7.48 7.72 8.10 8.57 9.09 9.61 10.07 10.51 11.00 11.44 11.72 11.86 12.11 12.30 12.49 12.71 12.91 AEO 1992 6.86 7.42 7.88 8.16 8.55 8.80 9.06 9.32 9.50 9.80 10.17 10.35 10.56 10.61 10.85 11.00 11.15 11.29 11.50 AEO 1993 7.25 8.01 8.49 9.06

144

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1.98 2.12 2.27 2.41 2.59 2.73 2.85 2.98 3.14 3.35 3.59 3.85 4.18 4.51 4.92 5.29 5.56 5.96 AEO 1995 1.89 2.00 1.95 2.06 2.15 2.40 2.57 2.90 3.16 3.56 3.87 4.27 4.56 4.85 5.16 5.41 5.66 AEO 1996 1.63 1.74 1.86 1.99 2.10 2.19 2.29 2.38 2.48 2.59 2.72 2.84 2.97 3.12 3.29 3.49 3.73 AEO 1997 2.03 1.82 1.90 1.99 2.06 2.13 2.21 2.32 2.43 2.54 2.65 2.77 2.88 3.00 3.11 3.24 AEO 1998 2.30 2.20 2.26 2.31 2.38 2.44 2.52 2.60 2.69 2.79 2.93 3.06 3.20 3.35 3.48 AEO 1999 1.98 2.15 2.20 2.32 2.43 2.53 2.63 2.76 2.90 3.02 3.12 3.23 3.35 3.47

145

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

146

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

147

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

148

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

149

Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production, Projected vs. Actual Production, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 14.74 14.26 14.33 14.89 15.39 15.88 AEO 1983 16.48 16.27 16.20 16.31 16.27 16.29 14.89 AEO 1984 17.48 17.10 17.44 17.58 17.52 17.32 16.39 AEO 1985 16.95 17.08 17.11 17.29 17.40 17.33 17.32 17.27 17.05 16.80 16.50 AEO 1986 16.30 16.27 17.15 16.68 16.90 16.97 16.87 16.93 16.86 16.62 16.40 16.33 16.57 16.23 16.12 AEO 1987 16.21 16.09 16.38 16.32 16.30 16.30 16.44 16.62 16.81 17.39 AEO 1989* 16.71 16.71 16.94 17.01 16.83 17.09 17.35 17.54 17.67 17.98 18.20 18.25 18.49 AEO 1990 16.91 17.25 18.84 20.58 20.24 AEO 1991 17.40 17.48 18.11 18.22 18.15 18.22 18.39 18.82 19.03 19.28 19.62 19.89 20.13 20.07 19.95 19.82 19.64 19.50 19.30 19.08 AEO 1992 17.43 17.69 17.95 18.00 18.29 18.27 18.51 18.75 18.97

150

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

151

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

152

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

153

Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 9.2 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 7.29 8.09 8.94 9.62 10.27 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 6.37 6.89 7.50 8.15 9.05 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30

154

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

155

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68 22.11 22.47 22.83 23.36 AEO 1997 19.10 19.70 20.17 20.32 20.54 20.77 21.26 21.90 22.31 22.66 22.93 23.38 23.68 23.99 24.25 24.65 AEO 1998 18.85 19.06 20.35 20.27 20.60 20.94 21.44 21.81 22.25 22.65 23.18 23.75 24.23 24.70 24.97 AEO 1999 18.80 19.13 19.28 19.82 20.23 20.77 21.05 21.57 21.98 22.47 22.85 23.26 23.77 24.15

156

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

157

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

158

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

159

Table 15. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual (nominal cents per kilowatt-hour) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.38 6.96 7.63 8.23 8.83 9.49 AEO 1983 6.85 7.28 7.74 8.22 8.68 9.18 13.12 AEO 1984 6.67 7.05 7.48 7.89 8.25 8.65 11.53 AEO 1985 6.62 6.94 7.32 7.63 7.89 8.15 8.46 8.85 9.20 9.61 10.04 AEO 1986 6.67 6.88 7.05 7.18 7.35 7.52 7.65 7.87 8.31 8.83 9.41 10.01 10.61 11.33 12.02 AEO 1987 6.63 6.65 6.92 7.12 7.38 7.62 7.94 8.36 8.86 11.99 AEO 1989* 6.50 6.75 7.14 7.48 7.82 8.11 8.50 8.91 9.39 9.91 10.49 11.05 11.61 AEO 1990 6.49 6.72 8.40 10.99 14.5 AEO 1991 6.94 7.31 7.59 7.82 8.18 8.38 8.54 8.73 8.99 9.38 9.83 10.29 10.83 11.36 11.94 12.58 13.21 13.88 14.58 15.21 AEO 1992 6.97 7.16 7.32 7.56 7.78 8.04 8.29 8.57 8.93 9.38 9.82 10.26 10.73 11.25 11.83 12.37 12.96 13.58 14.23 AEO 1993

160

Table 11. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 AEO 1983 1.08 1.16 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 AEO 1984 0.99 1.05 1.16 1.27 1.43 1.57 2.11 AEO 1985 0.94 1.00 1.19 1.45 1.58 1.86 1.94 2.06 2.17 2.32 2.44 AEO 1986 0.74 0.88 0.62 1.03 1.05 1.27 1.39 1.47 1.66 1.79 1.96 2.17 2.38 2.42 2.43 AEO 1987 0.84 0.89 1.07 1.16 1.26 1.36 1.46 1.65 1.75 2.50 AEO 1989* 1.15 1.32 1.44 1.52 1.61 1.70 1.79 1.87 1.98 2.06 2.15 2.23 2.31 AEO 1990 1.26 1.43 2.07 2.68 2.95 AEO 1991 1.36 1.53 1.70 1.82 2.11 2.30 2.33 2.36 2.42 2.49 2.56 2.70 2.75 2.83 2.90 2.95 3.02 3.09 3.17 3.19 AEO 1992 1.48 1.62 1.88 2.08 2.25 2.41 2.56 2.68 2.70 2.72 2.76 2.84 2.92 3.05 3.10 3.20 3.25 3.30 3.30 AEO 1993 1.79 2.08 2.35 2.49 2.61 2.74 2.89 2.95 3.00 3.05 3.10

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161

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 21.20 21.42 21.60 21.99 22.37 22.63 22.95 23.22 23.58 23.82 24.09 24.13 24.02 24.14 AEO 1995 20.82 20.66 20.85 21.21 21.65 21.95 22.12 22.25 22.43 22.62 22.87 23.08 23.36 23.61 24.08 24.23 24.59 AEO 1996 21.32 21.64 22.11 22.21 22.26 22.34 22.46 22.74 23.14 23.63 24.08 24.25 24.63 25.11 25.56 26.00 26.63 AEO 1997 22.15 22.75 23.24 23.64 23.86 24.13 24.65 25.34 25.82 26.22 26.52 27.00 27.35 27.70 28.01 28.47 AEO 1998 21.84 23.03 23.84 24.08 24.44 24.81 25.33 25.72 26.22 26.65 27.22 27.84 28.35 28.84 29.17 AEO 1999 21.35 22.36 22.54 23.18 23.65 24.17 24.57 25.19 25.77 26.41 26.92 27.42 28.02 28.50

162

Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling R1 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling R1 Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling R1 While dry storage technologies are some of the safest in the world, the U.S. Department of Energy is planning a confirmatory dry storage project for high burnup fuel. This report evaluates existing capabilities at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for handling and opening full-sized dry storage casks. Existing facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center provide the infrastructure to support handling and examining of casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal

163

DOE Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan, "Facilities for  

Office of Science (SC) Website

DOE Office of DOE Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan, "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook" News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 10.11.07 DOE Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan, "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook" Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science today released a comprehensive update of its landmark 2003 publication, Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook, that shows the

164

DOE Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan: "Facilities for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan: Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan: "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook" DOE Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan: "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook" October 11, 2007 - 3:21pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science today released a comprehensive update of its landmark 2003 publication, Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook, that shows the agency has made "significant progress" in deploying the scientific facilities and instruments that the United States needs to capture world scientific leadership, extend the frontiers of science and support the Department's missions. When it was published four years ago, the Facilities Outlook was the first

165

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

166

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Feb-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Mar-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1

Johns, Russell Taylor

167

OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH THE TEST FACILITIES FOR TESLA H. Weise, DESY, Hamburg, Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH THE TEST FACILITIES FOR TESLA H. Weise, DESY, Hamburg, Germany Abstract The TESLA superconducting electron-positron linear collider with an integrated X-ray laser laboratory government in matters of science. In preparation of this, the TESLA Test Facility was set up at DESY. More

168

Wind Scanner: A full-scale Laser Facility for Wind and Turbulence Measurements around large Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Scanner: A full-scale Laser Facility for Wind and Turbulence Measurements around large Wind Turbines Torben Mikkelsen, Jakob Mann and Michael Courtney Wind Energy Department, Risø National Laboratory:Torben.Mikkelsen@Risoe.dk Summary RIS? DTU has started to build a newly designed laser-based lidar scanning facility for remote wind

169

ORAU Campus Visitor Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

+ Number Directions from Main Campus: Go back out to ORAU Way Turn left onto ORAU Way Turn left at S Illinois AveTN-62 (2.9 mi) Bear Slight right toward Bethel...

170

XPO Visitors Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

104 108 110 114 Daily Schedule XPO Sponsors XPO Programmatic Partners U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon U .S . Department of Energy Solar Decathlon . . . . . . . . . . 110...

171

Visitors Far and Wide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

closure. Participants at the January 28 meeting discussed enthusiastically the job-creation and environmental promises of a hybrid-vehicle industry. They pledged to work with a...

172

Visitor Information Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residence s, under constructi on School of Engineering Center Nanotechnology Building, under construction Li Ka Shing Center Stanford Institutes of Medicine, under construction...

173

ACCESS/VISITOR CONTROL  

... enter last keeping visual contact at all ... Term used to describe when one person allows another ... all personnel are subject to search of their ...

174

CECM: Visitor Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CECM is located in the Shrum Science Building Room P8495, at the foot of the stairwell just east of the Earth Sciences General office on the 9000 level and...

175

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time News Featured Articles 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony...

176

The Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Actual Production History (APH) Insurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Actual Production History insurance plan protects against crop losses from a number of causes. All aspects of this insurance are described, including reporting requirements for the producer.

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

178

Full-scale facility for evaluating lost circulation materials and techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has designed and built a full-scale facility for the evaluation of lost circulation materials and techniques under simulated down-hole geothermal wellbore conditions. System capabilities include a maximum temperature of 400/sup 0/F, maximum allowed working pressure of 1150 psi, and a variable pumping rate up to 280 gpm at 1000 psi. The system will be utilized to evaluate candidate lost circulation materials and techniques that may be useful to solving geothermal well drilling lost circulation problems.

Loeppke, G.E.; Caskey, B.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part II: Microphysical Properties Derived from Lidar Depolarization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part II of this series of papers describing the results of the extended time observations of cirrus clouds from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS), the information content of laser backscatter depolarization ...

Kenneth Sassen; Sally Benson

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part I: Macrophysical and Synoptic Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A uniquely extensive high cloud dataset has been collected from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing in support of the First (ISCCP) International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment extended time ...

Kenneth Sassen; James R. Campbell

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

A SPECIALIZED, MULTI-USER COMPUTER FACILITY FOR THE HIGH-SPEED, INTERACTIVE PROCESSING OF EXPERIMENTAL DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a proposed five user facility is shown In Figure 1. TheA SPECIALIZED, MULTI-USER COMPUTE* FACILITY FOR THE HIGH-to support aultiple ' users on the facility, each capable.of

Maples, C.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Assessing Climate Information Use in Agribusiness. Part I: Actual and Potential Use and Impediments to Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project for the development of methodology to enable agribusiness decision makers to utilize more effectively climate information involved investigation of three agribusiness firms, as well as measurement of their actual and potential use. The ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Steven T. Sonka; Steven Hofing

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Trends of Calculated and Simulated Actual Evaporation in the Yangtze River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actual evaporation in the Yangtze River basin is calculated by the complementary relationship approachthat is, the advectionaridity (AA) model with parameter validation from 1961 to 2007and simulated by the general circulation model (GCM) ...

Yanjun Wang; Bo Liu; Buda Su; Jianqing Zhai; Marco Gemmer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Use of Remotely Sensed Actual Evapotranspiration to Improve RainfallRunoff Modeling in Southeast Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), mounted on the polar-orbiting Terra satellite, to determine leaf area index (LAI), and use actual evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS LAI data combined ...

Yongqiang Zhang; Francis H. S. Chiew; Lu Zhang; Hongxia Li

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration from Satellite and Meteorological Data in Central Bolivia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial estimates of actual evapotranspiration are useful for calculating the water balance of river basins, quantifying hydrological services provided by ecosystems, and assessing the hydrological impacts of land-use practices. To provide this ...

Christian Seiler; Arnold F. Moene

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Date Published 05/2013 Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Traditional energy performance calculated using building simulation with the typical meteorological year (TMY) weather data represents the energy performance in a typical year but not necessarily the average or typical energy performance of a building in long term. Furthermore, the simulated results do not provide the range of variations due to the change of weather, which is important in building energy management and risk assessment of energy efficiency investment. This study analyzes the weather impact on peak electric demand and energy use by building simulation using 30-year actual meteorological year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels across all 17 climate zones. The simulated results from the AMY are compared to those from TMY3 to determine and analyze the differences. It was found that yearly weather variation has significant impact on building performance especially peak electric demand. Energy savings of building technologies should be evaluated using simulations with multi-decade actual weather data to fully consider investment risk and the long term performance.

187

Small-scale Facilities for Gas Clean Up and Carbon Capture Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Henry W. Pennline Henry W. Pennline Chemical Engineer National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6013 henry.pennline@netl.doe.gov Diane (DeeDee) Newlon Technology Transfer Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4086 r.diane.newlon@netl.doe.gov Small-Scale FacilitieS For GaS clean Up and carbon captUre reSearch Capabilities The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is conducting research on the cleanup of gas produced either by the combustion or gasification of fossil fuels. This effort directly supports the goal of various DOE technology programs (i.e., Carbon Sequestration, Gasification, etc.) to ensure the continued utilization of coal in an environmentally and economically

188

Workers Complete Asbestos Removal at West Valley to Prepare Facility for Demolition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 1, 2011 September 1, 2011 Workers Complete Asbestos Removal at West Valley to Prepare Facility for Demolition WEST VALLEY, N.Y. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work- ers safely cleared asbestos from more than 5,500 feet of piping in the Main Plant Process Building. Project completion is an important step in preparing the former commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing building for demolition. Recovery Act workers also cleaned up more than 1,700 square feet of material containing asbestos, mostly floor tiles in the building's former control room. "Completion of this work is a significant accomplishment and another major step forward as we prepare the Main Plant Process Building for demolition," said Bryan Bower, the DOE Director at West Valley.

189

A Scanning Electron Microscope Facility for Characterization of Tritium Containing Materials  

SciTech Connect

A scanning electron microscope (SEM) facility for the examination of tritium-containing materials is operational at Mound Laboratory. The SEM is installed with the sample chamber incorporated as an integral part of an inert gas glovebox facility to enable easy handling of radioactive and pyrophoric materials. A standard SEM (ERTEC Model B-1) was modified to meet dimensional, operational, and safety-related requirements. A glovebox was designed and fabricated which permitted access with the gloves to all parts of the SEM sample chamber to facilitate detector and accessory replacement and repairs. A separate console combining the electron optical column and specimen chamber was interfaced to the glovebox by a custom-made, neoprene bellows so that the vibrations normally associated with the blowers and pumps were damped. Photomicrographs of tritiated pyrophoric materials show the usefulness of this facility. Some of the difficulties involved in the investigation of these materials are also discussed.

Downs, G. L.; Tucker, P. A.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC and its Radiological Considerations  

SciTech Connect

Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) in SLAC will be used to study plasma wakefield acceleration. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design a maze wall to separate FACET project and LCLS project to allow persons working in FACET side during LCLS operation. Also FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design the shielding for FACET dump to get optimum design for shielding both prompt and residual doses, as well as reducing environmental impact. FACET will be an experimental facility that provides short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons to excite plasma wakefields and study a variety of critical issues associated with plasma wakefield acceleration [1]. This paper describes the FACET beam parameters, the lay-out and its radiological issues.

Mao, X.S.; Leitner, M.Santana; Vollaire, J.

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

191

Geothermal greenhouse-heating facilities for the Klamath County Nursing Home, Klamath Falls, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Klamath County Nursing Home, located in Klamath Falls, Oregon, was constructed in 1976. The building of 55,654 square feet currently houses care facilities for approximately 120 persons. During the initial planning for the Nursing Home, the present site was selected primarily on the basis of its geothermal resource. This resource (approx. 190/sup 0/F) currently provides space and domestic hot water heating for the Nursing Home, Merle West Medical Center and the Oregon Institute of Technology. The feasibility of installing a geothermal heating system in a planned greenhouse for the Nursing Home is explored. The greenhouse system would be tied directly to the existing hot water heating system for the Nursing Home.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Facilities for testing desiccant materials and geometries of dehumidifiers for solar-regenerated desiccant cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

Four experimental test facilities for characterizing the performance of solid desiccant materials and dehumidifier matrices which have the potential to be used in solar-regenerated desiccant cooling systems are reviewed. The water equilibrium capacity and sorption rates of desiccant materials, depending on their form, can be either measured with a quartz crystal microbalance or a desiccant sorption test facility. Pressure drop, heat- and mass-transfer rates and transient equilibrium dehumidification capacity of a dehumidifier matrices are measured in a desiccant heat and mass transfer test facility. The performance and steady state dehumidification capabilities of prototype dehumidifier components under realistic conditions are measured in a desiccant cyclic test facility. The description of the test apparatus, experimental procedure, measurement errors, and typical results for the four test facilities are presented here. 15 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Comparison of actual and predicted energy savings in Minnesota gas-heated single-family homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data available from a recent evaluation of a home energy audit program in Minnesota are sufficient to allow analysis of the actual energy savings achieved in audited homes and of the relationship between actual and predicted savings. The program, operated by Northern States Power in much of the southern half of the state, is part of Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service. NSP conducted almost 12 thousand RCS audits between April 1981 (when the progam began) and the end of 1982. The data analyzed here, available for 346 homes that obtained an NSP energy audit, include monthly natural gas bills from October 1980 through April 1983; heating degree day data matched to the gas bills; energy audit reports; and information on household demographics, structure characteristics, and recent conservation actions from mail and telephone surveys. The actual reduction in weather-adjusted natural gas use between years 1 and 3 averaged 19 MBtu across these homes (11% of preprogram consumption); the median value of the saving was 16 MBtu/year. The variation in actual saving is quite large: gas consumption increased in almost 20% of the homes, while gas consumption decreased by more than 50 MBtu/year in more than 10% of the homes. These households reported an average expenditure of almost $1600 for the retrofit measures installed in their homes; the variation in retrofit cost, while large, was not as great as the variation in actual natural gas savings.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Remote Handling and Maintenance in the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams  

SciTech Connect

Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing, MI was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design and establish a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), a cutting-edge research facility to advance the understanding of rare nuclear isotopes and the evolution of the cosmos. The research conducted at the FRIB will involve experimentation with intense beams of rare isotopes within a well-shielded target cell that will result in activation and contamination of components. The target cell is initially hands-on accessible after shutdown and a brief cool-down period. Personnel are expected to have hands-on access to the tops of shielded component modules with the activated in-beam sections suspended underneath. The modules are carefully designed to include steel shielding for protecting personnel during these hand-on operations. However, as the facility has greater levels of activation and contamination, a bridge mounted servomaniputor may be added to the cell, to perform the disconnecting of services to the component assemblies. Dexterous remote handling and exchange of the modularized activated components is completed at a shielded window workstation with a pair of master-slave manipulators. The primary components requiring exchange or maintenance are the production target, the beam wedge filter, the beam dump, and the beam focusing and bending magnets. This paper provides an overview of the FRIB Target Facility remote handling and maintenance design requirements, concepts, and techniques.

Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Aaron, Adam M [ORNL; Carroll, Adam J [ORNL; DeVore, Joe R [ORNL; Giuliano, Dominic R [ORNL; Graves, Van B [ORNL; Bennett, Richard P [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB); Bollen, Georg [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB); Cole, Daniel F. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB); Ronningen, Reginald M. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB); Schein, Mike E [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB); Zeller, Albert F [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nuclear Theory and Science of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a world-leading laboratory for the study of nuclear structure, reactions and astrophysics. Experiments with intense beams of rare isotopes produced at FRIB will guide us toward a comprehensive description of nuclei, elucidate the origin of the elements in the cosmos, help provide an understanding of matter in neutron stars, and establish the scientific foundation for innovative applications of nuclear science to society. FRIB will be essential for gaining access to key regions of the nuclear chart, where the measured nuclear properties will challenge established concepts, and highlight shortcomings and needed modifications to current theory. Conversely, nuclear theory will play a critical role in providing the intellectual framework for the science at FRIB, and will provide invaluable guidance to FRIB's experimental programs. This article overviews the broad scope of the FRIB theory effort, which reaches beyond the traditional fields of nuclear structure and reactions, and nuclear astrophysics, to explore exciting interdisciplinary boundaries with other areas. \\keywords{Nuclear Structure and Reactions. Nuclear Astrophysics. Fundamental Interactions. High Performance Computing. Rare Isotopes. Radioactive Beams.

A. B Balantekin; J. Carlson; D. J. Dean; G. M. Fuller; R. J. Furnstahl; M. Hjorth-Jensen; R. V. F. Janssens; Bao-An Li; W. Nazarewicz; F. M. Nunes; W. E. Ormand; S. Reddy; B. M. Sherrill

2014-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

Risk management considerations for seismic upgrading of an older facility for short-term residue stabilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building 707 and its addition, Building 707A, were selected, after the production mission of Rocky Flats was terminated a few years ago, to stabilize many of the plutonium residues remaining at the site by 2002. The facility had undergone substantial safety improvements to its safety systems and conduct of operations for resumption of plutonium operations in the early 1990s and appeared ideally suited for this new mission to support accelerated Site closure. During development of a new authorization basis, a seismic evaluation was performed. This evaluation addressed an unanalyzed expansion joint and suspect connection details for the precast concrete tilt-up construction and concluded that the seismic capacity of the facility is less than half of that determined by previous analysis. Further, potential seismic interaction was identified between a collapsing Building 707 and the seismically upgraded Building 707A, possibly causing the partial collapse of the latter. Both the operating contractor and the Department of Energy sought a sound technical basis for deciding how to proceed. This paper addresses the risks of the as-is facility and possible benefits of upgrades to support a decision on whether to upgrade the seismic capacity of Building 707, accept the risk of the as-is facility for its short remaining mission, or relocate critical stabilization missions. The paper also addresses the Department of Energy`s policy on natural phenomena.

Additon, S.L.; Peregoy, W.L. [TENERA Rocky Flats, LLC, Golden, CO (United States); Foppe, T.L. [Foppe and Associates, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

OMEGA: A NEW COLD X-RAY SIMULATION FACILITY FOR THE EVALUATION OF OPTICAL COATINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on recent progress for the development of a new cold X-ray optical test capability using the Omega Facility located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. These tests were done on the 30 kJ OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. We conducted a six-shot series called OMEGA II on 14 July 2006 in one eight-hour day (supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency). The initial testing was performed using simple protected gold optical coatings on fused silica substrates. PUFFTFT analyses were completed and the specimen's thermal lateral stress and transverse stress conditions were calculated and interpreted. No major anomalies were detected. Comparison of the pre- and posttest reflective measurements coupled with the TFCALC analyses proved invaluable in guiding the analyses and interpreting the observed damage. The Omega facility is a high quality facility for performing evaluation of optical coatings and coupons and provides experience for the development of future National Ignition Facility (NIF) testing.

Fisher, J H; Newlander, C D; Fournier, K B; Beutler, D E; Coverdale, C A; May, M J; Tobin, M; Davis, J F; Shiekh, D

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.7% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

199

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.3% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas) #/Month

Johns, Russell Taylor

200

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 1.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1. 8.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

202

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 2.2% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

203

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.1% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas

Johns, Russell Taylor

204

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance. 1/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

205

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET

Johns, Russell Taylor

206

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance Shops Offices 6 OF REPORT DP Form #31 - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES

Johns, Russell Taylor

207

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Theft Total $280 $280 Total % Rcvd 0.4% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List

Johns, Russell Taylor

208

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared.1% DP Form #31 Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY Form #31 Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY

Johns, Russell Taylor

209

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran, Davis Introduction · The Iran Oil Project, initiated in 2007, aims to find the inefficiencies and their possible sources in Iranian oil and gas policies. Background Information Assumptions · Perfect Competition

California at Davis, University of

210

Satellite-Based Actual Evapotranspiration over Drying Semiarid Terrain in West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple satellite-based algorithm for estimating actual evaporation based on Makkinks equation is applied to a seasonal cycle in 2002 at three test sites in Ghana, West Africa: at a location in the humid tropical southern region and two in the ...

D. Schttemeyer; Ch Schillings; A. F. Moene; H. A. R. de Bruin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A new facility for Non-Destructive Assay with a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new facility for non-destructive assay using a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf source is presented. The system is designed to analyze samples having maximum size of about 15x20 cm{sup 2}, the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously transmission of neutrons and gamma rays.

Stevanato, L.; Caldogno, M.; Hao Xin [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Dima, R.; Fabris, D.; Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pesente, S.; Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, 1080 A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The following chapters are included in this study: (1) fusion nuclear issues, (2) survey of experimental needs, (3) requirements of the experiments, (4) non-fusion facilities, (5) fusion facilities for nuclear experiments, and (6) fusion research and development scenarios. (MOW)

Abdou, M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Use of Savannah River Site facilities for blend down of highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Savannah River Company was asked to assess the use of existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities for the conversion of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). The purpose was to eliminate the weapons potential for such material. Blending HEU with existing supplies of depleted uranium (DU) would produce material with less than 5% U-235 content for use in commercial nuclear reactors. The request indicated that as much as 500 to 1,000 MT of HEU would be available for conversion over a 20-year period. Existing facilities at the SRS are capable of producing LEU in the form of uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}) powder, uranyl nitrate [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] solution, or metal. Additional processing, and additional facilities, would be required to convert the LEU to uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) or uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 3}), the normal inputs for commercial fuel fabrication. This study`s scope does not include the cost for new conversion facilities. However, the low estimated cost per kilogram of blending HEU to LEU in SRS facilities indicates that even with fees for any additional conversion to UO{sub 2} or UF{sub 6}, blend-down would still provide a product significantly below the spot market price for LEU from traditional enrichment services. The body of the report develops a number of possible facility/process combinations for SRS. The primary conclusion of this study is that SRS has facilities available that are capable of satisfying the goals of a national program to blend HEU to below 5% U-235. This preliminary assessment concludes that several facility/process options appear cost-effective. Finally, SRS is a secure DOE site with all requisite security and safeguard programs, personnel skills, nuclear criticality safety controls, accountability programs, and supporting infrastructure to handle large quantities of special nuclear materials (SNM).

Bickford, W.E.; McKibben, J.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Analysis of Actual Operating Conditions of an Off-grid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells have been proposed as ideal replacements for other technologies in remote locations such as Rural Alaska. A number of suppliers have developed systems that might be applicable in these locations, but there are several requirements that must be met before they can be deployed: they must be able to operate on portable fuels, and be able to operate with little operator assistance for long periods of time. This project was intended to demonstrate the operation of a 5 kW fuel cell on propane at a remote site (defined as one without access to grid power, internet, or cell phone, but on the road system). A fuel cell was purchased by the National Park Service for installation in their newly constructed visitor center at Exit Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park. The DOE participation in this project as initially scoped was for independent verification of the operation of this demonstration. This project met with mixed success. The fuel cell has operated over 6 seasons at the facility with varying degrees of success, with one very good run of about 1049 hours late in the summer of 2006, but in general the operation has been below expectations. There have been numerous stack failures, the efficiency of electrical generation has been lower than expected, and the field support effort required has been far higher than expected. Based on the results to date, it appears that this technology has not developed to the point where demonstrations in off road sites are justified.

Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson; Jack Schmid

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant

Pei, Y J; Dong, X; Feng, G Y; Fu, S; Gao, H; Hong, Y; Li, G; Li, Y X; Shang, L; Sheng, L S; Tian, Y C; Wang, X Q; Wang, Y; Wei, W; Zhang, Y W; Zhou, H J

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

217

Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Development of an Experimental Facility for Flame Speed Measurements in Powdered Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research with heterogeneous mixtures involving solid particulate in closed, constant-volume bombs is typically limited by the powder dispersion technique. This work details the development of an experimental apparatus that promotes ideal conditions, namely a quiescent atmosphere and uniform particle distribution, for measuring laminar, heterogeneous flame propagation. In this thesis, two methods of dispersing particles are investigated. In the first, heterogeneous mixtures are made in a secondary vessel that is connected to the main experiment. Particles are dispersed into the secondary vessel by adapting a piston-driven particle injector, which has been shown to produce uniform particle distributions. The heterogeneous mixture is then transferred to the main bomb facility and ignited after laminar conditions are achieved. In the second method of dispersion, particles are directly injected into the main experimental facility using a strong blast of compressed air. As with the first approach, enough time is given (~4 minutes) for the mixture to become quiescent before ignition occurs. An extinction diagnostic is also applied to the secondary mixing vessel as well as the primary experimental facility (for both dispersion methods) to provide a qualitative understanding of the dispersion technique. To perform this diagnostic a 632.8-nm, 5-mW Helium-Neon (HeNe) laser was employed. Aluminum nano-particles with an average diameter of 100 nm were used in this study. It was found that for typical dust loadings produced with both dispersion techniques, a pure dust-air system would not ignite due to the current spark ignition system. Thus, a hybrid mixture of Al/CH4/O2/N2 was employed to achieve the project goal of demonstrating a system for controlled laminar flame speed measurements in aerosol mixtures. With the hybrid mixture, the combustion characteristics were studied both with and without the presence of nano-Al particles. Based on the experimental results, the simplicity of the "direct-injection" methodology compared to that of the "side-vessel" is desirable and will be further investigated as a viable alternative, or improvement, to the side-vessel technology.

Vissotski, Andrew John

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Audit Report: Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site, OAS-RA-13-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Audit Report Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site OAS-RA-L-13-04 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 9, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (Richland) awarded a contract, effective October 1, 2008, to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to remediate select portions of the Hanford Site's Central Plateau. As part of the American Recovery and

220

The Actual Impact of the International Tribunal for former Yugoslavia on the Reconciliation Process in Bosnia-Herzegovina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the actual impact of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on the reconciliation process in Bosnia-Herzegovina and analyses possible (more)

Johansen, Kristine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment, behaviour, energy price, consumers Abstract suggest that raising energy pricessuch as in the form ofconsumers actually see energy prices and are therefore

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A New Facility For Non-Destructive Assay With A Time-Tagged {sup 252}Cf Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new facility for Non-Destructive Assay based on a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission source is now in operation at the Padova University. The system is designed to analyze samples with dimensions on the order of 20x20 cm{sup 2}, the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously transmission of neutrons and gamma rays as a function of energy.

Stevanato, L.; Caldogno, M.; Hao, Xin [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Dima, R.; Fabris, D.; Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pesente, S.; Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, 1080 A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Actual versus predicted impacts of three ethanol plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help reduce US dependence on imported petroleum, Congress passed the Energy Security Act of 1980 (public Law 96-294). This legislation authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to promote expansion of the fuel alcohol industry through, among other measures, its Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Program. Under this program, selected proposals for the conversion of plant biomass into fuel-grade ethanol would be granted loan guarantees. of 57 applications submitted for loan guarantees to build and operate ethanol fuel projects under this program, 11 were considered by DOE to have the greatest potential for satisfying DOE`s requirements and goals. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE evaluated the potential impacts of proceeding with the Loan Guarantee Program in a programmatic environmental assessment (DOE 1981) that resulted in a finding of no significant impact (FANCY) (47 Federal Register 34, p. 7483). The following year, DOE conducted site-specific environmental assessments (EAs) for 10 of the proposed projects. These F-As predicted no significant environmental impacts from these projects. Eventually, three ethanol fuel projects received loan guarantees and were actually built: the Tennol Energy Company (Tennol; DOE 1982a) facility near Jasper in southeastern Tennessee; the Agrifuels Refining Corporation (Agrifuels; DOE 1985) facility near New Liberia in southern Louisiana; and the New Energy Company of Indiana (NECI; DOE 1982b) facility in South Bend, Indiana. As part of a larger retrospective examination of a wide range of environmental effects of ethanol fuel plants, we compared the actual effects of the three completed plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources with the effects predicted in the NEPA EAs several years earlier. A secondary purpose was to determine: Why were there differences, if any, between actual effects and predictions? How can assessments be improved and impacts reduced?

Eddlemon, G.K.; Webb, J.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Miller, R.L.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Method and apparatus for distinguishing actual sparse events from sparse event false alarms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Remote sensing method and apparatus wherein sparse optical events are distinguished from false events. "Ghost" images of actual optical phenomena are generated using an optical beam splitter and optics configured to direct split beams to a single sensor or segmented sensor. True optical signals are distinguished from false signals or noise based on whether the ghost image is presence or absent. The invention obviates the need for dual sensor systems to effect a false target detection capability, thus significantly reducing system complexity and cost.

Spalding, Richard E. (Albuquerque, NM); Grotbeck, Carter L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

226

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

227

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

228

File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 257 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:33, 3 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 09:33, 3 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (257 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools High School Curricula

229

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12 AEO 1996 1994 16.81 16.98 17.37 17.98 18.61 19.27 19.92 20.47 20.97 21.41 21.86 22.25 22.61 22.97 23.34 23.70 24.08

230

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28 AEO 1996 17.16 17.74 18.59 19.72 20.97 22.34 23.81 25.26 26.72 28.22 29.87 31.51 33.13 34.82 36.61 38.48 40.48

231

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

232

Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan Characterizing the homogenized sample groups Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

233

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included caustic leaching for Al removal solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr solids filtration with the CUF follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF ion exchange processing for Cs removal evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Comparison of Projections to Actual Performance in the DOE-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), Global Energy Concepts (GEC) worked with participating utilities to develop a set of performance projections for their projects based on historical site atmospheric conditions, turbine performance data, operation and maintenance (O and M) strategies, and assumptions about various energy losses. After a preliminary operation period at each project, GEC compared the actual performance to projections and evaluated the accuracy of the data and assumptions that formed the performance projections. This paper presents a comparison of 1999 power output, turbine availability, and other performance characteristics to the projections for TVP projects in Texas, Vermont, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Alaska. Factors that were overestimated or underestimated are quantified. Actual wind speeds are compared to projections based on long-term historical measurements. Turbine power curve measurements are compared with data provided by the manufacturers, and loss assumptions are evaluated for accuracy. Overall, the projects performed well, particularly new commercial turbines in the first few years of operation. However, some sites experienced below average wind resources and greater than expected losses. The TVP project owners successfully developed and constructed wind power plants that are now in full commercial operation, serving a total of approximately 12,000 households.

Rhoads, H.; VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Compton, A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

237

University of Missouri Foreign Visitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nicaragua 47 78 Iran 46 79 Vanuatu 46 79 Azerbaijan 45 81 Belize 43 82 El Salvador 42 83 Honduras 42 83 81 0 25970 77 - 103 25x 33x Azerbaijan 81 74 45 55 35 7697 121 5 550 70 97 96 - - Bahamas 129 68 21 - - - - - - - - - Azerbaijan 81 6 26 49 - 10 2 3 22 - - Bahamas 129 - - - - - - - - - - Bahrain 142 6x 36 69 - 9 2 5 10

Zeng, Yong - Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Missouri

238

Policy Comparisons What about visitors?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity addition & maintenance · Tax reductions (gasoline & registration fees) · Investment in transit systems · Improvements in non-motorized modes (including bike lanes and sidewalks) · Special projects

Kockelman, Kara M.

239

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

240

Building a Model Patient Room to Test Design Innovations With Actual Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfortable hospital environment SUMMARY Designing and constructing a new hospital is a complex and costly undertaking that involves experts from many disciplines both inside and outside the health care arena. But despite expending funds and time, hospital leaders often discover significant flaws once a hospital opens that can undermine the quality of patient care and staff effectiveness and efficiency. From 2010 to 2012, a team at the Princeton HealthCare System worked to devise an optimal design for inpatient rooms at a new hospital: the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The project entailed building a functional model patient room. This was a unique and innovative method to allow the team to test design innovations with actual patients, according to project director Susan Lorenz, DrNP, RN, vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer for the Princeton HealthCare System. The project helped support the emerging field of evidence-based hospital design.

A Princeton; More Efficient; Key Results

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

242

Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108, Aza okitsuke, oaza obuchi rokkasyo-mura, kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ito, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Goto, Masakazu [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., 14-10, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

244

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

245

Actual Dose Variation of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer, accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of daily image-guided patient setup corrections and to quantify the parotid gland volume and dose variations for nasopharyngeal cancer patients using helical tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Five nasopharyngeal cancer patients who underwent helical tomotherapy were selected retrospectively. Each patient had received 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Daily megavoltage CT scans were registered with the planning CT images to correct the patient setup errors. Contours of the spinal cord and parotid glands were drawn on the megavoltage CT images at fixed treatment intervals. The actual doses delivered to the critical structures were calculated using the helical tomotherapy Planned Adaptive application. Results: The maximal dose to the spinal cord showed a significant increase and greater variation without daily setup corrections. The significant decrease in the parotid gland volume led to a greater median dose in the later phase of treatment. The average parotid gland volume had decreased from 20.5 to 13.2 cm{sup 3} by the end of treatment. On average, the median dose to the parotid glands was 83 cGy and 145 cGy for the first and the last treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusions: Daily image-guided setup corrections can eliminate significant dose variations to critical structures. Constant monitoring of patient anatomic changes and selective replanning should be used during radiotherapy to avoid critical structure complications.

Han Chunhui [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)], E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high level waste sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of high level waste requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove about 90 percent of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, but boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of aluminum species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford high level waste samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a shrinking core model that provides a basis for prediction of dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. This model is further developed to include the effects of particle size polydispersity, which is found to strongly influence the rate of dissolution.

Peterson, Reid A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Rapko, Brian M.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

Actinide partitioning from actual Idaho chemical processing plant acidic tank waste using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Iron was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Mercury was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (76%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} wash section.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Actual versus design performance of solar systems in the National Solar Data Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report relates field measured performance to the designer predicted performance. The field measured data was collected by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) over a period of six years. Data from 25 solar systems was selected from a data pool of some 170 solar systems. The scope of the project extends beyond merely presenting comparisons of data. There is an attempt to provide answers which will move the solar industry forward. As a result of some industry and research workshops, several concerns arose which can be partially allayed by careful study of the NSDN data. These are: What types of failures occurred and why. How good was the design versus actual performance. Why was predicted performance not achieved in the field. Which components should be integrated with a system type for good performance. Since the designs span several years and since design philosophies are quite variable, the measured results were also compared to f-Chart 5.1 results. This comparison is a type of normalization in that all systems are modeled with the same process. An added benefit of this normalization is a further validation of the f-Chart model on a fairly large scale. The systems were modeled using equipment design parameters, measured loads, and f-Chart weather data from nearby cities.

Logee, T.L.; Kendall, P.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Adjusting External Doses from the ORNL and Y-12 Facilities for the Oak Ridge Nuclear Facilities Mortality Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adjusting External Doses from the ORNL and Y-12 Adjusting External Doses from the ORNL and Y-12 Facilities for the Oak Ridge Nuclear Facilities Mortality Study A Supplemental Report to Data Collection, Validation, and Description for the Oak Ridge Nuclear Facilities Mortality Study J. P. Watkins (1), D. L. Cragle (1), E. L. Frome (2), C. M. West (1), D. J. Crawford- Brown (3), and W. G. Tankersley (1) (1) Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Environmental and Health Sciences Division, Center for Epidemiologic Research, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117. (2) Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830. (3) School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400. This report concerns work undertaken as part of the Health and Mortality Study of Department of

251

Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

252

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

An Experimental Shield Test Facility for the Development of Minimum Weight Shields for Compact Reactor Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Discussions are given of the characteristics of fission-source plate, graphite reactor, and pool-type reactor facilities applicable to development studies of minimum weight shielding materials. Advantages of a proposed SNAP dual-purpose shielding facility are described in terms of a disk-shaped fission-source plate, reactor, and building. A program for the study of advanced shielding materials is discussed for materials and configuations to be evaluted with the fission-source plate, the testing of the prototype at high-power levels, and full-power tests on the actual reactor.

Tomlinson, R.L.

1959-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

255

Facilities for Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Our state-of-the-art property measurements require extensive calibration facilities of equal quality. Regular calibrations are essential for realistic ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

DEMONSTRATION OF THE GLYCOLIC-FORMIC FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ACTUAL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Glycolic acid was effective at dissolving many metals, including iron, during processing with simulants. Criticality constraints take credit for the insolubility of iron during processing to prevent criticality of fissile materials. Testing with actual waste was needed to determine the extent of iron and fissile isotope dissolution during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The Alternate Reductant Project was initiated by the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Company to explore options for the replacement of the nitric-formic flowsheet used for the CPC at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The goals of the Alternate Reductant Project are to reduce CPC cycle time, increase mass throughput of the facility, and reduce operational hazards. In order to achieve these goals, several different reductants were considered during initial evaluations conducted by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). After review of the reductants by SRR, SRNL, and Energy Solutions (ES) Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL), two flowsheets were further developed in parallel. The two flowsheet options included a nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet, and a nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet. As of July 2011, SRNL and ES/VSL have completed the initial flowsheet development work for the nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet and nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet, respectively. On July 12th and July 13th, SRR conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to down select the alternate reductant flowsheet. The SEE team selected the Formic-Glycolic Flowsheet for further development. Two risks were identified in SEE for expedited research. The first risk is related to iron and plutonium solubility during the CPC process with respect to criticality. Currently, DWPF credits iron as a poison for the fissile components of the sludge. Due to the high iron solubility observed during the flowsheet demonstrations with simulants, it was necessary to determine if the plutonium in the radioactive sludge slurry demonstrated the same behavior. The second risk is related to potential downstream impacts of glycolate on Tank Farm processes. The downstream impacts will be evaluated by a separate research team. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested a radioactive demonstration of the Glycolic-Formic Flowsheet with radioactive sludge slurry be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the SRNL. The Shielded Cells demonstration only included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, and not a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle or the co-processing of salt products. Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) slurry was used for the demonstration since it was readily available, had been previously characterized, and was generally representative of sludges being processing in DWPF. This sample was never used in the planned Shielded Cells Run 7 (SC-7).

Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

The influence of indoor temperature on the difference between actual and theoretical energy consumption for space heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Advice procedure (EAP) is developed to evaluate the energetic performance of "existing" dwellings to generate a useful advice for the occupants of the dwelling to invest in rational energy measures. The EAP is based on a theoretical calculation ... Keywords: actual energy consumption, consumer behaviour, indoor temperature, space heating, theoretical energy consumption

Amaryllis Audenaert; Katleen Briffaerts; Dries De Boeck

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free- electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x-rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 {mu}m. As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0. 5 to 100-{mu}m range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility. 80 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Conradson, S.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Elliott, C.J.; Burns, M.J.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.; Johnson, W.J.; Wang, T.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Meier, K.L.; Olsher, R.H.; Scott, M.L.; Griggs, J.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Seventh Quarter of the First Budget Period, April 1 through June 30, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion will include the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. Combustion Gas Turbine; Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment; and Externally Fired Gas Turbine/Water Augmented Gas Turbine. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Analysis and optimization of gas pipeline networks and surface production facilities for the Waskom Field--Harrison County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research has developed a computer simulation of the production facilities model of the Waskom Field in order to analyze existing and future production methods. The Waskom Field, located in East Texas, is a redeveloped reservoir sequence that produces primarily natural gas with minor amounts of oil and gas-condensate from the Upper and Lower Cotton Valley Sands as well as Sands in the Travis Peak sequence. The present gas production at Waskom Field averages about 12,000 Mcf/D. We have used data and the current production history to create a model of the surface production facilities, and we will simulate field performance by using a computer simulation package. In particular, all of the field facilities as well as the production history are included in these simulation Surface facilities for the Waskom field include pipelines of varying, sizes, separators, compressors, valves, and production manifolds. After creating and verifying the field model, we determined that the field possesses greater compressor capabilities than it requires. A simulation was performed where by the rental compressor in the Reuben Pierce lease was removed. The computer simulation showed that we can lower the last line pressure to 200 psig from 450 psig (which the operator was eventually able to negotiate) and the remaining compressors can sufficiently compress all of the gas currently produced in the field. Our few additional recommendations are to clean the separators, remove dual separator layouts, and remove several constricting valves that were identified from the simulation.

Pang, Jason Ui-Yong

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Accepted to Combustion and Flame Feb. 11, 2004 Demonstration of a Free-Piston Rapid Compression Facility for the Study of High  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted to Combustion and Flame Feb. 11, 2004 Demonstration of a Free-Piston Rapid Compression Facility for the Study of High Temperature Combustion Phenomena M. T. Donovan, X. He, B. T. Zigler, T. R developed at the University of Michigan (UM) for use in studying high-temperature combustion phenomena

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

262

Wind Plant Capacity Credit Variations: A Comparison of Results Using Multiyear Actual and Simulated Wind-Speed Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although it is widely recognized that variations in annual wind energy capture can be significant, it is not clear how significant this effect is on accurately calculating the capacity credit of a wind plant. An important question is raised concerning whether one year of wind data is representative of long-term patterns. This paper calculates the range of capacity credit measures based on 13 years of actual wind-speed data. The results are compared to those obtained with synthetic data sets that are based on one year of data. Although the use of synthetic data sets is a considerable improvement over single-estimate techniques, this paper finds that the actual inter- annual variation in capacity credit is still understated by the synthetic data technique.

Milligan, Michael

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Technical progress report for the magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility for the period April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on progress on a multitask contract to develop the necessary technology for the steam bottoming plant of the MHD Steam Combined Cycle power plant. A Proof-Of-Concept (POC) test was conducted during the quarter and the results are reported. This POC test was terminated after 88 hours of operation due to the failure of the coal pulverizer main shaft. Preparations for the test and post-test activities are summarized. Modifications made to the dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) are described and measurements of its performance are reported. The baghouse performance is summarized, together with actions being taken to improve bag cleaning using reverse air. Data on the wet ESP performance is included at two operating conditions, including verification that it met State of Tennessee permit conditions for opacity with all the flow through it. The results of experiments to determine the effect of potassium seed on NO{sub x} emissions and secondary combustion are reported. The status of efforts to quantify the detailed mass balance for all POC testing is summarized. The work to develop a predictive ash deposition model is discussed and results compared with deposition actually encountered during the test. Plans to measure the kinetics of potassium and sulfur on flames like the secondary combustor, are included. Advanced diagnostic work by both UTSI and MSU is reported. Efforts to develop the technology for a high temperature air heater using ceramic tubes are summarized.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

RELAP5 Model of a Two-phase ThermoSyphon Experimental Facility for Fuels and Materials Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) does not have a separate materials-irradiation flow loop and requires most materials and all fuel experiments to be placed inside a containment. This is necessary to ensure that internal contaminants such as fission products cannot be released into the primary coolant. As part of the safety basis justification, HFIR also requires that all experiments be able to withstand various accident conditions (e.g., loss of coolant) without generating vapor bubbles on the surface of the experiment in the primary coolant. As with any parallel flow system, HFIR is vulnerable to flow excursion events when vapor is generated in one of those flow paths. The effects of these requirements are to artificially increase experiment temperatures by introducing a barrier between the experimental materials and the HFIR coolant and to reduce experiment heat loads to ensure boiling doesn t occur. A new experimental facility for materials irradiation and testing in the HFIR is currently being developed to overcome these limitations. The new facility is unique in that it will have its own internal cooling flow totally independent of the reactor primary coolant and boiling is permitted. The reactor primary coolant will cool the outside of this facility without contacting the materials inside. The ThermoSyphon Test Loop (TSTL), a full scale prototype of the proposed irradiation facility to be tested outside the reactor, is being designed and fabricated (Ref. 1). The TSTL is a closed system working as a two-phase thermosyphon. A schematic is shown in Fig. 1. The bottom central part is the boiler/evaporator and contains three electric heaters. The vapor generated by the heaters will rise and be condensed in the upper condenser, the condensate will drain down the side walls and be circulated via a downcomer back into the bottom of the boiler. An external flow system provides coolant that simulates the HFIR primary coolant. The two-phase flow code RELAP5-3D (Ref. 2) is the main tool employed in this design. The model has multiple challenges: boiling, condensation and natural convection flows need to be modeled accurately.

Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Demonstration of a SREX flowsheet for the partitioning of strontium and lead from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning {sup 90}Sr and Pb from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Previous countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process with simulated waste resulted in 99.98% removal of Sr and 99.9% removal of Pb. Based on the results of these studies, a demonstration of the SREX flowsheet was performed. The demonstration consisted of (1) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using simulated sodium-bearing waste spiked with {sup 85}Sr and (2) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using actual waste from tank WM-183. All testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0. 15 M 4`,4`(5)-di-(tert-butyldicyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L{reg_sign}), a 2.0 MHNO{sub 3} scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.1 M ammonium citrate strip section for the removal of Pb from the SREX solvent, and a 3.0 M HNO{sub 3} equilibration section. The behavior of {sup 90}Sr, Pb, Na, K, Hg, H{sup +}, the actinides, and numerous other non-radioactive elements was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted and selectively stripped Sr and Ph from the SBW simulant and the actual tank waste. For the testing with actual tank waste (WM - 183), removal efficiencies of 99.995 % and >94% were obtained for {sup 90}Sr and Pb, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Olson, L.G.; Todd, T.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Is interactivity actually important?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It appears that it is a well-accepted assumption that interactivity will improve the entertainment and/or learning value of a media. This paper reviews various studies exploring the role of interactivity and reports on a study conducted to see whether ... Keywords: game engine, interactivity, learning, simulation, training

Debbie Richards

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large scale water test facility and a commercial CFD computer program were used to investigate labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape found in aircraft engines. The 2-D test rig cases focused on the effect of tooth position and operating condition for the standard geometry. The computed cases considered tooth axial and radial position, different operating conditions, and several geometric dimensions. This investigation also compares the leakage of the standard geometry to that of a modified convex wall geometry. The test facility is a 33 times enlargement of the actual seal. The pressure drop leakage rate and flow visualization digital images for the standard geometry seal were measured at various Reynolds numbers and at nine different tooth positions. The discharge coefficient and a dimensionless pressure drop number were used to plot the leakage data to make it easier for seal designers to predict the leakage of labyrinth seals. The experimental visualization results show for a given Reynolds number that the closer the labryinth tooth gets to the step the deeper the throughflow jet penetrated into the seal cavity. The decrease of the tooth tip clearance also has a similar effect. Specifically the smaller the tooth tip clearance the deeper the flow path penetrated into the seal cavity. The experimental measurements show that the tooth tip axial position, as well as the minimum-tooth clearance, affect the leakage. A significant improvement in leakage was generally observed when the minimum-distance tooth clearance occurs across the entire tip of the tooth. This occurs only at the most upstream tooth position tested. Similarly, the computed results show that the tooth axial position affects the seal leakage. It was also found that the leakage of the modified convex wall geometry was significantly less than that of the standard geometry.

Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Rainfall-Induced Changes in Actual Surface Backscattering Cross Sections and Effects on Rain-Rate Estimates by Spaceborne Precipitation Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors used Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar (TRMM PR) data to investigate changes in the actual (attenuation corrected) surface backscattering cross section (?0e) due to changes in surface conditions ...

Shinta Seto; Toshio Iguchi

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Estimation of daily actual evapotranspiration from remotely sensed data under complex terrain over the upper Chao river basin in North China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily actual evapotranspiration over the upper Chao river basin in North China on 23 June 2005 was estimated based on the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), in which the parameterization schemes for calculating the instantaneous solar ...

Yanchun Gao; Di Long; Zhao-Liang Li

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirement s. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A. (INEEL); Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N. (V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute); Logunov, M.V. (MAYAK Production Association)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Demonstration of the SREX process for the removal of {sup 90}Sr from actual highly radioactive solutions in centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SREX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of {sup 90}Sr from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the SREX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.995% was obtained for {sup 90}Sr. As a result, the activity of {sup 90}Sr was reduced from 201 Ci/m{sup 3} in the feed solution of 0.0089 Ci/m{sup 3} in the aqueous raffinate, which is below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW limit of 0.04 Ci/m{sup 3} for {sup 90}Sr. Lead was extracted by the SREX solvent and successfully partitioned from the {sup 90}Sr using an ammonium citrate strip solution. Additionally, 94% of the total alpha activity, 1.9% of the {sup 241}Am, 99.94% of the {sup 238}Pu, 99.97% of the {sup 239}Pu, 36.4% of the K, 64% of the Ba, and >83% of the Zr were extracted by the SREX solvent. Cs, B, Cd, Ca, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Na were essentially inextractable. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Frequently Asked Questions for APS Beamline Visitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and computer servers and printers in conjunction with supporting all Laboratory cyber security policies. This document provides answers to many of the questions asked by...

273

Presentation to JAEA Visitors, July 24, 2012  

SciTech Connect

There are 7 Reasons for characterizing spent fuel nuclide concentrations: (1) Provide IAEA with the capability to independently verify the mass of plutonium at any site that has spent fuel; (2) Shipper/receiver difference; (3) Determination of the input accountability mass of an electrochemical (pyro-chemical) processing facility; (4) Continuity of knowledge at spent fuel storage site; (5) Optimal reloads through knowledge of true actinide content; (6) Burnup credit for fuel transport and storage; and (7) Provide confidence to the public that the shipment of spent fuel around the world is being undertaken in a rigorous manner, assuring that material is not diverted during shipment. Types of fuel of interest are: Fast Reactor Fuel, Normal burnup low enriched uranium (LEU), Mixed oxide (MOX), Low burnup LEU, and Research reactor. MCNPX calculates the slowing down and the energy spread for a given time. The principles are: (1) Neutrons slow down in LSDS; (2) Slow neutrons capture preferentially on a fission resonance; (3) Fission emits high-energy neutrons; (4) High-energy neutrons detected in threshold detector (that is not sensitive to slow neutrons) (e.g., {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th); and (5) The detection time is characteristic of the slow neutron energy. Following each PSR pulse, the entire signal is digitized in 2 nanosecond intervals, and subsequently analyzed Analysis involves applying a digital filter to extract fission pulses in a background of initial oscillations and noise throughout. Some of the noise is not random. Depending on the threshold setting and filter parameters, both the normalization and the trend change. Original PNNL LSDS design required a 1-meter radius cylindrical LSDS. Much higher efficiency would allow us to use a (1.2m) LSDS (this is the LANL LSDS size), or a less intense source, or a combination of both. We still estimate 10{sup 16} total neutrons from the source to obtain 2-3% precision in {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U assay.

Gavron, Victor [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Exchange Visitors Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Facility Operations Food Services Graphics Mail and Distribution Parking and Garage Photography Printing Recycling Safety and Health Shuttle Bus and Couriers Supply...

275

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Visitor Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

25 29-E Main Control Center (MCC) 5 32-F Main Gate (Information Booth) 83 31-B Master Substation 16 30-F Medical (Room 11) 28 30-E Metal Stores Shelter 29 29-F Operations...

276

NIST SCIENTISTS HELP VISITORS TO THE SMITHSONIAN'S ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... AND ENZYMES. How far away is the moon? How fast does light travel? How do detergent enzymes trounce laundry stains? ...

277

A VISITOR'S GUIDE TO ARGONNE NATIONAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and engineers, three-quarters of whom hold doctoral degrees. Argonne's annual operating budget of around $630 assessments through metagenome analysis, protein discovery, regional climate prediction and integrated climate and forensics of weapons of mass destruction, decision sciences, new sensors and materials, and cyber security

278

Conference & Meeting Room Directions | Visitor's Information...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Technology Division (Building 515) Instrumentation Division (Building 535) Medical Research Center (Building 490) National Synchrotron Light Source (Building 725)...

279

Training | BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training A valid BNL guest number is needed for training. Return users, you may check your training status on-line to see which courses you need to complete again. System...

280

BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center | Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is dedicated to providing a healthy and safe work environment for all employees, guests, users, and contractors who perform work....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Questionnaire | BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard...

282

Visitor_Security_and_Safety_Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in a designated lot near the main lobby and auditorium. Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Security Operations Office of Headquarters Security Operations United...

283

Operation of beam line facilities for real-time x-ray studies at Sector 7 of the advanced photon source. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report documents the research accomplishments achieved in the first phase of operations of a new Advanced Photon Source beam line (7-ID MHATT-CAT) dedicated to real-time x-ray studies. The period covered by this report covers the establishment of a world-class facility for time-dependent x-ray studies of materials. During this period many new and innovative research programs were initiated at Sector 7 with support of this grant, most notably using a combination of ultrafast lasers and pulsed synchrotron radiation. This work initiated a new frontier of materials research: namely, the study of the dynamics of materials under extreme conditions of high intensity impulsive laser irradiation.

Clarke, Roy

2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

285

RADIATION FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation facility is designed for irradiating samples in close proximity to the core of a nuclear reactor. The facility comprises essentially a tubular member extending through the biological shield of the reactor and containing a manipulatable rod having the sample carrier at its inner end, the carrier being longitudinally movable from a position in close proximity to the reactor core to a position between the inner and outer faces of the shield. Shield plugs are provided within the tubular member to prevent direct radiation from the core emanating therethrough. In this device, samples may be inserted or removed during normal operation of the reactor without exposing personnel to direct radiation from the reactor core. A storage chamber is also provided within the radiation facility to contain an irradiated sample during the period of time required to reduce the radioactivity enough to permit removal of the sample for external handling. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1961-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groupsbismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group2)are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groupsplutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

288

About NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visitor Info Web Policies Home About About NERSC The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary scientific computing facility for the Office of...

289

Performance evaluation of 24 ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated N-Reactor storage basin water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of 24 organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated waters from the 100 Area 105 N-Reactor fuel storage basin. The data described in this report can be applied for developing and evaluating ion exchange pre-treatment process flowsheets. Cesium and strontium batch distribution ratios (K{sub d}`s), decontamination factors (DF), and material loadings (mmol g{sup -1}) are compared as a function of ion exchange material and initial cesium concentration. The actual and simulated N-Basin waters contain relatively low levels of aluminum, barium, calcium, potassium, and magnesium (ranging from 8.33E-04 to 6.40E-05 M), with slightly higher levels of boron (6.63E-03 M) and sodium (1.62E-03 M). The {sup 137}Cs level is 1.74E-06 Ci L-{sup 1} which corresponds to approximately 4.87E-10 M Cs. The initial Na/Cs ratio was 3.33E+06. The concentration of total strontium is 4.45E-06 M, while the {sup 90}Sr radioactive component was measured to be 6.13E-06 Ci L{sup -1}. Simulant tests were conducted by contacting 0.067 g or each ion exchange material with approximately 100 mL of either the actual or simulated N-Basin water. The simulants contained variable initial cesium concentrations ranging from 1.00E-04 to 2.57E- 10 M Cs while all other components were held constant. For all materials, the average cesium K{sub d} was independent of cesium concentration below approximately 1.0E-06 M. Above this level, the average cesium K{sub d} values decreased significantly. Cesium K{sub d} values exceeding 1.0E+07 mL g{sup -1} were measured in the simulated N-Basin water. However, when measured in the actual N-Basin water the values were several orders of magnitude lower, with a maximum of 1.24E+05 mL g{sup -1} observed.

Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Boehmite Actual Waste Dissolutions Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of HLW requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove a significant quantity of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum is found in the form of gibbsite, sodium aluminate and boehmite. Gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic. Boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. Samples were taken from four Hanford tanks and homogenized in order to give a sample that is representative of REDOX (Reduction Oxidation process for Pu recovery) sludge solids. Bench scale testing was performed on the homogenized waste to study the dissolution of boehmite. Dissolution was studied at three different hydroxide concentrations, with each concentration being run at three different temperatures. Samples were taken periodically over the 170 hour runs in order to determine leaching kinetics. Results of the dissolution studies and implications for the proposed processing of these wastes will be discussed.

Snow, Lanee A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Peterson, Reid A.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V.; Smirnov, I.; Babain, V.; Zaitsev, B.; Esimantovskiy, V.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Universal Solvent Exchange (UNEX) Process II: Flowsheet Development & Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Actual Acidic Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel solvent extraction process, the Universal Extraction (UNEX) process, has been developed for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from acidic waste solutions. The UNEX process solvent consists of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide for the extraction of 137Cs, polyethylene glycol for the extraction of 90Sr, and diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide for the extraction of the actinides and lanthanides. A nonnitroaromatic polar diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone has been developed for this process. A UNEX flowsheet consisting of a single solvent extraction cycle has been developed as a part of a collaborative effort between the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This flowsheet has been demonstrated with actual acidic radioactive tank waste at the INEEL using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded cell facility. The activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and the actinides were reduced to levels at which a grout waste form would meet NRC Class A LLW requirements. The extraction of 99Tc and several nonradioactive metals by the UNEX solvent has also been evaluated.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V. N.; Smirnov, I. V.; Esimantovskiy, V. M.; Zaitsev. B. N.; Babain, V. A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With this testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137 Cs and 90 Sr to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Brewer, Ken Neal; Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Demonstration of the TRUEX process for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP tank waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRUEX is being evaluated at Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for separating actinides from acidic radioactive waste stored at ICPP; efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration with actual tank waste. A continuous countercurrent flowsheet test was successfully completed at ICPP using waste from tank WM-183. This demonstration was performed using 24 states of 2-cm dia centrifugal contactors in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet had 8 extraction stages, 5 scrub stages, 6 strip stages, 3 solvent wash stages, and 2 acid rinse stages. A centrifugal contactor stage in the scrub section was not working during testing, and the scrub feed (aqueous) solution followed the solvent into the strip section, eliminating the scrub section in the flowsheet. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides, reducing the activity from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste.The 0.04 M HEDPA strip section back-extracted 99.9998% of the actinide from the TRUEX solvent. Removal efficiencies of >99. 90, 99.96, 99.98, >98.89, 93.3, and 89% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 99}Tc. Fe was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Hg was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (73%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na2CO3 wash section. Only 1.4% of the Hg exited with the high activity waste strip product.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Demonstration of an optimized TRUEX flowsheet for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in recent demonstrations of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. The first demonstration was performed in 1996 using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. Based on the results of this flowsheet demonstration, the flowsheet was optimized and a second flowsheet demonstration was performed. This test also was performed using 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. However, the total number of contactor stages was reduced from 24 to 20. Also, the concentration of HEDPA in the strip solution was reduced from 0.04 M to 0.01 M in order to minimize the amount of phosphate in the HLW fraction, which would be immobilized into a glass waste form. This flowsheet demonstration was performed using centrifugal contactors installed in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet tested consisted of six extraction stages, four scrub stages, six strip stages, two solvent was stages, and two acid rinse stages. An overall removal efficiency of 99.79% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 540 nCi/g in the feed to 0.90 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Removal efficiencies of 99.84%, 99.97%, 99.97%, 99.85%, and 99.76% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm-diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With the testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for Cs-137, Sr-90, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of Cs-137 and Sr-90 to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent with actinides and metals (Zr, Fe, and Mo). Also, the carryover of aqueous solution (flooding) with the solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (>6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

B. N. Zaitsev (Khlopin Radium Institute); D. J. Wood (INEEL); I. V. Smirnov; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst; T. A. Todd; V. A. Babain; V. M. Esimantovskiy; V. N. Romanovskiy

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum View topic -Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553d  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12 Dark Energy may not actually exist Moderators: arc - On With the New #12;9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 2

Temple, Blake

300

NIST Building Facility for Hydrogen Pipeline Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... long-term exposure to hydrogen can embrittle existing pipelines, increasing the ... term service tests and apply them to study pipeline materials and ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

practical support to developing countries on participating in technology transfer and developing nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) in the transport sector. A...

302

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Facility for Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 as a test bed for technologies that will power the next generation of particle accelerators. It also hosts experiments that require extreme electric and magnetic fields. Visit...

303

Test facility for PLT TF coils  

SciTech Connect

Past experience with the model C stellerator and other toroidal field devices indicates that mechanical and electrical tests of a toroidal field coil prior to maximum field operation of the device is prudent and desirable. This paper describes a test program for the PLT-TF coils. The test stand consists of one test coil, two background coils and a steel supporting structure. The three coil configuration produces a 67.5 kG field at the inner conductor (38 kG at the bore center) and simulates a 1/R field distribution in the bore of the test coil. The resolution of the field force system and resultant stresses within the test structure are discussed. A test procedure is described which maximizes the information obtained from a 100,000 pulse program. (auth)

Hearney, J.; File, J.; Dreskin, S.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Flowmeter Calibration Facility for Heated Gas Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... water condenses back to the liquid phase. ... the carbon dioxide goes through two stages of ... degree turn, a low pressure-drop flow conditioner, and ...

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Social impact issues among visitors to Franz Josef Glacier,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are on-going within the Department ? They include reports on conferences, workshops, and study tours, and also work in progress ? Internal Reports are not normally subject to peer review? This report was written by Ross Corbett, Tourism Resource Consultants, PO Box 2515, Wellington, New Zealand and prepared for publication by DOC Science Publishing, Science & Research Unit; editing and layout by Ian Mackenzie ? Publication was approved by the Manager, Science & Research

Westland National Park; Ross Corbett; Corbett Ross

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Legal Agreements | BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Legal Agreements Legal Agreements Adobe Acrobat Reader will be needed to view PDF files listed on this page. Obtain Reader or troubleshoot common problems. BNL User Agreements Non-Proprietary User Agreement Sample Non-Proprietary User Agreement (pdf) List of Institutions with Non-Proprietary User Agreement in place Open Data User Agreement Sample Open Data User Agreement (pdf) List of Institutions with Open Data User Agreement in place Proprietary User Agreement Sample Proprietary User Agreement (pdf) List of Institutions with Proprietary User Agreement in place Other Legal Agreements Guest Intellectual Property Agreement (GIPA) GIPA Sample (pdf) Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA) CRADA Information Work for Others (WFO) WFO Information Federal Agency Agreements

307

International Conference on Monitoring and Management of Visitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deposition, ozone, pathogens, rarity, sulfur deposition. Acadia National Park (ANP) preserves 19,178 hectares of ANP for useful input and providing access to ANP's resources; Jill Weber for providing informa- tion on rare and invasive plants of ANP; Charlene Donohue of the Maine Forest Service for providing information

308

BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center | Opening a project account  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory. The return of any unused balance must be requested in writing; or A wire transfer for total amount; e-mail Ms. Irving for bank details. Again, request return of...

309

BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center | Identification Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are only issued by Michigan, New York, Vermont, Washington, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec. Mexican Citizens Mexican citizens are required to present a...

310

BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center | User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collider RHIC Access Information RHIC & AGS Users' Center Building 400A, Brookhaven National Lab Upton, NY 11973 631-344-3333 userscenter@bnl.gov CFN Center for Functional...

311

Solar Decathlon Visitors Guide 2011, National Mall, West Potomac...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2011 New Zealand VICTORIA UNIVERSITY OF WELLINGTON 101 The Teams Here they are: the Solar Decathlon 2011 teams. As you tour their houses, think of the creative spirit, sense of...

312

BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center | Shipping to Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(transport package) with a gross weight equal to or greater than 400 pounds (180 kilograms) must be marked with the center of gravity and gross weight on at least one side, or...

313

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY HEALTH INSURANCE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS & EXCHANGE VISITORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Emergency services; 3. Hospitalization; 4. Maternity and newborn care; 5. Mental health and substance use disorder services; including behavioral health treatment; 6. Prescription drugs; 7. Rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices; 8. Laboratory services; 9. Minimum $100,000 USD per sickness or injury 10

Stuart, Steven J.

314

BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center | About the Guest Information...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Guest Information System (GIS) Those visiting Brookhaven National Laboratory for an extended period of time must enter their information into the BNL Guest Information...

315

NREL: About NREL - National Wind Technology Center - Visitor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO weather as of: 700 PM MST SAT JAN 18 2014 Clear 41F (5C) Clear Details & Forecast Transportation There is no public transportation to the National Wind Technology...

316

Safety, Health, and Environmental (SHE) Program Visitor Awareness Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the following building materials at MSFC: Spray applied insulation Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning in buildings label identifies representatives from all SHE organizations that are responsible for the building and thermal system insulation Floor tiles/adhesive, Interior wallboard/exterior siding Pipe insulation

317

Visitors, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University) Mar 23 2009 Prof. Efthimios Liarokapis (Nat. Technical University, Athens, Greece) Mar 22 2009 to Mar 4 2009 Dr. Scott Riggs, Zac Stegen and Jon Kemper (Florida State...

318

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Actual Date of Delivery Deliverable Security Class  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of all NoAH components, defines their requirements and describes the interface between them. The NoAH architecture, as described so far, is a set of individual components that cooperate to form a farm of distributed honeypots. Although the main NoAH components low- and highinteraction honeypots, signature generation,

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Actual Cost of Food Systems on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs ...................................................................................................................16 Table 14: Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Rate Per Capita from County Survey

Beresnev, Igor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Design Parameters Derived from Actual Forgings*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Minimum R f : R c ratio is 1.0 to 1. Maximum R f : R c ratio is 6.8 to 1. Average R f : R c ratio is 2.8 to 1....

322

Definition: Net Actual Interchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interchange, balancing authority, smart grid, Balancing Authority Area References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

323

Might Dark Matter be Actually Black?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There have been proposals that primordial black hole remnants (BHRs) are the dark matter, but the idea is somewhat vague. We argue here first that the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) may prevent black holes from evaporating completely, in a similar way that the standard uncertainty principle prevents the hydrogen atom from collapsing. Secondly we note that the hybrid inflation model provides a plausible mechanism for production of large numbers of small black holes. Combining these we suggest that the dark matter might be composed of Planck-size BHRs and discuss the possible constraints and signatures associated with this notion.

Chen, Pisin

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

324

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

maintenance costs should be reported from asset-level data collected in the Site's Maintenance Management and Financial Management Systems. b. Annual Required Maintenance...

325

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

than any other quarter on record-961 The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report facility use by total visitor days and facility to track actual...

326

Classes: an abstract data type facility for the C language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Language constructs for definition and use of abstract data types ease the design and maintenance of large programs. This paper describes the C class concept, an extension to the C language providing such constructs. A class is defined ...

Bjarne Stroustrup

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

EXPERIMENTAL TEST FACILITY FOR EVALUATION OF CONTROLS AND CONTROL STRATEGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pseudo collector vs Return boiler V2 Direct heating Supplysensors Flow switches Boiler enable I DORIC 220 data loggercollector, consists of a boiler with a controlled mixing

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

EXPERIMENTAL TEST FACILITY FOR EVALUATION OF CONTROLS AND CONTROL STRATEGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sept. Proc. of 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling Researchence Applications, Inc. SOLAR HEATING/ COOLING TEST FACILITYperformance of different solar heating control strategies

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

EXPERIMENTAL TEST FACILITY FOR SELECTIVE RADIATIVE COOLING SURFACES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been supported by the Solar Heating and Cooling Research andextensively for heating purposes in solar collectors. For

Sakkal, Fateh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

EXPERIMENTAL TEST FACILITY FOR EVALUATION OF SOLAR CONTROL STRATEGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental solar heating and cooling system has beenSYSTEM DESCRIPTION The solar heating and cooling systembeen supported by the Solar Heating and Cooling Research and

Majteles, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

EXPERIMENTAL TEST FACILITY FOR EVALUATION OF CONTROLS AND CONTROL STRATEGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building heating energy system are modeled requirements in the to be satisfied microcomputer. by the solar

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Future Facilities for Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsars seen at gamma-ray energies offer insight into particle acceleration to very high energies, along with information about the geometry and interaction processes in the magnetospheres of these rotating neutron stars. During the next decade, a number of new gamma-ray facilities will become available for pulsar studies. This brief review describes the motivation for gamma-ray pulsar studies, the opportunities for such studies, and some specific discussion of the capabilities of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) for pulsar measurements.

D. J. Thompson

2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

333

In Situ Ultrahigh Temperature X-Ray Microtomography Facility for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical Behavior in Human Cortical Bone Across Multiple Length Scales: ... Hydrogen-Accelerated Fatigue Crack Growth in a Low-Strength Pipeline Steel.

334

DESIGN OF AN EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY FOR BUILDING AIRFLOW AND HEAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

winter wheat flour is especially suited for cake mixes while flour from durum wheat is required winter wheat, the flour from such a mixture might be acceptable, but not the most desirable for cake mixes when compared to flour from 100% soft red winter wheat. Wheat of Other Classes (Total) also

335

Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect

The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10/sup 15/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ steady state source or a 10/sup 17/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee.

Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J. (eds.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Review of Test Facilities for Distributed Energy Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

troughs and a Solar Furnace. Currently, the facility is testing a 10 kW grid-connected Stirling engine

337

Heating facilities for the city schools, Ephrata, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Ephrata, Washington has an existing well that has the capability of pumping 2200 gallons per minute of 86/sup 0/F water into the City drinking water system. To determine the economic practicality of using the City water to heat the schools, one school (Middle School) was selected for evaluation. Two cases were considered. Case 1 uses a two stage water-to-water heat pump to produce a 190/sup 0/F circulating hot water steam. This would be compatible with the existing system and essentially no retrofit costs for the room convective heating system would be incurred. Case 2 uses a single stage water-to-water heat pump to produce a 140/sup 0/F circulating hot water stream. Retrofit costs would incur for additional room convection equipment. In both cases the heat pump is sized to furnish the total heating and hot water requirements of the school. However, one of the existing boilers is left in place to serve as standby. The Middle School evaluation shows the single stage heat pump to be most cost effective, having a return on invested capital of about 19%. Projecting the single stage evaluation to include all the schools, the total conversion cost would be about $800,000. This includes a retrofit allowance of $100,000. The return on investment would be about 19%. Total annual savings in fuel oil consumption would be nearly 150,000 gallons, amounting to a first year savings of about $134,000. Peak water usage would be 1000 gallons per minute, about 45% of that available. Annual water usage would be about 90 million gallons, about 14% of the water used during 1978. This water would be returned to the drinking water system after extraction of heat. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

NETL: Utilization Projects - Pilot Scale Facility for Fabrication...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

produce and market lightweight structural posts, crib members, and blocks from coal combustion by-products for use in underground mines. In addition, the performance of...

339

Designing computational steering facilities for distributed agent based simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agent-Based Models (ABMs) are a class of models which, by simulating the behavior of multiple agents (i.e., ndependent actions, interactions and adaptation), aim to emulate and/or predict complex phenomena. One of the general features of ABM simulations ... Keywords: agent-based simulation, computational steering, distributed systems, visualization of distributed models

Gennaro Cordasco, Rosario De Chiara, Francesco Raia, Vittorio Scarano, Carmine Spagnuolo, Luca Vicidomini

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Performance of a facility for measuring scintillator non-proportionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, Officeof Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Engineering (NA-22)

Choong, Woon-Seng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ministry eyes 3 ITER-related facilities for Aomori Prefecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-generation reactors. The ministry also wants to drastically remodel the fusion plasma research device called JT-60

342

Cryogenic vertical test facility for the SRF cavities at BNL  

SciTech Connect

A vertical test facility has been constructed to test SRF cavities and can be utilized for other applications. The liquid helium volume for the large vertical dewar is approximate 2.1m tall by 1m diameter with a clearance inner diameter of 0.95m after the inner cold magnetic shield installed. For radiation enclosure, the test dewar is located inside a concrete block structure. The structure is above ground, accessible from the top, and equipped with a retractable concrete roof. A second radiation concrete facility, with ground level access via a labyrinth, is also available for testing smaller cavities in 2 smaller dewars. The cryogenic transfer lines installation between the large vertical test dewar and the cryo plant's sub components is currently near completion. Controls and instrumentations wiring are also nearing completion. The Vertical Test Facility will allow onsite testing of SRF cavities with a maximum overall envelope of 0.9 m diameter and 2.1 m height in the large dewar and smaller SRF cavities and assemblies with a maximum overall envelope of 0.66 m diameter and 1.6 m height.

Than, R.; Liaw, CJ; Porqueddu, R.; Grau, M.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tallerico, T.; McIntyre, G.; Lederle, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Location and design of a competitive facility for profit maximisation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A single facility has to be located in competition with fixed existing facilities of similar type. Demand is supposed to be concentrated at a finite number of points,

344

EXPERIMENTAL TEST FACILITY FOR SELECTIVE RADIATIVE COOLING SURFACES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communication [4] Ph. Grenier, Refrigeration Radiative.Catalanotti et al [11 and Ph. Grenier [4]. Fig. 2 shows the

Sakkal, Fateh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Performance of a facility for measuring scintillator non-proportionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

part by the National Nuclear Security Administration, OfficeNuclear Detection Office of the Department of Homeland Security.

Choong, Woon-Seng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INLs Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

Randy Bohachek; Charles Park; Bruce Wallace; Phil Winston; Steve Marschman

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

EXPERIMENTAL TEST FACILITY FOR EVALUATION OF CONTROLS AND CONTROL STRATEGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workshop on Control of Solar Energy Systems for Heating andand Michael Wahlig Solar Energy Group Energy and Environmentfor active hydronic solar energy systems. The experimental

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Facility for Endurance Testing of Hydrophobic Isotope Exchange Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

Lidia Matei; C. Postolache; C. Tuta; S. Brad

349

Unique High-Temperature Facility for Studying Organic Reactions in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Allan Costine, Joanne Loh, Robbie McDonald, Greg Power ... Results from commissioning tests including detection response times, purge times and...

350

Automation of port facilities for import of GNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines the implementation of port terminals intended for the import of liquified natural gas in Brazilian territory and its importance to assure the continuity of energy offer, which historically has been one of the main factors limiting ... Keywords: GNL, automation, power resources, regaseification, terminal

Andr Seichi Ribeiro Kuramoto; Nilson Magalhes Bueno; Walter Da Silva Frazo Filho; Eduardo Mario Dias; Caio Fernando Fontana

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Decision Support Facility for the APS Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source is now in its fifth year of routine beam production. The EPICS-based [1] control system has entered the phase in its life cycle where new control algorithms must be implemented under increasingly stringent operational and reliability requirements. The sheer volume of the control system (~270,000 records, ~145 VME-based input-output controllers (IOCs), and ~7,000,000 lines of EPICS ASCII configuration code), presents a daunting challenge for code maintenance. The present work describes a relational database that provides an integrated view of the interacting components of the entire APS control system, including the IOC low-level logic, the physical wiring documentation, and high-level client applications. The database is extracted (booted) from the same operational CVS repository as that used to load the active IOCs. It provides site-wide decision support facilities to inspect and trace control flow and to identify client (e.g., user interface) programs involved at any selected poin...

Dohan, D A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Novel Muon Beam Facilities for Project X at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Innovative muon beam concepts for intensity-frontier experiments such as muon-to-electron conversion are described. Elaborating upon a previous single-beam idea, we have developed a design concept for a system to generate four high quality, low-energy muon beams (two of each sign) from a single beam of protons. As a first step, the production of pions by 1 and 3 GeV protons from the proposed Project X linac at Fermilab is being simulated and compared with the 8-GeV results from the previous study.

Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Abrams, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Heating facilities for the MGM Grand Hotel, Reno, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The MGM Grand Hotel-Reno is located adjacent to an area with a well-documented geothermal resource. Currently, there is a number of entities seeking to determine the exact nature of the resource at the MGM site. This report concerns itself with identifying current natural gas loads within the MGM complex which could be met by geothermal should a source become available. The two principle assumptions upon which the following material is based are (1) that a source of 190/sup 0/F or higher temperature water is available and (2) all systems discussed would be installed in parallel with existing systems. That is, existing systems would remain in place providing 100 percent backup for the geothermal systems.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

USE OF THE DRY MAINTENANCE FACILITY FOR HRT MAINTENANCE  

SciTech Connect

A portable shield was utilized in performing nine semidirect dry maintenance jobs on the HRT. The shield proved to be completely reliable, affording a considerable savings in maintenance costs and reactor downtime. (auth)

Jarvis, J.P.

1962-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

EXPERIMENTAL TEST FACILITY FOR EVALUATION OF SOLAR CONTROL STRATEGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~R~OUTI Solar Controller STRIP CHART RECORDER INPUT WEATHERsolar system load loop, climatological values from the weather

Majteles, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Thermal vacuum life test facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy (DOE) assigned Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility, now operated by EG G Mound Applied Technologies, the responsibility for assembling and testing General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Assembled and tested were five RTGs, which included four flight units and one non-flight qualification unit. Figure 1 shows the RTG, which was designed by General Electric AstroSpace Division (GE/ASD) to produce 285 W of electrical power. A detailed description of the processes for RTG assembly and testing is presented by Amos and Goebel (1989). The RTG performance data are described by Bennett, et al. (1986). The flight units will provide electrical power for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Galileo mission to Jupiter (two RTGs) and the joint NASA/European Space Agency (ESA) Ulysses mission to study the polar regions of the sun (one RTG). The remaining flight unit will serve as the spare for both missions, and a non-flight qualification unit was assembled and tested to ensure that performance criteria were adequately met. 4 refs., 3 figs.

Deaton, R.L.; Goebel, C.J.; Amos, W.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

EXPERIMENTAL TEST FACILITY FOR EVALUATION OF SOLAR CONTROL STRATEGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ext. 6782 r University of California/Berkeley Prepared forof the University of California, the Lawrence BerkeleyLAB ORA TOR Y UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA

Majteles, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Understanding the Effects of Floral Density on Flower Visitation Rates and Species Composition of Flower Visitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their opposite effects on energy and time costs per flower.influence on NREI if energy and time costs per flower areintake, I j , energy cost, E i , j , and time cost, T i ,

Essenberg, Carla Jean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Understanding the Effects of Floral Density on Flower Visitation Rates and Species Composition of Flower Visitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ha plots 29.6 to 85.6 Canola (Brassica oilseed), in Arthurdensities, (Apis mellifera) in canola (Brassica observed in

Essenberg, Carla Jean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

With ORNL's help, the new visitor's center at the Grand Staircase-Escalante National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monument received LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council Strategic Energy Management Through Optimizing the Energy Performance of Buildings Oak Ridge National Laboratory Helps Others Meet Their Energy Goals It is an obvious choice

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

FES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) 2010 FESAC COV Report on FES Program .pdf file (707KB) FES Response to FESAC COV Report on FES .pdf file...

362

ASCR Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Computer Research, and Collaboratories .pdf file (124KB) ASCR Response to ASCAC COV Report on Applied Mathematics, Computer Research, and Collaboratories .pdf file (20KB)...

363

Spending behaviour of visitors to the Klein Karoo National Arts Festival / Martinette Kruger.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Klein Karoo National Arts Festival (KKNK) is one of the most popular arts festivals in South Africa, but ticket sales have alarmingly declined since (more)

Kruger, Martinette

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Conference Centre attracts steady stream of visitors We're exac' I , halfway throughthe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exist. Abbreviations: FACS, fluorescence activated cell sorter; OD, optical density; PMT used a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) to inoculate between 1 and 512 single budding yeast1001122 #12;such as damaged grapes in Italy [40], rotting figs in California [10], soil near oak trees

Farrell, Anthony P.

365

What if you could actually trust your kernel?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of formally verified OS kernels means that for the first time we have a truly trustworthy foundation for systems. In this paper we explore the design space this opens up. The obvious applications are in security, although not all of them are ...

Gernot Heiser; Leonid Ryzhyk; Michael Von Tessin; Aleksander Budzynowski

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.00 17.89 17.55 17.24 16.98 16.99 AEO 1983 15.82 16.13 16.37 16.50 16.56 16.63 17.37 AEO 1984 15.77 15.76 16.01...

367

Energy Efficiency in Denmark - Results and actual programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renato Ezban is responsible for the implementation of a new system for certification of buildings and inspection of boilers and ventilation systems. Peter Bach is chairman of ECEEE...

368

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

369

Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

OSullivan, Francis Martin

371

experiment actually sees," Smith says. "When we were  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,200 pieces of music from record companies and various artists, and that number is still growing. "As more of ceremonies for a number of nationally known gospel artists' concerts and have produced a CD titled Thank You components. The students' main robot features customized parts made with a titanium powder manufacturing

372

Actual Commercial Buildings Energy Use and Emissions and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

An analysis of trends in energy consumption and energy-related carbon emissions in U.S. buildings, 1970-1998.

373

Pu speciation in actual and simulated aged wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Pu L{sub II/III} edge was used to determine the speciation of this element in (1) Hanford Z-9 Pu crib samples, (2) deteriorated waste resins from a chloride process ion-exchange purification line, and (3) the sediments from two Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Liter Scale simulant brine systems. The Pu speciation in all of these samples except one is within the range previously displayed by PuO{sub 2+x-2y}(OH){sub y}{center_dot}zH{sub 2}O compounds, which is expected based on the putative thermodynamic stability of this system for Pu equilibrated with excess H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} under environmental conditions. The primary exception was a near neutral brine experiment that displayed evidence for partial substitution of the normal O-based ligands with Cl{sup -} and a concomitant expansion of the Pu-Pu distance relative to the much more highly ordered Pu near neighbor shell in PuO{sub 2}. However, although the Pu speciation was not necessarily unusual, the Pu chemistry identified via the history of these samples did exhibit unexpected patterns, the most significant of which may be that the presence of the Pu(V)-oxo species may decrease rather than increase the overall solubility of these compounds. Several additional aspects of the Pu speciation have also not been previously observed in laboratory-based samples. The molecular environmental chemistry of Pu is therefore likely to be more complicated than would be predicted based solely on the behavior of PuO{sub 2} under laboratory conditions.

Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The potential and actual effectiveness of interactive query expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Van Rijsbergen,C.J. Magennis,M. Proceedings of the 20th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Reseach and Development in Information Retrieval (Seattle, USA) pp 324-332 ACM

Van Rijsbergen, C.J.

375

Solar Decathlon Visitors Guide 2011, National Mall, West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C., September 23 - October 2, 2011 (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Guide to the student-designed houses, ten contests, exhibits, and workshops of the U.S. Department of Energy 2011 Solar Decathlon, held in Washington, D.C., from September 23 through October 2, 2011. Teams of college students designed and built the solar-powered houses on display here. They represent 13 U.S. states, five countries, and four continents. Now the teams are rising to the challenge by competing in 10 contests over nine days, with the championship trophy on the line. This is their time to shine. The 2011 teams may share a common goal - to design and build the best energy-efficient house powered by the sun - but their strategies are different. One house is made of precast concrete, while another 'dances' in response to its environment. Another house is meant to sit atop a building, proving the sky's the limit for energy innovation. Whatever your idea of sustainable living may be, you are bound to find it at the Solar Decathlon.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Challenges and Recommendations for Visitors Teaching Design in the Developing World towards Sustainable Equitable Futures: Four Divided Nations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar energy for the island and beyond in anticipation of the eventual fuel shortage while concurrently providing a huge green area or recreational eco-park. My students primarily worked on a tangential competition for revamping the old Olympic Park... http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=33190&Cr=corruption&Cr1 last accessed 28.05.2012 2 http://www.unicist.org/papers/ontology_ei_en.pdf last accessed 28.05.2012 3 For this author, one of the biggest challenges to teaching in the above...

Jann, Marga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Zion National Park Visitor Center: Significant Energy Savings Achieved through a Whole-Building Design Process: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Park Service (NPS) applied a whole-building design process developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to create a building that performs more than 70% better than a comparable code-compliant building at no additional construction cost. This whole-building design process involves a committed design team, including the energy consultant, in the earliest conceptual design phase and continues through building commissioning. The design team for this project included the architect, engineer, energy consultant, landscape architect, owner, operator, and others who could influence the building design and operation. Extensive whole-building energy and lighting computer simulations were conducted throughout the process, which included the integration of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies into the building. The design team, inspired by natural cooling within the canyon, developed simple solutions to create an extremely energy efficient building. The se strategies included natural ventilation cooling, cooltowers for evaporative cooling without distribution fans, daylighting, massive building materials, Trombe walls and direct solar gains for heating, engineered window overhangs for solar load control, a building automation system to maintain comfort and control the energy-efficient lighting system, and a roof-mounted photovoltaic system to offset building electrical loads and ensure a power supply during the frequent utility grid outages.

Torcellini, P.; Judkoff, R.; Hayter, S.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Key success factors in managing the visitors' experience at the Klein Karoo National Arts Festival / Erasmus L.J.J.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ABSA Klein Karoo National Arts Festival (KKNK) is one of the biggest and most popular Afrikaans arts festivals in South Africa, and since its (more)

Erasmus, Lourens Johannes Jacobus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Charges/Reports | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (629KB) NP Committees of Visitors NP Home Charges/Reports Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page 2013 Molybdenum-99 Charge Letter (December 2013 .pdf file (469KB)) Neutrino-less Double Beta Decay Charge Letter (December 2013 .pdf file (466KB)) Report to NSAC on Scientific Facilities (March 2013 .pdf file (850KB)) (Major Nuclear Physics Facilities for the Next Decade) Transmittal Letter (March 2013 .pdf file (171KB)) Letter to the Facilities Charge (December 2012) .pdf file (790KB) Report to NSAC on the Committee of Visitors (March 2013 .pdf file (1.8MB)) Transmittal Letter (March 2013 .pdf file (61KB)) Committee of Visitors Charge Letter (July 2012) .pdf file (322KB)

380

Test facility for well logging cables (in air at atmospheric pressure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system has been built to test, in air at ambient pressure, short sections of electromechanical cables which are potentially useful for geothermal well logging service. Electrical characteristics of the test cable are monitored while the cable is exposed to elevated temperature and tensioned in a manner simulating loading experienced by a typical well logging cable. Cable conductor resistance, dielectric resistance and capacitance are measured. The cable can be exposed to bending, simulating that which occurs when passing over sheaves or wound on or off a drum. Cable anchors are arranged to permit nearly 100 percent strength tensioning in the heated section. Electrical connectors are made at the unstrained ends at ambient temperature. The system can also be used to tension test cable terminations at elevated temperatures.

Not Available

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

FACILITY FOR THE TESTING OF THE TFTR PROTOTYPE NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and filament power supply transformers in their respectiver e c t i f i e r transformers. Power from this V equipment

Haughian, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE FACILITY FOR THE TESTINGS OF THE TFTR NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

filament transformer; the arc and filament power supply 4753.38 HVA rectifier transformers. Power from this equipment

Haughian, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A recirculating linac-based facility for ultrafast X-ray science  

SciTech Connect

We present an updated design for a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac, in particular the incorporation of EUV and soft x-ray production. The project has been named LUX - Linac-based Ultrafast X-ray facility. The source produces intense x-ray pulses with duration of 10-100 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with synchronization of 10 s fs, optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. The photon range covers the EUV to hard x-ray spectrum by use of seeded harmonic generation in undulators, and a specialized technique for ultra-short-pulse photon production in the 1-10 keV range. High-brightness rf photocathodes produce electron bunches which are optimized either for coherent emission in free-electron lasers, or to provide a large x/y emittance ration and small vertical emittance which allows for manipulation to produce short-pulse hard x-rays. An injector linac accelerates the beam to 120 MeV, and is followed by four passes through a 600-720 MeV recirculating linac. We outline the major technical components of the proposed facility.

Corlett, J.N; Barletta, W.A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.M.; Green, M.A.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.; Placidi, M.; Pirkl, W.; Parmigiani, F.

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Micrometeorological Facility for Eddy Flux Measurements of CO2 and H2O  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ground-based eddy flux system which is used to measure the CO2 and H2O exchange between the atmosphere and the biosphere is described. Fluctuations of CO2, H2O, air temperature and atmospheric turbulence are sampled at frequencies up to 50 Hz. ...

F. Chahuneau; R. L. Desjardins; R. Verdon; E. Brach

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Short Sample Testing Facility for the Superconducting Super Collider: Requirements and Development Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be tested are inserted in the brass channel, separated by4ea) Instrumentation Boards (3 ea) Brass Channel Helium

Zbasnik, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Techniques and Facilities for Handling and Packaging Tritiated Liquid Wastes for Burial  

SciTech Connect

Methods and facilities have been developed for the collection, storage, measurement, assay, solidification, and packaging of tritiated liquid wastes (concentrations up to 5 Ci/ml) for disposal by land burial. Tritium losses to the environment from these operations are less than 1 ppm. All operations are performed in an inert gas-purged glovebox system vented to an effluent removal system which permits nearly complete removal of tritium from the exhaust gases prior to their dischardge to the environment. Waste oil and water from tritium processing areas are vacuum-transferred to glovebox storage tanks through double-walled lines. Accommodations are also available for emptying portable liquid waste containers and for removing tritiated water from molecular sieve beds with heat and vacuum. The tritium concentration of the collected liquids is measured by an in-line calorimeter. A low-volume metering pump is used to transfer liquids from holding tanks to heavy walled polyethylene drums filled with an absorbent or cement for solidification. Final packaging of the sealed polyethylene drums is in either an asphalt-filled combination 30- and 55- gallon metal drum package or a 30-gallon welded stainless steel container.

Rhinehammer, T. B.; Mershad, E. A.

1974-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Design of a Scaled-down DRACS Test Facility for an AHTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) has been proposed for an Advanced-High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) that uses fluoride salt as the coolant. A study is being carried out to test its performance and provide experimental data for model validation. A detailed scaling analysis has been performed for the DRACS, as reported in a companion paper [1], in which a scaling methodology is developed. In this paper, scaling results for a protoltypic DRACS design are presented to design a scaled-down DRACs test facility.

Christensen, R. N. [Ohio State University; Lv, Q. NMN [Ohio State University; Subharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Sun, X NMN [Ohio State University; Blue, T. E. [Ohio State University; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Wang, X. NMN [Ohio State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Design and use of an MITR-II beam port facility for undergraduate education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This summary describes the design and use of a one-axis flight-time neutron spectrometer that has been installed on one of the beam ports of the 5-MW(t) Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR). The objective of this facility is to further undergraduate education by making a quality experimental facility available for student use. This spectrometer, which has now been in use for two years, has received excellent evaluations from the more than 100 undergraduates who have made measurements with it.

Kwok, K.S.; Fecych, W.; Shull, C.G.; Bernard, J.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Q&A with Cindy Regnier, Manager of the Facility for Low Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

problems that FLEXLAB was designed to address? One problem that is occupying many minds right now is successfully integrating HVAC, facades, shading, lighting systems and controls...

391

Geothermal-heating facilities for Carson Elementary School and Wind River Middle School  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carson Elementary School and Wind River Middle School are located in Carson, Washington, adjacent to the Wind River. Both schools are operated by the Stevenson-Carson School District. Carson Elementary, comprised of 49,000 square feet, was constructed in several phases beginning in 1951. The construction is variable, but is characterized by large expanses of single glass and uninsulated masonry areas. An oil fired steam boiler supplies a variety of terminal equipment. Wind River Middle School was built in 1972 and, as a result, exhibits much greater insulation levels. The 38,000 square foot structure is heated entirely by an electric resistance terminal reheat system. Carson Hot Springs Resort, located approximately one half mile from the schools, exhibits temperatures of 124/sup 0/F. In addition, geological work is in progress to better define the local geothermal resource. The feasibility of geothermal use at the school for space heating purposes is examined.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Concept for a small, colocated fuel cycle facility for oxide breeder fuels  

SciTech Connect

As part of a United States Department of Energy (USDOE) program to examine innovative liquid-metal reactor (LMR) system designs over the past three years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) collaborated on studies of mixed oxide fuel cycle options. A principal effort was an advanced concept for a small integrated fuel cycle colocated with a 1300-MW(e) reactor station. The study provided a scoping design and a basis on which to proceed with implementation of such a facility if future plans so dictate. The facility integrated reprocessing, waste management, and refabrication functions in a single facility of nominal 35-t/year capacity utilizing the latest technology developed in fabrication programs at WHC and in reprocessing at ORNL. The concept was based on many years of work at both sites and extensive design studies of prior years.

Burch, W.D.; Stradley, J.G.; Lerch, R.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Summary of Off-Normal Events in US Fuel Cycle Facilities for AFCI Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for facilities comprising the fission reactor fuel cycle, with the exception of reactor operations. This report includes mines, mills, conversion plants, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication plants, transportation of fuel materials between these centers, and waste storage facilities. Some of the facilities discussed are no longer operating; others continue to produce fuel for the commercial fission power plant industry. Some of the facilities discussed have been part of the militarys nuclear effort; these are included when the processes used are similar to those used for commercial nuclear power. When reading compilations of incidents and accidents, after repeated entries it is natural to form an opinion that there exists nothing but accidents. For this reason, production or throughput values are described when available. These adverse operating experiences are compiled to support the design and decisions needed for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The AFCI is to weigh options for a new fission reactor fuel cycle that is efficient, safe, and productive for US energy security.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. J. Piet; S. O. Sheetz; D. H. McGuire; W. B. Boore

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

In vivo Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility for Total Body Nitrogen and Cd  

SciTech Connect

A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system has been designed and constructed to measure the total body nitrogen and Cd for in vivo studies. An aqueous solution of KNO{sub 3} was used as phantom for system calibration. The facility has been used to monitor total body nitrogen (TBN) of mice and found that is related to their diet. Some mice swallowed diluted water with Cl{sub 2}Cd, and the presence of Cd was detected in the animals. The minimum Cd concentration that the system can detect was 20 ppm.

Munive, Marco; Revilla, Angel [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Solis, Jose L. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Lima (Peru)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

395

Semantic knowledge facilities for a web-based recipe database system supporting personalization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent explosive proliferation of interesting and useful data over the Web such as various recipes, while providing people with readily available information, brings out a challenging issue on how to manage such non-conventional data effectively. ... Keywords: constraint and rule, cooking graph, knowledge base, personalization, recipe, semantic modeling, user profiling

Liping Wang; Qing Li; Guozhu Dong; Yu Li

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Transmutation facility for weapons grade plutonium based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft, pending eventual use as nuclear reactor fuel. A transmutation facility consisting of a fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons grade plutonium in the form of PuO2 pebbles in a lithium slurry was investigated and found to be technically feasible. A design concept/operation scenario was developed for a facility which would be able to transmute the world's estimated inventory of weapons grade plutonium to 11% Pu-240 concentration in about 25 years. The fusion neutron source would be based on tokamak plasma operating conditions and magnet technology being qualified in ongoing R D programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material needed to handle the high heat fluxes. Extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify other technologies required for the facility.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Transmutation facility for weapons-grade plutonium disposition based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons-grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft during subsequent storage, pending eventual use as fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. A transmutation facility consisting of a tokamak fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons-grade plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2} pebbles in a lithium slurry is investigated. A design concept/operation scenario is developed for a facility that would be able to transmute the world`s estimated surplus inventory of weapons-grade plutonium to 11% {sup 240}Pu concentration in nearly 25 yr. The fusion neutron source would be based on plasma physics and plasma support technology being qualified in ongoing research and development (R&D) programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R&D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material that would be needed to handle the high heat fluxes; otherwise, extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R&D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify all required technologies. Such a facility might feasibly be deployed in 20 to 30 yr, or sooner with a crash program. 49 refs., 5 figs., 13 tabs.

Stacey, W.M.; Pilger, B.L.; Mowrey, J.A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SC), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA),network) NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ORNL/TM-2001/124 Support Facility for a Mercury-Jet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................................. 13 2.7 COIL REPLACEMENT AND REMOTE HANDLING.................................................... 14 2, shielding, remote-handling features of the facility, and a preliminary cost estimate. #12;#12;xi for mercury target system components, and various remote-handling equipment used for maintenance tasks

McDonald, Kirk

400

Design and operation of an inert gas facility for thermoelectric generator storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While the flight hardware is protected by design from the harsh environments of space, its in-air storage often requires special protection from contaminants such as dust, moisture and other gases. One of these components, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) which powers the missions, was deemed particularly vulnerable to pre-launch aging because the generators remain operational at core temperatures in excess of 1000 degrees centigrade throughout the storage period. Any oxygen permitted to enter the devices will react with thermally hot components, preferentially with molybdenum in the insulating foils, and with graphites to form CO/CO{sub 2} gases which are corrosive to the thermopile. It was important therefore to minimize the amount of oxygen which could enter, by either limiting the effective in-leakage areas on the generators themselves, or by reducing the relative amount of oxygen within the environment around the generators, or both. With the generators already assembled and procedures in place to assure minimal in-leakage in handling, the approach of choice was to provide a storage environment which contains significantly less oxygen than normal air. 2 refs.

Goebel, C.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

theory. Some significant problems in magnetic -confinement-fusion reactorTheory and Experiment I/O Input/output IRU Irrevocable right-of-use (networking) ISM Interstellar matter ITER International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center, 1996 present. Services and Systems at NERSC (Oct. 1, 1997- Dec 31, 1998,History Chief Architect, NERSC Division, Lawrence Berkeley

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Renovation of CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) for Development of Advanced Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) was constructed at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) in 1980 as a basic research field where spent fuel pins from fast reactor (FR) and high level liquid waste can be dealt with. The renovation consists of remodeling of the CA-3 cell and the laboratory A, installation of globe boxes, hoods and analytical equipments to the laboratory C and the analytical laboratory. Also maintenance equipments in the CA-5 cell which had been out of order were repaired. The CA-3 cell is the main cell in which important equipments such as a dissolver, a clarifier and extractors are installed for carrying out the hot test using the irradiated FR fuel. Since the CPF had specialized originally in the research function for the Purex process, it was desired to execute the research and development of such new, various reprocessing processes. Formerly, equipments were arranged in wide space and connected with not only each other but also with utility supply system mainly by fixed stainless steel pipes. It caused shortage of operation space in flexibility for basic experimental study. Old equipments in the CA-3 cell including vessels and pipes were removed after successful decontamination, and new equipments were installed conformably to the new design. For the purpose of easy installation and rearranging the experimental equipments, equipments are basically connected by flexible pipes. Since dissolver is able to be easily replaced, various dissolution experiments is conducted. Insoluble residue generated by dissolution of spent fuel is clarified by centrifugal. This small apparatus is effective to space-saving. Mini mixer settlers or centrifugal contactors are put on to the prescribed limited space in front of the backside wall. Fresh reagents such as solvent, scrubbing and stripping solution are continuously fed from the laboratory A to the extractor by the reagent supply system with semi-automatic observation system. The in-cell crane in CA-5 was renovated to increase driving efficiency. At the renovation for the in-cell crane, full scale mockup test and 3D simulation test had been executed in advance. After the renovation, hot tests in the CPF had been resumed from JFY 2002. New equipments such as dissolver, extractor, electrolytic device, etc. were installed in CA-3 conformably to the new design laid out in order to ensure the function and space. Glove boxes in the analysis laboratory were renewed in order to let it have flexibility from the viewpoint of conducting basic experiments (ex. U crystallization). Glove boxes and hoods were newly installed in the laboratory A for basic research and analysis, especially on MA chemistries. One laboratory (the laboratory C) was established to research about dry reprocessing. The renovation of the CPF has been executed in order to contribute to the development on the advanced fast reactor fuel cycle system, which will give us many sort of technical subject and experimental theme to be solved in the 2. Generation of the CPF.

Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency:4-33, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki pref, 319-1194 (Japan)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Facilities for utilization of geothermal steam, Verdant Vales School, Middletown, California  

SciTech Connect

Verdant Vales School is a boarding school and summer camp located in the Geysers - Calistoga KGRA near Middletown, California. The school consists of dormitories, classrooms and related facilities to accommodate a maximum of 55 students and a staff of 5. Energy for heating buildings and domestic hot water, is provided by electricity supplied by Pacific Gas and Electric Company. In addition, a considerable amount of LPG is consumed to heat the swimming pool and the hot water required for the automatic dishwasher in the kitchen. The school has 3000 pounds per hour of 150 psig steam available at no cost from an existing geothermal well adjacent to the school site. A preliminary design of a system has been developed that utilizes the geothermal steam to eliminate the school's LPG requirement, and minimizes outside purchases of electricity for space and water heating. Savings have been developed, and material costs for the new facilities have been estimated.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A virtual test facility for simulating detonation-induced fracture of thin flexible shells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fluid-structure interaction simulation of detonation- and shock-wave-loaded fracturing thin-walled structures requires numerical methods that can cope with large deformations as well as topology changes. We present a robust level-set-based approach ...

Ralf Deiterding; Fehmi Cirak; Sean P. Mauch; Daniel I. Meiron

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S.Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR) andOASCR Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (DOE

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Short Sample Testing Facility for the Superconducting Super Collider: Requirements and Development Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High EnergyOffice of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High Energy

Zbasnik, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security Administration (NNSA), NSF, and NASA, as well asfunded by DOE-SC, DOE-NNSA, NSF, and NASA, as well asrecognized by both the DOE/NNSA ASCI Advanced Simulation and

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SC), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA),NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE program)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Technical report for the generic site add-on facility for plutonium polishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide environmental data and reference process information associated with incorporating plutonium polishing steps (dissolution, impurity removal, and conversion to oxide powder) into the genetic-site Mixed-Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MOXFF). The incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will enable the removal of undesirable impurities, such as gallium and americium, known to be associated with the plutonium. Moreover, unanticipated impurities can be removed, including those that may be contained in (1) poorly characterized feed materials, (2) corrosion products added from processing equipment, and (3) miscellaneous materials contained in scrap recycle streams. These impurities will be removed to the extent necessary to meet plutonium product purity specifications for MOX fuels. Incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will mean that the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) will need to produce a plutonium product that can b e dissolved at the MOXFF in nitric acid at a suitable rate (sufficient to meet overall production requirements) with the minimal usage of hydrofluoric acid, and its complexing agent, aluminum nitrate. This function will require that if the PDCF product is plutonium oxide powder, that powder must be produced, stored, and shipped without exceeding a temperature of 600 C.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE FACILITY FOR THE TESTINGS OF THE TFTR NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

similar raised floor of plywood con struction extends fromsections of moveable plywood, and there is ready access to

Haughian, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Materials exposure test facilities for varying low-Btu coal-derived gas  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the United States Department of Energy's High Temperature Turbine Technology Readiness Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is participating in the Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Materials Study. The objective is to create a technology base for ceramic materials which could be used by stationary gas power turbines operating in a high-temperature, coal-derived, low-Btu gas products of combustion environment. Two METC facilities have been designed, fabricated and will be operated simultaneously exposing ceramic materials dynamically and statically to products of combustion of a coal-derived gas. The current studies will identify the degradation of ceramics due to their exposure to a coal-derived gas combustion environment.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Carpenter, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

On selection and operation of an international interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposal of post-irradiation fuel from nuclear reactors has been an issue for the nuclear industry for many years. Most countries currently have no long-term disposal strategy in place. Therefore, the concept of an ...

Burns, Joe, 1966-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: a facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and other high-$\\beta$ phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains $\\sim$14 m$^{3}$ of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized $(>50\\%)$. At present, up to 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB$_6$) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB$_6$ cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through ${\\bf J}\\times{\\bf B}$ torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies...

Cooper, C M; Brookhart, M; Clark, M; Collins, C; Ding, W X; Flanagan, K; Khalzov, I; Li, Y; Milhone, J; Nornberg, M; Nonn, P; Weisberg, D; Whyte, D G; Zweibel, E; Forest, C B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Build the Best Data Center Facility for Your Business (paperback), 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive guide to designing and operating reliable server environments Keep your data center cool, clean, scalable, and secure Learn the five principles of effective data center design Avoid the natural and man-made hazards that can jeopardize ...

Douglas Alger

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Workers Complete Asbestos Removal at West Valley to Prepare Facility for Demolition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers safely cleared asbestos from more than 5,500 feet of piping in the Main Plant Process Building. Project completion is an important step in preparing...

418

A U.S. high-flux neutron facility for fusion materials development  

SciTech Connect

Materials for a fusion reactor first wall and blanket structure must be able to reliably function in an extreme environment that includes 10-15 MW-year/m{sup 2} neutron and heat fluences. The various materials and structural challenges are as difficult and important as achieving a burning plasma. Overcoming radiation damage degradation is the rate-controlling step in fusion materials development. Recent advances with oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels show promise in meeting reactor requirements, while multi-timescale atomistic simulations of defect-grain boundary interactions in model copper systems reveal surprising self-annealing phenomenon. While these results are promising, simultaneous evaluation of radiation effects displacement damage ({le} 200 dpa) and in-situ He generation ({le} 2000 appm) at prototypical reactor temperatures and chemical environments is still required. There is currently no experimental facility in the U.S. that can meet these requirements for macroscopic samples. The E.U. and U.S. fusion communities have recently concluded that a fusion-relevant, high-flux neutron source for accelerated characterization of the effects of radiation damage to materials is a top priority for the next decade. Data from this source will be needed to validate designs for the multi-$B next-generation fusion facilities such as the CTF, ETF, and DEMO, that are envisioned to follow ITER and NIF.

Rei, Donald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated simulation of a fusion reactor Accurately detectin magnetic -confinement-fusion reactor simulation for whichsimulation of a fusion reactor is beyond the capability of

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Development of a Next-Generation Environmental Chamber Facility for Chemical Mechanism and VOC Reactivity Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethylene, propylene, n-butane and trans-2-butene wereas ethylene, propylene, n-butane and trans-2-butene and 30 mpropane, propylene, n-butane, n-hexane, toluene, n-octane

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Sciences Network, or ESnet, is a high-speed networkreliable connections, ESnet enables researchers at nationaloperated by Berkeley Lab, ESnet provides direct connections

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

User Facilities .Managing National User Facilities Berkeley Lab has been afour DOE national user facilities. The focus of Berkeley Lab

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, October--December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs. Substantial progress in underground construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. MWK equipment at the grade level and the first tier are being set in the structure.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Evaluation of an Angled Louver Facility for Guiding Sturgeon to a Downstream Bypass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydroelectric projects may expose downstream moving and migrating fish to injury and mortality during passage through the projects turbines. This report presents the results of a field evaluation of a louver array for guiding juvenile shortnose sturgeon toward a safe route past a water intake.

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

425

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the long-puzzling gamma-ray bursts (extremely bright andcollapse supernovae and gamma-ray burst modeling);, and, at

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

A new facility for High energy PIXE at the ARRONAX Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) using high energy protons is a non destructive multi elemental technique that can analyze medium and heavy trace elements on thick samples. A new experimental setup is being built at the ARRONAX facility (Nantes, France) for such purpose. Tests have been made in order to quantify the background induced by a 68 MeV proton beam on a 250\\mu m copper target. Our measurement has been compared with expected theoretical value including the various components of the bremsstrahlung and the Compton induced by gamma rays. This study has allowed us to determine a detection limit of the order of tens of ppm and has shown also the different ways to improve it. Amongst them are a better shielding of the detector and the use of lower beam intensity. Another ways consist to use the prompt gamma rays emitted by the interaction of the beam with the target nucleus as well as the registration of the decay of the activation product after the end of the bombardment. This activation and especially the production of long lived radionuclide can be controlled by tuning the proton energy and intensity resulting in a low activation which is not prejudicial to most of the samples and with almost no effect on the PIXE performances.

C. Koumeir; F. Haddad; V. Metivier; N. Servagent; N. Michel

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

428

IKNO, a user facility for coherent terahertz and UV synchrotron radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in existing 3rd generation light sources. Simultaneously toin modern 3rd generation light sources. 2. The IKNO storagea typical 3rd generation light source. The up to nine orders

Sannibale, Fernando

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Facilities for utilization of geothermal steam, Verdant Vales School, Middletown, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verdant Vales School is a boarding school and summer camp located in the Geysers - Calistoga KGRA near Middletown, California. The school consists of dormitories, classrooms and related facilities to accommodate a maximum of 55 students and a staff of 5. Energy for heating buildings and domestic hot water, is provided by electricity supplied by Pacific Gas and Electric Company. In addition, a considerable amount of LPG is consumed to heat the swimming pool and the hot water required for the automatic dishwasher in the kitchen. The school has 3000 pounds per hour of 150 psig steam available at no cost from an existing geothermal well adjacent to the school site. A preliminary design of a system has been developed that utilizes the geothermal steam to eliminate the school's LPG requirement, and minimizes outside purchases of electricity for space and water heating. Savings have been developed, and material costs for the new facilities have been estimated.

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Feasibility study for a recirculating linac-based facility for femtosecond dynamics  

SciTech Connect

LBNL is pursuing design studies and the scientific program for a facility dedicated to the production of x-ray pulses with ultra-short time duration, for application in dynamical studies of processes in physics, biology, and chemistry. The proposed x-ray facility has the short x-ray pulse length ({approx}60 fs FWHM) necessary to study very fast dynamics, high flux (up to approximately 10E11 photons/sec/0.1 percentBW) to study weakly scattering systems, and tuneability over 1-12 keV photon energy. The hard x-ray photon production section of the machine accommodates seven 2-m long undulators. Design studies for longer wavelength sources, using high-gain harmonic generation, are in progress. The x-ray pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz is matched to studies of dynamical processes (initiated by ultra-short laser pulses) that typically have a long recovery time or are not generally cyclic or reversible and need time to allow relaxation, replacement, or flow of the sample. The technique for producing ultra-short x-ray pulses uses relatively long electron bunches to minimize high-peak-current collective effects, and the ultimate x-ray duration is achieved by a combination of bunch manipulation and optical compression. Synchronization of x-ray pulses to sample excitation signals is expected to be of order 50 - 100 fs. Techniques for making use of the recirculating geometry to provide beam-based signals from early passes through the machine are being studied.

Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Barletta, W.A.; Byrd, J.M.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.; Green, M.A.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; Kairan, D.; Kujawski, E.; Li, D.; Lidia, S.; Luft, P.; McClure, R.; Parmigiani, F.; Petroff, Y.; Pirkl, W.; Placidi, M.; Reavill, D.; Reichel, I.; Rimmer, R.A.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.E.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Tanabe, J.; Truchlikova, D.; Wan, W.; Wang, S.; Wells, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

2002-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

431

Power containers: an OS facility for fine-grained power and energy management on multicore servers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficiency and power capping are critical concerns in server and cloud computing systems. They face growing challenges due to dynamic power variations from new client-directed web applications, as well as complex behaviors due to multicore resource ... Keywords: hardware counters, multicore, operating system, power modeling, power virus, server and cloud computing

Kai Shen; Arrvindh Shriraman; Sandhya Dwarkadas; Xiao Zhang; Zhuan Chen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Towards an Experimental Testbed Facility for Cyber-Physical Security Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) are under great scrutiny due to large Smart Grid investments and recent high profile security vulnerabilities and attacks. Research into improved security technologies, communication models, and emergent behavior is necessary to protect these systems from sophisticated adversaries and new risks posed by the convergence of CPSs with IT equipment. However, cyber-physical security research is limited by the lack of access to universal cyber-physical testbed facilities that permit flexible, high-fidelity experiments. This paper presents a remotely-configurable and community-accessible testbed design that integrates elements from the virtual, simulated, and physical environments. Fusing data between the three environments enables the creation of realistic and scalable environments where new functionality and ideas can be exercised. This novel design will enable the research community to analyze and evaluate the security of current environments and design future, secure, cyber-physical technologies.

Edgar, Thomas W.; Manz, David O.; Carroll, Thomas E.

2012-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

433

Shielding Calculations for the New Experimental Storage Ring for the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shielding / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Radiation Protection

K. Vogt; G. Fehrenbacher; A. Knapp; T. Radon

434

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Article on Trident Laser Facility for NA-11 Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Trident Intermediate-Scale Laser Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an extremely versatile Nd:glass laser system dedicated to high energy density laboratory physics and weapons physics research and fundamental laser-matter interactions. Trident is a three-beam, 200 J/beam at the second harmonic for glass (527 nm wavelength), facility with tremendous flexibility and high beam quality. Pulse durations varying over 6 orders of magnitude, from 0.5 picoseconds to 1.0 microsecs, can be directed to either of two different target chambers with changeable illumination geometries, including the ability to achieve near-diffraction limited focus. This provides a unique range of capability at one facility from sub-picosecond pulses (and high-intensity laser science) to nanosecond pulses (and LPI physics relevant to ICF) to microsecond pulses (and driving flyer plates for supported shock dynamic materials science.) When in short-pulse mode (less than picosecond pulse), a single beam can provide up to 200 TW of power with uniquely controllable and measured pre-pulse contrast of 10 orders of magnitude. A recent external capability review at Los Alamos concluded that 'Trident is generating excellent, cutting edge science and is a leading intermediate scale laser system worldwide.'

Barnes, Cris W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

436

European facilities for accelerator neutrino physics: perspectives for the decade to come  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Very soon a new generation of reactor and accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments - Double Chooz, Daya Bay, Reno and T2K - will seek for oscillation signals generated by the mixing parameter theta_13. The knowledge of this angle is a fundamental milestone to optimize further experiments aimed at detecting CP violation in the neutrino sector. Leptonic CP violation is a key phenomenon that has profound implications in particle physics and cosmology but it is clearly out of reach for the aforementioned experiments. Since late 90's, a world-wide activity is in progress to design facilities that can access CP violation in neutrino oscillation and perform high precision measurements of the lepton counterpart of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. In this paper the status of these studies will be summarized, focusing on the options that are best suited to exploit existing European facilities (firstly CERN and the INFN Gran Sasso Laboratories) or technologies where Europe has a world leadership. Similar considerations will be developed in more exotic scenarios - beyond the standard framework of flavor oscillation among three active neutrinos - that might appear plausible in the occurrence of anomalous results from post-MiniBooNE experiments or the CNGS.

R. Battiston; M. Mezzetto; P. Migliozzi; F. Terranova

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

Characterization of an Aerosol Shock Tube Facility for Heterogeneous Combustion Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion is responsible for providing energy for many applications, especially in propulsion and rocket propellants. Shock tubes provide a controlled, repeatable means of studying combustion characteristics; although, most of these studies require the fuel in a mixture to exist in pure gas-phase. This makes it challenging to test low-vapor-pressure fuels that tend to remain in condensed form. Low-vapor-pressure fuels are commonly used in many combustion applications, making combustion studies of these fuels important. A method to study low-vapor-pressure fuels using a shock tube approach is to inject the fuel into the shock tube as tiny, uniformly-sized aerosol droplets. The sub-micron-sized aerosol droplets remain uniformly suspended in the shock tube prior to running the experiment. An incident shock wave vaporizes the liquid fuel droplets, then the reflected shock wave initiates ignition of the mixture. This study presents the characterization of an aerosol fuel injection method to the shock tube to study the combustion of low-vapor-pressure fuels. An aerosol generator was used to produce repeatable, uniformly-sized fuel droplets, and flow controllers were used to control and measure oxygen and argon dilution gas injected into the shock tube. A technique was developed to ensure consistent and repeatable aerosol fuel production rates over which calibration curves were found. This study presents the ignition delay times for C7H16 (? = 1.0) at a pressure of 2.0 atm for temperatures from 1220 - 1427 K, C7H8 (? = 1.0) at 1.9 atm over a temperature range of 1406 1791 K, and C12H26 (? = 0.3) at 3.0 atm for the temperature range of 1293 1455 K. The ignition delay times for heptane and toluene were compared to the literature values at the same conditions and were found to be in good agreement. Laser extinction (visible laser at 632nm) was used to verify the presence of aerosol fuel droplets inside the shock tube for dodecane, but showed the heptane aerosol vaporized upon injection into the shock tube. Initial laser absorption (3.39 m) measurements were also taken. This aerosol technique was found to successfully evaluate combustion effects of low-vapor-pressure fuels; however, was limited by the range of possible fuel concentrations. Further work needs to be performed on the verification of aerosol spatial uniformity and obtaining higher fuel concentrations.

Sandberg, Lori Marie

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

TRENTA Facility for Trade-Off Studies Between Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange and Cryogenic Distillation Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

I. Cristescu et al.

439

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Year Outlook, US DOE, Office of Science, Nov I-2 APPENDIX JWashington, D.C. : DOE Office of Science, July 30, 2003).Proposal to the DOE Office of Science from Lawrence Berkeley

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Requirements and Design Envelope for Volumetric Neutron Source Fusion Facilities for Fusion Nuclear Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

The paper shows that timely development of fusion nuclear technology (FNT) components, e.g. blanket, for DEMO requires the construction and operation of a fusion facility parallel to ITER. This facility, called VNS, will be dedicated to testing, developing and qualifying FNT components and material combinations. Without VNS, i.e. with ITER alone, the confidence level in achieving DEMO operating goals has been quantified and is unacceptably low (< 1 %). An attractive design envelope for VNS exists. Tokamak VNS designs with driven plasma (Q ~ 1-3), steady state plasma operation and normal copper toroidal field coils lead to small sized devices with moderate cost.

Abdou, M [University of California, Los Angeles; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

"DIANA" - A New, Deep-Underground Accelerator Facility for Astrophysics Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The DIANA project (Dakota Ion Accelerators for Nuclear Astrophysics) is a collaboration between the University of Notre Dame, University of North Carolina, Western Michigan University, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to build a nuclear astrophysics accelerator facility 1.4 km below ground. DIANA is part of the US proposal DUSEL (Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory) to establish a cross-disciplinary underground laboratory in the former gold mine of Homestake in South Dakota, USA. DIANA would consist of two high-current accelerators, a 30 to 400 kV variable, high-voltage platform, and a second, dynamitron accelerator with a voltage range of 350 kV to 3 MV. As a unique feature, both accelerators are planned to be equipped with either high-current microwave ion sources or multi-charged ECR ion sources producing ions from protons to oxygen. Electrostatic quadrupole transport elements will be incorporated in the dynamitron high voltage column. Compared to current astrophysics facilities, DIANA could increase the available beam densities on target by magnitudes: up to 100 mA on the low energy accelerator and several mA on the high energy accelerator. An integral part of the DIANA project is the development of a high-density super-sonic gas-jet target which can handle these anticipated beam powers. The paper will explain the main components of the DIANA accelerators and their beam transport lines and will discuss related technical challenges.

Leitner, M.; Leitner, D.; Lemut, A.; Vetter, P.; Wiescher, M.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

442

Feasibility assessment: Lake Frances power generation facilities for the city of Siloam Springs, Arkansas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of developing the power potential of the Illinois River at the Lake Frances Dam for utilization by the city of Siloam Springs, Arkansas, was studied. It was found that the average annual power production potential of this site is 3.8 MWh; the cost saving produced by the proposed hydropower project will not support any remedial rehabilitation costs of the entire dam structure; development and operation of this hydropower project would save nonrenewal types of energy; if the capital cost can be fixed at present day prices, the development will become economically feasible when electric costs increase by 43%; and there will be no significant adverse environmental impact resulting from either the construction or operation of the hydropower facilities. It was concluded that the hydropower facilities should be constructed, owned and operated by the city of Siloam Springs, provided the dam safety can be assured and sources of funding can be made available so that the annual costs will not exceed the annual savings. (LCL)

None

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Development of a propulsion system and component test facility for advanced radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verification and validation of design and modeling activities for radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms undertaken at the Center for Space Nuclear Research is essential for proof of concept. Previous research at the center has driven the selection of advanced material combinations; some of which require specialized handling capabilities. The development of a closed and contained test facility to forward this research is discussed within this paper.

Robert C. O'Brien; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A Data Sharing Facility for Mobile Ad-Hoc Emergency and Rescue Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient information sharing is very important for emergency and rescue operations. Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks (MANETs) are often the only network environment for such operations. We have developed the MIDAS Data Space (MDS) to transparently share information ... Keywords: Emergency and rescue operations, mobile ad-hoc networks, tailor-made middleware, shared data space.

Thomas Plagemann; Ellen Munthe-Kaas; Katrine S. Skjelsvik; Matija Puzar; Vera Goebel; Ulrik Johansen; Joe Gorman; Santiago Perez Marin

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Herschel Space Observatory - An ESA facility for far-infrared and submillimetre astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Herschel was launched on 14 May 2009, and is now an operational ESA space observatory offering unprecedented observational capabilities in the far-infrared and submillimetre spectral range 55-671 {\\mu}m. Herschel carries a 3.5 metre diameter passively cooled Cassegrain telescope, which is the largest of its kind and utilises a novel silicon carbide technology. The science payload comprises three instruments: two direct detection cameras/medium resolution spectrometers, PACS and SPIRE, and a very high-resolution heterodyne spectrometer, HIFI, whose focal plane units are housed inside a superfluid helium cryostat. Herschel is an observatory facility operated in partnership among ESA, the instrument consortia, and NASA. The mission lifetime is determined by the cryostat hold time. Nominally approximately 20,000 hours will be available for astronomy, 32% is guaranteed time and the remainder is open to the worldwide general astronomical community through a standard competitive proposal procedure.

Pilbratt, G L; Passvogel, T; Crone, G; Doyle, D; Gageur, U; Heras, A M; Jewell, C; Metcalfe, L; Ott, S; Schmidt, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Underground facility for geoenvironmental and geotechnical research at the SSC Site in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface environment is an important national resource that is utilized for construction, waste disposal and groundwater supply. Conflicting and unwise use has led to problems of groundwater contamination. Cleanup is often difficult and expensive, and perhaps not even possible in many cases. Construction projects often encounter unanticipated difficulties that increase expenses. Many of the difficulties of predicting mechanical behavior and fluid flow and transport behavior stem from problems in characterizing what cannot be seen. An underground research laboratory, such as can be developed in the nearly 14 miles of tunnel at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site, will provide a unique opportunity to advance scientific investigations of fluid flow, chemical transport, and mechanical behavior in situ in weak and fractured, porous rock on a scale relevant to civil and environmental engineering applications involving the subsurface down to a depth of 100 m. The unique element provided by underground studies at the SSC site is three-dimensional access to a range of fracture conditions in two rock types, chalk and shale. Detailed experimentation can be carried out in small sections of the SSC tunnel where different types of fractures and faults occur and where different rock types or contacts are exposed. The entire length of the tunnel can serve as an observatory for large scale mechanical and fluid flow testing. The most exciting opportunity is to mine back a volume of rock to conduct a post-experiment audit following injection of a number of reactive and conservative tracers. Flow paths and tracer distributions can be examined directly. The scientific goal is to test conceptual models and numerical predictions. In addition, mechanical and hydrological data may be of significant value in developing safe and effective methods for closing the tunnel itself.

Wang, H.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Myer, L.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Visiting Us | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visitor Registration Form Visitor Registration Form As a national laboratory, formal registration is REQUIRED for all visitors coming to Argonne National Laboratory. Visitors must...

448

Environmental Impacts of Tourism in Khao Yai National Park, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of visitor impacts is critical for sustainable tourism management in national parks. The focus of past tourism impact research on national parks is either on bio-physical impacts (conducted as recreation ecology research) or on social impacts (human dimensions, including environmental perception and crowding). Research integrating these two dimensions has been rarely conducted. This research aims to fill this gap through the integrative approach that attempts to understand current biophysical impacts of visitor activities in a national park, and it examines how visitors perceive these impacts. The primary objectives of this dissertation are 1) to provide a synthesis of existing of bio-physical impacts of visitor activities in the Khao Yai National Park (KYNP) and 2) to examine visitors perception of those impacts. Also, the factors affecting visitors perception are analyzed. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in this study. Previous impact studies conducted in KYNP were reviewed. A visitor survey was conducted between December 2008 and February 2009. The questionnaires were distributed to 628 domestic and 40 international visitors. The 38 KYNP official interviews were completed. Based on previous impact research in KYNP, the most common bio-physical impacts include soil compaction, removal of humus layer, erosion, plant damage, soil and root exposure, water quality deterioration, disturbance and feeding wildlife. Other environmental impacts include noise pollution and garbage accumulation. The results indicate that more than 30 percent of visitors do not recognize the negative results of their activities. With the exception of vegetation and water impacts, overall, visitors perceive the impacts as less severe than the actual impacts. Environmental impacts are rated differently by the KYNP officials, domestic, and international visitors. Also, significant differences were found among birders, hikers, and campers. The key factors influencing impact perceptions include income level, education level, residential location, park visitation experience, length of stay in KYNP, recreation activity, frequency of activity, group type, and group size. It is suggested that both the quality and the quantity of visitor impact research are needed to construct the body of knowledge of impacts in KYNP. A long-term impact monitoring is required to sustain the ecological integrity in KYNP.

Phumsathan, Sangsan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), and their recent paper in Science magazine. That team, led by Despina Milathianaki and including collaborators from Lawrence Livermore National...

450

When home is work : grounding the virtual worker in an actual world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In our increasingly wired society, the numbers of people who work from their homes is rapidly growing. However, few have the luxury of living in a space designed for office work and as such suffer from a number of problems, ...

Nussbaum Kress, Stephanie N. (Stephanie Nicole), 1975-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Predicted mouse peroxisome-targeted proteins and their actual subcellular locations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sequences that con- tained only motifs incompatible with peroxisomal locali- zation (e.g., RNA-helicase (IPR0006050)), or that were supported by an unequivocal PSORT II [17] nuclear local- ization were eliminated. In addition, we predicted protein solubility...

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

452

Ferrocyanide Safety Project: Comparison of actual and simulated ferrocyanide waste properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1950s, additional high-level radioactive waste storage capacity was needed to accommodate the wastes that would result from the production of recovery of additional nuclear defense materials. To provide this additional waste storage capacity, the Hanford Site operating contractor developed a process to decontaminate aqueous wastes by precipitating radiocesium as an alkali nickel ferrocyanide; this process allowed disposal of the aqueous waste. The radiocesium scavenging process as developed was used to decontaminate (1) first-cycle bismuth phosphate (BiPO{sub 4}) wastes, (2) acidic wastes resulting from uranium recovery operations, and (3) the supernate from neutralized uranium recovery wastes. The radiocesium scavenging process was often coupled with other scavenging processes to remove radiostrontium and radiocobalt. Because all defense materials recovery processes used nitric acid solutions, all of the wastes contained nitrate, which is a strong oxidizer. The variety of wastes treated, and the occasional coupling of radiostrontium and radiocobalt scavenging processes with the radiocesium scavenging process, resulted in ferrocyanide-bearing wastes having many different compositions. In this report, we compare selected physical, chemical, and radiochemical properties measured for Tanks C-109 and C-112 wastes and selected physical and chemical properties of simulated ferrocyanide wastes to assess the representativeness of stimulants prepared by WHC.

Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Sell, R.L.; Bredt, P.R.; Barrington, R.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Plan Provision Comparison (Summary information only for specific provisions please refer to actual plan document language)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is effective. Investment Providers (* indicates discontinued contributions) Securian TIAA-CREF* Securian* TIAA-CREF* Vanguard* Fidelity* Defined Benefit Plan ­ Assets managed by the State Board of Investment Securian TIAA-CREF* Fidelity Vanguard DWS Investments T Rowe Price* Securian TIAA-CREF* Fidelity Vanguard #12;All information

Thomas, David D.

454

A longitudinal analysis of moving desires, expectations and actual moving behaviour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than homeowners; experiencing a deficiency of space increases mobility; longer durations at the same address and housing satisfaction or liking the neighbourhood lead to a lower likelihood of subsequently moving. ***Table 6 about here*** Model...

Coulter, Rory; van Ham, Maarten; Feijten, Peteke

455

Paying for public transportation : the optimal, the actual, and the possible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passenger transportation poses challenges to American cities in the form of air pollution, traffic congestion, auto collisions, and barriers to mobility. Public transit has the potential to be part of a solution to these ...

Antos, Justin David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The myth of the single mode man : how the mobility pass better meets actual travel demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this thesis is to investigate how employer transportation subsidy programs can result in more sustainable outcomes. Cities are growth machines that increasingly seek to mitigate the effects of that growth caused ...

Block-Schachter, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Basis for a Waste Management Public Communication Policy: Actual Situation Analysis and Implementation of Corrective Actions  

SciTech Connect

Argentina will require new sites for the location of radioactive waste final disposal systems. It is currently mandatory to have social and political consensus to obtain the corresponding agreements. The experience obtained with the cancellation of the project ''Feasibility Study and Engineering Project--Repository for High Level Radioactive Waste'', reinforces even more the necessity to count with the acceptance of the public to carry out projects of this kind. The first phase of the former was developed in the 80's: geological, geophysical and hydrogeological studies were performed in a compact granitic rock located in Sierra del Medio, Chubut province. This project had to be called off in the early 90's due to strong social rejection. This decision was closely related to the poor attention given to social communication issues. The governmental decision-makers in charge underwent a lot of pressure from social groups claiming for the cancellation of the project due to the lack of information and the fear it triggered. Thus, the lesson learnt: ''social communication activities must be carefully undertaken in order to achieve the appropriate management of the radioactive waste produced in our country.'' The same as in other countries, the specific National Law demands the formulation of a Strategic Plan which will not only include the research into radioactive waste, but the design of a Social Communication Programme as well. The latter will be in charge of informing the population clearly and objectively about the latest scientific and technological advances in the issue. A tentative perception-attitude pattern of the Argentine society about the overall nuclear issue is outlined in this paper. It is meant to contribute to the understanding of the public's adverse reaction to this kind of project. A communication programme is also presented. Its objective is to install the waste management topic in the public's opinion with a positive real outlook.

Jolivet, L. A.; Maset, E. R.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying marketfailures in the end use of energy  

SciTech Connect

"Getting the price right" is a goal of many market-orientedenergy policies. However, there are situations where the consumer payingfor the energy is separate from the owner of the energy-using device.Economists call this a "principal agent problem". A team organised by theInternational Energy Agency examined seven end uses and one sector whereprincipal agent problems existed: refrigerators, water heating, spaceheating, vending machines, commercial HVAC, company cars, lighting, andfirms. These investigations took place in Australia, Japan, theNetherlands, Norway, and the United States. About 2 100 percent of theenergy consumed in the end uses examined was affected by principal agentproblems. The size (and sometimes even the existence) varied greatly fromone country to another but all countries had significant amounts ofenergy affected by principal agent problems. The presence of a marketfailure does not mean that energy use would fall substantially if thefailure were eliminated; however it does suggest that raising energyprices such as in the form of carbon taxes will not necessarily increaseefficiency investments.

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Characterization and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

This report describes processing and analysis results of boehmite waste type (Group 5) and insoluble high Cr waste type (Group 6). The sample selection, compositing, subdivision, physical and chemical characterization are described. Extensive batch leach testing was conducted to define kinetics and leach factors of selected analytes as functions of NaOH concentration and temperature. Testing supports issue M-12 resolution for the Waste Treatment Plant.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

The analysis and comparison of actual to predicted collector array performances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hottel-Whillier-Bliss (HWB) equation has been the standard tool for the evaluation of collector thermal performance for four decades. This paper presents a technique that applies the criteria of ASHRAE Standard 93-77 to the determination of the HWB ...

W. H. McCumber; M. W. Weston

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Probabilistic structural seismic performance assessment methodology and application to an actual bridge-foundation -ground system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Structural Engineering , ASCE, to be submitted, JanuaryJournal of Structural Engineering , ASCE, 113(5), 1011-1028.response of bridge piers. ASCE Journal of Structural

Zhang, Yuyi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Houston, we have a problem...: a survey of actual problems in computer games development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a survey of problems found in the development process of electronic games. These problems were collected mainly from game postmortems and specialized litterature on game development, allowing a comparison with respect to well-known ... Keywords: electronic games, game development, postmortems, problems in game development, survey

Fbio Petrillo; Marcelo Pimenta; Francisco Trindade; Carlos Dietrich

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Basis for a Waste Management Public Communication Policy: Actual Situation Analysis and Implementation of Corrective Actions  

SciTech Connect

Argentina will require new sites for the location of radioactive waste final disposal systems. It is currently mandatory to have social and political consensus to obtain the corresponding agreements. The experience obtained with the cancellation of the project ''Feasibility Study and Engineering Project--Repository for High Level Radioactive Waste'', reinforces even more the necessity to count with the acceptance of the public to carry out projects of this kind. The first phase of the former was developed in the 80's: geological, geophysical and hydrogeological studies were performed in a compact granitic rock located in Sierra del Medio, Chubut province. This project had to be called off in the early 90's due to strong social rejection. This decision was closely related to the poor attention given to social communication issues. The governmental decision-makers in charge underwent a lot of pressure from social groups claiming for the cancellation of the project due to the lack of information and the fear it triggered. Thus, the lesson learnt: ''social communication activities must be carefully undertaken in order to achieve the appropriate management of the radioactive waste produced in our country.'' The same as in other countries, the specific National Law demands the formulation of a Strategic Plan which will not only include the research into radioactive waste, but the design of a Social Communication Programme as well. The latter will be in charge of informing the population clearly and objectively about the latest scientific and technological advances in the issue. A tentative perception-attitude pattern of the Argentine society about the overall nuclear issue is outlined in this paper. It is meant to contribute to the understanding of the public's adverse reaction to this kind of project. A communication programme is also presented. Its objective is to install the waste management topic in the public's opinion with a positive real outlook.

Jolivet, L. A.; Maset, E. R.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

464

Actual screens may vary slightly due to the frequent enhancements and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to move to the latest news--without entering search terms. C Get a document. Select the type; enter for a list of available segments. Choose a segment and enter your search terms. Click Add. (If you know, enter the page number you want to display, and click Go. 3 421 4 Navigating to a Specific Search Term

465

Actual vs anticipated savings from DSM programs: An assessment of the California experience  

SciTech Connect

Since the late 1980`s, utilities in California have used demand-side management (DSM) extensively to achieve a variety of corporate and public policy goals. This commitment to ene efficiency was encouraged by the establishment of financial incentives for the utilities to acquire demand-side resources. With restructuring of electric and gas markets underway in California, including recent cutbacks by the California utilities in their DSM program efforts, it is timely to review retrospectively the accomplishments of California`s DSM investments. This paper summarizes the results of 50 evaluation studies that assess California DSM programs operating between 1990 and 1992. On average, the programs delivered 112% of the energy savings that were planned, and the typical program realized approximately 86% of the energy savings it was expected to deliver. Thus, the California DSM programs outperformed DSM programs from the 1980s, in terms of more accurately forecasting energy impacts. Among the 50 impact studies, lower realization rates are associated with residential-sector programs, relatively high ex-ante estimates of savings, and significant levels of free ridership.

Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mihlmester, P.E. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Selection of the most advantageous gas turbine air filtration system: Comparative study of actual operating experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses relative merits of three types of air filtration systems used by Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Ltd. (Pakistan), on its gas turbine compressor packages. These Filtration systems are: (i) Two stage inertial plus auto oil bath type multi-duty filters by AAF used on Saturn Mark-1 packages manufactured by Solar Turbines Inc. (ii) Three stage high efficiency barrier filters by AAF used on Centaur packages by Solar. (iii) Single stage pulse-jet self-cleaning filter by Donaldson again used on a Centaur package. The selection is primarily based in package performance data collected over a 15 month period analyzing power loss due to fouling effects and related operation and maintenance costs for the three systems. The Company's operating experience indicates that on new installations the pulse clean system offers the best advantage both in terms of filtration costs as well as availability of additional horse power when operating under moderate to severe environmental conditions.

Gilani, S.I.; Mehr, M.Z.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

VOL 314 24 NOVEMBER 2006 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org1256 A visitor to Earth during most of the planet's his-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of car- bon and nitrogen. But in many cases, he said, scientists still don't know which populations electricity. The 26 October seminar "Microbes, Minerals and the Environment" honored the late Philip Abelson electrons. They can harvest electricity from aquatic environments and may prove useful as power sources

Lovley, Derek

469

Lessons Learned from Field Evaluation of Six High-Performance Buildings: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy performance of six high-performance buildings around the United States was monitored in detail. The six buildings include the Visitor Center at Zion National Park; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Thermal Test Facility; the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Merrill Center; The BigHorn Home Improvement Center; the Cambria DEP Office Building; and the Oberlin College Lewis Center. This paper discusses the design energy targets and actual performance.

Torcellini, P.; Deru, M.; Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Pless, S.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D. B.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Technical progress report for the magnetohydrodynamics coal-fired flow facility for the period April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on the status of a multitask contract to develop the technology for the steam bottoming portion of a MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. The report describes the facility maintenance and environmental work completed, status of completing technical reports and certain key administrative actions occurring during the quarter. In view of current year budget reductions and program reductions to closeout the MHD program, downsizing of the UTSI work force took place. No further testing occurred or was scheduled during the quarter, but the DOE CFFF facility was maintained in a standby status.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Definition of a facility for experimental studies of two-phase flows and heat transfer in porous materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A facility-development effort is currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in order to create an experimental capability for the study of two-phase, steam/water flows through a variety of porous media. The facility definition phase of this project is described. Equations are derived for the steady, adiabatic, macroscopically-linear two-phase flow of a single-component fluid through a porous medium, including energy transfer both by convection and conduction. These equations are then solved to give relative permeabilities for the steam and water phases as functions of known and/or measurable quantities. A viable experimental approach was thereby formulated, leading to the definition of facility components and instrumentation requirements, including the application of gamma-beam densitometry for the measurement of liquid-saturation distributions in porous media. Finally, a state-of-the-art computer code was utilized to numerically simulate the proposed experiments, providing an estimate of the facility operating envelope.

Reda, D.C.; Eaton, R.R.

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Licensing an assured isolation facility for low-level radioactive waste. Volume 1: Licensing strategy and issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed set of proposed criteria and guidance for the preparation of a license application for an assured isolation facility (AIF). The report is intended to provide a detailed planning basis upon which a prospective applicant may begin pre-licensing discussions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and initiate development of a license application. The report may also be useful to the NRC or to state regulatory agencies that may be asked to review such an application. Volume 1 of this report provides background information, and describes the licensing approach and methodology. Volume 2 identifies specific information that is recommended for inclusion in a license application.

Silverman, D.J.; Bauser, M.A. [Morgan, Lewis and Bockius, Washington, DC (United States); Baird, R.D. [Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Recommended Changes to Guidelines for Operating an Interim On-Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility - For NRC Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The majority of commercial U.S. nuclear stations have constructed on-site low-level waste (LLW) storage facilities, and most of these same utilities are experiencing or have experienced at least one period of interim on-site storage. EPRI has issued two revisions of Guidelines for Operating an Interim On-Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility. Revision 1 of these Guidelines focused on operational considerations and incorporated many of the lessons learned while operating various types of LLW s...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

474

EA-0995: Drum Storage Facility for Interim Storage of Materials Generated by Environmental Restoration Operations, Golden, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and operate a drum storage facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden,...

475

Comparison of mass balance, energy consumption and cost of composting facilities for different types of organic waste  

SciTech Connect

Mass balance, energy consumption and cost are basic pieces of information necessary for selecting a waste management technology. In this study, composting facilities that treat different types of organic waste were studied by questionnaire survey and via a chemical analysis of material collected at the facilities. The mass balance was calculated on a dry weight basis because the moisture content of organic waste was very high. Even though the ratio of bulking material to total input varied in the range 0-65% on a dry basis, the carbon and ash content, carbon/nitrogen ratio, heavy metal content and inorganic nutrients in the compost were clearly influenced by the different characteristics of the input waste. The use of bulking material was not correlated with ash or elemental content in the compost. The operating costs were categorised into two groups. There was some economy of scale for wages and maintenance cost, but the costs for electricity and fuel were proportional to the amount of waste. Differences in operating costs can be explained by differences in the process characteristics.

Zhang Huijun [Lab of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Matsuto, Toshihiko, E-mail: matsuto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Lab of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Project Financial Summary Report Concerning Financing Surface Facilities for a 50 Megawatt Geothermal Electric Power Plant Facility in Utah  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the economic and financial conditions pertaining to geothermal electric power plant utilization of geothermal fluids produced from the Roosevelt Hot springs area of Utah. The first year of electric power generation is scheduled to be 1982. The non-resource facilities will be called ''surface facilities'' and include the gathering system, the power plant, the substation, and the injection system.

1978-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

477

A SPECIALIZED, MULTI-USER COMPUTER FACILITY FOR THE HIGH-SPEED, INTERACTIVE PROCESSING OF EXPERIMENTAL DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL to develop a specialized computer facility specificallyto process o a large computer (e.g. , CDC7600) may require iof modern, mid-range computers. Unfortunately the data

Maples, C.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

A Large-Scale Matched-Index-of-Refraction Flow Facility for LDA Studies Around Complex Geometrics  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Useage of laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) requires optical access to the flow field of interest. This has not always proved easy, as in the case of complex geometries or very near-wall boundary layer measurements. One solution is to employ a solid material and fluid with the same refractive index. In this case, there is no optical interference of the solid with the LDA. Although this technique is not new, previous studies have been limited to small flow apparatus and relatively unpleasant fluids. A large-scale flow tunnel has now been constructed, permitting matched index of refraction LDA measurements in difficult geometries, higher Reynolds numbers, and increased spatial resolution in the measurements. This paper describes the facility and fluid flow quality, and presents some preliminary results for very near-wall measurements of a transitional boundary layer behind a roughness element.

Stoots, Carl Marcel; Condie, Keith Glenn; McEligot, Donald Marinus; Becker, S.; Durst, F.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Design and Construction of a Guarded Hot Box Facility for Evaluating the Thermal Performance of Building Wall Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this study was to design and build a guarded hot box to test the R-Value of building materials. The Riverside Energy Efficiency Laboratory is looking to expand their testing capabilities by including this service. Eventually, the laboratory will become energy star certified. A guarded hot box facility consists of two boxes maintained at specific temperatures and a guard box around each one that is maintained at the same temperature as the box it surrounds. The ASTM C1363 standard was used as guide for the construction and testing of sample specimen. This standard called for an air velocity profile uniform within 10 percent of the average. Velocity tests were performed with various different configurations to give a uniform velocity. Although the velocity did not meet standards, the configuration chosen included a piece of 1/4" pegboard placed 2" away from the top and the bottom of the inner box. By using the known overall heat added and removed from the system, as well as all the heat losses the heat transferred through the specimen and its R-Value can be calculated. The uncertainty of the R-Value and the accuracy of the testing facility gave conflicting results. Future experiments will use improved testing methods that include differential thermocouples to obtain better uncertainty for the R-Value calculations.

Mero, Claire Renee

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Project Financial Summary Report Concerning Financing Surface Facilities for a 50 Megawatt Geothermal Electric Power Plant Facility in Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the economic and financial conditions pertaining to geothermal electric power plant utilization of geothermal fluids produced from the Roosevelt Hot springs area of Utah. The first year of electric power generation is scheduled to be 1982. The non-resource facilities will be called ''surface facilities'' and include the gathering system, the power plant, the substation, and the injection system.

None

1978-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility-for actual visitors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Analysis of the suitability of DOE facilities for treatment of commercial low-level radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the capabilities of the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) existing and proposed facilities to treat 52 commercially generated low-level radioactive mixed (LLMW) waste streams that were previously identified as being difficult-to-treat using commercial treatment capabilities. The evaluation was performed by comparing the waste matrix and hazardous waste codes for the commercial LLMW streams with the waste acceptance criteria of the treatment facilities, as identified in the following DOE databases: Mixed Waste Inventory Report, Site Treatment Plan, and Waste Stream and Technology Data System. DOE facility personnel also reviewed the list of 52 commercially generated LLMW streams and provided their opinion on whether the wastes were technically acceptable at their facilities, setting aside possible administrative barriers. The evaluation tentatively concludes that the DOE is likely to have at least one treatment facility (either existing or planned) that is technically compatible for most of these difficult-to-treat commercially generated LLMW streams. This conclusion is tempered, however, by the limited amount of data available on the commercially generated LLMW streams, by the preliminary stage of planning for some of the proposed DOE treatment facilities, and by the need to comply with environmental statutes such as the Clean Air Act.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

duiGserUerysalnioAolftorP Portfolio Analyser provides facilities for the searching and analysis of current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the following criteria: · Text Search - enter complete or partial search terms using wildcards or Boolean a search strategy using one or more of the following: · Text Search - enter complete or partial terms using operators to search the authors of a publication. · Journal - enter complete or partial terms using

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

483

Design, construction, and characterization of a facility for neutron capture gamma ray analysis of sulfur in coal using californium-252  

SciTech Connect

A study of neutron capture gamma ray analysis of sulfur in coal using californium-252 as a neutron source is reported. Both internal and external target geometries are investigated. The facility designed for and used in this study is described. The external target geometry is found to be inappropriate because of the low thermal neutron flux at the sample location, which must be outside the biological shielding. The internal target geometry is found to have a sufficient thermal neutron flux, but an excessive gamma ray background. A water filled plastic facility, rather than the paraffin filled steel one used in this study, is suggested as a means of increasing flexibility and decreasing the beackground in the internal target geometry.

Layfield, J.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Versatile 0. 5 TW electron beam facility for power conditioning studies of large rare-gas/halide lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rare-gas/halide lasers which are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion will require large area, low impedance electron beam drivers. A wide range of electron beam parameters are being considered for future systems in an effort to optimize the overall system design. A number of power conditioning issues must be investigated in order to obtain a better understanding of the various trade-offs involved in making such optimizations. The RAYITO electron beam accelerator is being designed and built at Sandia National Laboratories and will be used for such investigations. It will be capable of operating in either a 2 or 4 ohm configuration at 1 MV, 50 ns or 0.8 MV, 200 ns. Design details for RAYITO are presented in this paper. Experiments planned for this facility are also discussed.

Ramirez, J. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

9/18/09 2:57 PMDark energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 9http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/health/dark-energy-may-not-actually-exist_100234185.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National New Delhi nuclear Ads by Google Origin Universe Albert Einstein E Sabai Body Temple Hero Universe in Pakistan Dundalk Avenue flooded as water main breaks Al Qaeda video threatens Germans ahead of polls

Temple, Blake

486

Analysis of information exchange activities to actualize and validate situation awareness during shift changeovers in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shift work situations occur in almost all safety-critical organizations, and the investigations of some catastrophes like Chernobyl, Exxon Valdez, and the Gol/Legacy mid-air collision indicated that shift work information exchange played an important ... Keywords: Process systems safety, Resilience engineering, Shift work changeover, Situation awareness

Paulo Victor Rodrigues de Carvalho; Tahar-Hakim Benchekroun; Jose Orlando Gomes

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

The Theoretical, Discrete, and Actual Response of the Barnes Objective Analysis Scheme for One- and Two-Dimensional Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the response of the Barnes objective analysis scheme as a function of wavenumber or wavelength and extends previous work in two primary areas. First, the first- and second-pass theoretical response functions for continuous two-...

Patricia M. Pauley; Xiaihua Wu

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Demonstration of the TRUEX process for the treatment of actual high activity tank waste at the INEEL using centrifugal contactors  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), formerly reprocessed spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The radioactive raffinates from the solvent extraction uranium recovery processes were converted to granular solids (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. A secondary liquid waste stream was generated during the course of reprocessing, primarily from equipment decontamination between campaigns and solvent wash activities. This acidic tank waste cannot be directly calcined due to the high sodium content and has historically been blended with reprocessing raffinates or non-radioactive aluminum nitrate prior to calcination. Fuel reprocessing activities are no longer being performed at the ICPP, thereby eliminating the option of waste blending to deplete the waste inventory. Currently, approximately 5.7 million liters of high-activity waste are temporarily stored at the ICPP in large underground stainless-steel tanks. The United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare filed a Notice of Noncompliance in 1992 contending some of the underground waste storage tanks do not meet secondary containment. As part of a 1995 agreement between the State of Idaho, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Navy, the waste must be removed from the tanks by 2012. Treatment of the tank waste inventories by partitioning the radionuclides and immobilizing the resulting high-activity and low-activity waste streams is currently under evaluation. A recent peer review identified the most promising radionuclide separation technologies for evaluation. The Transuranic Extraction-(TRUEX) process was identified as a primary candidate for separation of the actinides from ICPP tank waste.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1991) The Issue of Domestic Energy Market Failure. Canberra,information in energy service markets leading to problemsis a goal of many market-oriented energy policies. However,

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

6.0 UNCERTAINTIES The major uncertainty in this analysis is the actual exposure that people will experience.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will experience. Because many abandoned uranium mines are on federal lands, the most likely exposure scenario to this are Native Americans who live around the uranium mines and personnel who may work around the sites effect uranium mines have on the ground water and the subsequent use of the water. In many parts