National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for facility-for actual visitors

  1. Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    visitors Visitors Upon arrival, all non-LLNL visitors touring the Facility must first report to Beth Mariotti (ext. 4-3396). All visitors, including employees of LLNL, are required to be escorted by a member of Facility Operations or an individual approved by Operations. Visitors tours can only be conducted when no safety hazards (i.e., laser, high voltage, radiation) are present

  2. Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitors For Visitors A repository for images for those visiting Los Alamos and Northern New Mexico. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets PHOTOS BY TOPIC Careers Community Visitors Environment History Science The Lab Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Northern New Mexico Northern New Mexico Summer lightning storms in Northern

  3. Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitors Visitors Coming to Los Alamos? Need badging information? Need local resources or housing? This is the place. Badging, Badge Office» Bradbury Science Museum» Education Office Housing» Living in Los Alamos» TOP STORIES - highlights of our science, people, technologies close Rio Arriba Leadership Summit addresses challenges, opportunities Community leaders gather in Española for a round-table discussion. READ MORE DOE's Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization presented

  4. International Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitors Foreign national visitors come to Jefferson Lab temporarily to engage in meetings, brief research activities to benefit their home institutions, collaborations, signing agreements, attending conferences, workshops, or other scientific events and/or activities, by entering the U.S. as a "business visitor." Foreign national visits to Jefferson Lab are accomplished by entering the U.S. with a B-1 visa (obtained from a U.S. Embassy/Consulate) or using the Visa Waiver Program. If

  5. Visitor Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitor Info Visitor Information NERSC is located in Shyh Wang Hall-also known as the computational research and theory (CRT) building (Bldg. 59)-on the campus of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. You can find information about visiting the lab, including an interactive campus map, transportation and lodging suggestions at http://www.lbl.gov/visit/. Your host must arrange site access prior to your visit. Last edited: 2016-01-06 16:48:46

  6. Visitor Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitor Info Visitor Information NERSC is located in Shyh Wang Hall-also known as the computational research and theory (CRT) building (Bldg. 59)-on the campus of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. You can find information about visiting the lab, including an interactive campus map, transportation and lodging suggestions at http://www.lbl.gov/visit/. Your host must arrange site access prior to your visit. Last edited: 2016-01-06 16:48:46

  7. Visitor Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Visitor Information The Museum is open to the public every day except Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's. Contact Us thumbnail of 1350 Central Avenue Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Avenue 505 667-4444 Email Museum Hours Open every day except Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's. Tuesday-Saturday: 10 am-5 pm Sunday & Monday: 1-5 pm FREE ADMISSION Download our brochure for more information (pdf) Weather conditions Call ahead during snow storms: (505) 667-6622 or (877)

  8. Visitor Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitor Information Visiting the Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center For guests who wish to visit and meet with the technical staff, please contact the TRACC service desk or the Technical Point of Contact assigned to you for registration, scheduling, and confirmation, including Foreign Visits and Assignments. Registration with your host is required for entry into the TRACC facilities. A photo I.D., such as a driver's license or passport, is also required for facility access. If

  9. ARM - Historical Visitor Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operational Visitors and Accounts Data Archive and Usage (October 1995 - Present) Historical Visitor Statistics As a national user facility, ARM is required to report...

  10. Exchange Visitor Welcome Brochure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exchange Visitor Program WELCOME BROCHURE Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs Private Sector Exchange United States Department of State The Department of State welcomes you to the United States. We are pleased to receive you as an exchange visitor. As an Exchange Visitor Program participant, you will acquire an experience in the United States and as an ambassador of your country you will help educate the American people about your home country and culture. This brochure will help you

  11. campus-visitor-map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MC-212 Pollard Aud. MC- 210 MC- 120 MC-130 MC-100 Main Campus Map Building RoomOffice Contact Name + Number Visitor Map You are here. Emergency Assembly Point Entrance Buildings...

  12. BPA Visitor Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and is located at BPA headquarters in Portland, Oregon at 905 NE 11th Ave. (Public Transit @ the Lloyd Center MAX Station). Many of the publications available in the Visitor...

  13. Visitors | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitors Visitors are welcome at Ames Laboratory. As a U.S. Department of Energy research facility, Ames Laboratory is subject to security conditions established by the Department of Homeland Security. To make sure that you are complying with the current security conditions, please check with the Plant Protection Desk on the ground floor level of the Technical and Administrative Services Facility (TASF) building. Protection personnel can help you locate a specific staff member or direct you to a

  14. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Visitor Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitor Information NNSANFO Language Options U.S. DOENNSA - Nevada Field Office Visitor Information The Nevada Field Office welcomes visitors to its facilities, but if you plan ...

  15. Visitor Information | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In both cases a visitor will be asked to sign in to the Captive Portal network service using a temporary assigned visitor username and password. Wireless Network Access for ...

  16. Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Moose, WY Grand Teton National Park's rugged landscape and stunning array of wildlife attract nearly three million visitors every year, making it one of our most popular national parks. A new Grand Teton National Park visitor center near the park's headquarters north of Jackson, Wyoming, replaces an outdated building, educates an increased number of visitors, and inspires further exploration of this extraordinary landscape. The project site is located along the Snake River, between a riparian forest and a sagebrush meadow.

  17. NREL Visitors Center Closing Temporarily for Remodeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitors Center Closing Temporarily for Remodeling Media may contact: George Douglas, 303-275-4096 email: George Douglas Golden, Colo., Sept. 6, 2000 - The Visitors Center at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will be closed Friday, Sept. 8 through Friday, Sept. 22 for the installation of new floor tile and carpet. Visitors Center staff expects to re-open the building for normal operation on Monday, Sept. 25. Contact the Visitors Center volunteer

  18. Visitor Hanford Computer Access Request - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitor Hanford Computer Access Request Visitor Hanford Computer Access Request Visitor Hanford Computer Access Request Visitor Hanford Computer Access Request Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), in compliance with the 'Tri-Party Agreement Databases, Access Mechanism and Procedures' document, DOE/RL-93-69, Revision 5; set forth the requirements for access to the Hanford Site

  19. Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of our science, people, technologies close Grape Growers Association enlivens agriculture Entrepreneurial Networking Program unites New Mexico grape growers for successful...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories/California Visitor Map to the Visitor Badge Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories/California Visitor Map to the Visitor Badge Office You will be required to show picture ID (driver's license or passport) for check in. Your name will be on an "authorized for access" list to obtain your badge. Because all visitors must be badged and escorted, visiting Sandia requires some logistical preparation. Each prospective visitor must provide the following information before their visit: * First, middle, and last name * Social Security number * Citizenship *

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in

  2. Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate - Visitor Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home › About Us Visitor Information Entering ORNL ORNL welcomes visitors to the Laboratory. However, because of increased security requirements, we've made some changes in how the site is accessed. Bethel Valley Road, which is the main access route to Oak Ridge National Laboratory from both directions, is now closed to the public. If you are planning a visit to ORNL, your host will arrange for you to proceed past entrance stations on Bethel Valley Road leading to the Laboratory's Visitor

  3. Oak Ridge Visitors Center Solar Array

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This photograph features a 5-kilowatt photovoltaic (PV) system in front of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Visitors Center that was dedicated in 2007 to kick off the first Southeast Solar Summit....

  4. Directions and Visitor Information | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directory Argonne National Laboratory About Safety News Careers Education Community Diversity Directory Energy Environment Security User Facilities Science Work with Argonne Visiting Argonne Site Access Policy Map Argonne-University of Chicago Shuttle Map of Argonne Commitment to Safety Argonne is dedicated to protecting visitors to our campus. Every visitor watches a two-minute training video about how to protect oneself and others while on campus. External dosimetry The External Dosimetry

  5. Visitor Security Requirements | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitor Security Requirements NOTE: These requirements do not apply to events held at the SREL Conference Center, which is located outside the security barricade. Before you arrive: I. Obtaining a visitor's badge II. Prohibited articles III. Electronics policy IV. Vehicle inspections When you arrive: Proceed to the badge office (map). Present two forms of identification from the list of acceptable documents, including one photo ID, to receive your badge. You will not receive a badge without

  6. Exchange Visitors Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exchange Visitors Program Exchange Visitors Program The Department of Energy program offices engage in a variety of cooperative international exchanges and program initiatives which involve sponsoring foreign national professionals to work on projects in the U.S. The Office of Travel Management provides assistance to DOE Program Elements on employer-sponsored visa issues, and requirements. DOE J-1 Visas - provide foreign nationals with opportunities to participate in educational and cultural

  7. FES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FES Committees of Visitors Deputy Director for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Contact Information Deputy Director for Science Programs U.S. Department of

  8. Pre-Arrival Information for Exchange Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page1 U.S. Department of Energy Exchange Visitor Program G-3-00348 Welcome to the Department of Energy Exchange Visitor Program! This is to give pre-arrival information that you will need to successfully plan your visit to the United States, and to help you understand the terms and conditions of your upcoming exchange assignment at the U.S. Department of Energy facility or National Laboratory, to which you are assigned. Please check this information immediately. If you have questions, please

  9. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and ... Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and ...

  10. Visitor Control / Site Access - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Hanford Site Wide Programs Visitor Control / Site Access About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Cultural Resources Contact Us Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Planning to come to the Hanford Site? Map of Hanford Map of Hanford If you are planning on coming to Hanford as part of a job assignment, tour, or event, you need to be familiar with the requirements and restrictions associated with being on

  11. Jefferson Lab Visitor's Center - Schedule a Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Map Virtual Tour Schedule a Tour Newport News Resources Places to Visit Tourist Attractions Restaurants Climate and Weather Tour Safety Jefferson Lab Environmental, Health & Safety Manual Chapter 3230: Communication of Hazards to Visitors Jefferson Lab is classified as a low-hazard facility. This means the hazards encountered here are comparable to those typically found in an industrial setting. There are a few places on-site where minimal personal protective equipment (PPE) is

  12. W7 printing from VISITOR network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W7 printing from VISITOR network Last Modified by Jerry Camuso, 02/12/2015. 1 . From the "start menu", click on "Devices and Printers" 2. Click on "Add a printer" and choose "Add a local printer". 3 . Choose "create a new port" and pick "Standard TCP/IP Port" from the drop down menu. 4. Type the following for the next box and click "Next": Hostname or IP address: PRINTSERV.slac.stanford.edu Port name: This should be the DNS

  13. Illustrious Visitors Good Hosts Real Celebrity | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Illustrious Visitors Good Hosts Real Celebrity Illustrious Visitors; Good Hosts! Real Celebrity. June 15, 2015 On a regular basis, the DOE Site Office asks us to update our list of illustrious visitors; often, there is nothing to say. Other times we are inundated. The past few months has seen a fine selection of events hosted by Jefferson Lab, and Jefferson Science Associates and its parent Southeastern Universities Research Association. This past week, Joachim Mnich, a member of the DESY

  14. ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office | Department of Energy Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and

  15. HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committees of Visitors High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (106KB) Staff HEP Budget HEP Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs University Research ...

  16. Village Power Exhibit Featured at NREL's Visitors Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Village Power Exhibit Featured at NREL's Visitors Center "Powering Our Lives, Powering Our World Energy" Expo Slated for February-April For more information contact: Gary Schmitz, 303-275-4050 email: Gary Schmitz Golden, Colo., Feb. 16, 2001 - An exhibit that demonstrates how renewable energy sources can bring needed electricity to developing nations worldwide opens Feb. 20 at the Visitors Center of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The Village Power

  17. Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certification | Department of Energy Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Certification Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Certification October 16, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Acting Deputy Secretary Kupfer Thank you, Mike, for that introduction and to both you and Jane for hosting this event. You both have been instrumental in the dramatic transformation of this site. We made a commitment more than a decade ago to

  18. Interagency Visitor Center at Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Calabasas, CA This project was to develop the first visitor center for the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area located in the Los Angeles, California area. The previous visitor center was across from a shopping mall in rental space at park headquarters in Thousand Oaks. The new facility is centrally located in the park at a much more appropriate natural and cultural resource setting. It is a partnership project with the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, which is a local land conservation and park agency. It is also a joint facility with California State Parks.

  19. HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) The links below provide an archive of High ...

  20. FES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FES Committees of Visitors Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) FESAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (266KB) FES Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees FES Home FES Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) » The links below provide an archive of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Committees of Visitors (COV) reports and responses. 2014 FESAC COV Report on FES Program .pdf file

  1. Los Alamos notifies employees, visitors of possible beryllium exposure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Possible beryllium exposure Los Alamos notifies employees, visitors of possible beryllium exposure Current and former Laboratory employees and contractors who either worked at or visited the facility have been-or are in the process of being-notified. January 28, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to

  2. Highly Asynchronous VisitOr Queue Graph Toolkit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-10-01

    HAVOQGT is a C++ framework that can be used to create highly parallel graph traversal algorithms. The framework stores the graph and algorithmic data structures on external memory that is typically mapped to high performance locally attached NAND FLASH arrays. The framework supports a vertex-centered visitor programming model. The frameworkd has been used to implement breadth first search, connected components, and single source shortest path.

  3. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  4. JLab Registration/International Services - Researcher/Visitor ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Researcher/Visitor ID Requirements CHANGE IN ACCEPTABLE ID DOCUMENTS FOR JLAB ACCESS U.S. Citizens must bring a valid Government issued ID card that contains a photo such as a passport or valid driver's license. Non-driver photo identification cards issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles can be used as proof of identification. Lawful Permanent Resident of the United States must bring their Green Card or passport with valid I-551 stamp AND a valid government issued

  5. ASCR Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ASCR Committees of Visitors Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) ASCAC Home ... The links below provide an archive of Advanced Scientific Computing Research ...

  6. BES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    BES Committees of Visitors Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) BESAC Home Meetings BESAC 2016-2017 Membership ChargesReports Charter .pdf file (128KB) BES Committees ...

  7. HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEPAP Home HEP Committees of Visitors High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings 2016 HEPAP Membership ChargesReports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP ...

  8. More than 480 visitors from 23 states take site tour during Secret City

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Festival | Y-12 National Security Complex More than 480 visitors from ... More than 480 visitors from 23 states take site tour during Secret City Festival Posted: June 25, 2014 - 8:34am Tours of Y-12 on June 13 brought more than 480 visitors. Y-12 employee and tour guide Bill Wilburn, left, chats with Teresa Neas, and her husband Kim, whose mother, Audeane Bowers-Neas, worked at Y-12 in the 1940s. Tours of Y-12 on June 13 brought more than 480 visitors. Tourists from 23 states and the

  9. Concerning the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Symons, James

    2013-05-29

    James Symons, Nuclear Science Division Director at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and Daniela Leitner, head of operations at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron, discuss major contributions to the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University, including ion source, which will based on the VENUS source built for the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the GRETA gamma-ray detector now under construction there.

  10. Attachment B Visitor Tours at TA-53 TA53-FO-121-001B.4 Preparation Checklist for Visitor Tours at TA-53

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attachment B Visitor Tours at TA-53 TA53-FO-121-001B.4 Preparation Checklist for Visitor Tours at TA-53 This checklist provides reminders of safety and security considerations in preparation and implementation of tours at TA-53. Tour Date: Purpose of Tour or Tour Title: Tour Host and Z#: State Time and Approximate Duration: Tour Type Check all that apply: Educational Outreach/Student Tour with Minors Large Group Tour Other Tour High Level or Distinguished Work Related Tour Preparation, Visitor

  11. Could Material Defects Actually Improve Solar Cells?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Could Material Defects Actually Improve Solar Cells? Could Material Defects Actually Improve Solar Cells? March 21, 2016 Contact: Kathy Kincade, kkincade@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2124 NRELsolarcell Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are using supercomputers to study what may seem paradoxical: certain defects in silicon solar cells may actually improve their performance. The findings, published January 11, 2016 in Applied Physics Letters,

  12. Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bercea, Sorin; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constantin

    2013-12-16

    In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (∼10{sup −9} - 10{sup −8} Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe.

  13. An Injector Test Facility for the LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, E.,; /SLAC

    2007-03-14

    SLAC is in the privileged position of being the site for the world's first 4th generation light source as well as having a premier accelerator research staff and facilities. Operation of the world's first x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility will require innovations in electron injectors to provide electron beams of unprecedented quality. Upgrades to provide ever shorter wavelength x-ray beams of increasing intensity will require significant advances in the state-of-the-art. The BESAC 20-Year Facilities Roadmap identifies the electron gun as ''the critical enabling technology to advance linac-based light sources'' and recognizes that the sources for next-generation light sources are ''the highest-leveraged technology'', and that ''BES should strongly support and coordinate research and development in this unique and critical technology''.[1] This white paper presents an R&D plan and a description of a facility for developing the knowledge and technology required to successfully achieve these upgrades, and to coordinate efforts on short-pulse source development for linac-based light sources.

  14. SA 2712-CVC;CONTRACTOR/VISITOR COMPUTERS TEMPORARY ONE TIME EXCEPTION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This form does not authorize the use of the equipment on any Sandia network. Proper accounts and credentials must be obtained and provided to any visitor requiring network access ...

  15. NP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The links below provide an archive of Nuclear Physics (NP) Committees of Visitors (COV) reports and responses. 2016 NSAC COV Report on NP Program .pdf file (1.4MB) NP Response to ...

  16. NP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committees of Visitors Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (90KB) Staff NP Budget NP Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Labs & Universities Nuclear Physics Related Brochures Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)

  17. WDTS Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committees of Visitors Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) WDTS Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (24KB) WDTS Budget WDTS Committees of Visitors Jobs Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) Community College Internships (CCI) Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) at DOE Laboratories DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship (AEF) Program DOE National Science Bowl® (NSB) STEM Resources

  18. FES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committees of Visitors Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (113KB) Staff FES Budget FES Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Fusion and Plasmas Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301)

  19. COLLOQUIUM: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Challenges | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab February 4, 2015, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities and Technical Challenges Dr. Georg Bollen Michigan State University - The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams Wednesday Colloquium, February 4, 2015, "Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities and Technial Chanllenges", Dr. Georg Bollen Colloquium Committee: The Princeton Plasma Physics

  20. In-House Facility for Building Batteries and Performance Behavior...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In-House Facility for Building Batteries and Performance Behavior of SNL-Built 18650 Li... Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: 76th Lithium Battery Technical...

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Visitors Guide 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy 2015 Visitors Guide is a free, hard-copy publication distributed free to those attending the Solar Decathlon event. The publications' objectives are to serve as the primary information resource for those in attendance, and to deliver a compelling message about the Solar Decathlon's success as a proven workforce development program and its role in educating students and the public about clean energy products and design solutions. The U.S. Department of Energy 2015 Visitors Guide SD15 Visitors Guide goals are to guide attendees through the Solar Decathlon village; List and explain the 10 contests; educate attendees about the participating teams and their competition houses; provide access to more information on the Solar Decathlon website through the use of QR codes; and acknowledge the support of all event sponsors.

  2. Y-12 has almost 500 visitors from 23 states tour site during Secret City

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Festival | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) has almost 500 visitors from 23 states tour site during Secret City Festival Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 3:34pm NNSA Blog B&W Y-12 employee and tour guide Bill Wilburn, left, chats with Teresa Neas, and her husband Kim, whose mother, Audeane Bowers-Neas, worked at Y-12 in the 1940s. Tours of Y-12 on June 13 brought almost 500 visitors. Tourists from 23 states and the District of Columbia toured the site as part of Oak Ridge's

  3. FY 2013 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement FY 2013 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement FY 2013 DARM ...

  4. FY 2012 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement FY 2012 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement FY 2012 DARM ...

  5. Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO

  6. Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / $Billion 2005 Chained GDP)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",10.89145253,10.73335719,10.63428655,10.48440125,10.33479508,10.20669515,10.06546105,9.94541493,9.822393757,9.707148466,9.595465524,9.499032573,9.390723436,9.29474735,9.185496812,9.096176848,9.007677565,8.928276581 "AEO

  7. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  8. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)

  9. Cryogenic distribution for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Jones, Dana Arenius, Adam Fila, P. Geutschow, Helmut Laumer, Matt Johnson, Cory S. Waltz, J. G. Weisend II

    2012-06-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a new National User Facility for nuclear science funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science and operated by Michigan State University. The FRIB accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) cavities operating at 2 K and SC magnets operating at 4.5 K all cooled by a large scale cryogenic refrigeration system. A major subsystem of the cryogenic system will be the distribution system whose primary components will include a distribution box, the transfer lines and the interconnect valve boxes at each cryogenic device. An overview of the conceptual design of the distribution system including engineering details, capabilities and schedule is described.

  10. Enhanced test facility for OTEC at Keahole Point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillis, D.L.; Stevens, H.C.; Panchal, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Additional test facilities are being planned for Keahole Point, Hawaii, that would greatly increase the amounts of warm and cold water available for OTEC research and development. Present activities include the design of seawater systems and a pumping station, using the existing OTEC-1 cold-water pipe and pumps. Future options include the installation of available heat exchangers and ammonia-system equipment, the addition of a turbine generator, and facilities for open- and closed-cycle testing of components and systems.

  11. Northwestern University Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, Tobin Jay

    2013-05-08

    Northwestern University with DOE support created a Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research. This facility is designed to further strengthen our already strong catalysis research capabilities and thus to address these National challenges. Thus, state-of-the art instrumentation and experimentation facility was commissioned to add far greater breadth, depth, and throughput to our ability to invent, test, and understand catalysts and catalytic processes, hence to improve them via knowledge-based design and evaluation approaches.

  12. ALS Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... September 2012 Congressman Steve Womack (R-Arkansas) toured the ALS on September 25, along ... Womack, a freshman member of Congress is Vice Chairman of the House Energy and Water ...

  13. ALS Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Currently the group is developing a regional solar-permitting policy to streamline the process and cost of installing residential solar panels. During their visit, members toured ...

  14. ALS Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of zeolites and transition metal oxide catalysts, and he has ... (including updates on demandresponse, residential ... research and development, earth sciences, advanced ...

  15. FY 2012 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirement | Department of Energy Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement FY 2012 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement FY 2012 DARM Transmittal Letter and Attachment Final.pdf (406.93 KB) More Documents & Publications FY 2013 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement Real Property Maintenance Reporting Requirement Memorandum (July 13, 2010)

  16. Test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.F.; Allen, G.C.; Shipers, L.R.; Dobranich, D.; Ottinger, C.A.; Harmon, C.D.; Fan, W.C. ); Todosow, M. )

    1992-09-22

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and baseline performance of some of the major subsystems designed to support a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion fuel elements and engines being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. Some preliminary results of evaluating this facility for use in testing other NTP concepts are also summarized.

  17. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grnewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  18. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Aaron T.

    2015-09-18

    The String theory workshop was held from March 4-7, 2015 on the University of Michigan campus. Local organizers were Gordon Kane and Aaron Pierce. Piyush Kumar (Yale), Jim Halverson (KITP), Bobby Acharya (ICTP) and Sven Krippendorf (Oxford) served as external organizers.The meeting focused on the status of work to project 10 or 11 dimensional string/M theories onto our 4 spacetime dimensions (compactification). The workshop had 31 participants, half from outside the U.S. Participants were encouraged to focus on predictions for recent and forthcoming data, particularly for Higgs physics and LHC and dark matter, rather than on the traditional approach of embedding the Standard Model particles and forces. The Higgs boson sympoosium was locally organized by James Wells (chair), Aaron Pierce and Jianming Qian. Additional input in the early stages by Stefan Pokorski (Warsaw) who was unable to attend in the end. The workshop consistent of 22 talks from experts around the world, both theoretical and experimental. Experimentalists summarized the current state of knowledge of the Higgs boson and its varients. The theory talks ranged from technical calculations of Standard Model processes to speculative novel ideas. The YHET visitor program invited weekly young visitors to the University of Michigan campus to present their work. This year 24 participants came under the program, with 17 of them receiving at least partial support for their visits.

  19. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Aaron T.

    2014-04-01

    The workshop was held from September 23-25, 2013 on the University of Michigan campus. Local organizers were Dragan Huterer, Katherine Freese, and Heidi Wu (University of Michigan). Marilena Lo Verde (University of Chicago) also served as an external organizer. This workshop sought to gather experimentalists and theorists to discuss and define directions in cosmology research after the 1st year release of Planck data. The workshop included 35 invited (non-U-M) cosmologists, most of them relatively junior. The workshop was notable for spirited discussion of various theoretical ideas and experimental developments, and particularly on how one could test theory with ongoing and future experiments. In our follow-up poll, 95% of participants reported that interactions with other participants at the workshop may lead to further collaboration. Most participants (again about 95%) reported that they are very satisfied with the quality of the program, information they received, and the logistical support. Slides are available on line at: http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2013/CAP13/program.html. The YHET visitor program invited weekly young visitors to the University of Michigan campus to present their work. This year 23 participants came under the program. Slides are available on line for talks when applicable: http://mctp.physics.lsa.umich.edu/brown-bag-seminar-history/winter 2014 and http://mctp.physics.lsa.umich.edu/brown-bag-seminar-history/fall-2013.

  20. MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the mesoscale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the ...

  1. FY 2013 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirement | Department of Energy Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement FY 2013 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement FY 2013 DARM Transmittal Letter and Attachment Final.pdf (541.36 KB) More Documents & Publications FY 2012 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement FY_09_DM_RM_AM_Reporting_Memo_and_attachment_072009.pdf Real Property Maintenance Reporting Requirement

  2. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2008 and Projected 2009 through 2013 " ,"(Megawatts and 2008 ...

  3. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2009 and Projected 2010 through 2014 " ,"(Megawatts and 2009 ...

  4. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 " ,"(Megawatts and 2006 ...

  5. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2007 and Projected 2008 through 2012 " ,"(Megawatts and 2007 ...

  6. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2007 and Projected 2008 through 2012 " ,"(Megawatts and 2007 ...

  7. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 " ,"(Megawatts and 2006 ...

  8. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, " ,"2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 " ,"(Megawatts and 2005 Base ...

  9. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2009 and Projected 2010 through 2014 " ,"(Megawatts and 2009 ...

  10. Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ...

  11. Direct sunlight facility for testing and research in HCPV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sciortino, Luisa Agnello, Simonpietro Bonsignore, Gaetano; Cannas, Marco; Gelardi, Franco Mario; Napoli, Gianluca; Spallino, Luisa; Barbera, Marco; Buscemi, Alessandro; Montagnino, Fabio Maria; Paredes, Filippo; Candia, Roberto; Collura, Alfonso; Di Cicca, Gaspare; Cicero, Ugo Lo; Varisco, Salvo

    2014-09-26

    A facility for testing different components for HCPV application has been developed in the framework of 'Fotovoltaico ad Alta Efficienza' (FAE) project funded by the Sicilian Regional Authority (PO FESR Sicilia 2007/2013 4.1.1.1). The testing facility is equipped with an heliostat providing a wide solar beam inside the lab, an optical bench for mounting and aligning the HCPV components, electronic equipments to characterize the I-V curves of multijunction cells operated up to 2000 suns, a system to circulate a fluid in the heat sink at controlled temperature and flow-rate, a data logging system with sensors to measure temperatures in several locations and fluid pressures at the inlet and outlet of the heat sink, and a climatic chamber with large test volume to test assembled HCPV modules.

  12. Support Facility for a Mercury Target Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spampinato, P.T.

    2001-12-06

    A conceptual design for a neutrino-producing facility is presented, including the mercury-jet target system, beam absorber, and facility for the target/capture region. The mercury system is a closed loop that includes a containment structure in the high-magnetic field region, a mercury pool beam absorber, conventional equipment such as magnetic-coupled pumps, valves, a heat exchanger, and a special nozzle insert. The superconducting solenoids in the target region are protected from nuclear heating and radiation damage with water-cooled tungsten-carbide shielding; the decay channel solenoids are protected with water-cooled steel shielding. The target region and decay channel have high-neutron fluxes resulting in components that are highly activated. Therefore, the facility configuration is based on remotely maintaining the target system and the magnets, as well as providing sufficient shielding for personnel. Summaries of cost estimates for the target system, magnet shielding, maintenance equipment, and the facility are also presented.

  13. Evaluation of existing United States` facilities for use as a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Chidester, K.; Eaton, S.L.; Motley, F.E.; Siebe, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    A number of existing US facilities were evaluated for use as a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition. These facilities include the Fuels Material Examination Facility (FMEF) at Hanford, the Washington Power Supply Unit 1 (WNP-1) facility at Hanford, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) at Barnwell, SC, the Fuel Processing Facility (FPF) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the P-reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The study consisted of evaluating each facility in terms of available process space, available building support systems (i.e., HVAC, security systems, existing process equipment, etc.), available regional infrastructure (i.e., emergency response teams, protective force teams, available transportation routes, etc.), and ability to integrate the MOX fabrication process into the facility in an operationally-sound manner that requires a minimum amount of structural modifications.

  14. Visitor center at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, Lancaster, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colyer, R.D.; Freeman, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve contains the largest remaining stand of the California Poppy (Eschschozia Californica), the state flower of California. To welcome the thousands of people viewing the desert wildflowers each spring, the State of California decided to build a visitor/interpretive center. This building deals primarily with the question of fit; a building's fit aesthetically with its site and the fit of a building's design response to the climate of the site. In this case, both aspects of this question led the client and architects to seek an earth sheltered solution using materials at least metaphorically indigenous to the region. On both a technical and formal level, this building seeks to fit the unique climate and historical heritage of its site.

  15. Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 ...

  16. Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2...

  17. Table 10. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,...

  18. "Table 7b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,200...

  19. Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,201...

  20. Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 ...

  1. Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,200...

  2. Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 ...

  3. Berkeley Lab Opens State-of-the-Art Facility for Computational...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab Opens State-of-the-Art Facility for Computational Science News & Publications ESnet News Media & Press Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors ...

  4. Solar space heating for the visitors' center, Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henley, Marion

    1980-06-01

    This document is the final report of the solar energy system located at the Visitors' Center on the Stephens College Campus, Columbia, Missouri. The system is installed in a four-story, 15,000 square foot building designed to include the college's Admission Office, nine guest rooms for overnight lodging for official guests of the college, a two-story art gallery, and a Faculty Lounge. The solar energy system is an integral design of the building and utilizes 176 Honeywell/Lennox hydronic flat-plate collectors which use a 50% water-ethylene glycol solution and water-to-water heat exchanger. Solar heated water is stored in a 5000 gallon water storage tank located in the basement equipment room. A natural gas fired hot water boiler supplies hot water when the solar energy heat supply fails to meet the demand. The designed solar contribution is 71% of the heating load. The demonstration period for this project ends June 30, 1984.

  5. Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO

  6. Table 6. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",2934.6,3201.05,3361.65,3504,3657.3,3737.6,3879.95,3993.1,4098.95,4212.1,4303.35,4398.25,4474.9,4540.6,4584.4,4639.15,4668.35,4672 "AEO

  7. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING, D.L.

    2007-04-13

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 2224 Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cesium-137 sulfate and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.

  8. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING, D.L.

    2006-10-18

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 222-S Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cs-137 sulfate, and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.

  9. Facility for Rare Isotope Beams: The Journey Has Begun on DOE's latest Scientific User Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After many years of planning, ground was officially broken on the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) in a ceremony held at the construction site on Michigan State University’s campus.

  10. Berkeley Lab Opens State-of-the-Art Facility for Computational Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Opens State-of-the-Art Facility for Computational Science Berkeley Lab Opens State-of-the-Art Facility for Computational Science Wang Hall takes advantage of Lab's hillside location for advanced energy efficiency November 12, 2015 Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, 510-486-5849 CRTpretty A new center for advancing computational science and networking at research institutions and universities across the country opened today at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National

  11. Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO

  12. Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 1094 1103 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041

  13. Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 999 1021 1041 1051 1056 1066 1073 1081 1087 1098 1107 1122 1121 1128 1143 1173 1201 1223 AEO 1995 1006 1010 1011 1016 1017 1021 1027 1033 1040 1051 1066 1076 1083 1090 1108 1122 1137 AEO 1996 1037 1044 1041 1045 1061 1070 1086 1100 1112 1121 1135 1156 1161 1167 1173 1184 1190 1203 1215 AEO 1997 1028 1052 1072 1088

  14. Table 15. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (billion kilowatt-hours)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",2843,2891,2928,2962,3004,3039,3071,3112,3148,3185,3228,3263,3298,3332,3371,3406,3433,3469 "AEO 1995",,2951,2967,2983,3026,3058,3085,3108,3134,3166,3204,3248,3285,3321,3357,3396,3433,3475 "AEO

  15. Table 15. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Projected (billion kilowatt-hours) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 2843 2891 2928 2962 3004 3039 3071 3112 3148 3185 3228 3263 3298 3332 3371 3406 3433 3469 AEO 1995 2951 2967 2983 3026 3058 3085 3108 3134 3166 3204 3248 3285 3321 3357 3396 3433 3475 AEO 1996 2973 2998 3039 3074 3106 3137 3173 3215 3262 3317 3363 3409 3454 3505 3553 3604 3660 3722 3775 AEO 1997 3075

  16. Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 7632 7676 AEO 1997 6636 6694

  17. Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 2018 2055 AEO 1997 2362 2307

  18. Table 6. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 2935 3201 3362 3504 3657 3738 3880 3993 4099 4212 4303 4398 4475 4541 4584 4639 4668 4672 AEO 1995 2953 3157 3281 3489 3610 3741 3818 3920 4000 4103 4208 4303 4362 4420 4442 4460 4460 AEO 1996 3011 3106 3219 3398 3519 3679 3807 3891 3979 4070 4165 4212 4260 4289 4303 4322 4325 4347 4344 AEO 1997 3099 3245 3497

  19. Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO

  20. Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",19.87,20.21,20.64,20.99,21.2,21.42,21.6,21.99,22.37,22.63,22.95,23.22,23.58,23.82,24.09,24.13,24.02,24.14 "AEO 1995",,20.82,20.66,20.85,21.21,21.65,21.95,22.12,22.25,22.43,22.62,22.87,23.08,23.36,23.61,24.08,24.23,24.59 "AEO

  1. MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the mesoscale

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the mesoscale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the mesoscale Authors: Barnes, Cris William [1] ; Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2015-02-11 OSTI Identifier: 1170260 Report Number(s): LA-UR-15-20995 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource

  2. DOE Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan: "Facilities for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook" | Department of Energy Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan: "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook" DOE Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan: "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook" October 11, 2007 - 3:21pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science today released a comprehensive update of its landmark 2003

  3. Design of a test facility for gas-fired desiccant-based air conditioning systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.A.; Steele, W.G.; Hodge, B.K.

    1996-12-31

    The design of a facility for testing desiccant-based air conditioning systems is presented. The determination of the performance parameters of desiccant systems is discussed including moisture removal capacity, latent and total cooling capacities, and efficiency indexes. The appropriate procedures and key measurements for determining these parameters are identified using uncertainty analysis.

  4. EIS-0133: Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s San Francisco Operations Office developed this draft environmental impact statement to analyze the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts of alternatives for constructing and operating a Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility for nonradioactive (hazardous and nonhazardous) mixed and radioactive wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  5. Table 10. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 2.02 2.40 2.66 2.74 2.81 2.85 2.89 2.93 2.95 2.97 3.00 3.16 3.31 3.50 3.57 3.63 3.74 3.85 AEO 1995 2.46 2.54 2.80 2.87 2.87 2.89 2.90 2.90 2.92 2.95 2.97 3.00 3.03 3.19 3.35 3.51 3.60 AEO 1996 2.56 2.75 2.85 2.88 2.93 2.98 3.02 3.06 3.07 3.09 3.12 3.17 3.23 3.29 3.37 3.46 3.56 3.68 3.79 AEO 1997 2.82 2.96

  6. Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO $ Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 1992 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 7.20 7.20 7.30 7.30 7.40 7.50 7.60 AEO 1995 1993 6.80 6.80 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20

  7. Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9

  8. Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / $Billion 2005 Chained GDP) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 10.9 10.7 10.6 10.5 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1995 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.9 8.8 8.7 AEO 1996 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 1997 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4

  9. Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68

  10. Field calibration facilities for environmental measurement of radium, thorium, and potassium. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, W.D.; George, D.C.

    1986-08-01

    A key component of Technical Measurements Center support is the development, identification, standardization, and maintenance of calibration facilities for environmental radioelement measurements. This report describes calibration facilities located at Grand Junction, Colorado, and at six secondary sites. These facilities are available to contractors for the calibration of radiometric field instrumentation for in-situ measurements of radium, thorium, and potassium. All of the calibration facilities described herein were constructed by the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies for use in annual uranium-reserve determinations. The use of these facilities for the calibration of radiometric field instruments used in remedial action is made possible by the commonality of the radiometric measurement technique for uranium and for radium. The use of these facilities will standardize remedial action measurements in a cost-effective manner.

  11. The universe in the laboratory - Nuclear astrophysics opportunity at the facility for antiproton and ion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langanke, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, Technische Universitt Darmstadt, Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-05-09

    In the next years the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR will be constructed at the GSI Helmholtzze-ntrum fr Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. This new accelerator complex will allow for unprecedented and pathbreaking research in hadronic, nuclear, and atomic physics as well as in applied sciences. This manuscript will discuss some of these research opportunities, with a focus on supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis.

  12. DOE Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan, "Facilities for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook" | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) DOE Office of Science Publishes Update of Landmark Plan, "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook" News News Home Featured Articles Science Headlines 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000

  13. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  14. ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jaunary 2010" ,"Next Update: October 2010" ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2008 and Projected ...

  15. ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2009 and Projected 2010 through 2014" ,"(Thousands of Megawatthours and ...

  16. ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2006 and Projected 2008 through 2012 " ,"(Thousands of Megawatthours and ...

  17. ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 " ,"(Thousands of Megawatthours and ...

  18. Jefferson Lab Visitor's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  19. Survey of carbonization facilities for municipal solid waste treatment in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, In-Hee; Kawamoto, Katsuya

    2010-07-15

    The operations of carbonization facilities for municipal solid waste treatment in Japan were examined. Input waste, system processes, material flows, quality of char and its utilization, fuel and chemical consumption, control of facility emissions, and trouble areas in facility operation were investigated and analyzed. Although carbonization is a technically available thermochemical conversion method for municipal solid waste treatment, problems of energy efficiency and char utilization must be solved for carbonization to be competitive. Possible solutions include (1) optimizing the composition of input waste, treatment scale, organization of unit processes, operational methods, and quality and yield of char on the basis of analysis and feedback of long-term operating data of present operating facilities and (2) securing stable char demands by linking with local industries such as thermal electric power companies, iron manufacturing plants, and cement production plants.

  20. Fourth-generation plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition facility for hybrid surface modification layer fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Langping; Huang Lei; Xie Zhiwen; Wang Xiaofeng; Tang Baoyin

    2008-02-15

    The fourth-generation plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) facility for hybrid and batch treatment was built in our laboratory recently. Comparing with our previous PIIID facilities, several novel designs are utilized. Two multicathode pulsed cathodic arc plasma sources are fixed on the chamber wall symmetrically, which can increase the steady working time from 6 h (the single cathode source in our previous facilities) to about 18 h. Meanwhile, the inner diameter of the pulsed cathodic arc plasma source is increased from the previous 80 to 209 mm, thus, large area metal plasma can be obtained by the source. Instead of the simple sample holder in our previous facility, a complex revolution-rotation sample holder composed of 24 shafts, which can rotate around its axis and adjust its position through revolving around the center axis of the vacuum chamber, is fixed in the center of the vacuum chamber. In addition, one magnetron sputtering source is set on the chamber wall instead of the top cover in the previous facility. Because of the above characteristic, the PIIID hybrid process involving ion implantation, vacuum arc, and magnetron sputtering deposition can be acquired without breaking vacuum. In addition, the PIIID batch treatment of cylinderlike components can be finished by installing these components on the rotating shafts on the sample holder.

  1. Summary of radionuclide air emissions from Department of Energy facilities for CY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Facilities owned or operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) handle and process radioactive materials in conjunction with their research, nuclear materials production, remediation, and waste disposal activities. During normal operations, some of these facilities have the potential to release small quantities of radionuclides to the environment. Radionuclide emissions to the atmosphere from DOE facilities are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of Section 112 of the Clean Air Act. Subpart H of 40 CFR Part 61 of the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) sets standards for public exposure to airborne radioactive materials (other than radon) released by DOE facilities, DOE radon emissions are regulated by NESHAPs in Subparts Q and T. Subparts Q and T apply specifically to DOE storage and disposal facilities for radium-containing material. Airborne radionuclide emissions are also regulated by the Department of Energy under the authority provided by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977, as amended. This report summarizes air emissions subject to the EPA requirements and demonstrates that DOE facilities are in compliance with the required dose limits.

  2. OMEGA: A NEW COLD X-RAY SIMULATION FACILITY FOR THE EVALUATION OF OPTICAL COATINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, J H; Newlander, C D; Fournier, K B; Beutler, D E; Coverdale, C A; May, M J; Tobin, M; Davis, J F; Shiekh, D

    2007-04-27

    We report on recent progress for the development of a new cold X-ray optical test capability using the Omega Facility located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. These tests were done on the 30 kJ OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. We conducted a six-shot series called OMEGA II on 14 July 2006 in one eight-hour day (supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency). The initial testing was performed using simple protected gold optical coatings on fused silica substrates. PUFFTFT analyses were completed and the specimen's thermal lateral stress and transverse stress conditions were calculated and interpreted. No major anomalies were detected. Comparison of the pre- and posttest reflective measurements coupled with the TFCALC analyses proved invaluable in guiding the analyses and interpreting the observed damage. The Omega facility is a high quality facility for performing evaluation of optical coatings and coupons and provides experience for the development of future National Ignition Facility (NIF) testing.

  3. Facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Steven W.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Lykke, Keith R

    2006-11-10

    Detectors have historically been calibrated for spectral power responsivity at the National Institute of Standards and Technology by using a lamp-monochromator system to tune the wavelength of the excitation source. Silicon detectors can be calibrated in the visible spectral region with combined standard uncertainties at the 0.1% level. However,uncertainties increase dramatically when measuring an instrument's spectral irradiance or radiance responsivity. We describe what we believe to be a new laser-based facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCUS) that was developed to calibrate instruments directly in irradiance or radiance mode with uncertainties approaching or exceeding those available for spectral power responsivity calibrations. In SIRCUS, the emission from high-power, tunable lasers is introduced into an integrating sphere using optical fibers, producing uniform, quasi-Lambertian, high-radiant-flux sources. Reference standard irradiance detectors, calibrated directly against national primary standards for spectral power responsivity and aperture area measurement,are used to determine the irradiance at a reference plane. Knowing the measurement geometry, the source radiance can be readily determined as well. The radiometric properties of the SIRCUS source coupled with state-of-the-art transfer standard radiometers whose responsivities are directly traceable to primary national radiometric scales result in typical combined standard uncertainties in irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations of less than 0.1%. The details of the facility and its effect on primary national radiometric scales are discussed.

  4. Risk management considerations for seismic upgrading of an older facility for short-term residue stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Additon, S.L.; Peregoy, W.L.; Foppe, T.L.

    1999-06-01

    Building 707 and its addition, Building 707A, were selected, after the production mission of Rocky Flats was terminated a few years ago, to stabilize many of the plutonium residues remaining at the site by 2002. The facility had undergone substantial safety improvements to its safety systems and conduct of operations for resumption of plutonium operations in the early 1990s and appeared ideally suited for this new mission to support accelerated Site closure. During development of a new authorization basis, a seismic evaluation was performed. This evaluation addressed an unanalyzed expansion joint and suspect connection details for the precast concrete tilt-up construction and concluded that the seismic capacity of the facility is less than half of that determined by previous analysis. Further, potential seismic interaction was identified between a collapsing Building 707 and the seismically upgraded Building 707A, possibly causing the partial collapse of the latter. Both the operating contractor and the Department of Energy sought a sound technical basis for deciding how to proceed. This paper addresses the risks of the as-is facility and possible benefits of upgrades to support a decision on whether to upgrade the seismic capacity of Building 707, accept the risk of the as-is facility for its short remaining mission, or relocate critical stabilization missions. The paper also addresses the Department of Energy`s policy on natural phenomena.

  5. Remote Handling and Maintenance in the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, Thomas W; Aaron, Adam M; Carroll, Adam J; DeVore, Joe R; Giuliano, Dominic R; Graves, Van B; Bennett, Richard P; Bollen, Georg; Cole, Daniel F.; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Schein, Mike E; Zeller, Albert F

    2011-01-01

    Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing, MI was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design and establish a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), a cutting-edge research facility to advance the understanding of rare nuclear isotopes and the evolution of the cosmos. The research conducted at the FRIB will involve experimentation with intense beams of rare isotopes within a well-shielded target cell that will result in activation and contamination of components. The target cell is initially hands-on accessible after shutdown and a brief cool-down period. Personnel are expected to have hands-on access to the tops of shielded component modules with the activated in-beam sections suspended underneath. The modules are carefully designed to include steel shielding for protecting personnel during these hand-on operations. However, as the facility has greater levels of activation and contamination, a bridge mounted servomaniputor may be added to the cell, to perform the disconnecting of services to the component assemblies. Dexterous remote handling and exchange of the modularized activated components is completed at a shielded window workstation with a pair of master-slave manipulators. The primary components requiring exchange or maintenance are the production target, the beam wedge filter, the beam dump, and the beam focusing and bending magnets. This paper provides an overview of the FRIB Target Facility remote handling and maintenance design requirements, concepts, and techniques.

  6. US Army facility for the consolidation of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, S.L.; Tanner, J.E.; Murphy, B.L.; Gillings, J.C.; Hadley, R.T.; Lyso, O.M.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Murphy, D.W.

    1983-12-01

    A preliminary study of a waste consolidation facility for the Department of the Army's low-level radioactive waste was carried out to determine a possible site and perform a cost-benefit analysis. Four sites were assessed as possible locations for such a facility, using predetermined site selection criteria. To assist in the selection of a site, an evaluation of environmental issues was included as part of each site review. In addition, a preliminary design for a waste consolidation facility was developed, and facilities at each site were reviewed for their availability and suitability for this purpose. Currently available processes for volume reduction, as well as processes still under development, were then investigated, and the support and handling equipment and the staff needed for the safe operation of a waste consolidation facility were studied. Using current costs for the transportation and burial of low-level waste, a cost comparison was then made between waste disposal with and without the utilization of volume reduction. Finally, regulations that could affect the operation of a waste consolidation facility were identified and their impact was assessed. 11 references, 5 figures, 16 tables.

  7. Analysis of Actual Operating Conditions of an Off-grid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson; Jack Schmid

    2008-12-31

    Fuel cells have been proposed as ideal replacements for other technologies in remote locations such as Rural Alaska. A number of suppliers have developed systems that might be applicable in these locations, but there are several requirements that must be met before they can be deployed: they must be able to operate on portable fuels, and be able to operate with little operator assistance for long periods of time. This project was intended to demonstrate the operation of a 5 kW fuel cell on propane at a remote site (defined as one without access to grid power, internet, or cell phone, but on the road system). A fuel cell was purchased by the National Park Service for installation in their newly constructed visitor center at Exit Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park. The DOE participation in this project as initially scoped was for independent verification of the operation of this demonstration. This project met with mixed success. The fuel cell has operated over 6 seasons at the facility with varying degrees of success, with one very good run of about 1049 hours late in the summer of 2006, but in general the operation has been below expectations. There have been numerous stack failures, the efficiency of electrical generation has been lower than expected, and the field support effort required has been far higher than expected. Based on the results to date, it appears that this technology has not developed to the point where demonstrations in off road sites are justified.

  8. Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO

  9. Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-10-01

    Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under

  10. Analysis of material recovery facilities for use in life-cycle assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pressley, Phillip N.; Levis, James W.; Damgaard, Anders; Barlaz, Morton A.; DeCarolis, Joseph F.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Life-cycle assessment of solid waste management relies on accurate process models. • Material recovery facility (MRF) processes were modeled with new primary data. • Single stream, dual stream, pre-sorted, and mixed waste MRFs were considered. • MRF electricity consumption ranges from 4.7 to 7.8 kW h per Mg input. • Total cost ranges from $19.8 to $24.9 per Mg input. - Abstract: Insights derived from life-cycle assessment of solid waste management strategies depend critically on assumptions, data, and modeling at the unit process level. Based on new primary data, a process model was developed to estimate the cost and energy use associated with material recovery facilities (MRFs), which are responsible for sorting recyclables into saleable streams and as such represent a key piece of recycling infrastructure. The model includes four modules, each with a different process flow, for separation of single-stream, dual-stream, pre-sorted recyclables, and mixed-waste. Each MRF type has a distinct combination of equipment and default input waste composition. Model results for total amortized costs from each MRF type ranged from $19.8 to $24.9 per Mg (1 Mg = 1 metric ton) of waste input. Electricity use ranged from 4.7 to 7.8 kW h per Mg of waste input. In a single-stream MRF, equipment required for glass separation consumes 28% of total facility electricity consumption, while all other pieces of material recovery equipment consume less than 10% of total electricity. The dual-stream and mixed-waste MRFs have similar electricity consumption to a single-stream MRF. Glass separation contributes a much larger fraction of electricity consumption in a pre-sorted MRF, due to lower overall facility electricity consumption. Parametric analysis revealed that reducing separation efficiency for each piece of equipment by 25% altered total facility electricity consumption by less than 4% in each case. When model results were compared with actual data for an

  11. Reaction chemistry of nitrogen species in hydrothermal systems: Simple reactions, waste simulants, and actual wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dell`Orco, P.; Luan, L.; Proesmans, P.; Wilmanns, E.

    1995-02-01

    Results are presented from hydrothermal reaction systems containing organic components, nitrogen components, and an oxidant. Reaction chemistry observed in simple systems and in simple waste simulants is used to develop a model which presents global nitrogen chemistry in these reactive systems. The global reaction path suggested is then compared with results obtained for the treatment of an actual waste stream containing only C-N-0-H species.

  12. Dose Rate Analysis Capability for Actual Spent Fuel Transportation Cask Contents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Lefebvre, Robert A; Peplow, Douglas E.; Williams, Mark L; Scaglione, John M

    2014-01-01

    The approved contents for a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensed spent nuclear fuel casks are typically based on bounding used nuclear fuel (UNF) characteristics. However, the contents of the UNF canisters currently in storage at independent spent fuel storage installations are considerably heterogeneous in terms of fuel assembly burnup, initial enrichment, decay time, cladding integrity, etc. Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation & Disposal Analysis Resource and Data System (UNF ST&DARDS) is an integrated data and analysis system that facilitates automated cask-specific safety analyses based on actual characteristics of the as-loaded UNF. The UNF-ST&DARDS analysis capabilities have been recently expanded to include dose rate analysis of as-loaded transportation packages. Realistic dose rate values based on actual canister contents may be used in place of bounding dose rate values to support development of repackaging operations procedures, evaluation of radiation-related transportation risks, and communication with stakeholders. This paper describes the UNF-ST&DARDS dose rate analysis methodology based on actual UNF canister contents and presents sample dose rate calculation results.

  13. Treatability studies of actual listed waste sludges from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Peeler, D.K.; Gilliam, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Spence, R.D.

    1996-05-06

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are investigating vitrification for various low-level and mixed wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Treatability studies have included surrogate waste formulations at the laboratory-, pilot-, and field-scales and actual waste testing at the laboratory- and pilot-scales. The initial waste to be processing through SRTC`s Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is the K-1407-B and K-1407-C (B/C) Pond sludge waste which is a RCRA F-listed waste. The B/C ponds at the ORR K-25 site were used as holding and settling ponds for various waste water treatment streams. Laboratory-, pilot-, and field- scale ``proof-of-principle`` demonstrations are providing needed operating parameters for the planned field-scale demonstration with actual B/C Pond sludge waste at ORR. This report discusses the applied systems approach to optimize glass compositions for this particular waste stream through laboratory-, pilot-, and field-scale studies with surrogate and actual B/C waste. These glass compositions will maximize glass durability and waste loading while optimizing melt properties which affect melter operation, such as melt viscosity and melter refractory corrosion. Maximum waste loadings minimize storage volume of the final waste form translating into considerable cost savings.

  14. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-09

    .A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  15. TESTING OF THE SPINTEK ROTARY MICROFILTER USING ACTUAL HANFORD WASTE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUBER HJ

    2010-04-13

    The SpinTek rotary microfilter was tested on actual Hanford tank waste. The samples were a composite of archived Tank 241-AN-105 material and a sample representing single-shell tanks (SST). Simulants of the two samples have been used in non-rad test runs at the 222-S laboratory and at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The results of these studies are compared in this report. Two different nominal pore sizes for the sintered steel rotating disk filter were chosen: 0.5 and 0.1 {micro}m. The results suggest that the 0.5-{micro}m disk is preferable for Hanford tank waste for the following reasons: (1) The filtrate clarity is within the same range (<<4 ntu for both disks); (2) The filtrate flux is in general higher for the 0.5-{micro}m disk; and (3) The 0.1-{micro}m disk showed a higher likelihood of fouling. The filtrate flux of the actual tank samples is generally in the range of 20-30% compared to the equivalent non-rad tests. The AN-105 slurries performed at about twice the filtrate flux of the SST slurries. The reason for this difference has not been identified. Particle size distributions in both cases are very similar; comparison of the chemical composition is not conclusive. The sole hint towards what material was stuck in the filter pore holes came from the analysis of the dried flakes from the surface of the fouled 0.1-{micro}m disk. A cleaning approach developed by SRNL personnel to deal with fouled disks has been found adaptable when using actual Hanford samples. The use of 1 M nitric acid improved the filtrate flux by approximately two times; using the same simulants as in the non-rad test runs showed that the filtrate flux was restored to 1/2 of its original amount.

  16. Actual versus predicted impacts of three ethanol plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddlemon, G.K.; Webb, J.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Miller, R.L.

    1993-03-15

    To help reduce US dependence on imported petroleum, Congress passed the Energy Security Act of 1980 (public Law 96-294). This legislation authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to promote expansion of the fuel alcohol industry through, among other measures, its Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Program. Under this program, selected proposals for the conversion of plant biomass into fuel-grade ethanol would be granted loan guarantees. of 57 applications submitted for loan guarantees to build and operate ethanol fuel projects under this program, 11 were considered by DOE to have the greatest potential for satisfying DOE`s requirements and goals. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE evaluated the potential impacts of proceeding with the Loan Guarantee Program in a programmatic environmental assessment (DOE 1981) that resulted in a finding of no significant impact (FANCY) (47 Federal Register 34, p. 7483). The following year, DOE conducted site-specific environmental assessments (EAs) for 10 of the proposed projects. These F-As predicted no significant environmental impacts from these projects. Eventually, three ethanol fuel projects received loan guarantees and were actually built: the Tennol Energy Company (Tennol; DOE 1982a) facility near Jasper in southeastern Tennessee; the Agrifuels Refining Corporation (Agrifuels; DOE 1985) facility near New Liberia in southern Louisiana; and the New Energy Company of Indiana (NECI; DOE 1982b) facility in South Bend, Indiana. As part of a larger retrospective examination of a wide range of environmental effects of ethanol fuel plants, we compared the actual effects of the three completed plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources with the effects predicted in the NEPA EAs several years earlier. A secondary purpose was to determine: Why were there differences, if any, between actual effects and predictions? How can assessments be improved and impacts reduced?

  17. Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per barrel in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO $ Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",1992,16.69,16.42999,16.9899,17.66,18.28,19.0599,19.89,20.72,21.65,22.61,23.51,24.29,24.9,25.6,26.3,27,27.64,28.16

  18. Method and apparatus for distinguishing actual sparse events from sparse event false alarms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spalding, Richard E.; Grotbeck, Carter L.

    2000-01-01

    Remote sensing method and apparatus wherein sparse optical events are distinguished from false events. "Ghost" images of actual optical phenomena are generated using an optical beam splitter and optics configured to direct split beams to a single sensor or segmented sensor. True optical signals are distinguished from false signals or noise based on whether the ghost image is presence or absent. The invention obviates the need for dual sensor systems to effect a false target detection capability, thus significantly reducing system complexity and cost.

  19. What do the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Program Specs Actually Require?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alternate HVAC Systems & the Need to Use a Credentialed HVAC Contractor What do the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Program Specs Actually Require? The DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program frequently receives inquiries about the need for qualifying projects to use an HVAC contractor who is certified by an H-QUITO 1 . The DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program incorporates all of the ENERGY STAR Homes provisions. While commissioning is important for all HVAC systems, Versions 3 and 3.1 of the ENERGY

  20. ACTUAL WASTE TESTING OF GYCOLATE IMPACTS ON THE SRS TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, C.

    2014-05-28

    Glycolic acid is being studied as a replacement for formic acid in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. After implementation, the recycle stream from DWPF back to the high-level waste Tank Farm will contain soluble sodium glycolate. Most of the potential impacts of glycolate in the Tank Farm were addressed via a literature review and simulant testing, but several outstanding issues remained. This report documents the actual-waste tests to determine the impacts of glycolate on storage and evaporation of Savannah River Site high-level waste. The objectives of this study are to address the following: Determine the extent to which sludge constituents (Pu, U, Fe, etc.) dissolve (the solubility of sludge constituents) in the glycolate-containing 2H-evaporator feed. Determine the impact of glycolate on the sorption of fissile (Pu, U, etc.) components onto sodium aluminosilicate solids. The first objective was accomplished through actual-waste testing using Tank 43H and 38H supernatant and Tank 51H sludge at Tank Farm storage conditions. The second objective was accomplished by contacting actual 2H-evaporator scale with the products from the testing for the first objective. There is no anticipated impact of up to 10 g/L of glycolate in DWPF recycle to the Tank Farm on tank waste component solubilities as investigated in this test. Most components were not influenced by glycolate during solubility tests, including major components such as aluminum, sodium, and most salt anions. There was potentially a slight increase in soluble iron with added glycolate, but the soluble iron concentration remained so low (on the order of 10 mg/L) as to not impact the iron to fissile ratio in sludge. Uranium and plutonium appear to have been supersaturated in 2H-evaporator feed solution mixture used for this testing. As a result, there was a reduction of soluble uranium and plutonium as a function of time. The change in soluble uranium concentration was

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facility use by total visitor days and facility to track actual visitors and active user research computer accounts. Historical data show an apparent relationship between the...

  2. PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-11-01

    Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

  3. Wind farm production cost: Optimum turbine size and farm capacity in the actual market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laali, A.R.; Meyer, J.L.; Bellot, C.; Louche, A.

    1996-12-31

    Several studies are undertaken in R&D Division of EDF in collaboration with ERASME association in order to have a good knowledge of the wind energy production costs. These studies are performed in the framework of a wind energy monitoring project and concern the influence of a few parameters like wind farm capacity, turbine size and wind speed on production costs, through an analysis of the actual market trend. Some 50 manufacturers and 140 different kind of wind turbines are considered for this study. The minimum production cost is situated at 800/900 kW wind turbine rated power. This point will probably move to more important powers in the future. This study is valid only for average conditions and some special parameters like particular climate conditions or lack of infrastructure for a special site the could modify the results shown on the curves. The variety of wind turbines (rated power as a function of rotor diameter, height and specific rated power) in the actual market is analyzed. A brief analysis of the market trend is also performed. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-20

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

  5. Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per million Btu in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO $ Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",1992,1.4699,1.4799,1.53,1.57,1.58,1.57,1.61,1.63,1.68,1.69,1.7,1.72,1.7,1.76,1.79,1.81,1.88,1.92 "AEO

  6. Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO $ Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47

  7. Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO $ Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63

  8. Table 7a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO $ Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 1992 2.44 2.48 2.57 2.66 2.70 2.79 2.84 2.92 3.04 3.16 3.25 3.36 3.51 3.60 3.77 3.91 3.97 4.08 AEO 1995 1993 2.39 2.48 2.42 2.45 2.45 2.53 2.59 2.78 2.91 3.10 3.24 3.38 3.47 3.53 3.61 3.68

  9. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2009-02-28

    This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

  10. The primary test of measuremental system for the actual emittance of relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang Fu; Tai-bin Du; Xin Chen

    1995-12-31

    Recent, a new measuremental system has been established basically in Tsinghua University PRA. This system is able to measure the lower emittance of the electron beams from the RF accelerators for the FEL. It consists of a scanning magnetic field, a slit, a fluorescent screen, and a TV camera, an image processing system, a CAD 386 computer. Using it an actual phase diagram is obtained for 4-10 Mev electron beams, The principle and structure of the facility were reported in the Proceeding of the 15th FEL Conference. This paper describes the performance of the main components and the results of first measurement for the electron gun and 4Mev standing wave LINAC, Some new suggests are related too.

  11. An insight into actual energy use and its drivers in high-performance buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Cheng; Hong, Tianzhen; Yan, Da

    2014-07-12

    Using portfolio analysis and individual detailed case studies, we studied the energy performance and drivers of energy use in 51 high-performance office buildings in the U.S., Europe, China, and other parts of Asia. Portfolio analyses revealed that actual site energy use intensity (EUI) of the study buildings varied by a factor of as much as 11, indicating significant variation in real energy use in HPBs worldwide. Nearly half of the buildings did not meet the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2004 energy target, raising questions about whether a building’s certification as high performing accurately indicates that a building is energy efficient and suggesting that improvement in the design and operation of HPBs is needed to realize their energy-saving potential. We studied the influence of climate, building size, and building technologies on building energy performance and found that although all are important, none are decisive factors in building energy use. EUIs were widely scattered in all climate zones. There was a trend toward low energy use in small buildings, but the correlation was not absolute; some small HPBs exhibited high energy use, and some large HPBs exhibited low energy use. We were unable to identify a set of efficient technologies that correlated directly to low EUIs. In two case studies, we investigated the influence of occupant behavior as well as operation and maintenance on energy performance and found that both play significant roles in realizing energy savings. We conclude that no single factor determines the actual energy performance of HPBs, and adding multiple efficient technologies does not necessarily improve building energy performance; therefore, an integrated design approach that takes account of climate, technology, occupant behavior, and operations and maintenance practices should be implemented to maximize energy savings in HPBs. As a result, these findings are

  12. Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto; Ito, Masanori; Goto, Masakazu

    2007-07-01

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

  13. An insight into actual energy use and its drivers in high-performance buildings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Cheng; Hong, Tianzhen; Yan, Da

    2014-07-12

    Using portfolio analysis and individual detailed case studies, we studied the energy performance and drivers of energy use in 51 high-performance office buildings in the U.S., Europe, China, and other parts of Asia. Portfolio analyses revealed that actual site energy use intensity (EUI) of the study buildings varied by a factor of as much as 11, indicating significant variation in real energy use in HPBs worldwide. Nearly half of the buildings did not meet the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2004 energy target, raising questions about whether a building’s certification as high performing accuratelymore » indicates that a building is energy efficient and suggesting that improvement in the design and operation of HPBs is needed to realize their energy-saving potential. We studied the influence of climate, building size, and building technologies on building energy performance and found that although all are important, none are decisive factors in building energy use. EUIs were widely scattered in all climate zones. There was a trend toward low energy use in small buildings, but the correlation was not absolute; some small HPBs exhibited high energy use, and some large HPBs exhibited low energy use. We were unable to identify a set of efficient technologies that correlated directly to low EUIs. In two case studies, we investigated the influence of occupant behavior as well as operation and maintenance on energy performance and found that both play significant roles in realizing energy savings. We conclude that no single factor determines the actual energy performance of HPBs, and adding multiple efficient technologies does not necessarily improve building energy performance; therefore, an integrated design approach that takes account of climate, technology, occupant behavior, and operations and maintenance practices should be implemented to maximize energy savings in HPBs. As a result, these

  14. BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

    2008-09-25

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The

  15. LANSCE | User Resources | Visitor Registration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visit Registration Users must register online at least: 4 weeks prior to experiment for U.S. citizens 2 months prior to experiment for foreign nationals. Lujan Center WNR Visit Registration Visit Registration

  16. Actual Versus Estimated Utility Factor of a Large Set of Privately Owned Chevrolet Volts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart; Thomas Bradley; Stephen Schey

    2014-04-01

    In order to determine the overall fuel economy of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), the amount of operation in charge depleting (CD) versus charge sustaining modes must be determined. Mode of operation is predominantly dependent on customer usage of the vehicle and is therefore highly variable. The utility factor (UF) concept was developed to quantify the distance a group of vehicles has traveled or may travel in CD mode. SAE J2841 presents a UF calculation method based on data collected from travel surveys of conventional vehicles. UF estimates have been used in a variety of areas, including the calculation of window sticker fuel economy, policy decisions, and vehicle design determination. The EV Project, a plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure demonstration being conducted across the United States, provides the opportunity to determine the real-world UF of a large group of privately owned Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicles. Using data collected from Volts enrolled in The EV Project, this paper compares the real-world UF of two groups of Chevrolet Volts to estimated UF's based on J2841. The actual observed fleet utility factors (FUF) for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups studied were observed to be 72% and 74%, respectively. Using the EPA CD ranges, the method prescribed by J2841 estimates a FUF of 65% and 68% for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups, respectively. Volt drivers achieved higher percentages of distance traveled in EV mode for two reasons. First, they had fewer long-distance travel days than drivers in the national travel survey referenced by J2841. Second, they charged more frequently than the J2841 assumption of once per day - drivers of Volts in this study averaged over 1.4 charging events per day. Although actual CD range varied widely as driving conditions varied, the average CD ranges for the two Volt groups studied matched the EPA CD range estimates, so CD range variation did not affect FUF results.

  17. Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 1.50 1.55 1.64 1.73 1.78 1.82 1.92 2.01 2.13 2.22 2.30 2.41 2.46 2.64 2.78 2.90 3.12 3.30 AEO 1995 1.42 1.46 1.49 1.55 1.59 1.62 1.67 1.76 1.80 1.89 1.97 2.05 2.13 2.21 2.28 2.38 2.50 AEO 1996 1.35 1.35 1.37 1.39 1.42 1.46 1.50 1.56 1.62 1.67 1.75

  18. Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 3.09 3.15 2.86 2.78 2.73 2.65 2.62 2.60 2.56 2.53 2.52 2.49 2.45 2.41 2.40 2.36 2.32 2.29 AEO 1995 3.66 2.77 2.53 2.71 2.67 2.61 2.55 2.48 2.46 2.45 2.45 2.43 2.39 2.35 2.31 2.27 2.24 AEO 1996 2.61

  19. Table 7b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 2.49 2.60 2.76 2.93 3.05 3.24 3.39 3.60 3.86 4.15 4.40 4.70 5.08 5.39 5.85 6.27 6.59 7.01 AEO 1995 2.44 2.61 2.61 2.70 2.78 2.95 3.11 3.44 3.72 4.10 4.43 4.78 5.07 5.33 5.64 5.95 6.23 AEO 1996 2.08 2.19 2.20 2.39 2.47 2.54 2.64 2.74 2.84 2.95 3.09

  20. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTING FOR INCLUSION & COPRECIPITATION WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WARRANT, R.W.

    2006-12-11

    Fractional crystallization is being considered as a pretreatment method to support supplemental treatment of retrieved single-shell tank (SST) saltcake waste at the Hanford Site. The goal of the fractional crystallization process is to optimize the separation of the radioactivity (radionuclides) from the saltcake waste and send it to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant and send the bulk of the saltcake to the supplemental treatment plant (bulk vitrification). The primary factors that influence the separation efficiency are (1) solid/liquid separation efficiency, (2) contaminant inclusions, and (3) co-precipitation. This is a report of testing for factors (2) and (3) with actual tank waste samples. For the purposes of this report, contaminant inclusions are defined as the inclusion of supernatant, containing contaminating radionuclides, in a pocket within the precipitating saltcake crystals. Co-precipitation is defined as the simultaneous precipitation of a saltcake crystal with a contaminating radionuclide. These two factors were tested for various potential fractional crystallization product salts by spiking the composite tank waste samples (SST Early or SST Late, external letter CH2M-0600248, ''Preparation of Composite Tank Waste Samples for ME-21 Project'') with the desired target salt and then evaporating to precipitate that salt. SST Early represents the typical composition of dissolved saltcake early in the retrieval process, and SST Late represents the typical composition during the later stages of retrieval.

  1. Relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rates in teenagers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terblanche, A.P.S.; Ozkaynak, H.; Spengler, J.D.; Butler, D.A. )

    1991-08-01

    A study was designed to explore the relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rate (HR) as measured by a portable heart rate monitor. Twenty-two teenagers (8 boys, 14 girls, median age of 16) from Watertown High School, Massachusetts participated in this pilot study which involved continuous monitoring of HR during normal daily activities and simultaneous completion of a time-activity diary. There were 31 successful monitoring sessions ranging from 1.9 to 17 hours with a median monitoring time of 12.6 hours. Four unsuccessful monitoring sessions were experienced due to equipment failure. Apart from participant cooperation, the single most important factor affecting the feasibility of continuous heart rate monitoring was found to be equipment design. Th overall average heart rate observed was 88.4 bpm (SD = 24.3). An individual's correlation coefficient for perceived activity level (documented in half-hour intervals) and heart rate (averaged over the half-hour intervals) varied from 0.24 to 0.89. More than half of the correlation coefficients were below 0.40. There was a significant difference between average heart rate for time spent indoors (90 bpm) versus outdoors (103 bpm) even after correcting for sleeping time. It is concluded that continuous HR monitoring with simultaneous completion of a time/activity dairy is feasible and is a promising source of information for studies on exposure to air pollutants.

  2. Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

    2013-11-01

    To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

  3. Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

    2013-11-01

    To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In this project, the Building America CARB team evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

  4. Long-term storage facility for reactor compartments in Sayda Bay - German support for utilization of nuclear submarines in Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Dietmar; Voelzke, Holger; Weber, Wolfgang; Noack, Volker; Baeuerle, Guenther

    2007-07-01

    The German-Russian project that is part of the G8 initiative on Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction focuses on the speedy construction of a land-based interim storage facility for nuclear submarine reactor compartments at Sayda Bay near Murmansk. This project includes the required infrastructure facilities for long-term storage of about 150 reactor compartments for a period of about 70 years. The interim storage facility is a precondition for effective activities of decommissioning and dismantlement of almost all nuclear-powered submarines of the Russian Northern Fleet. The project also includes the establishment of a computer-assisted waste monitoring system. In addition, the project involves clearing Sayda Bay of other shipwrecks of the Russian navy. On the German side the project is carried out by the Energiewerke Nord GmbH (EWN) on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour (BMWi). On the Russian side the Kurchatov Institute holds the project management of the long-term interim storage facility in Sayda Bay, whilst the Nerpa Shipyard, which is about 25 km away from the storage facility, is dismantling the submarines and preparing the reactor compartments for long-term interim storage. The technical monitoring of the German part of this project, being implemented by BMWi, is the responsibility of the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). This paper gives an overview of the German-Russian project and a brief description of solutions for nuclear submarine disposal in other countries. At Nerpa shipyard, being refurbished with logistic and technical support from Germany, the reactor compartments are sealed by welding, provided with biological shielding, subjected to surface treatment and conservation measures. Using floating docks, a tugboat tows the reactor compartments from Nerpa shipyard to the interim storage facility at Sayda Bay where they will be left on the on-shore concrete

  5. System requirements specification for a solar central receiver system integrated with a cogeneration facility for copper smelting. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    This specification defines the characteristics, design and environmental requirements, and economic data for a solar central receiver system integrated with a cogeneration facility for copper smelting. The added solar capacity will supply process heat to an existing copper smelting flash furnace of Finnish design as well as providing for the cogeneration of electricity by an added gas turbine system. Heat storage to accommodate periods of low solar insolation is accomplished by the innovative utilization of copper slag in a thermal energy storage system. This specification is limited (1) to those portions of the plant to be added or modified in order to accomplish the proposed solar retrofit, and (2) by the conceptual design nature of the contracted study. Section 1 of this specification describes the proposed modifications to existing site conditions and facilities, and the nomenclature used. Section 2 provides a listing of applicable standards and codes, publications, reference documentation, and regulatory information. Design and performance requirements to be met by this solar cogeneration facility are outlined in Section 3, and the environmental criteria applicable to the plant are addressed in Section 4. The solar cogeneration facility's characteristics and performance data are specified in Section 5, along with the plant cost and economic data. Simulation models are also described. Appendix B presents site facility information; Appendix C covers the determination of the physical and chemical properties of copper smelter slag; Appendix D presents estimating backup sheets.

  6. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-07-10

    In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

  7. STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burket, P

    2009-02-24

    This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

  8. Final Report. LAW Glass Formulation to Support AP-101 Actual Waste Testing, VSL-03R3470-2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, I. S.; Pegg, I. L.; Rielley, Elizabeth; Carranza, Isidro; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan-Tao T.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Cecil, Richard; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-06-22

    The main objective of the work was to develop and select a glass formulation for vitrification testing of the actual waste sample of LAW AP-101 at Battelle - Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD). Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses to demonstrate compliance with contract and processing requirements, evaluation of the ability to achieve waste loading requirements, testing to demonstrate compatibility of the glass melts with melter materials of construction, comparison of the properties of simulant and actual waste glasses, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  9. Report from the Committee of Visitors on its Review of the Processes and Procedures used to Manage the Theory and Computations Program, Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-03-01

    A Committee of Visitors (COV) was formed to review the procedures used by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences to manage its Theory and Computations program. The COV was pleased to conclude that the research portfolio supported by the OFES Theory and Computations Program was of very high quality. The Program supports research programs at universities, research industries, and national laboratories that are well regarded internationally and address questions of high relevance to the DOE. A major change in the management of the Theory and Computations program over the past few years has been the introduction of a system of comparative peer review to guide the OFES Theory Team in selecting proposals for funding. The COV was impressed with the success of OFES in its implementation of comparative peer review and with the quality of the reviewers chosen by the OFES Theory Team. The COV concluded that the competitive peer review process has improved steadily over the three years that it has been in effect and that it has improved both the fairness and accountability of the proposal review process. While the COV commends OFES in its implementation of comparative review, the COV offers the following recommendations in the hope that they will further improve the comparative peer review process: The OFES should improve the consistency of peer reviews. We recommend adoption of a “results-oriented” scoring system in their guidelines to referees (see Appendix II), a greater use of review panels, and a standard format for proposals; The OFES should further improve the procedures and documentation for proposal handling. We recommend that the “folders” documenting funding decisions contain all the input from all of the reviewers, that OFES document their rationale for funding decisions which are at variance with the recommendation of the peer reviewers, and that OFES provide a Summary Sheet within each folder; The OFES should better communicate the procedures used to

  10. RELAP5 Model of a Two-phase ThermoSyphon Experimental Facility for Fuels and Materials Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, Juan J; McDuffee, Joel Lee

    2013-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) does not have a separate materials-irradiation flow loop and requires most materials and all fuel experiments to be placed inside a containment. This is necessary to ensure that internal contaminants such as fission products cannot be released into the primary coolant. As part of the safety basis justification, HFIR also requires that all experiments be able to withstand various accident conditions (e.g., loss of coolant) without generating vapor bubbles on the surface of the experiment in the primary coolant. As with any parallel flow system, HFIR is vulnerable to flow excursion events when vapor is generated in one of those flow paths. The effects of these requirements are to artificially increase experiment temperatures by introducing a barrier between the experimental materials and the HFIR coolant and to reduce experiment heat loads to ensure boiling doesn t occur. A new experimental facility for materials irradiation and testing in the HFIR is currently being developed to overcome these limitations. The new facility is unique in that it will have its own internal cooling flow totally independent of the reactor primary coolant and boiling is permitted. The reactor primary coolant will cool the outside of this facility without contacting the materials inside. The ThermoSyphon Test Loop (TSTL), a full scale prototype of the proposed irradiation facility to be tested outside the reactor, is being designed and fabricated (Ref. 1). The TSTL is a closed system working as a two-phase thermosyphon. A schematic is shown in Fig. 1. The bottom central part is the boiler/evaporator and contains three electric heaters. The vapor generated by the heaters will rise and be condensed in the upper condenser, the condensate will drain down the side walls and be circulated via a downcomer back into the bottom of the boiler. An external flow system provides coolant that simulates the HFIR primary coolant

  11. Design, Development and Operational Experience of Demonstration Facility for Cs-137 Source Pencil Production at Trombay - 13283

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patil, S.B.; Srivastava, P.; Mishra, S.K.; Khan, S.S.; Nair, K.N.S.

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste management is a vital aspect of any nuclear program. The commercial feasibility of the nuclear program largely depends on the efficiency of the waste management techniques. One of such techniques is the separation of high yield radio-nuclides from the waste and making it suitable for medical and industrial applications. This will give societal benefit in addition to revenue generation. Co-60, the isotope presently being used for medical applications, needs frequent replacement because of its short half life. Cs-137, the major constituent of the nuclear waste, is a suitable substitute for Co-60 as a radioactive source because of its longer half life (28 years). Indian nuclear waste management program has given special emphasis on utilization of Cs-137 for such applications. In view of this a demonstration facility has been designed for vitrification of Cs-137 in borosilicate glass, cast in stainless steel pencils, to be used as source pencils of 300 Ci strength for blood irradiation. An induction heated metallic melter of suitable capacity has been custom designed for the application and employed for the Cs-137 pencil fabrication facility. This article describes various systems, design features, experiments and resulting modifications, observations and remote handling features necessary for the actual operation of such facility. The layout of the facility has been planned in such a way that the same can be adopted in a hot cell for commercial production of source pencils. (authors)

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - NMMSS Role in Preparing a New Facility for Reporting to the International Atomic Energy Agency_Gary Hirs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Role in Preparing a New Facility for Reporting to the International Atomic Energy Agency Gary Hirsch - NMMSS Purpose  This presentation covers the steps that NMMSS took to support the successful reporting to the IAEA by the U.S. Government for a new IAEA SELECT facility - LES owned and operated by URENCO USA  NMMSS reports import/export activity for ALL civilian nuclear materials to the IAEA  IAEA selected facilities have unique composition/facility code reporting requirements. 2

  13. Ion exchange removal of cesium from simulated and actual supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, G.N.; Bontha, J.R.; Carlson, C.D.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in conjunction with the Process Chemistry and Statistics Section of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), conducted this study as part of the Supernatant Treatment Development Task for the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) Applied Engineering Project. The study assesses the performance of the CS-100 ion exchange material for removing cesium from simulated and actual alkaline supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103. The objective of these experiments is to compare the cesium ion exchange loading and elution profiles of actual and simulated wastes. Specific experimental objectives include (1) demonstration of decontamination factors (DF) for cesium removal, 92) verification of simulant performance, (3) investigation of waste/exchanger chemistry, and (4) determination of the radionuclide content of the regenerated CS-100 resin prior to disposal.

  14. A facility for X-ray diffraction in magnetic fields up to 25 T and temperatures between 15 and 295 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.; Kovalev, A. E. Suslov, A. V.; Siegrist, T.

    2015-12-15

    A facility for X-ray diffraction has been developed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. It brings diffraction capability to the 25 T Florida split coil magnet and implements temperature control in a range of 15–295 K using a cold finger helium cryostat. This instrument represents an alternative to pulsed magnetic field systems, and it exceeds the static magnetic fields currently available at synchrotron facilities. Magnetic field compatibility of an X-ray source and detectors with the sizable magnetic fringe fields emanating from the magnet constrained the design of the diffractometer.

  15. Technique of estimation of actual strength of a gas pipeline section at its deformation in landslide action zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tcherni, V.P.

    1996-12-31

    The technique is given which permits determination of stress and strain state (SSS) and estimation of actual strength of a section of a buried main gas pipeline (GP) in the case of its deformation in a landslide action zone. The technique is based on the use of three-dimensional coordinates of axial points of the deformed GP section. These coordinates are received by a full-scale survey. The deformed axis of the surveyed GP section is described by the polynomial. The unknown coefficients of the polynomial can be determined from the boundary conditions at points of connection with contiguous undeformed sections as well as by use of minimization methods in mathematical processing of full-scale survey results. The resulting form of GP section`s axis allows one to determine curvatures and, accordingly, bending moments along all the length of the considered section. The influence of soil resistance to longitudinal displacements of a pipeline is used to determine longitudinal forces. Resulting values of bending moments and axial forces as well as the known value of internal pressure are used to analyze all necessary components of an actual SSS of pipeline section and to estimate its strength by elastic analysis.

  16. Making appropriate comparisons of estimated and actual costs of reducing SO{sub 2} emissions under Title IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.E.

    1998-12-31

    A current sentiment within some parts of the environmental policy community is that market-based regulatory approaches such as emissions trading have proven so effective that actual costs will be only a small fraction of what ex ante cost estimation procedures would project. With this line of reasoning, some have dismissed available cost estimates for major proposed new regulations, such as the new PM and ozone NAAQS, as not meaningful for policy decisions. The most commonly used evidence in support of this position is the experience with SO{sub 2} reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. In Title IV, a market for emissions allowances has been used to achieve reductions in sulfur dioxides (SO{sub 2}) to ameliorate acid rain. It is commonly asserted today that the cost of achieving the SO{sub 2} emissions reductions has been only one-tenth or less of what Title IV was originally expected to cost. This paper demonstrates that, to the contrary, actual costs for SO{sub 2} reductions remain roughly in line with original estimates associated with Title IV. Erroneous conclusions about Title IV`s costs are due to inappropriate comparisons of a variety of different measures that appear to be comparable only because they are all stated in dollars per ton. Program cost estimates include the total costs of a fully-implemented regulatory program. The very low costs of Title IV that are commonly cited today are neither directly reflective of a fully implemented Title IV, (which is still many years away) nor reflective of all the costs already incurred. Further, a careful review of history finds that the initial cost estimates that many cite were never associated with Title IV. Technically speaking, people are comparing the estimated control costs for the most-costly power plant associated with earlier acid rain regulatory proposals with prices from a market that do not directly reflect total costs.

  17. A new facility for the synchrotron radiation-based calibration of transfer radiation sources in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet spectral range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornagel, Reiner; Fliegauf, Rolf; Klein, Roman Kroth, Simone; Paustian, Wolfgang; Richter, Mathias

    2015-01-15

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has a long tradition in the calibration of radiation sources in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet spectral range, with traceability to calculable synchrotron radiation. Within this context, new instrumentation in the PTB laboratory at the Metrology Light Source (MLS) has been put into operation that opens up extended and improved calibration possibilities. A new facility for radiation source calibrations has been set up in the spectral range from 7 nm to 400 nm based on a combined normal incidence-grazing incidence monochromator. The facility can be used for the calibration of transfer sources in terms of spectral radiant intensity or mean spectral radiance, with traceability to the MLS primary source standard. We describe the design and performance of the experimental station and give examples of some commissioning results.

  18. RADIATION FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1961-12-12

    A radiation facility is designed for irradiating samples in close proximity to the core of a nuclear reactor. The facility comprises essentially a tubular member extending through the biological shield of the reactor and containing a manipulatable rod having the sample carrier at its inner end, the carrier being longitudinally movable from a position in close proximity to the reactor core to a position between the inner and outer faces of the shield. Shield plugs are provided within the tubular member to prevent direct radiation from the core emanating therethrough. In this device, samples may be inserted or removed during normal operation of the reactor without exposing personnel to direct radiation from the reactor core. A storage chamber is also provided within the radiation facility to contain an irradiated sample during the period of time required to reduce the radioactivity enough to permit removal of the sample for external handling. (AEC)

  19. A novel facility for 3D micro-irradiation of living cells in a controlled environment by MeV ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mckel, V. Meissl, W.; Ikeda, T.; Meissl, E.; Kobayashi, T.; Kojima, T. M.; Ogiwara, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Clever, M.; Imamoto, N.

    2014-01-15

    We present a novel facility for micro-irradiation of living targets with ions from a 1.7 MV tandem accelerator. We show results using 1 MeV protons and 2 MeV He{sup 2+}. In contrast to common micro-irradiation facilities, which use electromagnetic or electrostatic focusing and specially designed vacuum windows, we employ a tapered glass capillary with a thin end window, made from polystyrene with a thickness of 12 ?m, for ion focusing and extraction. The capillary is connected to a beamline tilted vertically by 45, which allows for easy immersion of the extracted ions into liquid environment within a standard cell culture dish. An inverted microscope is used for simultaneously observing the samples as well as the capillary tip, while a stage-top incubator provides an appropriate environment for the samples. Furthermore, our setup allows to target volumes in cells within a ?m{sup 3} resolution, while monitoring the target in real time during and after irradiation.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-LOOP FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER FACILITY FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR REACTOR THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND HYBRID ENERGY SYSTEM STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-09-01

    A new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility for advanced nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Molten salts have been identified as excellent candidate heat transport fluids for primary or secondary coolant loops, supporting advanced high temperature and small modular reactors (SMRs). Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed. A preliminary design configuration will be presented, with the required characteristics of the various components. The loop will utilize advanced high-temperature compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) operating at prototypic intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) conditions. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750°C), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa) at a temperature of ~450°C. Experiment design challenges include identification of suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. Corrosion and high temperature creep behavior are major considerations. The facility will include a thermal energy storage capability designed to support scaled process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will also provide important data for code ve

  1. ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area," ,"1990-2010 Actual, 2011-2015 Projected" ,"(Thousands of Megawatthours)" ,"Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area" ,,,1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"2011E","2012E","2013E","2014E","2015E" ,"Eastern

  2. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-01-12

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

  3. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Visitor Dosimeter Badge Tracking

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... DOL District Claims Office, by the National Institute of Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH), by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Chicago Office or by the DOE-Grand Junction Office. ...

  4. Jefferson Lab Visitor's Center - Driving in Virginia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Driving in virginia Effective January 1, 2004, all applicants for a driver's license or photo ID card must show proof of U.S. Citizenship or Legal Presence in the United States. A U.S. birth certificate or unexpired U.S. passport will serve as both proof of identity and proof of legal presence. It can also be proved using a variety of other documents, such as a Certificate of Citizenship, Resident Alien Card or a valid foreign passport with a visa, I-94 or I-94W from a participating country. If

  5. Jefferson Lab Visitor's Center - Travel Accommodations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travel Accommodations While visiting or working at JLab there are many options for living accommodations. These options vary depending upon the expected length of stay, transportation available and money allotted for housing expenses. The following information has been compiled to assist in the search for living accommodations near the lab. For further assistance e-mail User Liaison or call 757-269-6388. On-Site Accommodations SURA Residence Facility Off-Site Accommodations Negotiated Lodging

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Visitors Center

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    farming, uranium production, and environmental cleanup eras, as well as the recent ecological restoration and legacy management mission, is presented through a series of exhibits. ...

  7. W7 printing from VISITOR network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2. Click on "Add a printer" and choose "Add a local printer". 3 . Choose "create a new port" and pick "Standard TCPIP Port" from the drop down menu. 4. Type the following for the...

  8. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-04-15

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  9. ,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, " ,"2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 " ,"(Megawatts and 2005 Base Year)" ,"Projected Monthly Base","Year","Contiguous U.S.","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid"

  10. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-02-19

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  11. ,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6" ,"Released: February 7, 2008" ,"Next Update: October 2008" ,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 " ,"(Megawatts and 2006 Base Year)" ,"Projected Monthly Base","Year","Contiguous U.S.","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid"

  12. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a

  13. SU-E-T-417: A Method for Predicting and Correcting the Dosimetric Effect of a Radiotherapy Treatment Couch in Actual Treatment Position

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, J; Shen, S; Wu, X; Huang, M; Benhabib, S; Cardan, R; Popple, R; Brezovich, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although radiation attenuation by the treatment couch can be included in the calculation of radiotherapy dose, difference between planned and actual treatment couch positions can generate significant dose discrepancies. We propose a method to predict and correct the dosimetric effect of the couch in actual treatment position. Methods: The couch transmission factor, T, varies with beam angle, G, couch lateral position, x, and vertical position, y, i.e., T=T(x,y,G). If T(x,y,G) is known for a fixed couch vertical position y=h, the transmission of central-axis beam (CAX) T(x,y,G) can be obtained by T(x,y,G)=T(x{sup +},h,G), where x{sup +}=x-(y-h)tan(G) and G is the angle between the beam and the vertical axis. Similarly, the transmission of any off-CAX point can be obtained using a similar formula. We measured CAX couch transmission at a fixed couch vertical position over the couch lateral motion range for all gantry angles by continuously scanning rotating arc beams. A 2D couch transmission correction matrix can thus be generated from T(x,h,G) for each treatment field for the actual couch position. By applying the transmission correction matrix to the planned field dose, the couch effect can be predicted and corrected. To verify this method, we measured couch transmission T(x, y=10cm, G=225)(225=IEC 135) and compared to that obtained from equivalent T(x{sup +}, y=3cm, G=225) over the range of lateral motion with a step size of 2 cm . Results: The measured couch transmission factors T(x, y=10cm, G=225) are in excellent agreement with those obtained from the equivalent T(x{sup +}, y=3cm, G=225). The mean difference is 0.004060.00135. Conclusion: The couch transmission correction matrix for any couch position and beam angle can be obtained from one set of scanning measurements at a fixed couch vertical position. The dosimetric effect of the treatment couch can be predicted and corrected by applying the couch transmission correction to the planned dose.

  14. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Chang, Wen-Kuei; Lin, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-01

    Buildings consume more than one third of the world?s total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small

  15. Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

  16. The MAX facility for CFD code validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Merzari, E.; Obabko, A.; Pointer, W. D.; Fischer, P.

    2012-07-01

    ANL has recently completed construction of a fluid dynamics test facility devised to provide validation data for CFD simulation tools used to evaluate various aspects of nuclear power plant design and safety. Experiments with the facility involve mixing air jets within a 1x1x1.7m long glass tank at atmospheric pressure. A particle image velocimetry system measures flow velocity and turbulence quantities within the tank while a high-speed infrared camera records temperatures across the tank lid. The tandem of high fidelity thermal and turbulence data is particularly useful for benchmarking transient heat transfer phenomena such as thermal striping. This paper describes the MAX facility, preliminary data obtained during shakedown tests, and the results of companion CFD calculations employing RANS-based Star-CCM+ and large eddy simulations with Nek 5000. (authors)

  17. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET)...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Experimental Tests (FACET) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) Facility Ops Projects, ... link , began operation in April 2012 as a test bed for technologies that could power the ...

  18. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1995-04-01

    This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  19. Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Quite frankly, our goal was gold, but our team here surpassed that goal to achieve the platinum level. This achievement is the result of a cooperative effort involving the ...

  20. Visitor Info | NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy Frontier...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    across Paint Branch Drive. From points south and west of Washington, DC, and Montgomery County, MD: Take the Capital Beltway (I-495) and head north and east. Just after...

  1. Fernald Preserve Attracts 50,000 Visitors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gary shares his appreciation for nature and the site with friends and family, who ... a variety of services including trails, nature and history programs for all ages, a ...

  2. NREL: Technology Transfer - Kuwait Visitors Interested in NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to improve energy efficiency in their refining operations. KOC may also apply concentrated solar power technology to produce some of the steam needed in the company's operations...

  3. PIA - HSS Electronic Visitor Management System (HSEVMS) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE PIA - INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource System PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho ...

  4. Zion's New Visitor Center a Model of Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More than 2.5 million people a year visit the park, overwhelming the scenic canyon with traffic, frustrating park-goers with noise and air pollution and damaging natural resources. ...

  5. Mobile Visitors in Particular to Note Web Upgrade

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – DOE recently launched changes to Energy.gov, which includes the public website for EM.

  6. Could Material Defects Actually Improve Solar Cells?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deep-level defects frequently hamper the efficiency of solar cells, but NREL theoretical research suggests that defects with properly engineered energy levels can improve carrier ...

  7. Discomfort Glare: What Do We Actually Know?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clear, Robert

    2012-02-29

    Glare models were reviewed with an eye for missing conditions or inconsistencies. We found ambiguities as to when to use small source versus large source models, and as to what constitutes a glare source in a complex scene. We also found surprisingly little information validating the assumed independence of the factors driving glare. A barrier to progress in glare research is the lack of a standardized dependent measure of glare. We inverted the glare models to predict luminance, and compared model predictions against the 1949 Luckiesh & Guth data that form the basis of many of them. The models perform surprisingly poorly, particularly with regards to the luminance-size relationship and additivity. Evaluating glare in complex scenes may require fundamental changes to form of the glare models.

  8. DC Bus Capacitor Manufacturing Facility for Electric Drive Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon apearravt028boan2010...

  9. Supercompaction and Repackaging Facility for Rocky Flats Plant transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barthel, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Supercompaction and Repackaging Facility (SaRF) for processing Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) generated transuranic (TRU) waste was conceptualized and has received funding of $1.9 million. The SaRF is scheduled for completion in September, 1989 and will eliminate a labor intensive manual repackaging effort. The semi-automated glovebox-contained SaRF is being designed to process 63,500 cubic feet of TRU waste annually for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste will enter the process through an airlock or drum dump and the combustible waste will be precompacted. Drums will be pierced to allow air to escape during supercompaction. Each drum will be supercompacted and transferred to a load out station for final packaging into a 55 gallon drum. Preliminary evaluations indicate an average 5 to 1 volume reduction, 2 to 1 increased processing rate, and 50% reduction in manpower. The SaRF will produce a significant annual savings in labor, material, shipping, and burial costs over the projected 15 year life, and also improve operator safety, reduce personnel exposure, and improve the quality of the waste product. 1 ref., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Radiological characterization of a vitrification facility for decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asou, M. [CEA/DEN/VALRHO/UMODD, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Le Goaller, C. [CEA/DEN/VALRHO/DDCO, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Martin, F. [AREVA NC DAP/MOP (France)

    2007-07-01

    Cleanup operations in the Marcoule Vitrification Facility (AVM) will start in 2007. This plant includes 20 highly irradiating storage tanks for high-level liquid waste before vitrification. The objective of the cleanup phase is to significantly decrease the amount of highly radioactive waste resulting from dismantling. A comprehensive radiological survey of the plant was initiated in 2000. Most of the tanks were characterized using advanced technologies: gamma imaging, CdZnTe gamma spectroscopy, dose rate measurements and 3D calculations codes. At the same time, inspections were conducted to develop 3D geometrical models of the tanks. The techniques used and the main results obtained are described as well as lessons learned from these operations. The rinsing program was defined in 2006. Decontamination operations are expected to begin in 2007, and radiological surveys will be followed up to monitor the efficiency of the decontamination process. Specific rinsing of all tanks and equipment will be carried out from 2007 to 2009. Concentrated liquid solutions will be vitrified between 2008 and 2010; the decommissioning of AVM will be delayed until the end of 2010. This strategy aims at producing less than 5% 'B' type (long-lived intermediate-level) waste from the decommissioning operations, as well as reducing the dose rate and risks by simplified remote dismantling. The paper reviews the main options selected for decontamination, as well as the radiological characterization strategy. Some cost-related aspects will also be analyzed. (authors)

  11. Gamma greenhouse: A chronic facility for crops improvement and agrobiotechnology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azhar, M. Ahsanulkhaliqin, A. W.

    2014-02-12

    Gamma irradiation is one of the most common procedures in plant mutagenesis and agrobiotechnology activities. The procedures consist of chronic and acute gamma radiation. Generally, {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs are gamma radiation sources for radiation processing with relatively high energy (half-life 5.27 years for {sup 60}Co and 30.1 years for {sup 137}Cs). The energy associated with gamma radiation is high enough to break the molecular bonds and ionize atoms without affecting structure of the atomic nucleus (avoiding induction of radioactivity). The Gamma Green House (GGH) is the only chronic irradiation facility in Malaysia, located at Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia). GGH is used for induction of mutation in plants and other biological samples at low dose radiation over period of time depending on the nature and sensitivity of the plant species. The GGH consist of circular green house with 30 meters radius, control room and irradiator with interlock system. The irradiator produces low dose gamma radiation derived from Caesium-137 radioactive source. The biological samples can be exposed to low dose radiation in days, weeks, months or years. The current irradiation rate for GGH is 2.67 Gy/hr at 1 meter from the source. Chronic gamma irradiation produces a wider mutation spectrum and useful for minimizing radiation damages towards obtaining new improved traits for research and commercial values. The prospect of the gamma greenhouse is its uses in research, educations and services on induced mutation techniques for the improvement of plant varieties and microbes. In generating awareness and attract users to the facility, Nuclear Malaysia provides wide range of irradiation services for plant species and mutagenesis consultancies to academicians, students scientists, and plant breeders, from local universities, other research institutes, and growers. Charges for irradiation and consultancy services are at nominal rates. The utilization activities of the gamma greenhouse mainly cover Research and Development, Research Collaboration, Exchange of Information, Irradiation Services, Training Programs, Education, Exchange of Scientists and Seminars/ Conferences.

  12. Haiti-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    entitled Navigating Transport NAMAs, which is tailored to each target group, outlines the instruments and technologies available as well as the context for climate negotiations...

  13. SNOLAB: An International Facility for Underground Science (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    infrastructure required of next generation particle-astrophysics experiments in pursuit of low-energy solar neutrinos, neutrinoless double beta decay, and cosmological dark matter. ...

  14. Fact Sheet: Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    response to questions of the Merit Review Panel, oral presentations and site visits. ... 2) appropriateness of the proposed method or approach; 3) competency of the ...

  15. Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... response to questions of the Merit Review Panel, oral presentations and site visits. ... 2) appropriateness of the proposed method or approach; 3) competency of the ...

  16. FLEXLAB (Facility for Low Energy eXperiments in Buildings)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... industry partners including: * Philips * Daikin * Large internet technology leader * CA Utilities * Johnson Controls * BPA * Hyundai * Nissan * Tesla * &18;EE, NSEO, and others. ...

  17. D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... 00902 Fmt 8010 Sfmt 8010 Y:SGML226033.XXX 226033 wreier-aviles on DSK5TPTVN1PROD with ... 8010 Y:SGML226033.XXX 226033 wreier-aviles on DSK5TPTVN1PROD with CFR 894 10 CFR Ch. ...

  18. Evaluation of the Netherlands International Test Facility for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... smart grid systems, and (3) scalabilityperformance testing using software simulations of a single medium-voltage distribution grid with a focus on demand-response approaches. ...

  19. Use of the fast flux test facility for tritium production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drell, S.; Hammer, D.; Cornwall, J.M.; Dyson, F.; Garwin, R.

    1996-10-25

    This report provides the results of a JASON review of the technical feasibility of using the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to generate tritium needed for the enduring United States nuclear weapons stockpile.

  20. Thermal vacuum life test facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deaton, R.L.; Goebel, C.J.; Amos, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy (DOE) assigned Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility, now operated by EG G Mound Applied Technologies, the responsibility for assembling and testing General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Assembled and tested were five RTGs, which included four flight units and one non-flight qualification unit. Figure 1 shows the RTG, which was designed by General Electric AstroSpace Division (GE/ASD) to produce 285 W of electrical power. A detailed description of the processes for RTG assembly and testing is presented by Amos and Goebel (1989). The RTG performance data are described by Bennett, et al. (1986). The flight units will provide electrical power for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Galileo mission to Jupiter (two RTGs) and the joint NASA/European Space Agency (ESA) Ulysses mission to study the polar regions of the sun (one RTG). The remaining flight unit will serve as the spare for both missions, and a non-flight qualification unit was assembled and tested to ensure that performance criteria were adequately met. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  1. DC Bus Capacitor Manufacturing Facility for Electric Drive Vehicles...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt028apeboan2012

  2. DC Bus Capacitor Manufacturing Facility for Electric Drive Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt028apeboan2011

  3. Novel Muon Beam Facilities for Project X at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuffer, D.V.; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Abrams, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    Innovative muon beam concepts for intensity-frontier experiments such as muon-to-electron conversion are described. Elaborating upon a previous single-beam idea, we have developed a design concept for a system to generate four high quality, low-energy muon beams (two of each sign) from a single beam of protons. As a first step, the production of pions by 1 and 3 GeV protons from the proposed Project X linac at Fermilab is being simulated and compared with the 8-GeV results from the previous study.

  4. Measurement and Control Systems of Tritium Facilities for Scientific Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinogradov, Yu.I.; Kuryakin, A.V.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.

    2005-07-15

    The technical approach, equipment and software developed during the creation of measurement and control systems for two complexes are described. The first one is a complex that prepares the gas mixture and targets of the 'TRITON' facility. The 'TRITON' facility is designed for studying muon catalyzed fusion reactions in triple mixtures of H/D/T hydrogen isotopes over wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The second one is 'ACCULINNA' - the liquid tritium target designed to investigate the neutron overloaded hydrogen and helium nuclei. These neutron-overloaded nuclei are produced in reactions of tritium beams on a heavy hydrogen and tritium target.

  5. Configuring the National Ignition Facility for direct-drive experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eimerl, D.

    1995-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a project whose primary mission is to provide an above-ground experimental capability for maintaining nuclear competence and weapons effects simulation, and to pursue the achievement of fusion ignition utilizing solid state lasers as the energy driver. In this facility a large number of laser beams are focused onto a small target located at the center of a spherical target chamber. The laser energy is delivered in a few billionths of a second, raising the temperature and density of the nuclear materials in the target to levels where significant thermonuclear energy is released. The thermonuclear reaction proceeds very rapidly, so that the target materials remain confined by their own inertia during the thermonuclear reaction. This type of approach is called inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The proposed project is described in a conceptual design report (CDR) that was released in May 1994. Early in FY95, a collaboration between the University of Rochester and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established to study reconfiguring the NIF to accommodate direct-drive experiments. The present paper is a report to the scientific community, primarily the scientists and engineers working on the design of the NIF. It represents results from work in progress, specifically work completed by the end of the second quarter FY95. This report has two main sections. The first describes the target requirements on the laser drive, and the second part describes how the NIF laser can be configured to accommodate both indirect and direct drive. The report includes a description of the scientific basis for these conclusions. Though a complete picture does not exist, the present understanding is sufficient to conclude that the primary target requirements and laser functional requirements for indirect and direct drive are quite compatible. It is evidently straightforward to reconfigure the NIF to accommodate direct and indirect drive.

  6. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohachek, Randy; Wallace, Bruce; Winston, Phil; Marschman, Steve

    2013-04-30

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  7. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Bohachek; Charles Park; Bruce Wallace; Phil Winston; Steve Marschman

    2013-04-01

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  8. Cryogenic vertical test facility for the SRF cavities at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.; Liaw, CJ; Porqueddu, R.; Grau, M.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tallerico, T.; McIntyre, G.; Lederle, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.

    2011-03-28

    A vertical test facility has been constructed to test SRF cavities and can be utilized for other applications. The liquid helium volume for the large vertical dewar is approximate 2.1m tall by 1m diameter with a clearance inner diameter of 0.95m after the inner cold magnetic shield installed. For radiation enclosure, the test dewar is located inside a concrete block structure. The structure is above ground, accessible from the top, and equipped with a retractable concrete roof. A second radiation concrete facility, with ground level access via a labyrinth, is also available for testing smaller cavities in 2 smaller dewars. The cryogenic transfer lines installation between the large vertical test dewar and the cryo plant's sub components is currently near completion. Controls and instrumentations wiring are also nearing completion. The Vertical Test Facility will allow onsite testing of SRF cavities with a maximum overall envelope of 0.9 m diameter and 2.1 m height in the large dewar and smaller SRF cavities and assemblies with a maximum overall envelope of 0.66 m diameter and 1.6 m height.

  9. Geothermal heating facilities for Frontier Inn, Susanville, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The Frontier Inn, located in Susanville, California, is a 38 unit motel composed of six major sections (coffee shop, A frame units, apartments, back units, two story units and office). These sections were built over a number of years and exhibit widely varying types of construction. Space heating is provided by primarily electric resistance equipment with some propane use. Domestic hot water is provided primarily by propane with some electric resistance. The coffee shop uses fuel oil for both space and domestic hot water heating. The City of Susanville is currently in the process of installing a geothermal district heating system. Although the motel site is not located in the area of present construction activity, it is expected that the pipeline will be extended in the near future. This study examines the potential of retrofitting the existing heating facilities at the Frontier Inn to geothermal.

  10. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  11. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the ... DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Fermi ...

  12. Technology of mirror machines: LLL facilities for magnetic mirror...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The second facility, MFTF (Mirror Fusion Test Facility), is currently in preliminary design with line item approval anticipated for FY 78. MFTF is designed primarily to exploit the ...

  13. DC Bus Capacitor Manufacturing Facility for Electric Drive Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  14. DC Bus Capacitor Manufacturing Facility for Electric Drive Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  15. DC Bus Capacitor Manufacturing Facility for Electric Drive Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  16. DC Bus Capacitor Manufacturing Facility for Electric Drive Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  17. A facility for accelerator research and education at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, Mike; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is currently constructing the 'SRF Test Accelerator at the New Muon Lab' (NML). NML consists of a photo-emitted RF electron gun, followed by a bunch compressor, low energy test beamlines, SCRF accelerating structures, and high energy test beamlines. The initial primary purpose of NML will be to test superconducting RF accelerating modules for the ILC and for Fermilab's 'Project X' - a proposal for a high intensity proton source. The unique capability of NML will be to test these modules under conditions of high intensity electron beams with ILC-like beam parameters. In addition NML incorporates a photoinjector which offers significant tunability and especially the possibility to generate a bright electron beam with brightness comparable to state-of-the-art accelerators. This opens the exciting possibility of also using NML for fundamental beams research and tests of new concepts in beam manipulations and acceleration, instrumentation, and the applications of beams.

  18. 8,000 visitors tour Jefferson Lab: Electron accelerator shut down for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy 8 Questions with Dr. Andres Tovar, Winner of ARPA-E's LITECAR Challenge 8 Questions with Dr. Andres Tovar, Winner of ARPA-E's LITECAR Challenge April 30, 2015 - 11:21am Addthis Dr. Andres Tovar, winner of the ARPA-E LITECAR challenge, is an assistant professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. | Photo courtesy of Dr. Andres Tovar. Dr. Andres Tovar, winner of the ARPA-E LITECAR challenge, is an assistant professor at Indiana University-Purdue

  19. BER Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    BERAC COV Report on Division of Climate and Environmental Science (CES) .pdf file (1.7MB) ... BERAC COV Report on Division of Climate Change Research (CCR) .pdf file (826KB) BER ...

  20. BER Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    BERAC COV Report on Division of Biological Systems Science (BSS) .pdf file (578KB) BER Response to BERAC COV Report on BSS .pdf file (28KB) 2013 BERAC COV Report on Division of ...

  1. BES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    and responses. 2015 BESAC COV Report on Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) .pdf file (2.0MB) BES Response to BESAC COV Report on MSE .pdf file (88KB) 2014 ...

  2. NP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    NSAC COV Report on NP Program .pdf file (1.8MB) NP Response to NSAC COV Report on NP .pdf file (56KB) 2010 NSAC COV Report on NP Program .pdf file (410KB) NP Response to NSAC COV ...

  3. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Aaron T.

    2013-04-01

    Asymmetric, thermal and non-thermal dark matter and its detection. The first of these workshops (RG Flows) was held from September 17-21 with local organizers Henriette Elvang and Jim Liu, and external organizer Matt Headrick (Brandeis). There were a total of 40 participants, 27 of which were external. The conference website is http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2012/rgflows/, with slides available at http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/ 2012/rgflows/sciprog.html. The second workshop (Light DM), was held April 15th-17th. It was especially timely as it coincided with the announcment of events seen by the CDMS collaboration consistent with a possible hint of a Light Dark Matter signal. The conference website is available at: http://www.umich. edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2013/dm2013/ with slides available on-line at http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2013/dm2013/program. html.

  4. Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Research (BER) Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) Office of Workforce Development for Teachers ...

  5. OROOfficeSafeguardsandSecurityClearanceTrackingSystemandVisitorControlSystemPIA.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  6. PUBLIC STAKEHOLDER MEETING #1 U.S. Capitol Visitor Center, 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The second trend she noted is the increasingly digital and distributed power grid, which ... Woods noted the changes required in regulation as well. The speed of the transformation of ...

  7. WDTS Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees...

  8. Y-12 has almost 500 visitors from 23 states tour site during...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 3:34pm NNSA Blog B&W Y-12 employee and tour guide Bill Wilburn, ... Photo by Scott Fraker NNSA Blog Former Y-12 employee James Spicer points out the various ...

  9. B Reactor Tour Registration Opens March 2- Visitors Have Come From 60 Countries Worldwide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will open online registration for the B Reactor National Historic Landmark’s 2013 tour season on March 2 at noon. Families with children above the age of 12, along with middle schools and high schools, are invited to sign up for the coveted tour slots.

  10. Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor Experience at Historic Reactor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    RICHLAND, WASH. – Two locomotives that hauled irradiated fuel around the Hanford Site for a half-century will reach their final stop this week when they are delivered to the Historic B Reactor for preservation and public display.

  11. Lighting Retrofit Workbook: A Practical "How To" Guide for the National Park Service Visitor Centers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Workbook describes ways to maximize lighting energy savings while maintaining, or improving the lighting quality in national parks. It guides people through a lighting audit, assists in determining problem areas, and recommends a course of action. The workbook offers assistance in the development of an overall plan, suggests mechanisms for design and financial assistance, and recommends a routine maintenance program.

  12. BES Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    to BESAC COV Report on MSE .pdf file (88KB) 2014 BESAC COV Report on Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences (CSGB) .pdf file (522KB) BES Response to BESAC ...

  13. BER Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    to BERAC COV Report on ERS .pdf file (789KB) 2007 BERAC COV Report on Division of Climate Change Research (CCR) .pdf file (826KB) BER Response to BERAC COV Report on CCR...

  14. ASCR Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ASCAC COV Report on Applied Mathematics .pdf file (178KB) ASCR Response to ASCAC COV Report on Applied Mathematics .pdf file (110KB) 2012 ASCAC COV Report on Computer Science (CS) ...

  15. ASCR Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ASCR Response to ASCAC COV Report on SciDAC .pdf file (55KB) 2013 ASCAC COV Report on Applied Mathematics .pdf file (178KB) ASCR Response to ASCAC COV Report on Applied Mathematics ...

  16. Dissolution Studies With Pilot Plant and Actual INTEC Calcines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbst, Ronald Scott; Garn, Troy Gerry

    1999-04-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/ Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive A1(NO3)3 solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated >95 wt. % of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt. % dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt. % dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines.

  17. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NERC regions into the " ,"new industry organization entity that oversee electric ... associated with regional transmission organization." ," * Regional name has changed from ...

  18. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Area Power Pool (MAPP) to Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO)." ," * The MRO, SERC, and SPP regional boundaries were altered as utilities changed reliability organizations. ...

  19. CCP_FinalActual_2011_11_06.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 TROJAN DECOMMISSIONING (26,485) 1,500 (27,985) 16 WNP-1&3 DECOMMISSIONING 607 448 159 17 Sub-Total (25,878) 1,948 (27,826) 18 Gross Contracted Power...

  20. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 and Projected 2004 through 2008 " ,"(Megawatts and 2003 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power Grid","Western ...

  1. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 and Projected 2005 through 2009 " ,"(Megawatts and 2004 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power Grid","Western ...

  2. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 and Projected 2004 through 2008 " ,"(Megawatts and 2003 Base Year)",,,," " ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power ...

  3. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 and Projected 2005 through 2009 " ,"(Megawatts and 2004 Base Year)",,,," " ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power ...

  4. "Table 7a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... September 2014 Monthly Energy Review, DOEEIA-0035(201308) (Washington, DC, September 25, 2014), Table 9.10. Bureau of Economic Analysis, US Dept. of Commerce, September 2014

  5. Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

    1982-09-01

    An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-03-14

    provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP Central Facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF in Niger. This report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report facility use by total visitor days-broken down by institution type, gender, race, citizenship, visitor role, visit purpose, and facility-for actual visitors and for active user research computer accounts. During this reporting period, the ACRF Archive did not collect data on user characteristics in this way. Work is under way to collect and report these data. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006. For the first quarter of FY 2007, the overall number of users is up from the last reporting period. The historical data show that there is an apparent relationship between the total number of users and the 'size' of field campaigns, called Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs): larger IOPs draw more of the site facility resources, which are reflected by the number of site visits and site visit days, research accounts, and device accounts. These types of users typically collect and analyze data in near-real time for a site-specific IOP that is in progress. However, the Archive accounts represent persistent (year-to-year) ACRF data users that often mine from the entire collection of ACRF data, which mostly includes routine data from the fixed and mobile sites, as well as cumulative IOP data sets. Archive data users continue to show a steady growth, which is independent of the size of IOPs. For this quarter, the number of Archive data user accounts was 961, the highest since record-keeping began. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate

  7. Solar Decathlon Visitors Guide 2011, National Mall, West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C., September 23 - October 2, 2011 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    Guide to the student-designed houses, ten contests, exhibits, and workshops of the U.S. Department of Energy 2011 Solar Decathlon, held in Washington, D.C., from September 23 through October 2, 2011. Teams of college students designed and built the solar-powered houses on display here. They represent 13 U.S. states, five countries, and four continents. Now the teams are rising to the challenge by competing in 10 contests over nine days, with the championship trophy on the line. This is their time to shine. The 2011 teams may share a common goal - to design and build the best energy-efficient house powered by the sun - but their strategies are different. One house is made of precast concrete, while another 'dances' in response to its environment. Another house is meant to sit atop a building, proving the sky's the limit for energy innovation. Whatever your idea of sustainable living may be, you are bound to find it at the Solar Decathlon.

  8. Design and calibration of a test facility for MLI thermal performance measurements below 80K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boroski, W.; Kunzelman, R.; Ruschman, M.; Schoo, C.

    1992-04-01

    The design geometry of the SSC dipole cryostat includes active thermal radiation shields operating at 80K and 20K respectively. Extensive measurements conducted in a Heat Leak Test Facility (HLTF) have been used to evaluate the thermal performance of candidate multilayer insulation (MLI) systems for the 80K thermal shield, with the present system design based upon those measurement results. With the 80K MLI geometry established, efforts have focused on measuring the performance of MLI systems near 20K. A redesign of the HLTF has produced a measurement facility capable of conducting measurements with the warm boundary fixed at 80K and the cold boundary variable from 10K to 50K. Removing the 80K shield permits measurements with a warm boundary at 300K. The 80K boundary consists of a copper shield thermally anchored to a liquid nitrogen reservoir. The cold boundary consists of a copper anchor plate whose temperature is varied through boil-off gas from a 500 liter helium supply dewar. A transfer line heat exchanger supplies the boil-off gas to the anchor plate at a constant and controlled rate. The gas, which serves as cooling gas, is routed through a copper cooling tube soldered into the anchor plate. Varying the cooling gas flow rate varies the amount of refrigeration supplied to the anchor plate, thereby determining the plate temperature. A resistance heater installed on the anchor plate is regulated by a cryogenic temperature controller to provide final temperature control. Heat leak values are measured using a heatmeter which senses heat flow as a temperature gradient across a fixed thermal impedance. Since the thermal conductivity of the thermal impedance changes with temperature, the heatmeter is calibrated at key cold boundary temperatures. Thus, the system is capable of obtaining measurement data under a variety of system conditions. 7 refs.

  9. SU-E-J-233: A Facility for Radiobiological Experiments in a Large...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is 0.25 T. The dose rate of the cobalt irradiator is 16 cGymin at 100 cm SAD. EBT3 film was used to demonstrate more the system functionality. It was irradiated at 1 cm...

  10. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The first edition of this report, released in October 1982, presented physical-characteristic information for the various DOE radiologic-instrument calibration facilities located throughout the U.S...

  11. Upgrade of the BATMAN test facility for H{sup −} source development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinemann, B. Fröschle, M.; Falter, H.-D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.

    2015-04-08

    The development of a radio frequency (RF) driven source for negative hydrogen ions for the neutral beam heating devices of fusion experiments has been successfully carried out at IPP since 1996 on the test facility BATMAN. The required ITER parameters have been achieved with the prototype source consisting of a cylindrical driver on the back side of a racetrack like expansion chamber. The extraction system, called “Large Area Grid” (LAG) was derived from a positive ion accelerator from ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) using its aperture size (ø 8 mm) and pattern but replacing the first two electrodes and masking down the extraction area to 70 cm2. BATMAN is a well diagnosed and highly flexible test facility which will be kept operational in parallel to the half size ITER source test facility ELISE for further developments to improve the RF efficiency and the beam properties. It is therefore planned to upgrade BATMAN with a new ITER-like grid system (ILG) representing almost one ITER beamlet group, namely 5 × 14 apertures (ø 14 mm). Additionally to the standard three grid extraction system a repeller electrode upstream of the grounded grid can optionally be installed which is positively charged against it by 2 kV. This is designated to affect the onset of the space charge compensation downstream of the grounded grid and to reduce the backstreaming of positive ions from the drift space backwards into the ion source. For magnetic filter field studies a plasma grid current up to 3 kA will be available as well as permanent magnets embedded into a diagnostic flange or in an external magnet frame. Furthermore different source vessels and source configurations are under discussion for BATMAN, e.g. using the AUG type racetrack RF source as driver instead of the circular one or modifying the expansion chamber for a more flexible position of the external magnet frame.

  12. The Forward Tagger facility for low Q{sup 2} experiments at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celentano, Andrea

    2014-06-01

    Low Q{sup 2} electron scattering is an efficient and competitive experimental technique to provide intense, quasi-real photon beams, with a high degree of linear polarization. Such a technique will be employed in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory by having the primary 11?GeV electron beam from the CEBAF accelerator impinging on a liquid hydrogen target. Low-angle scattered electrons will be detected with the new Forward Tagger facility, while the final state hadrons will be measured with the CLAS12 spectrometer. The unique combination of the two detectors will permit to carry out a broad physics program, and to explore new possibilities for high quality physics.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: User Facilities for Energy Storage Materials Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about user facilities...

  14. MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: Materials Science(36); Nuclear Physics & Radiation Physics(73); Particle Accelerators(43); Physics of Elementary Particles & Fields(72) LANL, MaRIE Word ...

  15. EIS-0084: Incineration Facility for Radioactively Contaminated PCBs and Other Wastes, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Uranium Enrichment and Assessment prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposed Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, an incineration facility to dispose of radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biophenyls, as well as combustible waste from the Paducah, Portsmouth and Oak Ridge facilities.

  16. University of Wisconsin Ion Beam Laboratory: A facility for irradiated materials and ion beam analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, K. G.; Wetteland, C. J.; Cao, G.; Maier, B. R.; Gerczak, T. J.; Kriewaldt, K.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.; Dickerson, C.; Field, C. R.

    2013-04-19

    The University of Wisconsin Ion Beam Laboratory (UW-IBL) has recently undergone significant infrastructure upgrades to facilitate graduate level research in irradiated materials phenomena and ion beam analysis. A National Electrostatics Corp. (NEC) Torodial Volume Ion Source (TORVIS), the keystone upgrade for the facility, can produce currents of hydrogen ions and helium ions up to {approx}200 {mu}A and {approx}5 {mu}A, respectively. Recent upgrades also include RBS analysis packages, end station developments for irradiation of relevant material systems, and the development of an in-house touch screen based graphical user interface for ion beam monitoring. Key research facilitated by these upgrades includes irradiation of nuclear fuels, studies of interfacial phenomena under irradiation, and clustering dynamics of irradiated oxide dispersion strengthened steels. The UW-IBL has also partnered with the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF) to provide access to the irradiation facilities housed at the UW-IBL as well as access to post irradiation facilities housed at the UW Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials (CLIM) and other ATR-NSUF partner facilities. Partnering allows for rapid turnaround from proposed research to finalized results through the ATR-NSUF rapid turnaround proposal system. An overview of the UW-IBL including CLIM and relevant research is summarized.

  17. MATCHED-INDEX-OF-REFRACTION FLOW FACILITY FOR FUNDAMENTAL AND APPLIED RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots; Donald M. McEligot; Richard Skifton; Hugh McIlroy

    2014-11-01

    Significant challenges face reactor designers with regard to thermal hydraulic design and associated modeling for advanced reactor concepts. Computational thermal hydraulic codes solve only a piece of the core. There is a need for a whole core dynamics system code with local resolution to investigate and understand flow behavior with all the relevant physics and thermo-mechanics. The matched index of refraction (MIR) flow facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a unique capability to contribute to the development of validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes through the use of state-of-the-art optical measurement techniques, such as Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). PIV is a non-intrusive velocity measurement technique that tracks flow by imaging the movement of small tracer particles within a fluid. At the heart of a PIV calculation is the cross correlation algorithm, which is used to estimate the displacement of particles in some small part of the image over the time span between two images. Generally, the displacement is indicated by the location of the largest peak. To quantify these measurements accurately, sophisticated processing algorithms correlate the locations of particles within the image to estimate the velocity (Ref. 1). Prior to use with reactor deign, the CFD codes have to be experimentally validated, which requires rigorous experimental measurements to produce high quality, multi-dimensional flow field data with error quantification methodologies. Computational thermal hydraulic codes solve only a piece of the core. There is a need for a whole core dynamics system code with local resolution to investigate and understand flow behavior with all the relevant physics and thermo-mechanics. Computational techniques with supporting test data may be needed to address the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant during the transition from turbulent to laminar flow, including the possibility of an early laminarization of the flow (Refs. 2 and 3) (laminarization is caused when the coolant velocity is theoretically in the turbulent regime, but the heat transfer properties are indicative of the coolant velocity being in the laminar regime). Such studies are complicated enough that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models may not converge to the same conclusion. Thus, experimentally scaled thermal hydraulic data with uncertainties should be developed to support modeling and simulation for verification and validation activities. The fluid/solid index of refraction matching technique allows optical access in and around geometries that would otherwise be impossible while the large test section of the INL system provides better spatial and temporal resolution than comparable facilities. Benchmark data for assessing computational fluid dynamics can be acquired for external flows, internal flows, and coupled internal/external flows for better understanding of physical phenomena of interest. The core objective of this study is to describe MIR and its capabilities, and mention current development areas for uncertainty quantification, mainly the uncertainty surface method and cross-correlation method. Using these methods, it is anticipated to establish a suitable approach to quantify PIV uncertainty for experiments performed in the MIR.

  18. SU-E-J-233: A Facility for Radiobiological Experiments in a Large Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlone, M; Heaton, R; Keller, H; Wouters, B; Jaffray, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing medical linear accelerators with integrated image guidance by MRI. Less work has been done on the fundamental biology of cell survival in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to describe an experimental system capable of measuring cell survival response in the types of MRI-linac systems currently under development. Methods: We have integrated a cobalt irradiator with a solenoid magnet. The solenoid magnet has inner diameter of 10 cm. To enable measurement of the biological effects as a function of depth, we are utilizing the sliced gel technique, in which cells are embedded and fixed within a gelatin matrix. Irradiated cells at defined positions (sub mm resolution) can subsequently be recovered and assessed for cell survival or other biological effects. Results: The magnetic field profile in the solenoid has a peak magnetic field 36 cm below the top edge of the magnet bore and can be placed at and SAD of 100 cm. At a solenoid current of 35 A, the peak magnetic field is 0.25 T. The dose rate of the cobalt irradiator is 16 cGy/min at 100 cm SAD. EBT3 film was used to demonstrate the system functionality. It was irradiated at 1 cm depth at 100 cm SSD with a 44 field to 1.5 Gy in a 0.25 T magnetic field. The dose profile was similar between this film and the control exposure without magnetic field. Conclusion: Integrating a cobalt irradiator with a high field magnet is demonstrated. The magnetic field at the cobalt defining head was minimal and did not interfere with the functioning of this unit. Cell survival experiments can be reproduced exactly in the presence or absence of a magnetic field since a resistive magnet is used.

  19. Economic comparison of centralizing or decentralizing processing facilities for defense transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C M

    1980-07-01

    This study is part of a set of analyses under direction of the Transuranic Waste Management Program designed to provide comprehensive, systematic methodology and support necessary to better understand options for national long-term management of transuranic (TRU) waste. The report summarizes activities to evaluate the economics of possible alternatives in locating facilities to process DOE-managed transuranic waste. The options considered are: (1) Facilities located at all major DOE TRU waste generating sites. (2) Two or three regional facilities. (3) Central processing facility at only one DOE site. The study concludes that processing at only one facility is the lowest cost option, followed, in order of cost, by regional then individual site processing.

  20. Facilities for exploring molecular biology databases on the Web: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowitz, V.M.; Chen, I.M.A.; Kosky, A.S.; Szeto, E.

    1996-12-31

    We discuss criteria for evaluating and comparing the main facilities provided by molecular biology databases (MBDs) for exploring (that is, retrieving and interpreting data) on the Web. We use these criteria for examining the facilities supported by typical MBDs such as Genbank, AtDB, GSDB, GDB, and MGD (as of September 5, 1996). 19 refs.

  1. Ethanol as a fuel: design and construction of an ethanol production facility for a farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelger, E.C. III

    1981-01-01

    This dissertation describes the production of ethanol from biomass. It includes descriptions of photosynthesis, feedstock preparation, fermentation, distillation and end use. Technical problems and limitations as well as social, political, and economic aspects of producing ethanol are addressed. The potential of small-scale ethanol production and specific case studies are reviewed. A low-cost efficient design for a single farm ethanol facility is included. (DMC)

  2. Summary of radionuclide air emissions from Department of Energy facilities for CY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    DOE facilities submit annual reports to their respective EPA regional offices and to EPA headquarters describing their activities during the previous year, including estimates of atmospheric radionuclide emissions and the resulting dose to the maximally exposed member of the public. This report summarizes the information submitted to EPA by DOE facilities in their air emission reports for calendar year 1992. An overview of DOE facility compliance with the NESHAPs Subpart H dose standard is provided. In addition to the required compliance information, supplemental information on air emissions is discussed.

  3. In vivo Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility for Total Body Nitrogen and Cd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munive, Marco; Revilla, Angel; Solis, Jose L.

    2007-10-26

    A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system has been designed and constructed to measure the total body nitrogen and Cd for in vivo studies. An aqueous solution of KNO{sub 3} was used as phantom for system calibration. The facility has been used to monitor total body nitrogen (TBN) of mice and found that is related to their diet. Some mice swallowed diluted water with Cl{sub 2}Cd, and the presence of Cd was detected in the animals. The minimum Cd concentration that the system can detect was 20 ppm.

  4. Technical report for the generic site add-on facility for plutonium polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E. D.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide environmental data and reference process information associated with incorporating plutonium polishing steps (dissolution, impurity removal, and conversion to oxide powder) into the genetic-site Mixed-Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MOXFF). The incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will enable the removal of undesirable impurities, such as gallium and americium, known to be associated with the plutonium. Moreover, unanticipated impurities can be removed, including those that may be contained in (1) poorly characterized feed materials, (2) corrosion products added from processing equipment, and (3) miscellaneous materials contained in scrap recycle streams. These impurities will be removed to the extent necessary to meet plutonium product purity specifications for MOX fuels. Incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will mean that the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) will need to produce a plutonium product that can b e dissolved at the MOXFF in nitric acid at a suitable rate (sufficient to meet overall production requirements) with the minimal usage of hydrofluoric acid, and its complexing agent, aluminum nitrate. This function will require that if the PDCF product is plutonium oxide powder, that powder must be produced, stored, and shipped without exceeding a temperature of 600 C.

  5. Summary of Off-Normal Events in US Fuel Cycle Facilities for AFCI Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. J. Piet; S. O. Sheetz; D. H. McGuire; W. B. Boore

    2005-09-01

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for facilities comprising the fission reactor fuel cycle, with the exception of reactor operations. This report includes mines, mills, conversion plants, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication plants, transportation of fuel materials between these centers, and waste storage facilities. Some of the facilities discussed are no longer operating; others continue to produce fuel for the commercial fission power plant industry. Some of the facilities discussed have been part of the military’s nuclear effort; these are included when the processes used are similar to those used for commercial nuclear power. When reading compilations of incidents and accidents, after repeated entries it is natural to form an opinion that there exists nothing but accidents. For this reason, production or throughput values are described when available. These adverse operating experiences are compiled to support the design and decisions needed for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The AFCI is to weigh options for a new fission reactor fuel cycle that is efficient, safe, and productive for US energy security.

  6. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Andrei Seryi

    2010-01-08

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

  7. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  8. Development of a propulsion system and component test facility for advanced radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. O'Brien; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe

    2011-02-01

    Verification and validation of design and modeling activities for radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms undertaken at the Center for Space Nuclear Research is essential for proof of concept. Previous research at the center has driven the selection of advanced material combinations; some of which require specialized handling capabilities. The development of a closed and contained test facility to forward this research is discussed within this paper.

  9. PILAC: A pion linac facility for 1-GeV pion physics at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiessen, H.A.; White, D.H.

    1991-11-22

    A design study for a Pion Linac (PILAC) at LAMPF is under way at Los Alamos. We present here a reference design for a system of pion source, linac, and high-resolution beam line and spectrometer that will provide 10{sup 9} pions per second on target and 200-keV resolution for the ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}) reaction at 0.92 GeV. A general-purpose beam line that delivers both positive and negative pions in the energy range 0.4-1.1 GeV is included, thus opening up the possibility of a broad experimental program as is discussed in this report. A kicker-based beam sharing system allows delivery of beam to both beam lines simultaneously with independent sign and energy control. Because the pion linac acts like an rf particle separator, all beams produced by PILAC will be free of electron (or positron) and proton contamination. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Solar-central-receiver system integrated with a cogeneration facility for copper smelting. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    A cavity central receiver hybrid solar cogeneration retrofit for a smelting facility producing copper and sulfuric acid is described. Existing facilities and the southwest New Mexico site are described. The process for selection of the system configuration and subsystem criteria is described. This process involves the use of performance analyses, cost estimates, economic trade-offs, and vendor quotations and consultation. An air-based central receiver was selected, and sensible heat storage in rock is considered. A discounted cash flow analysis based upon the results of the conceptual design performance and cost estimates is performed. (LEW)

  11. Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford Site facilities for 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Although most of the facilities no longer receive dangerous waste, a few facilities continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facilities comprise 29 waste management units. Nine of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of contamination indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration profiles, rate, and extent of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect leakage, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1994 and September 1995. Groundwater quality is described for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides.

  12. Towards an Experimental Testbed Facility for Cyber-Physical Security Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgar, Thomas W.; Manz, David O.; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2012-01-07

    Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) are under great scrutiny due to large Smart Grid investments and recent high profile security vulnerabilities and attacks. Research into improved security technologies, communication models, and emergent behavior is necessary to protect these systems from sophisticated adversaries and new risks posed by the convergence of CPSs with IT equipment. However, cyber-physical security research is limited by the lack of access to universal cyber-physical testbed facilities that permit flexible, high-fidelity experiments. This paper presents a remotely-configurable and community-accessible testbed design that integrates elements from the virtual, simulated, and physical environments. Fusing data between the three environments enables the creation of realistic and scalable environments where new functionality and ideas can be exercised. This novel design will enable the research community to analyze and evaluate the security of current environments and design future, secure, cyber-physical technologies.

  13. A Test Facility for MEIC ERL Circulator Ring Based Electron Cooler Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Douglas, David R.; Hutton, Andrew M.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Nissen, Edward W.

    2013-05-01

    An electron cooling facility which is capable to deliver a beam with energy up to 55 MeV and average current up to 1.5 A at a high bunch repetition rate up to 750 MHz is required for MEIC. The present cooler design concept is based on a magnetized photo-cathode SRF gun, an SRF ERL and a compact circulator ring. In this paper, we present a proposal of a test facility utilizing the JLab FEL ERL for a technology demonstration of this cooler design concept. Beam studies will be performed and supporting technologies will also be developed in this test facility.

  14. Facility for Rare Isotope Beams: The Journey Has Begun on DOE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... rare that they can't be found naturally on earth. Instead, they're created in extreme conditions such as the centers of exploding supernovae. These isotopes decay into the elements ...

  15. A Test Facility for MEIC ERL Circulator Ring Based Electron Cooler...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    repetition rate up to 750 MHz is required for MEIC. The present cooler design concept is based on a magnetized photo-cathode SRF gun, an SRF ERL and a compact circulator ring. ...

  16. Adjusting External Doses from the ORNL and Y-12 Facilities for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doses for Unmonitored Employment-Years, 1947-60......12 Dose ... Figure 4 Y-12 Cumulative External Doses: 1947 -1960 3 Executive Summary An earlier ...

  17. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: A facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, C. M.; Brookhart, M.; Collins, C.; Khalzov, I.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Weisberg, D.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wallace, J.; Clark, M.; Flanagan, K.; Li, Y.; Nonn, P. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Whyte, D. G. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Zweibel, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other high-? phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3?m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000?G samarium cobalt magnets, which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains ?14 m{sup 3} of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized (>50%). At present, 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500?V, drawing 40?A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100?kW of electron cyclotron heating power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB{sub 6} cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through J??B torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies on MPDX require a high magnetic Reynolds number Rm?>?1000, and an adjustable fluid Reynolds number 10?1). Initial results from MPDX are presented along with a 0-dimensional power and particle balance model to predict the viscosity and resistivity to achieve dynamo action.

  18. JINR test facility for studies FEL bunching technique for CLIC driving beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolbilov, G.V.; Fateev, A.A.; Ivanov, I.N.

    1995-12-31

    SILUND-21 linear induction accelerator (energy up to 10 MeV, peak current about of 1 kA, pulse duration 50 - 70 ns) is constructed at JINR in the framework of experimental program to study free electron laser physics, a problem of two-beam acceleration and microwave electronics. In this paper we present project of an experiment to adopt the FEL bunching technique for generation of the CLIC driving beam.

  19. Feasibility study for a recirculating linac-based facility for femtosecond dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Barletta, W.A.; Byrd, J.M.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.; Green, M.A.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; Kairan, D.; Kujawski, E.; Li, D.; Lidia, S.; Luft, P.; McClure, R.; Parmigiani, F.; Petroff, Y.; Pirkl, W.; Placidi, M.; Reavill, D.; Reichel, I.; Rimmer, R.A.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.E.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Tanabe, J.; Truchlikova, D.; Wan, W.; Wang, S.; Wells, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

    2002-12-21

    LBNL is pursuing design studies and the scientific program for a facility dedicated to the production of x-ray pulses with ultra-short time duration, for application in dynamical studies of processes in physics, biology, and chemistry. The proposed x-ray facility has the short x-ray pulse length ({approx}60 fs FWHM) necessary to study very fast dynamics, high flux (up to approximately 10E11 photons/sec/0.1 percentBW) to study weakly scattering systems, and tuneability over 1-12 keV photon energy. The hard x-ray photon production section of the machine accommodates seven 2-m long undulators. Design studies for longer wavelength sources, using high-gain harmonic generation, are in progress. The x-ray pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz is matched to studies of dynamical processes (initiated by ultra-short laser pulses) that typically have a long recovery time or are not generally cyclic or reversible and need time to allow relaxation, replacement, or flow of the sample. The technique for producing ultra-short x-ray pulses uses relatively long electron bunches to minimize high-peak-current collective effects, and the ultimate x-ray duration is achieved by a combination of bunch manipulation and optical compression. Synchronization of x-ray pulses to sample excitation signals is expected to be of order 50 - 100 fs. Techniques for making use of the recirculating geometry to provide beam-based signals from early passes through the machine are being studied.

  20. A versatile facility for laboratory studies of viscoelastic and poroelastic behaviour of rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Ian; Schijns, Heather; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Mu Junjie; Delmenico, Alison

    2011-06-15

    Novel laboratory equipment has been modified to allow both torsional and flexural oscillation measurements at sub-microstrain amplitudes, thereby providing seismic-frequency constraints on both the shear and compressional wave properties of cylindrical rock specimens within the linear regime. The new flexural mode capability has been tested on experimental assemblies containing fused silica control specimens. Close consistency between the experimental data and the results of numerical modelling with both finite-difference and finite-element methods demonstrates the viability of the new technique. The capability to perform such measurements under conditions of independently controlled confining and pore-fluid pressure, with emerging strategies for distinguishing between local (squirt) and global (specimen-wide) fluid flow, will have particular application to the study of frequency-dependent seismic properties expected of cracked and fluid-saturated rocks of the Earth's upper crust.

  1. Design of the Long-term Waste Management Facility for Historic LLRW Port Hope Project - 13322

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Don; Barton, David; Case, Glenn

    2013-07-01

    The Municipality of Port Hope is located on the northern shores of Lake Ontario approximately 100 km east of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Starting in the 1930's, radium and later uranium processing by Eldorado Gold Mines Limited (subsequently Eldorado Nuclear Limited) (Eldorado) at their refinery in Port Hope resulted in the generation of process residues and wastes that were disposed of indiscriminately throughout the Municipality until about the mid-1950's. These process residues contained radium (Ra- 226), uranium, arsenic and other contaminants. Between 1944 and 1988, Eldorado was a Federal Crown Corporation, and as such, the Canadian Federal Government has assumed responsibility for the clean-up and long-term management of the historic waste produced by Eldorado during this period. The Port Hope Project involves the construction and development of a new long-term waste management facility (LTWMF), and the remediation and transfer of the historic wastes located within the Municipality of Port Hope to the new LTWMF. The new LTWMF will consist of an engineered above-ground containment mound designed to contain and isolate the wastes from the surrounding environment for the next several hundred years. The design of the engineered containment mound consists of a primary and secondary composite base liner system and composite final cover system, made up of both natural materials (e.g., compacted clay, granular materials) and synthetic materials (e.g., geo-synthetic clay liner, geo-membrane, geo-textiles). The engineered containment mound will cover an area of approximately 13 hectares and will contain the estimated 1.2 million cubic metres of waste that will be generated from the remedial activities within Port Hope. The LTWMF will also include infrastructure and support facilities such as access roads, administrative offices, laboratory, equipment and personnel decontamination facilities, waste water treatment plant and other ancillary facilities. Preliminary construction activities for the Port Hope LTWMF commenced in 2012 and are scheduled to continue over the next few years. The first cell of the engineered containment mound is scheduled to be constructed in 2015 with waste placement into the Port Hope LTWMF anticipated over the following seven year period. (authors)

  2. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  3. Preliminary Measurements From A New Flat Plate Facility For Aerodynamic Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; D. W. Nigg; E. J. Walsh; D. Hernon; M.R.D. Davies

    2005-03-01

    This paper details the design and preliminary measurements used in the characterisation of a new flat plate research facility. The facility is designed specifically to aid in the understanding of entropy generation throughout the boundary layer with special attention given to non-equilibrium flows. Hot-wire measurements were obtained downstream of two turbulence generating grids. The turbulence intensity, integral and dissipation length scale ranges measured are 1.6%-7%, 5mm-17mm and 0.7mm-7mm, respectively. These values compared well to existing correlations. The flow downstream of both grids was found to be homogenous and isotropic. Flow visualisation is employed to determine aerodynamic parameters such as flow 2-dimensionality and the effect of the flap angle on preventing separation at the leading edge. The flow was found to be 2-dimensional over all measurement planes. The non-dimensional pressure distribution of a modern turbine blade suction surface is simulated on the flat plate through the use of a variable upper wall. The Reynolds number range based on wetted plate length and inlet velocity is 70,000-4,000,000.

  4. The Facility for 500 MeV Plasma Wake-Field Acceleration Experiments at Budker INP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrenko, A. V.; Lotov, K. V.; Logatchov, P. V.; Burdakov, A. V.

    2010-11-04

    The experimental PWFA facility currently under construction at the Budker INP is described. The objective is to use electron and positron beams extracted from the VEPP-5 damping ring in PWFA experiments. Due to longitudinal beam compression many PWFA schemes including the efficient blowout regime as well as multibunch regime can be studied. The simulations of beam dynamics in the facility are presented. Also we propose a simple technique for longitudinal beam slicing using dipole kickers and collimator in the damping ring.

  5. Power Hardware-in-the-Loop (PHIL) Testing Facility for Distributed Energy Storage (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer.J.; Lundstrom, B.; Simpson, M.; Pratt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The growing deployment of distributed, variable generation and evolving end-user load profiles presents a unique set of challenges to grid operators responsible for providing reliable and high quality electrical service. Mass deployment of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) has the potential to solve many of the associated integration issues while offering reliability and energy security benefits other solutions cannot. However, tools to develop, optimize, and validate DESS control strategies and hardware are in short supply. To fill this gap, NREL has constructed a power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) test facility that connects DESS, grid simulator, and load bank hardware to a distribution feeder simulation.

  6. Cold test facility for 1.8 m superconducting model magnets at the SSCL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBarge, A.; Althaus, R.; Bird, R.; Baron, J.; Chagnon, J.; Deak, M.; Scott, M.; Vasilyev, V.; Williamson, G.

    1993-05-01

    A new facility has been constructed to measure the characteristic features of superconducting model magnets and cable at cryogenic temperatures--a function which supports the design and development process for building full-scale accelerator magnets. There are multiple systems operating in concert to test the model magnets, namely, cryogenic, magnet power, data acquisition and system control. A typical model magnet test includes the following items: warm measurements of magnet coils, strain gauges and voltage taps; hipot testing of insulation integrity; cooling with liquid nitrogen and then liquid helium; measuring quench current and magnetic field; (5) magnet warm-up. While the magnet is being cooled to 4.22 K, the mechanical stress is monitored through strain gauges. Current is then ramped into the magnet until it reaches some maximum value and the magnet transitions from the superconducting state to the normal state. Normal-zone propagation is monitored using voltage taps on the magnet coils during this process, thus indicating where the transition began. The current ramp is usually repeated until a plateau current is reached, where the magnet has mechanically settled. Many variations on the current ramping sequence are used to study different phenomena associated with magnet performance, e.g. magnetization hysteresis, eddy current losses, cryogenic stability, etc. A warm bore cryostat with a rotating coil is inserted in the magnet to measure field strength and homogeneity. These types of measurements yield multipole and current versus field data.

  7. EIS-0385-S1: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since selecting the Richton site, DOE has engaged in further consultations with Federal and Mississippi state agencies and is now considering different locations from those addressed in DOE/EIS–0385 for certain facilities associated with the Richton SPR expansion site.

  8. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-03-17

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  9. Workers Complete Asbestos Removal at West Valley to Prepare Facility for Demolition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers safely cleared asbestos from more than 5,500 feet of piping in the Main Plant Process Building. Project completion is an important step in preparing...

  10. NPH Risk Assessment and Mitigation of a SRS Facility for the Safe Storage of Tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.R.; Griffin, M.J.; Bjorkman, G.S.

    1995-10-18

    Because of the reduction in the nation`s stockpile of weapon systems a large amount of tritium is being returned to the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Due to the increased quantity of tritium returning to SRS, the SRS Tritium Facility was tasked to determine the most cost effective means to safely store the tritium gas in a short period of time. This paper presents results of the risk assessment developed to evaluate the safe storage of tritium at SRS, and highlights the structural design of the HIVES used as the cost-effective short term NPH mitigation solution.

  11. A New Facility for High-Energy Neutron-Induced Fission Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokofiev, A.; Carlsson, M.; Einarsson, L.; Haag, N.; Pomp, S.; Bergenwall, B.; Blomgren, J.; Hildebrand, A.; Johansson, C.; Mermod, P.; Oesterlund, M.; Tippawan, U.; Dangtip, S.

    2005-05-24

    A new facility is constructed for measurements of neutron-induced fission cross sections in the 20-180 MeV energy region versus the np scattering cross section, which is adopted as the primary neutron standard. The advantage of the experiment compared to earlier studies is that the fission-fragment detection and the neutron-flux measurement via np scattering are performed simultaneously and at the same position in the beam, and, therefore, many sources of systematic errors cancel out. Further reduction of systematic errors is achieved due to 'embedded' determination of effective solid angle of particle detectors using {alpha}-particles from the radioactive decay of the target nuclei. The performance of the facility is illustrated by first data obtained for angular distributions of fission fragments in the 238U(n,f) reaction.

  12. Berkeley Lab Opens State-of-the-Art Facility for Computational...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complementing NERSC and ESnet in the facility will be research programs in applied mathematics and computer science that develop new methods for advancing scientific discovery. ...

  13. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling R1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for handling and opening full-sized dry storage casks in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's plan for confirmatory dry storage project for high burnup fuel.

  14. EM Marks Completion of Facility for Low-Activity Waste Pretreatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    "This is really setting us up for success at WTP," ORP Manager Kevin Smith said of the ... EM Office of River Protection Manager Kevin Smith, far left, provides an update on the ...

  15. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists in the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: Dec 12, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Scientists in the Spotlight Every Second Saturday Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum features actual scientists and researchers talking to visitors about their favorite STEM (Science, Technology,

  16. LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Affiliates and Guests (1) Name:_____________________________________________ Z Number:____________ (2) Country of Citizenship:________________________ (3) Current Immigration Status: U.S. Immigrant/Permanent Resident J-1 Exchange Visitor F-1 Student H-1 Temporary Employee Other _____________________ (4) If Immigration Status is J-1, what is the subtype? Student Short Term Scholar Research Scholar Other______________________ (5) What is the actual primary purpose of the

  17. File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    this file. Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. If the file has been modified from...

  18. ,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    which oversees electric reliability. * NERC Regional names may be found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. " ," * Regional name and function has changed from ...

  19. What do the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Program Specs Actually...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... conditioners, air-source heat pumps, and water-source (i.e., geothermal) heat pumps up to ... In other words, under Revision 07, if a home's heatingcooling system happens to be a ...

  20. Sugars Can Actually Be Good For Your Health (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn

    2011-10-04

    Like peanut M&Ms, all cells are coated with sugars but the functions of these sugar coatings were a mystery until very recently. This presentation will highlight recent fascinating discoveries regarding why cells are coated with sugars, as well as new tools for cancer detection that take advantage of the cells sugar coating. Professor Bertozzis lab focuses on profiling changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and exploiting this information for development of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In addition, her group develops nanoscience-based technologies for probing cell function and for medical diagnostics.

  1. ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Area Power Pool (MAPP) to Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO)." ," * The MRO, SERC, and SPP regional boundaries were altered as utilities changed reliability organizations. ...

  2. ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 and Projected 2005 through 2009 " ,"(Thousands of Megawatthours and 2004 Base Year)" ,"Net Energy For Load (Annual)",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power ...

  3. ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 and Projected 2004 through 2008 " ,"(Thousands of Megawatthours and 2003 Base Year)" ,"Net Energy For Load (Annual)",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power ...

  4. Do we get actual vendor name while we searched with zip code...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    let me know? Submitted by SUTHARI on 29 September, 2014 - 08:02 1 answer Points: 0 Hi SUTHARI, we had a bug in the U.S. Utility Rate Database affecting zip codes with leading...

  5. CCP_FinalActual_FY_2015_crlPrintArea1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PLANNING 6,787 7,948 (1,161) 56 Sub-Total 15,145 18,569 (3,425) 57 Power Services Marketing and Business Support 58 POWER R&D 6,772 5,936 836 59 SALES & SUPPORT 18,293...

  6. ,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Administration, Form EIA-411, ""Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report.""" ,"Form EIA-411 for 2005" ,"Released: September 26, 2007" ,"Next Update: October 2007" ,"Table 3d. ...

  7. ,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Form EIA-411, ""Coordinated Bulk Power Supply and Demand Program Report.""" " ","Form EIA-411 for 2008" ,"Released: February 2010" ,"Next Update: October 2010" ,"Table 3d. ...

  8. Next Update: December 2011 Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. * Regional name and function has changed from Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) to Texas Reliability Entity (TRE). ...

  9. Next Update: October 2010 Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. * Regional name and function has changed from Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) to Texas Reliability Entity (TRE). ...

  10. Next Update: October 2009 Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. * Regional name and function has changed from Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) to Texas Reliability Entity (TRE). ...

  11. Design and calibration of a test facility for MLI thermal performance measurements below 80K. [Multilayer insulation (MLI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boroski, W.; Kunzelman, R.; Ruschman, M.; Schoo, C.

    1992-04-01

    The design geometry of the SSC dipole cryostat includes active thermal radiation shields operating at 80K and 20K respectively. Extensive measurements conducted in a Heat Leak Test Facility (HLTF) have been used to evaluate the thermal performance of candidate multilayer insulation (MLI) systems for the 80K thermal shield, with the present system design based upon those measurement results. With the 80K MLI geometry established, efforts have focused on measuring the performance of MLI systems near 20K. A redesign of the HLTF has produced a measurement facility capable of conducting measurements with the warm boundary fixed at 80K and the cold boundary variable from 10K to 50K. Removing the 80K shield permits measurements with a warm boundary at 300K. The 80K boundary consists of a copper shield thermally anchored to a liquid nitrogen reservoir. The cold boundary consists of a copper anchor plate whose temperature is varied through boil-off gas from a 500 liter helium supply dewar. A transfer line heat exchanger supplies the boil-off gas to the anchor plate at a constant and controlled rate. The gas, which serves as cooling gas, is routed through a copper cooling tube soldered into the anchor plate. Varying the cooling gas flow rate varies the amount of refrigeration supplied to the anchor plate, thereby determining the plate temperature. A resistance heater installed on the anchor plate is regulated by a cryogenic temperature controller to provide final temperature control. Heat leak values are measured using a heatmeter which senses heat flow as a temperature gradient across a fixed thermal impedance. Since the thermal conductivity of the thermal impedance changes with temperature, the heatmeter is calibrated at key cold boundary temperatures. Thus, the system is capable of obtaining measurement data under a variety of system conditions. 7 refs.

  12. Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans, Jim; Harper, David C; Snead, Lance Lewis; Schaich, Charles Ross

    2014-01-01

    A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

  13. EA-0995: Drum Storage Facility for Interim Storage of Materials Generated by Environmental Restoration Operations, Golden, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and operate a drum storage facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden,...

  14. Analysis of the suitability of DOE facilities for treatment of commercial low-level radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    This report evaluates the capabilities of the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) existing and proposed facilities to treat 52 commercially generated low-level radioactive mixed (LLMW) waste streams that were previously identified as being difficult-to-treat using commercial treatment capabilities. The evaluation was performed by comparing the waste matrix and hazardous waste codes for the commercial LLMW streams with the waste acceptance criteria of the treatment facilities, as identified in the following DOE databases: Mixed Waste Inventory Report, Site Treatment Plan, and Waste Stream and Technology Data System. DOE facility personnel also reviewed the list of 52 commercially generated LLMW streams and provided their opinion on whether the wastes were technically acceptable at their facilities, setting aside possible administrative barriers. The evaluation tentatively concludes that the DOE is likely to have at least one treatment facility (either existing or planned) that is technically compatible for most of these difficult-to-treat commercially generated LLMW streams. This conclusion is tempered, however, by the limited amount of data available on the commercially generated LLMW streams, by the preliminary stage of planning for some of the proposed DOE treatment facilities, and by the need to comply with environmental statutes such as the Clean Air Act.

  15. FEM calculation of eddy current losses and forces in thin conducting sheets of test facilities for fusion reactor components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biro, O.; Preis, K.; Richter, K.R. ); Heller, R.; Komarek, P.; Maurer, W. )

    1992-03-01

    The eddy current carrying conducting parts in fusion reactor models are frequently relatively thin sheets. To avoid the associated numerical problems, the surface current density is represented in this paper by a scalar quantity and, as a novelty, the magnetic field is described overall by a magnetic vector potential to treat multiply connected conductors easily. The method is applied to several problems involving fusion reactor components.

  16. System requirements specification for a solar central receiver system integrated with a cogeneration facility for copper smelting. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Detailed calculations are presented that cover the pressure drops in the pipelines added to the Hidalgo smelting plant due to the solar air system and the addition of a feedwater heater and superheater. A series of calculations is also given that addresses the performance of the flash smelting process. Additional calculations deal with the heat and mass balances for the steam system. Data on an analysis of the gas turbine and a system performance source code are included. Some specific data on power into the solar receiver from the user selected heliostat field are given for 170-meter, 190-meter, and 210-meter towers. Seven major trade areas addressed include: receiver operating pressure and temperature; selection of process heat air temperature; design point receiver power; thermal energy storage subsystem capacity; solar heliostat field optimization; gas turbine configuration and control; and tower height optimization. Analysis of the performance data of the smelting process and thermal analysis data of the cavity solar receiver for the Hidalgo smelter are given. (MCW)

  17. Acquisition of an In-House X-ray Scattering Facility for Nanostructure Characterization and Student Training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuller, Ivan K [UC San Diego

    2013-08-02

    This equipment grant was specifically dedicated to the development of a "state of the art" x-ray scattering facility...

  18. Development of the Variable Atmosphere Testing Facility for Blow-Down Analysis of the Mars Hopper Prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan D. Jerred; Robert C. O'Brien; Steven D. Howe; James E. O'Brien

    2013-02-01

    Recent developments at the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) on a Martian exploration probe have lead to the assembly of a multi-functional variable atmosphere testing facility (VATF). The VATF has been assembled to perform transient blow-down analysis of a radioisotope thermal rocket (RTR) concept that has been proposed for the Mars Hopper; a long-lived, long-ranged mobile platform for the Martian surface. This study discusses the current state of the VATF as well as recent blow-down testing performed on a laboratory-scale prototype of the Mars Hopper. The VATF allows for the simulation of Mars ambient conditions within the pressure vessel as well as to safely perform blow-down tests through the prototype using CO2 gas; the proposed propellant for the Mars Hopper. Empirical data gathered will lead to a better understanding of CO2 behavior and will provide validation of simulation models. Additionally, the potential of the VATF to test varying propulsion system designs has been recognized. In addition to being able to simulate varying atmospheres and blow-down gases for the RTR, it can be fitted to perform high temperature hydrogen testing of fuel elements for nuclear thermal propulsion.

  19. Audit Report: Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site, OAS-RA-13-04

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Audit Report: IG-0702 September 30, 2005 Use of Performance Based Incentives by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Audit Report: IG-0702 (487.45 KB) More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0736 Audit Report: IG-0863 Audit Report: IG-0412

    6 Audit Report: IG-0706 October 17, 2005 Accelerated Tank Waste Retrieval Activities at the Hanford Site The Department will not meet Tri-Party Agreement (Agreement) milestones for the retrieval of waste from the single-shell

  20. Multi-Purpose Thermal Hydraulic Loop: Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST) Facility for Support of Advanced Reactor Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-11-01

    Effective and robust high temperature heat transfer systems are fundamental to the successful deployment of advanced reactors for both power generation and non-electric applications. Plant designs often include an intermediate heat transfer loop (IHTL) with heat exchangers at either end to deliver thermal energy to the application while providing isolation of the primary reactor system. In order to address technical feasibility concerns and challenges a new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility “Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test facility” (ARTIST) is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed

  1. Design of a large-scale anaerobic digestion facility for the recovery of energy from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayhanian, M.; Jones, D.

    1996-12-31

    The California Prison Industry Authority, in conjunction with the City of Folsom, operates a 100 ton/d municipal solid waste (MSW) recovery facility using inmate labor. Through manual sorting, all useful organic and inorganic materials are recycled for marketing. The remaining organic material will be further processed to remove hazardous and inert material and prepared as a feedstock for an anaerobic digestion process. The clean organic waste (approximately 78 ton/d) will then be shredded and completely mixed with sewage water prior feeding to the digester. Off gas from the digester will be collected as a fuel for the steam boiler or combusted in a waste gas burner. Steam will be injected directly into the digester for heating. The anaerobically digested material will be moved to compost area where it will be mixed with wood faction of yard waste and processed aerobically for the production of compost material as a soil amendment. Anaerobic digesters will be constructed in two phases. The first phase consists of the construction of one 26 ton/d digester to confirm the suitability of feeding and mixing equipment. Modifications will be made to the second and third digesters, in the second phase, based on operating experience of the first digester. This paper discusses important design features of the anaerobic digestion facility.

  2. The Potential Role of a New Generation of Outdoor Building Test Facilities for Validation of Whole Building Simulation Tools

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology to reduce GHG emissions by 40% available by 2025, and cost effective. deer10_cackette.pdf (665.34 KB) More Documents & Publications Reducing Vehicle Emissions to Meet Environmental Goals Moving toward a commercial market for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles A View From The Bridge Renewable Energy Webinar Series 2015 | Department of Energy

    Learn more about the 2015 Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar Series and read detailed descriptions about each of the monthly webinars in the

  3. EIS-0110: Central Waste Disposal Facility for Low-Level Radioactive Waste, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assessed the environmental impacts of alternatives for the disposal of low-level waste and by-product materials generated by the three major plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). In addition to the no-action alternative, two classes of alternatives were evaluated: facility design alternatives and siting alternatives. This project was cancelled after the Draft Environmental Impact Statement was issued.

  4. Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste Management Facilities for Storage and Disposal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report provides findings from a set of social science studies undertaken by the Center for Risk and Crisis Management (CRCM) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which focus on public...

  5. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION FACILITIES FOR NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROWE,M.D.; KLEIN,R.C.; JONES,K.W.

    1999-07-31

    Sediment is accumulating in New York/New Jersey Harbor, and shipping channels are rapidly becoming too shallow for large ships. The Port Authority of New York/New Jersey has determined that dredging of the ship channels is essential to keep them navigable. About five million cubic yards of sediment must be removed per year to keep the channels open. Without dredging, the channels will soon become unusable, and the shoreside shipping and warehousing businesses that depend on them will fade away. The economic loss to the area would be devastating. But the deeper layers of sediment in the Harbor contain a broad range of pollutants that are hazardous to humans and the environment-a legacy of past discharges that are no longer permitted. These include heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins. As a result, there are several million cubic yards of sediments to be dredged per year that do not meet applicable criteria for ocean disposal and must be dealt with in some other way. A possible solution to the problem is to treat the dredged material to immobilize or destroy the contaminants and make the treated sediments suitable for disposal in the ocean or on land at acceptable cost. A variety of technologies can be used to achieve this goal. The simplest approach is to make manufactured soil from untreated sediment. The most complex approaches involve high-temperature destruction of organic contaminants and immobilization of inorganic contaminants. When any of these technologies are used, there is potential for risks to human health from process wastes and from the treated materials themselves. Also, disposal or beneficial use of treated materials may generate other risks to human health or the environment. A description of some of the technologies considered is given in Table 1. Success in removing or immobilizing the contaminants, which varies significantly among technologies, is reported elsewhere. This report provides a preliminary evaluation, or ``screening assessment,'' of potential occupational, public, and environmental health risks from dredging, transporting, and treating contaminated harbor sediments with thermal treatment methods to render them suitable for disposal or beneficial use. The assessment was done in stages as the project advanced and data became available from other tasks on characteristics of sediments and treatment processes.

  6. PP-420 Nogales Transmission L.L.C.- Comment from Nogales-Santa Cruz County Chamber of Commerce Visitor & Tourism Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Public comment from the Nogales-Santa Cruz County Chamber of Commerce on the Nogales Interconnection Project to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Mexico...

  7. Scientist in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientist in the Spotlight Scientist in the Spotlight WHEN: Jan 09, 2016 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Museum features actual scientists and researchers talking to visitors about their favorite Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

  8. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists in the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: Nov 14, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Scientists in the Spotlight Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum features actual scientists and researchers talking to visitors about their favorite STEM topics.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide density and structure govern the extent and distance of nanoparticle interaction with actual and model bacterial outer membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M.; Haynes, Christy L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2015-07-24

    Design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Orr, Galya; et al

    2015-07-24

    We report that design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) andmore » second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Lastly, our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.« less

  11. TESTING OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS ACTUAL WASTE TANK 5F AND TANK 12H SLUDGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, C.; King, W.

    2011-08-22

    Forty three of the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have internal structures that hinder removal of the last approximately five thousand gallons of waste sludge solely by mechanical means. Chemical cleaning can be utilized to dissolve the sludge heel with oxalic acid (OA) and pump the material to a separate waste tank in preparation for final disposition. This dissolved sludge material is pH adjusted downstream of the dissolution process, precipitating the sludge components along with sodium oxalate solids. The large quantities of sodium oxalate and other metal oxalates formed impact downstream processes by requiring additional washing during sludge batch preparation and increase the amount of material that must be processed in the tank farm evaporator systems and the Saltstone Processing Facility. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) was identified as a potential method for greatly reducing the impact of oxalate additions to the SRS Tank Farms without adding additional components to the waste that would extend processing or increase waste form volumes. In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate an alternative to the baseline 8 wt. % OA chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. The baseline OA technology results in the addition of significant volumes of oxalate salts to the SRS tank farm and there is insufficient space to accommodate the neutralized streams resulting from the treatment of the multiple remaining waste tanks requiring closure. ECC is a promising alternative to bulk OA cleaning, which utilizes a more dilute OA (nominally 2 wt. % at a pH of around 2) and an oxalate destruction technology. The technology is being adapted by AREVA from their decontamination technology for Nuclear Power Plant secondary side scale removal. This report contains results from the SRNL small scale testing of the ECC process using SRS sludge tank sample material. A Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) details the experimental plan as outlined by the Technical Task Request (TTR). The TTR identifies that the data produced by this testing and results included in this report will support the technical baseline with portions having a safety class functional classification. The primary goals for SRNL RWT are as follows: (1) to confirm ECC performance with real tank sludge samples, (2) to determine the impact of ECC on fate of actinides and the other sludge metals, and (3) to determine changes, if any, in solids flow and settling behavior.

  12. Microsoft Word - Trident Orientation for Visiting Experimenters...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15331) Operate computers on the LANL visitor network Visitor network credentials (http:register.lanl.govvisitor) Form1897 - Request to use a Non U.S. ...

  13. US ITER | About

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area Guides Area Guides Oak Ridge Oak Ridge Chamber of Commerce Oak Ridge Convention and Visitors Bureau Knoxville City About Knoxville Knoxville Convention & Visitors Bureau ...

  14. Cathedral Rock Picnic Area Rehabilitation Environmental Assessment

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Visitor Experience Additional parking spaces allow for more vehicles in the area, which increases associated noise and air pollution. This diminishes the experience of visitors who ...

  15. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    can obtain temporary visitors' passes. The laboratory will also be closed to pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Fermilab, traditionally open to visitors, closed its gates in...

  16. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Locks > Recreation * Over 500,000 Visitors Annually * Class "A" Visitor Center > Hydroelectric Power * Two Powerhouses * Five Generators * Remotely Operated By Nashville's...

  17. United States Government

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    public Internet web site visitors through the use of unapproved or undisclosed methods. ... Persistent cookies are techrlologies used to collect data from public web site visitors ...

  18. An MBE growth facility for real-time in situ synchrotron x-ray topography studies of strained-layer III--V epitaxial materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehouse, C.R.; Barnett, S.J.; Soley, D.E.J.; Quarrell, J.; Aldridge, S.J.; Cullis, A.G.; Emeny, M.T.; Johnson, A.D. , St. Andrews Road, Malvern, Worcs WR14 3PS ); Clarke, G.F.; Lamb, W. ); Tanner, B.K.; Cottrell, S. ); Lunn, B.; Hogg, C.; Hagston, W. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a unique combined UHV MBE growth x-ray topography facility designed to allow the first real-time synchrotron radiation x-ray topography study of strained-layer III--V growth processes. This system will enable unambiguous determination of dislocation nucleation and multiplication processes as a function of controlled variations in growth conditions, and also during post-growth thermal processing. The planned experiments have placed very stringent demands upon the engineering design of the system, and design details regarding the growth chamber; sample manipulator, x-ray optics, and real-time imaging systems are described. Results obtained during a feasibility study are also presented.

  19. Evaluation of Suitability of Selected Set of Department of Defense Military Bases and Department of Energy Facilities for Siting a Small Modular Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poore III, Willis P; Belles, Randy; Mays, Gary T; Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2013-03-01

    This report summarizes the approach that ORNL developed for screening a sample set of US Department of Defense (DOD) military base sites and DOE sites for possible powering with an SMR; the methodology employed, including spatial modeling; and initial results for several sample sites. The objective in conducting this type of siting evaluation is demonstrate the capability to characterize specific DOD and DOE sites to identify any particular issues associated with powering the sites with an SMR using OR-SAGE; it is not intended to be a definitive assessment per se as to the absolute suitability of any particular site.

  20. ASTA at Fermilab: Accelerator Physics and Accelerator Education Programs at the Modern Accelerator R&D Users Facility for HEP and Accelerator Applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; Piot, P.

    2013-09-01

    We present the current and planned beam physics research program and accelerator education program at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab.

  1. Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Jensen; K Johnson; JH Mather

    2009-07-14

    Clouds represent a critical component of the Earth’s atmospheric energy balance as a result of their interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation and a redistribution of heat through convective processes and latent heating. Despite their importance, clouds and the processes that control their development, evolution and lifecycle remain poorly understood. Consequently, the simulation of clouds and their associated feedbacks is a primary source of inter-model differences in equilibrium climate sensitivity. An important step in improving the representation of cloud process simulations is an improved high-resolution observational data set of the cloud systems including their time evolution. The first order quantity needed to understand the important role of clouds is the height of cloud occurrence and how it changes as a function of time. To this end, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) suite of instrumentation has been developed to make the observations required to improve the representation of cloud systems in atmospheric models.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A PILOT SCALE FACILITY FOR FABRICATION AND MARKETING OF LIGHTWEIGHT-COAL COMBUSTION BYPRODUCTS-BASED SUPPORTS AND MINE VENTILATION BLOCKS FOR UNDERGROUND MINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoginder P. Chugh

    2002-10-01

    The overall goal of this program was to develop a pilot scale facility, and design, fabricate, and market CCBs-based lightweight blocks for mine ventilation control devices, and engineered crib elements and posts for use as artificial supports in underground mines to replace similar wooden elements. This specific project was undertaken to (1) design a pilot scale facility to develop and demonstrate commercial production techniques, and (2) provide technical and marketing support to Fly Lite, Inc to operate the pilot scale facility. Fly Lite, Inc is a joint venture company of the three industrial cooperators who were involved in research into the development of CCBs-based structural materials. The Fly-Lite pilot scale facility is located in McLeansboro, Illinois. Lightweight blocks for use in ventilation stoppings in underground mines have been successfully produced and marketed by the pilot-scale facility. To date, over 16,000 lightweight blocks (30-40 pcf) have been sold to the mining industry. Additionally, a smaller width (6-inch) full-density block was developed in August-September 2002 at the request of a mining company. An application has been submitted to Mine Safety and Health Administration for the developed block approval for use in mines. Commercialization of cribs and posts has also been accomplished. Two generations of cribs have been developed and demonstrated in the field. MSHA designated them suitable for use in mines. To date, over 2,000 crib elements have been sold to mines in Illinois. Two generations of posts were also demonstrated in the field and designated as suitable for use in mines by MSHA. Negotiations are currently underway with a mine in Illinois to market about 1,000 posts per year based on a field demonstration in their mine. It is estimated that 4-5 million tons CCBs (F-fly ash or FBC fly ash) may be utilized if the developed products can be commercially implemented in U.S. coal and non-coal mines.

  3. Report on Development of Concepts for the Advanced Casting System in Support of the Deployment of a Remotely Operable Research Scale Fuel Fabrication Facility for Metal Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Marsden

    2007-03-01

    Demonstration of recycle processes with low transuranic losses is key to the successful implementation of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership strategy to manage spent fuel. It is probable that these recycle processes will include remote fuel fabrication. This report outlines the strategy to develop and implement a remote metal fuel casting process with minimal transuranic losses. The approach includes a bench-scale casting system to develop materials, methods, and perform tests with transuranics, and an engineering-scale casting system to demonstrate scalability and remote operability. These systems will be built as flexible test beds allowing exploration of multiple fuel casting approaches. The final component of the remote fuel fabrication demonstration culminates in the installation of an advanced casting system in a hot cell to provide integrated remote operation experience with low transuranic loss. Design efforts and technology planning have begun for the bench-scale casting system, and this will become operational in fiscal year 2008, assuming appropriate funding. Installation of the engineering-scale system will follow in late fiscal year 2008, and utilize materials and process knowledge gained in the bench-scale system. Assuming appropriate funding, the advanced casting system will be installed in a remote hot cell at the end of fiscal year 2009.

  4. Using the Global Environment Facility for developing Integrated Conservation and Development (ICAD) models -- Papua New Guinea`s Biodiversity Conservation Management Programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kula, G.; Jefferies, B.

    1995-03-01

    The unprecedented level of support that has been pledged to strengthen Government of Papua New Guinea (GoPNG) biodiversity conservation initiatives has re-identified an important fact that technical and infrastructure support must be complemented by programs that provide realistic opportunities for developing national capacity. Indications are that the next five years will present a range of challenging opportunities for the department to move from the intensive period of planning, which has been the focus of attention during the first phase of the National Forestry and Conservation Action Programme (NFCAP), into a sustained period of policy and project application. This paper examines processes under which strengthening programs contribute to national development objectives and complement accomplishment of the Department of Environment and Conservation Strategic Plan. An overview of the Global Environment Facility-Integrated Conservation and Development (ICAD) Project and coordination effort that are being made for biodiversity conservation projects in Papua New Guinea, are addressed.

  5. Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-02-21

    Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

  6. Preliminary results from Charpy impact testing of irradiated JPDR weld metal and commissioning of a facility for machining of irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iskander, S.K.; Hutton, J.T.; Creech, L.E.; Nanstad, R.K.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Rosseel, T.M.; Bishop, P.S.

    1999-09-01

    Forty two full-size Charpy specimens were machined from eight trepans that originated from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). They were also successfully tested and the preliminary results are presented in this report. The trends appear to be reasonable with respect to the location of the specimens with regards to whether they originated from the beltline or the core regions of the vessel, and also whether they were from the inside or outside regions of the vessel wall. A short synopsis regarding commissioning of the facility to machine irradiated materials is also provided.

  7. Development of a promising filtration method for liquid clarification in nuclear facilities. [For TMI-2 water, reprocessing dissolver solutions, ZnBr/sub 2/ shielding solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Byrd, L.A.; Ross, R.G.; Savage, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    Conclusions reached are that deep beds of diatomaceous earths are especially attractive for clarification of radioactive solutions, or slurries containing insoluble radioactive material, because the diatomaceous material provides a noncompressible medium that is retentive for a wide variety of particle sizes. Also, the diatomaceous material, because of its inorganic composition, is resistant to degradation by radiation from the retained particulate matter. Its silicious character is especially appropriate for conversion to vitrified or cement-type waste forms. This paper studied the use of diatomaceous earth to filter synthetic TMI-2 water, reprocessing dissolver solutions, and zinc bromide solutions (hot-cell shielding).

  8. Scaling and design analyses of a scaled-down, high-temperature test facility for experimental investigation of the initial stages of a VHTR air-ingress accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arcilesi, David J.; Ham, Tae Kyu; Kim, In Hun; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N.; Oh, Chang H.

    2015-07-01

    A critical event in the safety analysis of the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is an air-ingress accident. This accident is initiated, in its worst case scenario, by a double-ended guillotine break of the coaxial cross vessel, which leads to a rapid reactor vessel depressurization. In a VHTR, the reactor vessel is located within a reactor cavity that is filled with air during normal operating conditions. Following the vessel depressurization, the dominant mode of ingress of an air–helium mixture into the reactor vessel will either be molecular diffusion or density-driven stratified flow. The mode of ingress is hypothesized to depend largely on the break conditions of the cross vessel. Since the time scales of these two ingress phenomena differ by orders of magnitude, it is imperative to understand under which conditions each of these mechanisms will dominate in the air ingress process. Computer models have been developed to analyze this type of accident scenario. There are, however, limited experimental data available to understand the phenomenology of the air-ingress accident and to validate these models. Therefore, there is a need to design and construct a scaled-down experimental test facility to simulate the air-ingress accident scenarios and to collect experimental data. The current paper focuses on the analyses performed for the design and operation of a 1/8th geometric scale (by height and diameter), high-temperature test facility. A geometric scaling analysis for the VHTR, a time scale analysis of the air-ingress phenomenon, a transient depressurization analysis of the reactor vessel, a hydraulic similarity analysis of the test facility, a heat transfer characterization of the hot plenum, a power scaling analysis for the reactor system, and a design analysis of the containment vessel are discussed.

  9. Preliminary design of a biological treatment facility for trench water from a low-level radioactive waste disposal area at West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosten, R.; Malkumus, D.; Sonntag, T.; Sundquist, J.

    1993-03-01

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) owns and manages a State-Licensed Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area (SDA) at West Valley, New York. Water has migrated into the burial trenches at the SDA and collected there, becoming contaminated with radionuclides and organic compounds. The US Environmental Protection Agency issued an order to NYSERDA to reduce the levels of water in the trenches. A treatability study of the contaminated trench water (leachate) was performed and determined the best available technology to treat the leachate and discharge the effluent. This paper describes the preliminary design of the treatment facility that incorporates the bases developed in the leachate treatability study.

  10. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  11. Testing the effectiveness of mobile home weatherization measures in a controlled environment: The SERI CMFERT (Collaborative Manufactured Buildings Facility for Energy Research and Training) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.D.; Hancock, C.E.; Franconi, E.

    1990-03-01

    For several years the Solar Energy Research Institute has been testing the effectiveness of mobile home weatherization measures, with the support of the US DOE Office of State and Local Assistance Programs Weatherization Assistance Program, the DOE Office of Buildings and Community Systems, the seven states within the federal Weatherization Region 7, the Colorado Division of Housing, and the DOE Denver Support Office. During the winter of 1988--89, several weatherization measures were thermally tested on three mobile homes under controlled conditions inside a large environmental enclosure. The effects of each weatherization measure on conduction losses, infiltration losses, and combined furnace and duct-delivered heat efficiency were monitored. The retrofit options included air sealing, duct repair, furnace tune-up, interior storm panels, floor insulation, and roof insulation. The study demonstrated that cost-effective heating energy savings of about 20% to 50% are possible if weatherization techniques adapted to the special construction details in mobile homes are applied. 24 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Aaron K.; Webber, Michael E.

    2012-07-15

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-10-08

    research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. For the fourth quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users is down substantially (about 30%) from last quarter. Most of this decrease resulted from a reduction in the ACRF Infrastructure users (e.g., site visits, research accounts, on-site device accounts, etc.) associated with the AMF China deployment. While users had easy access to the previous AMF deployment in Germany that resulted in all-time high user statistics, physical and remote access to on-site accounts are extremely limited for the AMF deployment in China. Furthermore, AMF data have not yet been released from China to the Data Management Facility for processing, which affects Archive

  14. New Directions in X-ray Scattering - SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS | LUSI | PULSE | SSRL Summary Agenda On-site Travel Visitor Information Transportaion Local Attractions...

  15. Security Procedures for Golden Laboratories and Administration Offices |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Security Procedures for Golden Laboratories and Administration Offices Visitors are required to show government-issued photo identification (for example driver's license, passport, or military ID). Upon arrival to NREL's South Table Mountain site, visitors are to drive up to the East Site Entrance Building window where Security staff will confirm they are on the expected visitor list. Visitors will receive a parking placard and should park in the Research Support Facility (RSF) Visitor

  16. Visiting Us | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visitor Registration Form Visitor Registration Form As a national laboratory, formal registration is REQUIRED for all visitors coming to Argonne National Laboratory. Visitors must fill out the visitor registration form. If you require hotel accommodations while you are onsite, please contact the Argonne Guest House. You will need to bring your driver's license for entry to the Laboratory. If you are from a DOE Laboratory, please bring your badge with you. If you will be arriving Sunday, please

  17. CENTIMETER CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF THE NORTHERN HEAD OF THE HH 80/81/80N JET: REVISING THE ACTUAL DIMENSIONS OF A PARSEC-SCALE JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masque, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert; Girart, Josep M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Beltran, Maria T.

    2012-10-10

    We present 6 and 20 cm Jansky Very Large Array/Very Large Array observations of the northern head of the HH 80/81/80N jet, one of the largest collimated jet systems known so far, aimed to look for knots farther than HH 80N, the northern head of the jet. Aligned with the jet and 10' northeast of HH 80N, we found a radio source not reported before, with a negative spectral index similar to that of HH 80, HH 81, and HH 80N. The fit of a precessing jet model to the knots of the HH 80/81/80N jet, including the new source, shows that the position of this source is close to the jet path resulting from the modeling. If the new source belongs to the HH 80/81/80N jet, its derived size and dynamical age are 18.4 pc and >9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr, respectively. If the jet is symmetric, its southern lobe would expand beyond the cloud edge resulting in an asymmetric appearance of the jet. Based on the updated dynamical age, we speculate on the possibility that the HH 80/81/80N jet triggered the star formation observed in a dense core found ahead of HH 80N, which shows signposts of interaction with the jet. These results indicate that parsec-scale radio jets can play a role in the stability of dense clumps and the regulation of star formation in the molecular cloud.

  18. Results of fracture mechanics analyses of the Adorer cranes in the device assembly facility using actual, rather than conservative, stress-components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalder, E.N.C.

    1996-12-26

    Fracture mechanics analyses were done on 3 critical locations on the lower flange of the load beam of the Ederer 5 ton and 4 ton cranes in the D.A.F. Facility. This was done to determine appropriate flaw sizes for NDE detection during periodic inspection, and appropriate inspection intervals.

  19. Gate Access

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the laboratory. Visitors from outside the U.S. should be prepared to show a valid passport. See Access to the ALS for additional information about visitor procedures at the...

  20. [pic] EERE Web Site Statistics - Green Power Network

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... This information can indicate whether or not your site compels visitors to return. Updating web site content is one way to draw return visitors. | Domain Names This report lists ...

  1. [pic] EERE Web site statistics - Lose Your Excuse - Parents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This information can indicate whether or not your site compels visitors to return. Updating web site content is one way to draw return visitors. | Domain Names This report lists ...

  2. [pic] EERE Web Site Statistics - Solar Decathlon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This information can indicate whether or not your site compels visitors to return. Updating web site content is one way to draw return visitors. | Domain Names This report lists ...

  3. [pic] EERE Web Site Statistics - Topic Landing Pages

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... This information can indicate whether or not your site compels visitors to return. Updating web site content is one way to draw return visitors. | Domain Names This report lists ...

  4. [pic] EERE Web Site Statistics - Commercialization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This information can indicate whether or not your site compels visitors to return. Updating web site content is one way to draw return visitors. | Domain Names This report lists ...

  5. [pic] EERE Web Site Statistics - Lose Your Excuse

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This information can indicate whether or not your site compels visitors to return. Updating web site content is one way to draw return visitors. | Domain Names This report lists ...

  6. [pic] EERE Web Site Statistics - Office of EERE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... This information can indicate whether or not your site compels visitors to return. Updating web site content is one way to draw return visitors. | Domain Names This report lists ...

  7. [pic] EERE Web Site Statistics - Kids

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This information can indicate whether or not your site compels visitors to return. Updating web site content is one way to draw return visitors. | Domain Names This report lists ...

  8. [pic] EERE Web Site Statistics - Industrial Technologies Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... This information can indicate whether or not your site compels visitors to return. Updating web site content is one way to draw return visitors. | Domain Names This report lists ...

  9. [pic] EERE Web Site Statistics - Publication and Product Library

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This information can indicate whether or not your site compels visitors to return. Updating web site content is one way to draw return visitors. | Domain Names This report lists ...

  10. PPPL Offers Twice-Monthly Public Tours | Princeton Plasma Physics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Operations Adam Cohen leads visitors on a tour of the QUASAR stellarator. Physicist Sam Lazerson, far right, shows visitors a model of a stellarator during a tour of PPPL....

  11. WRITTEN STATEMENT OF TRACEY A. LEBEAU DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF INDIAN...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    has had over 1,490 visitors and our resource library which hosts dozens of tribally-relevant documents and tools has had over 1,250 visitors. Since July 2013, we have hosted 49...

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the meeting. Visitors from as far away as Tibet, Korea, and Tasmania visited the ARM booth. Most visitors were interested in learning about the scope of the user facility, the...

  13. [Agency Name

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    For example, visitors can enter a search term and find that information on Energy.gov; ... and (2) an extensive analysis of search terms used by visitors to reach Energy.gov. ...

  14. Bobcats at the Fernald Preserve

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fernald Preserve boasts over 10,000 visitors each year. Lately, many of the visitors to the site have been on the lookout for the elusive bobcat (Lynx rufus). Bobcats were found throughout the...

  15. Pantex signing ceremony kicks off wind farm project | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Congressman Mac Thornberry joined local dignitaries and other visitors at the Pantex Plant Thursday to make their mark on an important wind project at the Plant. The visitors ...

  16. January 2014 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Congressman Mac Thornberry joined local dignitaries and other visitors at the Pantex Plant Thursday to make their mark on an important wind project at the Plant. The visitors ...

  17. NNMCAB Board Minutes: May 2001 Jemez Pueblo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the May 30, 2001 Board meeting at Walatowa Visitor's Center Presentation DOE, Environmental Restoration, Ted Taylor

  18. SSRL SAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home General Visitor Information SLAC Map SLAC Map(.ppt) :Login area: 2007 August 2007 February 2006 July

  19. 4333 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Information 3 OSTI's Committee of Visitors, An Update Public Image File(s): COV%202009%20Group

  20. 2015 - 06 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Jun 2015 Mon, 06/15/2015 - 02:56pm Illustrious Visitors Good Hosts Real Celebrity

  1. Hanford Staff Directory - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Illness Compensation Hanford Workers Compensation Projects & Facilities HERO PHOENIX Hanford Meteorological Station Definitions Abbreviations and Acronyms Visitor Control...

  2. HAVOQGT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002909WKSTN00 Highly Asynchronous VisitOr Queue Graph Toolkit https://bitbucket.org/PerMA/havoggt/

  3. A scaling study of the natural circulation flow of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 for designing a scale-down test facility for design verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.; Revankar, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper a scaling study on the steady state natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 is described, and the scaling criteria for reproducing the same steady state thermalhydraulic characteristics of the natural circulation flow as a prototype core catcher cooling system in the scale-down test facility are derived in terms of the down-comer pipe diameter and orifice resistance. (authors)

  4. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  5. NV/YMP radiological control manual, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gile, A.L.

    1996-11-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the adjacent Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) are located in Nye County, Nevada. The NTS has been the primary location for testing nuclear explosives in the continental US since 1951. Current activities include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for US defense-generated waste, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, and non-nuclear test operations such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center (HSC). Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level nuclear waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Planned future remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures. The NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual, Revision 2, represents DOE-accepted guidelines and best practices for implementing Nevada Test Site and Yucca Mountain Project Radiation Protection Programs in accordance with the requirements of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. These programs provide protection for approximately 3,000 employees and visitors annually and include coverage for the on-site activities for both personnel and the environment. The personnel protection effort includes a DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program accredited dosimetry and personnel bioassay programs including in-vivo counting, routine workplace air sampling, personnel monitoring, and programmatic and job-specific As Low as Reasonably Achievable considerations.

  6. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Argyle, Mark Don; Lauerhass, Lance; Bendixsen, Carl Lee; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    2000-11-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  7. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Kirkham, R.J.; Pao, J.; Argyle, M.D.; Lauerhass, L.; Bendixsen, C.L.; Hinckley, S.H.

    2000-10-31

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  8. Competing Risk Analysis of Neurologic versus Nonneurologic Death in Patients Undergoing Radiosurgical Salvage After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Failure: Who Actually Dies of Their Brain Metastases?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, John T.; Colmer, Hentry G.; White, Lance; Fitzgerald, Nora; Isom, Scott; Bourland, John D.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Chan, Michael D.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To estimate the hazard for neurologic (central nervous system, CNS) and nonneurologic (non-CNS) death associated with patient, treatment, and systemic disease status in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) failure, using a competing risk model. Patients and Methods: Of 757 patients, 293 experienced recurrence or new metastasis following WBRT. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified covariates for consideration in the multivariate model. Competing risks multivariable regression was performed to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for both CNS and non-CNS death after adjusting for patient, disease, and treatment factors. The resultant model was converted into an online calculator for ease of clinical use. Results: The cumulative incidence of CNS and non-CNS death at 6 and 12 months was 20.6% and 21.6%, and 34.4% and 35%, respectively. Patients with melanoma histology (relative to breast) (aHR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.0), brainstem location (aHR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), and number of metastases (aHR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04-1.2) had increased aHR for CNS death. Progressive systemic disease (aHR 0.55, 95% CI 0.4-0.8) and increasing lowest margin dose (aHR 0.97, 95% CI 0.9-0.99) were protective against CNS death. Patients with lung histology (aHR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.9) and progressive systemic disease (aHR 2.14, 95% CI 1.5-3.0) had increased aHR for non-CNS death. Conclusion: Our nomogram provides individual estimates of neurologic death after salvage stereotactic radiosurgery for patients who have failed prior WBRT, based on histology, neuroanatomical location, age, lowest margin dose, and number of metastases after adjusting for their competing risk of death from other causes.

  9. Stereotactic, Single-Dose Irradiation of Lung Tumors: A Comparison of Absolute Dose and Dose Distribution Between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo Algorithms Based on Actual Patient CT Scans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Huixiao; Lohr, Frank; Fritz, Peter; Wenz, Frederik; Dobler, Barbara; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Muehlnickel, Werner

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation based on pencil beam (PB) algorithms has its shortcomings predicting dose in tissue heterogeneities. The aim of this study was to compare dose distributions of clinically applied non-intensity-modulated radiotherapy 15-MV plans for stereotactic body radiotherapy between voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) calculation and PB calculation for lung lesions. Methods and Materials: To validate XVMC, one treatment plan was verified in an inhomogeneous thorax phantom with EDR2 film (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY). Both measured and calculated (PB and XVMC) dose distributions were compared regarding profiles and isodoses. Then, 35 lung plans originally created for clinical treatment by PB calculation with the Eclipse planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were recalculated by XVMC (investigational implementation in PrecisePLAN [Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden]). Clinically relevant dose-volume parameters for target and lung tissue were compared and analyzed statistically. Results: The XVMC calculation agreed well with film measurements (<1% difference in lateral profile), whereas the deviation between PB calculation and film measurements was up to +15%. On analysis of 35 clinical cases, the mean dose, minimal dose and coverage dose value for 95% volume of gross tumor volume were 1.14 {+-} 1.72 Gy, 1.68 {+-} 1.47 Gy, and 1.24 {+-} 1.04 Gy lower by XVMC compared with PB, respectively (prescription dose, 30 Gy). The volume covered by the 9 Gy isodose of lung was 2.73% {+-} 3.12% higher when calculated by XVMC compared with PB. The largest differences were observed for small lesions circumferentially encompassed by lung tissue. Conclusions: Pencil beam dose calculation overestimates dose to the tumor and underestimates lung volumes exposed to a given dose consistently for 15-MV photons. The degree of difference between XVMC and PB is tumor size and location dependent. Therefore XVMC calculation is helpful to further optimize treatment planning.

  10. Community Connections: May 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In other news Science Showdown in Espaola draws close to 400 visitors; Monte del Sol Charter School students win top Supercomputing award; Future entrepreneurs develop...

  11. Why Sandia?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The goal is to reduce the number of suspicious visitors that cyberanalysts have to check, recognize and warn potential targets of nefarious emails, and, ultimately, spot spear ...

  12. Visiting | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visiting the APS If you have questions or need assistance planning your visit, please contact the APS User Office. Obtaining site access: General info: Visitors and new users |...

  13. LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (2) Country of Citizenship (3) Current Immigration Status: U.S. ImmigrantPermanent Resident J-1 Exchange Visitor F-1 Student...

  14. LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Number: (2) Country of Citizenship: (3) Current Immigration Status: U.S. ImmigrantPermanent Resident J-1 Exchange Visitor F-1 Student...

  15. US ITER | Contact Us

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organizational Charts ABOUT US ITER | WHY FUSION? | DOING BUSINESS WITH US ITER | MEDIA CORNER | JOBS | CONTACT US Visitor Information Key Contact Staff Directory Organizational ...

  16. Microsoft Word - REPORT Jefferson Lab Economic Impact FY2010...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    these contractors and visitors also spend money in the immediate area for accommodations, food and transportation. The estimation of economic impact is an analytic process that...

  17. Badging, Badge Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign national guests and employees must have an approved visit and present a valid passport and documentation of US legal status and work authorizations. Official visitors are...

  18. Badging, Real ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign national guests and employees must have an approved visit and present a valid passport and documentation of US legal status and work authorizations. Official visitors are...

  19. Washington, D.C. Office | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    must show government-issued photo identification (for example driver's license, passport, or military ID). Visitors must pass through a magnetometer and have their personal...

  20. Foreign National Access Request Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Security and Counterintelligence Division. The visitor must have a valid passport and visa (or supplemental documentation) listed below. Foreign National Personal...

  1. Search

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas of the Fermilab web site: (most useful for interested visitors) Search using Google Search the entire Fermilab web site: (most useful for staff and scientists) Search...

  2. What Kind of Energy Widgets Would Be Useful to You?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One tool Energy Savers is experimenting with is widgets, which allows you to share bits of our content with your blog or Web site visitors.

  3. Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) ENABLE Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) ESPC program by offering an alternative ... Park Visitor Center (South Rim), AZ. FEMP strives to attract small facilities ...

  4. ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National ...

  5. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

  6. Issuance, Control and Use of Badges, Passes, and Credentials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-12-19

    The change provides clarification of badges and passes used for escorted visitors into DOE facilities. Chg 1, dated 12-19-88

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Sterling Brook Custom...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    home builder: 1,300 visitors toured the home, thousands more learned about the home's advanced construction via the webpage, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest. ...

  8. Energy Innovation Portal Post, Issue 9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30, 2012 The number of business friendly marketing summaries housed on the Energy Innovation Portal continues to grow. Visitors now have access to more than 800 marketing...

  9. Smithsonian's Museum Day at Bradbury Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Smithsonian magazine subscribers and Smithsonian.com visitors. A celebration of culture, learning, and the dissemination of knowledge, Museum Day follows the free-admission...

  10. "Is There a Future for Nuclear Power After Fukushima?", Dr. Alexander...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On Saturday MBG Auditorium "Is There a Future for Nuclear Power After Fukushima?", Dr. ... For the safety of staff and visitors, PPPL security officers retain the right to ...

  11. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    talking to visitors about their favorite STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) topics. Featured in December: Teri Roberts and Isaac Salazar Stop by the Bradbury on...

  12. Site Map | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Welcome Visitor Information Job Openings Apply for Beam Time Machine Status | Schedule Conferences Seminars & Meetings Publications Safety and Training Construction Schedule Find...

  13. SMB 2014 - Imaging Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Local Restaurant Guides Visitor Information Events at Stanford Museums (Art and Science) Performing Arts Hiking Outdoors Amusement Parks Extended Day Trips Local...

  14. Lighting Retrofit Workbook: A Practical "How To" Guide for the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Retrofit Workbook: A Practical "How To" Guide for the National Park Service Visitor Centers Lighting Retrofit Workbook: A Practical "How To" Guide for the National Park ...

  15. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    visit the Lederman Science Center, the ground floor and atrium of Wilson Hall, and the Ramsey Auditorium, where signs will mark the boundaries. Visitors attending the Arts, Lecture...

  16. Campus Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Information Visitor Center TCS Conference Center APS Conference Center Bistro Freund Lodge Credit Union Entrance MAINNORTH GATE Entrance TRUCKEAST GATE Entrance WEST...

  17. REPORTING LOST, STOLEN, FORGOTTEN ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Protect Badges for LSF policy. Badge Holder NAME (Last, First, MI) SSN: SNLID: PHONE: Sandia Corp. Employee Contractor Consultant Visitor Colleague Badge Type HSPD-12...

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. * Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors ...

  19. piggy_prohibition.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    int.lanl.govsecurityintegratingdeployed.shtml References References 1) Manager's Instruction 07-004, Piggybacking Prohibition, June 2007 2) Escorting Uncleared US Visitors...

  20. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Name: Middle Name: Last Name: Institution: Title: E-Mail: Work Phone: Cell Phone: TUNLFEL Sponsor (REQUIRED): Extent of your visit: Visitor: Short Term (less than 1...

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-q | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and visitor experiences. Outside parks, the NPS will use Section 10(a) authority and to enter into settlement agreements, as appropriate, to develop measures for the protection,...

  2. Climate Leadership in Parks (CLIP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the impact that employees, concessionaires, and visitors have on climate change and air pollution. The Action Planning Module of the CLIP Tool is designed to help park staff...

  3. Nominees for NSAC Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nominations for NSAC Members Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings Members ChargesReports Charter .pdf file (629KB) NP Committees of Visitors Federal...

  4. ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Freedom of Information and Privacy Act...

  5. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan- Chapter 6, Foreign Interaction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2016 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 6, Foreign Interaction Describes DOE Headquarters procedures for approving foreign national visitors and assignees and travel to foreign countries.

  6. ASCR Budget | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Budget Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (220KB) Staff ASCR Budget ASCR Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Research ...

  7. Seaborg and Kennedy After Briefing | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    After Briefing Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (132KB) Staff BES Budget BES Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Organizational History ...

  8. Seaborg and Kennedy Arrive at AEC | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Arrive at AEC Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (132KB) Staff BES Budget BES Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Organizational History ...

  9. Program Update: 2nd Quarter 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Wind River Indian Reservation; Fernald Preserve Attracts 50,000 Visitors; LM Grand Junction Office Recognized for Combined Federal Campaign Contributions; Renewed Importance ...

  10. [pic] EERE Web Site Statistics - Social Media

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EERE Web Site Statistics - Social Media Custom View: 10110 - 93011 October 1, 2010 ... site compels visitors to return. Updating web site content is one way to draw return ...

  11. Multimedia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multimedia Multimedia Print Images Images of the ALS, including outside and inside panoramas, staff, user, and visitor pictures, and scientifc photos, are available for viewing and ...

  12. Multimedia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multimedia Print Images Images of the ALS, including outside and inside panoramas, staff, user, and visitor pictures, and scientifc photos, are available for viewing and download ...

  13. Office of the Director | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to distinguished external research visitors. The Ames Laboratory was established on May 17, 1947, following the contributions of Iowa State College to the Manhattan Project. ...

  14. OSTIblog frontpage view missing | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Collection and disclosure of information: To ensure we are able to communicate effectively with visitors to our web site, we collect some information that can be directly ...

  15. Smithsonian's Museum Day September

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Day is a day when museums and cultural institutions across the nation open their doors free of charge to Smithsonian magazine subscribers and Smithsonian.com visitors. A...

  16. Bradbury Science Museum takes part in Smithsonian's Museum Day...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Museum Day September 26 Museums and cultural institutions open their doors free of charge to Smithsonian magazine subscribers and Smithsonian.com visitors. September...

  17. Smithsonian's Museum Day at Bradbury Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Museum Day is when museums and cultural institutions across the nation open their doors free of charge to Smithsonian magazine subscribers and Smithsonian.com visitors. September...

  18. Area Information | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge: Convention and Visitors Bureau Oak Ridge: Oak Ridger Oak Ridge: Secret City History Area Attractions: To Do and See Knoxville: Clarence Brown Theater Knoxville: Frank...

  19. NREL: Education Center - Sustainable NREL Walking Campus Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainable NREL Walking Campus Tour NREL exemplifies environmental sustainability throughout its operations. Visitors to our main South Table Mountain campus will learn about ...

  20. HEPAP Agenda October 2010 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Previous Meetings 2016 HEPAP Membership ChargesReports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors Federal ...

  1. HEP Budget | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Budget High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (106KB) Staff HEP Budget HEP Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs University Research & National Labs ...

  2. HEPAP | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ChargesReports HEPAP High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings 2016 HEPAP Membership ChargesReports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors ...

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  12. HEPAP Agenda November 29-30, 2007 | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

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  15. HEPAP Agenda March 3-4, 2006 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

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