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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The

2

Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Carolina) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Carolina) Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation applies to electric generating plants and associated facilities designed for or capable of operation at a capacity of more than 75 MW. A certificate from the Public Service Commission is required prior

3

North Dakota Energy Conversion and Transmission Facility Siting Act (North  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dakota Energy Conversion and Transmission Facility Siting Act Dakota Energy Conversion and Transmission Facility Siting Act (North Dakota) North Dakota Energy Conversion and Transmission Facility Siting Act (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Line Extension Analysis

4

Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The Montana Major Facility Siting Act aims to protect the environment from

5

Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 7, 2011 June 7, 2011 Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility RICHLAND, Wash. - Construction of the largest ground- water treatment facility at the Hanford Site - a major American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project - is on schedule and more than 70 percent complete. Recovery Act workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are on pace to finish con- struction of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facil- ity this year. Funding for the project comes from the $1.6 billion the Richland Operations Office received from the Recovery Act. The 52,000-square-foot facility will pump contaminated water from the ground, remove contaminants with a combination of treatment technologies, and return clean water to the aquifer. The system will have the capacity to

6

Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume, Part 2, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This Draft Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed include: purpose and scope of the plan; site history and mission; draft plant organization; waste minimization; waste characterization; preferred option selection process; technology for treating low-level radioactive wastes and TRU wastes; future generation of mixed waste streams; funding; and process for evaluating disposal issues in support of the site treatment plan.

NONE

1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Audit Report: Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site, OAS-RA-13-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Audit Report Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site OAS-RA-L-13-04 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 9, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (Richland) awarded a contract, effective October 1, 2008, to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to remediate select portions of the Hanford Site's Central Plateau. As part of the American Recovery and

8

Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility Construction of the largest groundwater treatment facility at the Hanford Site – a major American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project – is on schedule and more than 70 percent complete. Recovery Act workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are on pace to finish construction of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility this year. Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives,

9

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees This act establishes a low-level radioactive waste disposal regional facility siting fund that requires nuclear power reactor constructors and operators to pay to the Department of Environmental Resources funds to be utilized for disposal facilities. This act ensures that nuclear facilities and the Department comply with the Low-Level Radioactive Disposal Act. The regional facility siting fund is used for reimbursement of expenses

10

Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History Workers recently razed a facility used in the historic Project Pluto, the latest American Recovery and Reinvestment Act accomplishment helping clean up traces of past nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Recovery Act workers safely hauled the last demolition waste from the Pluto Disassembly Facility to disposal facilities Jan. 11. The project is slated for completion this spring after workers finish installing a concrete cap over the below-ground level where the facility stood. Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History More Documents & Publications 2010 ARRA Newsletters

11

Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Utilities Protection Center of Georgia The Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (GUFPA) was established to protect the underground utility infrastructure of Georgia. GUFPA mandates that, before starting any mechanized digging or excavation work, you must

12

Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History Workers recently razed a facility used in the historic Project Pluto, the latest American Recovery and Reinvestment Act accomplishment helping clean up traces of past nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Recovery Act workers safely hauled the last demolition waste from the Pluto Disassembly Facility to disposal facilities Jan. 11. The project is slated for completion this spring after workers finish installing a concrete cap over the below-ground level where the facility stood. Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History More Documents & Publications 2010 ARRA Newsletters 2011 ARRA Newsletters

13

Coastal Facilities Review Act (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Review Act (Maryland) Facilities Review Act (Maryland) Coastal Facilities Review Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment This Act aims to preserve Maryland's coastal areas and to balance competing demands for resources by requiring environmental impact evaluations to be conducted prior to the approval of the construction or operation of certain facilities. Such review complements the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, which establishes a comprehensive plan for the proper use and development of energy resources in coastal areas. This Act applies to

14

Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LAS VEGAS - Workers recently razed a facility used in the LAS VEGAS - Workers recently razed a facility used in the historic Project Pluto, the latest American Recovery and Rein- vestment Act accomplishment helping clean up traces of past nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Recovery Act workers safely hauled the last demolition waste from the Pluto Disassembly Facility to disposal facilities Jan. 11. The project is slated for completion this spring after work- ers finish installing a concrete cap over the below-ground level where the facility stood. "Without Recovery Act funding, the demolition of Pluto would not have been feasible for several more years," Federal Sub- Project Director Kevin Cabble said. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the Pluto facility was used to develop the world's first

15

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Grant Program Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities in order to protect public health and safety, foster economic growth and protect the environment. Pennsylvania law establishes a fund to provide to the Department the

16

Site maps and facilities listings  

SciTech Connect

In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Virginia Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) Virginia Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Regional Industrial Facility Authorities The Virginia Regional Industrial Facilities Act is meant to aid the economic development of localities within the Commonwealth. The Act provides a mechanism for localities to establish regional industrial facility authorities, enabling them to pool financial resources to stimulate economic development. The purpose of a regional industrial

18

224-T Facility - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T Facility Projects & Facilities 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory 222-S Laboratory 224-B Facility 224-T Facility 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324...

19

Cold Test Facility - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects & Facilities > Cold Test Facility Projects & Facilities 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory 222-S Laboratory 224-B Facility 224-T...

20

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

22

GRR/Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting GRR/Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting 07MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Major Facility Siting Act ARM Title 17 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf 07MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Montana Major Facility Siting Act governs the siting of energy facilities in Montana. 7-MT-a.1 to 7-MT-a.2 - Does the Power Plant Have a Production Capacity of

23

Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility Management and Benchmarking Requirements Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility Management and Benchmarking Requirements October 8, 2013 - 2:02pm Addthis Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires agencies to report Federal facility energy and water use. Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires agencies to report Federal facility energy and water use. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is responsible for tracking Federal agency progress toward meeting Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 for Federal facility energy and water management and benchmarking. The EISA 432 Compliance Tracking System (EISA 432 CTS) tracks agency

24

Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Reporting » Energy Independence and Facility Reporting » Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility Management and Benchmarking Requirements Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility Management and Benchmarking Requirements October 8, 2013 - 2:02pm Addthis Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires agencies to report Federal facility energy and water use. Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires agencies to report Federal facility energy and water use. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is responsible for tracking Federal agency progress toward meeting Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 for Federal facility energy and water management and benchmarking.

25

Medical Testing and Surveillance Facilities - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Us > Hanford Site Wide Programs > Beryllium Program > Medical Testing and Surveillance Facilities About Us Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Points of Contact Beryllium...

26

Progress Continues Post-Recovery Act Award at Hanford Site |...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Progress Continues Post-Recovery Act Award at Hanford Site Progress Continues Post-Recovery Act Award at Hanford Site American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work at the Hanford...

27

WCI | Cutting-Edge Facilities | Site 300 Experimental Test Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site 300 Site Access Contained Firing Facility (CFF) Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) What is Site 300? Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 is an experimental test site operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. It is situated on 7,000 acres in rural foothills approximately six miles southwest of downtown Tracy and 15 miles southeast of Livermore. Site 300 was established in 1955 as a non-nuclear explosives test facility to support Livermore Laboratory's national security mission. The site gets its name from the early days of Lawrence Livermore, when the main laboratory was called Site 200 and the test facility was Site 300 (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was Site 100). Today, work at Site 300

28

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Grace Road Site (631-22G)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities and documents the results of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation conducted at Grace Road Site on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

Palmer, E.

1998-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

29

Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Thomas L. McCall, Jr. http:www.em.doe.govffaaortsca.html 4252001 Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agree.. Page 12 of 26 Deputy...

30

Preliminary siting characterization Salt Disposition Facility - Site B  

SciTech Connect

A siting and reconnaissance geotechnical program has been completed in S-Area at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This program investigated the subsurface conditions for the area known as ``Salt Disposition Facility (SDF), Site B'' located northeast of H-Area and within the S-Area. Data acquired from the Site B investigation includes both field exploration and laboratory test data.

Wyatt, D.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

31

Site Visit Report, Hanford Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Site Visit Report, Hanford Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility - January 2011 Site Visit Report, Hanford Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility - January 2011 January 2011 Hanford...

32

Nevada Test Site Sensor Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

A Sensor Test Facility (STF) was recently established at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). It has been used for a series of sensor tests that have demonstrated the usefulness of the testbed. The facility consists of a cut-and-cover bunker complex and the two square mile surrounding area. The STF was developed as a scientific testbed optimized for the development and evaluation of advanced sensor systems, including ground sensor systems designed to identify and detect hardened underground facilities. This was accomplished by identifying a facility in a remote location where seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference would be minimal, establishing a testbed that would be accommodating to field testing, and conducting a thorough geophysical characterization of the area surrounding the facility in order to understand the local geology and its effects on geophysical signals emanating from the facility. The STF is representative of a number of cut-and-cover bunkers around the world that are used for the manufacture and/or storage of weapons of mass destruction. This paper provides a general description of the Nevada Test Site, the Sensor Test Facility, and the Geophysical Site Characterization.

Gomez, B.J.; Boyer, W.B.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Site and facility transportation services planning documents  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) will eventually ship Purchasers' (10 CFR 961.3) spent nuclear fuel from approximately 122 commercial nuclear facilities. The preparation and processing of Site and Facility Specific Transportation Services Planning Documents (SPDs) and Site Specific Servicing Plans (SSSPs) provides a focus for advanced planning and the actual shipping of waste, as well as the overall development of transportation requirements for the waste transportation system. SPDs will be prepared for each of the affected nuclear waste facilities over the next 2 years with initial emphasis on facilities likely to be served during the earliest years of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS) operations. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Ratledge, J.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Danese, L.; Schmid, S. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Siting Act (Florida) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Siting Act (Florida) Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Siting Act (Florida) Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Siting Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes a centralized and coordinated permitting process for the location of natural gas transmission pipeline corridors and the construction and maintenance of natural gas transmission pipelines. The Act intends to achieve a reasonable balance between the need for the natural

35

Regional analysis of energy facility siting  

SciTech Connect

This paper has examined some of the regional environmental parameters of energy facility siting, with emphasis on air quality impacts. An example of a siting optimization study was presented, and it was shown how difficult it presently is to specify an environmental objective function that is universally applicable. The importance of regional background effects was discussed, and long-range transport models were used to analyze the relative importance of local and long-range impacts.

Lipfert, F W; Meier, P M; Kleinman, L I

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K-West Annex Facility - April 2014 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility - April 2014 April 2014 Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility...

37

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the workers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

38

On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

72.1 0614 On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report June 2014 6319-D6320 8972.2 0614 East Face Cell 1 West Face Cell 1 6319D-6322 6319D-6346 8972.3 0614 North Face Cell 1...

39

Site & Facility Restoration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Restoration Restoration Site & Facility Restoration Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) is the process of taking an active/excess/abandoned facility to a final disposition end state. Because of residual radioactivity, other hazardous constituents, and the physical condition of EM's facilities, D&D presents unique hazards that must be addressed from a safety, programmatic, environmental, and technological standpoint. Read more Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic

40

National Ignition Facility Project Site Safety Program  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presents safety protocols and requirements that management and workers shall follow to assure a safe and healthful work environment during activities performed on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project Site Safety Program (NPSSP) requires that activities at the NIF Project site be performed in accordance with the ''LLNL ES&H Manual'' and the augmented set of controls and processes described in this NIF Project Site Safety Program. Specifically, this document: (1) Defines the fundamental NIF site safety philosophy. (2) Defines the areas covered by this safety program (see Appendix B). (3) Identifies management roles and responsibilities. (4) Defines core safety management processes. (5) Identifies NIF site-specific safety requirements. This NPSSP sets forth the responsibilities, requirements, rules, policies, and regulations for workers involved in work activities performed on the NIF Project site. Workers are required to implement measures to create a universal awareness that promotes safe practice at the work site and will achieve NIF management objectives in preventing accidents and illnesses. ES&H requirements are consistent with the ''LLNL ES&H Manual''. This NPSSP and implementing procedures (e.g., Management Walkabout, special work procedures, etc.,) are a comprehensive safety program that applies to NIF workers on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project site includes the B581/B681 site and support areas shown in Appendix B.

Dun, C

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Effective safety procedures in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory would have provided protections in the event that the raging Las Conchas fire had spread to the site of an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project. "Our procedures not only placed the waste excavation site, Materials Disposal Area B (MDA-B), into a safe posture so it was well protected during the fire, but also allowed us to resume work quickly," said Project Director Al Chaloupka. Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire More Documents & Publications Los Alamos Lab Completes Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used in the 1940s

42

Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Response Act (Georgia) Site Response Act (Georgia) Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Public Benefits Fund Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act is Georgia's version of

43

Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Jump to: navigation, search Name Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Short Name EFSEC Place Olympia, Washington Zip 98504 Website http://www.efsec.wa.gov/defaul References EFSEC: Energy Facility Siting Evaluation Council[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Washington State Energy Facility Siting Council (EFSEC) oversees the siting process for major energy facilities in the State of Washington. EFSEC coordinates all evaluation and licensing steps for siting certain energy facilities. References ↑ "EFSEC: Energy Facility Siting Evaluation Council" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Washington_State_Energy_Facility_Site_Evaluation_Council&oldid=694902

44

Chapter 2 Transmission Facility Siting, Route Segments and Action...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

facilities, such as the proposed I-5 Project. It describes the general factors that BPA considers in siting potential new facilities. It then discusses how potential...

45

Site Location of Development Act (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location of Development Act (Maine) Location of Development Act (Maine) Site Location of Development Act (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Site Location of Development Act regulates the locations chosen for

46

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposal Facility U Plant Vitrification Plant Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility Waste...

47

Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment For the first time in history, workers at the Idaho site achieved success in the initial cleanup of potentially dangerous sodium in a decommissioned nuclear reactor using an innovative treatment process. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act invested $70 million in the project, which employs 130 workers. DOE officials cheered the outcome and praised the team that designed and implemented the innovative sodium treatment for which the DOE has filed a provisional patent application. Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment More Documents & Publications Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop

48

RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual Progress Report for 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress during 1989 of 16 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 25 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility. Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 40 refs., 75 figs., 6 tabs.

Smith, R.M.; Gorst, W.R. (eds.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Minnesota Power Plant Siting Act (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Plant Siting Act (Minnesota) Power Plant Siting Act (Minnesota) Minnesota Power Plant Siting Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This Act regulates the siting of large electric power generating plants, which are defined as plants designed for or capable of operating with a

50

Florida Electric Transmission Line Siting Act (Florida) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Transmission Line Siting Act (Florida) Electric Transmission Line Siting Act (Florida) Florida Electric Transmission Line Siting Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection The Transmission Line Siting Act (TLSA) is the state's centralized process for licensing electrical transmission lines which; (a) are 230 kV or larger; (b) cross a county line; and, (c) are 15 miles or longer. An

51

Florida Electrical Power Plant Siting Act (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrical Power Plant Siting Act (Florida) Electrical Power Plant Siting Act (Florida) Florida Electrical Power Plant Siting Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Solar Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection The Power Plant Siting Act (PPSA) is the state's centralized process for licensing large power plants. One license-a certification- replaces local and state permits. Local governments and state agencies within whose jurisdiction the power plant is to be built participate in the process. For

52

Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Receiving and Processing Facility Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility Waste Treatment Plant Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Email Email Page | Print Print...

53

Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level nuclear waste facilities. This legislation describes the factors considered by the Board in making siting decisions. The Board is authorized to enact rules and regulations pertaining to the siting of hazardous and low-level nuclear

54

Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC has been able to create/save thousands of jobs through the Recovery Act. These are the stories of just a few of the new hires.

Clark, Doug; Picciano, Bill; Culpepper, Kelli; Cole, Nancy; Oliver, Rahmel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC has been able to create/save thousands of jobs through the Recovery Act. These are the stories of just a few of the new hires.

Skila Harris

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC has been able to create/save thousands of jobs through the Recovery Act. These are the stories of just a few of the new hires.

Clark, Doug; Picciano, Bill; Culpepper, Kelli; Cole, Nancy; Oliver, Rahmel;

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

57

Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC has been able to create/save thousands of jobs through the Recovery Act. These are the stories of just a few of the new hires.

Skila Harris

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The munitions provisions of the Federal Facility Compliance Act  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA) was signed by President Bush on October 6, 1992. This Act amends the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the primary law governing hazardous waste management in the US The most significant provision of the FFCA was the waiver of sovereign immunity. This waiver subjects Federal facilities to the same ``incentives`` as the private sector for compliance. While the waiver has broad implications for all Federal facilities, other provisions of the FFCA impact specific sectors of the Federal complex. The focus of this paper is the FFCA Munitions Provisions, which have the potential to change some aspects of the structure of munitions management within the military. The Munitions Provisions, contained in Section 107 of the FFCA, modifies Section 3004 of RCRA by adding a new subsection (y) on Munitions. Section 107 requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop, after consultation with the Department of Defense (DOD) and appropriate State officials, regulations identifying when military munitions (including conventional and chemical munitions) become hazardous waste, and to provide for the safe transportation and storage of such waste. The FFCA requires EPA to promulgate the final ``Munitions Rule`` by October 6, 1994. These are the only provisions of the FFCA that require a new rulemaking. It is clear that the Munitions Rule could have a significant effect on the way in which DOD manages munitions. Demilitarization, range management, training activities, and emergency response actions may be affected. It is important for DOD, the Services, and individual installations, to be aware of potential impacts of the FFCA on munitions management operations. The purpose of this paper is to review several important munitions Rule issues, and to discuss potential impacts of these issues.

Kimmell, T.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Green, D.R. [Brown and Root Environmental, Houston, TX (United States); Queen, R. [Army Environmental Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Implemntation of the Recovery Act at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of the Recovery Act Implementation of the Recovery Act at the Savannah River Site OAS-RA-L-11-12 September 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 29, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: Daniel M. Weeber, Director Environment, Technology, and Corporate Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Implementation of the Recovery Act at the Savannah River Site" Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-11-12 BACKGROUND The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provided the Department of Energy (Department) $5.1 billion for Defense Environmental Cleanup. These funds have afforded the Department's Office of Environmental Management (EM) the opportunity to reduce

60

Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 13, 2011 July 13, 2011 Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - Effective safety procedures in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory would have provided protections in the event that the raging Las Conchas fire had spread to the site of an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project. "Our procedures not only placed the waste excavation site, Materials Disposal Area B (MDA-B), into a safe posture so it was well protected during the fire, but also allowed us to resume work quickly," said Project Director Al Chaloupka. The largest wildfire in New Mexico history forced the Lab to close for more than a week. While firefighters battled the fire, Recovery Act project officials were making plans to re-start the Recovery Act excavation of MDA-B when it was safe to return to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Method for siting detectors within a facility  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method, system and article of manufacture of siting one or more detectors in a facility represented with zones are provided. Signals S.sub.i,j representing an effect in zone j in response to a release of contaminant in zone i for one or more flow conditions are provided. A candidate architecture has one or more candidate zones. A limiting case signal is determined for each flow condition for multiple candidate architectures. The limiting case signal is a smallest system signal of multiple system signals associated with a release in a zone. Each system signal is a maximum one of the signals representing the effect in the candidate zones from the release in one zone for the flow condition. For each candidate architecture, a robust limiting case signal is determined based on a minimum of the limiting case signals. One candidate architecture is selected based on the robust limiting case signals.

Gleason, Nathaniel Jeremy Meyer (Livermore, CA)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

62

Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives, Railcars Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives, Railcars With the help of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Hanford Site is preserving the history of its locomotives and railcars as workers clean up the legacy of the Cold War. In the recently completed railcar project – a $5.5 million effort funded by the Recovery Act – the Richland Operations Office and its contractors moved two locomotives and two cask cars onto reclaimed track at the B Reactor for permanent public display. Designated a National Historic Landmark in August 2008, the B Reactor is slated to become part of the national park system commemorating the Manhattan Project and is open for

63

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Siting (Connecticut) Facilities Siting (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure,

64

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) environmental checklist forms for 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 304 Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 304 Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The 304 Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tritium Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 December 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of preparedness for severe natural phenomena events (NPEs) at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Savannah River Site's (SRS's) Tritium Facilities (TF). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations performed this review to evaluate the processes for identifying emergency response capabilities and maintaining them in a state of readiness in case of a severe NPE.

66

Guidelines for Applicants for Energy Facility Site Certificates...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Guidelines for Applicants for Energy Facility Site CertificatesPermittingRegulatory...

67

On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8947.1 8947.1 09/13 On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report September 2013 6319-D6242 8947.2 09/13 East Face Cell 1 West Face Cell 1 6319D-6208 6319D-6231 8947.3 09/13 North Face Cell 1 North Drainage (looking west) 6319D-6206 6319D-6205 8947.4 09/13 East Face Cell 2 West Face Cell 2 6319D-6230 6319D-6209 8947.5 09/13 East Face Cell 3 West Face Cell 3 6319D-6229 6319D-6210 8947.6 09/13 East Face Cell 4 West Face Cell 4 6319D-6227 6319D-62111 8947.7 09/13 East Face Cell 5 West Face Cell 5 6319D-6226 6319D-6213 8947.8 09/13 East Face Cell 6 6319D-6214 6319D-6225 West Face Cell 6 8947.9 09/13 East Face Cell 7 6319D-6215 6319D-6223 West Face Cell 7 8947.10 09/13 East Face Cell 8 6319D-6217 6319D-6220 West Face Cell 8 8947.11 09/13 South Face Cell 8 6319D-6219 6319D-6218 South Drainage (looking west) 8947.12 09/13

68

Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Monticello Vicinity Properties NPL Site and Monticello Millsite Federal Facility AgreemPage 1 of 36 : Monticello Vicinity Properties NPL Site and Monticello Millsite Federal Facility AgreemPage 1 of 36 EM Home | Regulatory Compliance | Environmental Compliance Agreements Monticello (Utah) Site: Monticello Vicinity Properties NPL Site and Monticello Millsite Federal Facility Agreement Pursuant to CERCLA Section 120, December 22, 1988 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY REGION VIII and THE STATE OF UTAH DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH and THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IN THE MATTER: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY MONTICELLO (UTAH) SITE: MONTICELLO VICINITY PROPERTIES NPL SITE and MONTICELLO MILLSITE Federal Facility Agreement pursuant to Section 120 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and ) FEDERAL FACILITY ) AGREEMENT PURSUANT TO

69

EIS-0364: Decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, Hanford Site, Richland, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), on proposed decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.

70

Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells May 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers at the Hanford Site have surpassed goals for drilling wells to detect and remove contamination from groundwater. The groundwater was contaminated by radioactive waste and chemicals generated during decades of producing plutonium for the Cold War at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The Department of Energy (DOE) had set a goal for its contractor, CH2M HILL

71

Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monticello Monticello Agreement Name Monticello (Utah) Site: Monticello Vicinity Properties NPL Site and Monticello Millsite Federal Facility Agreement Pursuant to CERCLA Section 120, December 22, 1988 State Utah Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Scope Summary Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring appropriate response actions at the Site Parties DOE; US EPA; State of Utah Department of Environmental Health Date 12/22/1988 SCOPE * Identify Interim Remedial Action (IRA) alternatives, if any, which are appropriate at the Site prior to the implementation of final remedial actions for the Site. * Evaluate all past investigative and response actions taken at the Site and documented

72

Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New Hampshire) Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New Hampshire) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NH Department of Environmental Services, Public Information and Permitting Unit The statute establishes a procedure for the review, approval, monitoring,

73

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package; and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstate the suitability of the site for a repository, to desin the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next; it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Summary - Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah, KY Paducah, KY EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: August 2008 ETR-16 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility(OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that was placed on the National Priorities List. DOE is required to remediate the PGDP in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is evaluating alternatives to dispose of waste generated from the remedial activities at the PGDP. One option is to construct an on-site disposal facility (OSDF) meeting the CERCLA requirements.

76

Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone April 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste

77

City of Gainesville- Public Facilities Siting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The City of Gainesville requires the design process for public facilities within city limits to take into consideration current and future solar access. In addition, regulated trees may be removed...

78

Savannah River Sites H Canyon Work Ensures Future Missions for Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EM and its primary contractor at the Savannah River Site (SRS) safely completed 16 facility modifications three months ahead of schedule in support of the continued operation and sustainability of the H Canyon facility.

79

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance .Employees shall be encouraged to become involved in the identification and control of hazards in the workplace. (DOE O 440.1A CRD) Workers shall have the right, without reprisal, to accompany DOE worker

80

Recovery Act Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site Recovery Act Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site July 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis UF6 piping deactivation The black inlet hose is attached to a negative air machine that allows Feed Plant cleanup workers to safely deactivate uranium hexafluoride (UF6) piping, seen at right of the lift supporting the crew. UF6 piping deactivation The black inlet hose is attached to a negative air machine that allows Feed Plant cleanup workers to safely deactivate uranium hexafluoride (UF6) piping, seen at right of the lift supporting the crew. Heavy equipment demo Heavy equipment demolishes the last part of the eastern third of the Feed Plant at the Paducah Site. Cleanup continues to prepare the remaining part of the complex, backgroundfor demolition later.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EM Recovery Act Funding Payment Summary by Site | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Recovery and Reinvestment Act Payments Surge Past 4 Billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Payments Surge Past 5 Billion EM Recovery Act Lessons Learned (Johnson)...

82

Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone April 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste

83

Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPT-LSO-2011-001 ARPT-LSO-2011-001 Site: Livermore Site Office Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment Dates of Activity 01/24/2011 - 01/28/2011 Report Preparer Robert Freeman Activity Description/Purpose: This activity report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of and participation in the Livermore Site Office Self-Assessment of the Facility Representative (FR) Program. This self-assessment was led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Livermore Site Office (LSO) and conducted by LSO staff, HSS staff, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety (CDNS) staff, a peer from Los Alamos Site

84

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE`s Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site`s waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hanford Site recently surpassed American Recovery and Reinvestment Act goals to accelerate the cleanup of legacy waste and fuels.

86

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES October 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES Carlsbad, NM - The recent completion of transuranic (TRU) waste cleanup at Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 in California brings the total number of sites cleared of TRU waste to 17. "Recovery Act funding has made this possible," Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Recovery Act Federal Project Director Casey Gadbury said of the VNC and LLNL cleanups funded with about $1.6 million in Recovery Act funds. "The cleanup of these and other small-quantity sites has been and will be accelerated because of the available Recovery Act funds."

87

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES October 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES Carlsbad, NM - The recent completion of transuranic (TRU) waste cleanup at Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 in California brings the total number of sites cleared of TRU waste to 17. "Recovery Act funding has made this possible," Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Recovery Act Federal Project Director Casey Gadbury said of the VNC and LLNL cleanups funded with about $1.6 million in Recovery Act funds. "The cleanup of these and other small-quantity sites has been and will be accelerated because of the available Recovery Act funds."

88

Savannah River Site Federal Facility Agreement, January 15, 1993 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Site Agreement Name Savannah River Site Federal Facility Agreement Under Section 120 of CERCLA, January 15, 1993 State South Carolina Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Scope Summary Ensure that the environmental impacts associated with past and present activities at the Savannah River Site are thoroughly investigated and that appropriate response actions are taken to protect the public health, welfare, and the environment. Parties DOE; US EPA; South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Date 1/15/1993 SCOPE * Ensure that the environmental impacts associated with past and present activities at the Savannah River Site are thoroughly investigated and that appropriate response actions are taken to protect the public health, welfare, and the environment.

89

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE's Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site's waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Facility Siting Council Energy Facility Siting Council Jump to: navigation, search Name Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council Address 625 Marion St. NE Place Salem, Oregon Zip 97301-3737 Year founded 1975 Phone number 503-378-4040 Website http://www.oregon.gov/energy/S Coordinates 44.943987°, -123.032543° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.943987,"lon":-123.032543,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

STI Products Produced by Site/Facility Management Contracts | Scientific  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Site/Facility Management Contracts Site/Facility Management Contracts Print page Print page Email page Email page In general, site/facility management contracts provide for Government ownership and unlimited rights for the Government for all technical data first produced in the performance of the contract. One exception to the Government's unlimited rights is data for which the contractor has asserted copyright. For scientific and technical articles submitted to and published in journals, symposia proceedings, or similar works, the contractor can assert copyright without prior permission of DOE, but the Government is granted a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable worldwide license to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly and display publicly, by or on behalf of the Government (broad license). The

92

Environmental Assessment for the new Whole Body Counter facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy proposes to construct and operate a new in-vivo counting facility at the Savannah River Site for the monitoring of employees for internal radionuclides. The proposed facility, titled the new Whole Body Counter (WBC) facility, would house both the existing and additional new invivo counting equipment and facility support operations. The proposed facility would be sited and located in an area of the SRS in which background radiation levels are sufficiently low to assure accurate in-vivo counts and a location that would assure ease of access for occupational workers. This Environmental Assessment has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, and the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CPR Parts 1500-1508). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. The proposed action has independent utility to the Savannah River operations and will be necessary to support plant activities regardless of the makeup of the future mission at the site. As such, the proposed new WBC facility is treated as part of the preliminary Reconfiguration Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ``No Action`` alternative.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 14, 2011 April 14, 2011 IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - For the first time in history, workers at the Idaho site achieved success in the initial cleanup of potentially dangerous sodium in a de- commissioned nuclear reactor using an innovative treatment process. The Ameri- can Recovery and Reinvestment Act invested $70 million in the project, which employs 130 workers. DOE officials cheered the outcome and praised the team that designed and imple- mented the innovative sodium treatment for which the DOE has filed a provisional patent application. "We're proud of our team for creating a unique solution to safely rid the Experi- mental Breeder Reactor-II of this highly reactive sodium before we demolish it," DOE Idaho Cleanup Project Assistant Manager Jim Cooper said. "Our workers

94

Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site October 30, 2009 - 3:35pm Addthis The Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina has been able to create/save thousands of jobs through the Recovery Act. These are the stories of just a few of their new hires. Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Hear from some of the Recovery Act hires at the Energy Department's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. These are just a few of the jobs funded by the Recovery Act to accelerate the cleanup of the former nuclear weapons research site and make the site safe for future generations. Addthis Related Articles Deputy Secretary Poneman: Recovery Act Putting Americans to Work and

95

Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility- August 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development.

97

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility- April 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Quality and Fire Protection Systems

98

Hazard ranking system evaluation of CERCLA inactive waste sites at Hanford: Volume 2: Engineered-facility sites (HISS data base)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to formally document the assessment activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. These activities were carried out pursuant to the DOE orders that address the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program for the cleanup of inactive waste sites. The DOE orders incorporate the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology, which is based on the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. This methodology includes: PA/SI, remedial investigation/feasibility study, record of decision, design and implementation of remedial action, operation and monitoring, and verification monitoring. Volume 1 of this report discusses the CERCLA inactive waste-site evaluation process, assumptions, and results of the Hazard Ranking System methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the data on the individual CERCLA engineered-facility sites at Hanford, as contained in the Hanford Inactive Site Surveillance (HISS) Data Base. Volume 3 presents the data on the individual CERCLA unplanned-release sites at Hanford, as contained in the HISS Data Base. 13 refs.

Jette, S.J.; Lamar, D.A.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Van Houten, N.C.; Stenner, R.D.; Cramer, K.H.; Higley, K.A.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Department of Energy Completes Five Recovery Act Projects- Moves Closer to Completing Recovery Act Funded Work at Oak Ridge Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program recently completed five projects at the Oak Ridge site funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

100

Savannah River Site Footprint Reduction Results under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - 13302  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, managed and operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. Construction of SRS began in the early 1950's to enhance the nation's nuclear weapons capability. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950's, eventually utilizing five production reactors constructed to support the national defense mission. Past operations have resulted in releases of hazardous constituents and substances to soil and groundwater, resulting in 515 waste sites with contamination exceeding regulatory thresholds. More than 1,000 facilities were constructed onsite with approximately 300 of them considered radiological, nuclear or industrial in nature. In 2003, SRS entered into a Memorandum of Agreement with its regulators to accelerate the cleanup using an Area Completion strategy. The strategy was designed to focus cleanup efforts on the 14 large industrial areas of the site to realize efficiencies of scale in the characterization, assessment, and remediation activities. This strategy focuses on addressing the contaminated surface units and the vadose zone and addressing groundwater plumes subsequently. This approach streamlines characterization and remediation efforts as well as the required regulatory documentation, while enhancing the ability to make large-scale cleanup decisions. In February 2009, Congress approved the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) to create jobs and promote economic recovery. At SRS, ARRA funding was established in part to accelerate the completion of environmental remediation and facility deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). By late 2012, SRS achieved 85 percent footprint reduction utilizing ARRA funding by accelerating and coupling waste unit remediation with D and D of remnant facilities. Facility D and D activities were sequenced and permitted with waste unit remediation activities to streamline regulatory approval and execution. Achieving footprint reduction fulfills the Government's responsibility to address legacy contamination; allows earlier completion of legally enforceable compliance agreement milestones; and enables future potential reuse of DOE resources, including land and infrastructure for other missions. Over the last 3.5 years significant achievements were met that contributed to footprint reduction, including the closure of 41 waste units (including 20 miles of radiologically contaminated stream) and decommissioning of 30 facilities (including the precedent setting in situ closure of two former production reactors, the first in the DOE Complex). Other notable achievements included the removal of over 39,750 cubic meters of debris and 68,810 cubic meters of contaminated soils, including 9175 cubic meters of lead-contaminated soil from a former site small arms testing range and treatment of 1,262 cubic meters of tritium-laden soils and concrete using a thermal treatment system. (authors)

Flora, Mary [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Angelia [United States Department of Energy Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Pope, Robert [United States Environmental Protection Agency Region IV Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)] [United States Environmental Protection Agency Region IV Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ARM - Recovery Act Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ActRecovery Act Instruments ActRecovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Logo Subscribe FAQs Recovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Fact Sheet March 2010 Poster (PDF, 10MB) External Resources Recovery Act - Federal Recovery Act - DOE Recovery Act - ANL Recovery Act - BNL Recovery Act - LANL Recovery Act - PNNL Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Recovery Act Instruments These pages provide a breakdown of the new instruments planned for installation among the permanent and mobile ARM sites. In addition, several instruments will be purchased for use throughout the facility and deployed as needed. These are considered "facility spares" and are included in the table below. View All | Hide All ARM Aerial Facility Instrument Title Instrument Mentor Measurement Group Measurements

102

Review of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of5 of5 U.S. Department of Energy Subject: Review of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Line:~ HS: Rev: Eff. Date: HSS CRAD 45-57 0 January 31,2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Acting Direc or, Office of Sifety and Emergency Management Evaluations Date: January 31, 2013 Criteria Review and Approach Document LL.v. ~·M Criteria Lead:ife\riew of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Page 1 of 5 Date: January 31, 2013 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), the Office of Enforcement and Oversight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) mission is to assess the effectiveness of the

103

Descriptions of representative contaminated sites and facilities within the DOE complex  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated efforts to prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that will analyze the existing environmental restoration and waste management program and evaluate alternatives for an integrated program. The alternatives being evaluated include (1) a {open_quotes}No Action{close_quotes} alternative as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), (2) an Applicable, Relevant, and Appropriate Requirements (ARAR)-driven alternative, (3) a land-use-driven alternative, (4) a health-risk-driven alternative, and (5) a combination land-use and health-risk-driven alternative. The analytical approach being taken to evaluate each of these alternatives is to perform a remedial engineering analysis and human health and ecosystem effects analyses on every contaminated site and facility in the DOE complex. One of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) roles in this approach has been to compile the source term and environmental setting data needed to drive each of these analyses. To date, over 10,000 individual contaminated sites and facilities located throughout the DOE complex of installations have been identified and at least some minimal data compiled on each. The PEIS analyses have been appreciably simplified by categorizing all of these contaminated sites and facilities into six broad categories: (1) contaminated buildings, (2) contaminated soils, (3) solid waste sites (e.g., burial grounds), (4) liquid containment structures (e.g., tanks), (5) surface water sites, and (6) contaminated groundwater sites. A report containing a complete description of each of these thousands of contaminated sites and facilities would be tremendously large and unwildy, as would separate reports describing the application of the analytical methodologies to each.

Short, S.M.; Buck, J.W.; Clark, L.L.; Fletcher, J.F.; Glantz, C.S.; Holdren, G.R.; Huesties, L.R.; Williams, M.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Oates, L. [ICF, Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Home I Qoehannn Site Facility Cleanup yroject Histow Cleanun  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Home Home I Qoehannn Site Facility Cleanup yroject Histow Cleanun Progress Media PowerPoint Robotics Gallem Contacts A view of the Permagrain building from the e Located in northwestern Clearfield County, Quehanna many businesses that have used radiation in their man facility contains residual radioactivity left over from \I for the federal government. Under an approved plan by the federal Nuclear Reeul: responsible regulatory agency, the Commonwealth be; The site now includes operations for PermaGrain Prod manufacturer of specialty wood tile and flooring. 1 Home 1 Histow 1 Cleanun 1 Progress I ( Media 1 PowerPoint I Robotics ( Gallerv 1 Contacts ( Contact Webmaster Last Modified ( I ofl 3s been the location of lcturing processes. The .k conducted decades ag

105

Facility siting and compensation: Lessons from the Massachusetts experience  

SciTech Connect

In 1980, Massachusetts enacted a unique and comprehensive process for siting hazardous waste facilities. No facility has been constructed or approved since then, however, so it seems appropriate to ask whether the process was fundamentally flawed in concept, implemented imperfectly, or whether some other lesson can be drawn. The authors of this study were closely involved with the legislation at its inception, and Sanderson has stayed involved with it professionally, most recently as manager of the Clean Harbors project. In this essay they combine analysis and memoir to examine the reasons why the Massachusetts siting process has not yet delivered a facility. They argue that the critical factors were both specific design defects of the law itself and general characteristics of the Massachusetts public decisionmaking process. The Massachusetts negotiated compensation model of facility siting is so complicated in practice, and so contingent on local factors, that no one can judge confidently whether it is on the whole hopeless, flawed but correctable, or merely unlucky. We believe its principal liability is that it offers two fatal temptations: to public officials, it appears to offer an alternative to taking leadership risks; and to frightened citizens, it appears to offer a way to avoid, rather than confront and control, physical risks and anxiety. Specific features of the process - its complexity, the inherent delay, the unfortunate design of the siting council - might be corrected with good effect. But we see larger and more pervasive forces as the real obstacle. The NIMBY problem is, at heart, symptomatic of the pessimistic expectations; raising those expectations is not a task that can be accomplished by any legislated decision process. 4 refs., 1 tabs.

O'Hare, M. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Sanderson, D. (EIP Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

File:07TXAEnergyFacilitySiting.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TXAEnergyFacilitySiting.pdf TXAEnergyFacilitySiting.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:07TXAEnergyFacilitySiting.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 30 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 08:25, 29 July 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 08:25, 29 July 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (30 KB) Abergfel (Talk | contribs) 11:08, 10 June 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 11:08, 10 June 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (30 KB) Apalazzo (Talk | contribs) 11:06, 30 April 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 11:06, 30 April 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (49 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs)

107

Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers revegetated 166 acres across 12 waste sites, planting over 1,100 pounds of seeds and about 280,000 pounds of mulch. The largest of the sites, known as the BC Control Area, is an approximately 13-square-mile area associated with a waste disposal system used during Hanford operations. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of

108

Savannah River Site Makes Progress on Recovery Act-funded Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Makes Progress on Recovery Act-funded Cleanup Savannah River Site Makes Progress on Recovery Act-funded Cleanup Savannah River Site Makes Progress on Recovery Act-funded Cleanup February 9, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis SRS loaded 14 standard waste boxes containing mixed and low-level waste that previously was classified as transuranic TRU waste. This shipment to a Florida treatment site marks the 1,000 cubic meter milestone of the 5,000 cubic meters in the Site’s TRU program that will be dispositioned through the Recovery Act. SRS loaded 14 standard waste boxes containing mixed and low-level waste that previously was classified as transuranic TRU waste. This shipment to a Florida treatment site marks the 1,000 cubic meter milestone of the 5,000 cubic meters in the Site's TRU program that will be dispositioned through

109

Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Workers Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint RICHLAND, Wash. - The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers revegetated 166 acres across 12 waste sites, planting over 1,100 pounds of seeds and about 280,000 pounds of mulch. The largest of the sites, known as the BC Control Area, is an approximately 13-square-mile area associated with a waste disposal system used during Hanford operations. Recovery Act workers remediated and reseeded a densely contaminated 140- acre portion of that area after disposing of more than 370,000 tons of contaminated soil. Recovery Act workers employed by DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company have remediated 61 waste sites,

110

The US Department of Energy`s facility reuse at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

This audit was initiated to determine whether the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site was maximizing its reuse of excess facilities.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary of Revised Tornado, Hurricane and Extreme Straight Wind Characteristics at Nuclear Facility Sites BY: John D. Stevenson Consulting Engineer

112

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement orenvironmental assessment). Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review More Documents & Publications Mini-Guidance Articles from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports, Dec. 1994 to Sept. 2005 "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations

113

240 Jobs Later: The Recovery Act's Impact at the Paducah Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

240 Jobs Later: The Recovery Act's Impact at the Paducah Site 240 Jobs Later: The Recovery Act's Impact at the Paducah Site 240 Jobs Later: The Recovery Act's Impact at the Paducah Site February 7, 2011 - 3:18pm Addthis Mechanics train with plasma arc cutting equipment at the Paducah Site | Courtesy of Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Mechanics train with plasma arc cutting equipment at the Paducah Site | Courtesy of Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Over 240 jobs were added to the Paducah Site through the Recovery Act. Crews were able to decontaminate and decommission an unused smelting complex for $10 million under budget and a year ahead of schedule. Workers demolished two other complexes in addition to the smelting

114

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement orenvironmental assessment). Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review More Documents & Publications Mini-Guidance Articles from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports, Dec. 1994 to Sept. 2005 "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations

115

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 7  

SciTech Connect

This seventh revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, environmental monitoring, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. Chapter 5.0 was not updated from the sixth revision (1994). It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE Orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.] ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others] and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Weldon Spring Site Federal Facility Agreement UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Site Federal Facility Agreement UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY REGION VII UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES IN THE MATTER OF: The United States Department of Energy's Weldon Spring Site, St. Charles, Missouri Docket No. CERCLA-07-2006-0161 FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT FOR THE WELDON SPRING SITE Weldon Spring Site Federal Facility Agreement i TABLE OF CONTENTS I. PRELIMINARY STATEMENT.............................................................................................. 1 II. JURISDICTION ...................................................................................................................... 2 III. PARTIES BOUND .................................................................................................................

118

Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Site Tour - Accelerator Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Counting House Free Electron Accelerator Facility Machine Control Center Physics Storage Building North Linear Accelerator South Linear Accelerator VEPCO Substation Machine Control Center Annex Machine Control Center Annex II North Access Building South Access Building Central Helium Liquefier Injector Hall A Truck Ramp Hall B Truck Ramp Hall C Truck Ramp Experimental Hall A Experimental Hall B Experimental Hall C East Arc West Arc Counting House Free Electron Accelerator Facility Machine Control Center Physics Storage Building North Linear Accelerator South Linear Accelerator VEPCO Substation Machine Control Center Annex Machine Control Center Annex II North Access Building South Access Building Central Helium Liquefier Injector Hall A Truck Ramp Hall B Truck Ramp Hall C Truck Ramp Experimental Hall A Experimental Hall B Experimental Hall C East Arc West Arc Science Education Jefferson Lab Jefferson Lab Home Search Jefferson Lab Contact Jefferson Lab Science Education Home Teacher Resources Student Zone Games and Puzzles Science Cinema Programs and Events Search Education Privacy and Security Notice Jefferson Lab Site Tour Guided Tour Site Map Accelerator Area Map Administrative Area Map Tour Index

119

Waste immobilization demonstration program for the Hanford Site`s Mixed Waste Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the Waste Receiving and Processing facility, Module 2A> waste immobilization demonstration program, focusing on the cooperation between Hanford Site, commercial, and international participants. Important highlights of the development and demonstration activities is discussed from the standpoint of findings that have had significant from the standpoint of findings that have had significant impact on the evolution of the facility design. A brief description of the future direction of the program is presented, with emphasis on the key aspects of the technologies that call for further detailed investigation.

Burbank, D.A.; Weingardt, K.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jobs at Savannah River Site Jobs at Savannah River Site Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site Addthis Description The Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC has been able to create/save thousands of jobs through the Recovery Act. These are the stories of just a few of the new hires. Speakers Skila Harris, Doug Clark, Bill Picciano, Kelli Culpepper, Nancy Cole, Duration 5:08 Topic Recovery Act Waste Management Nuclear Security & Safety Credit Energy Department Video SKILA HARRIS: We understand the health risks associated with radioactivity much better today than we did 50 years ago. And at the sites where this country was developing its weapons, we were not responsible in how we handled those materials. The recovery act has allowed us to accelerate the clean-up, hire a lot more people so we can

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction July 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact 202-586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S. Department of Energy completed the cleanup of Cold War legacy waste at the Nuclear Radiation Development, LLC (NRD) site near Grand Island, New York, and at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. The two locations became the 18th and 19th sites to be completely cleaned of legacy waste. This milestone was achieved as part of a $172 million investment from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expedite legacy waste cleanup

122

The Strip and Underground Mine Siting Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Strip and Underground Mine Siting Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Siting Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Siting Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources from strip and underground mining. This Act grants the Department of Environmental Quality the authority to review and approve or disapprove new strip-mine and new underground-mine site locations and reclamation plans and to adopt relevant

123

GRR/Section 7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process 7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism Regulations & Policies Hawaii Revised Statutes 201N Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 15, Chapter 36 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

124

Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California Workers in a study funded by $38 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to assess radiological contamination have collected more than 600 soil samples and surveyed 120 acres of land for gamma radiation. Under an interagency agreement with DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting the study at Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) Area IV and the Northern Undeveloped Land. Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California More Documents & Publications EA-1345: Final Environmental Assessment EIS-0402: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

125

Preliminary site studies for critical facilities using geotechnical units derived from engineering geologic analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be r enamed as the same unit. 12) Using the geotechnical units to define the site's character, determine the most economical and desirable location for the facility within each site, and recommend at least two sites for final consideration... be r enamed as the same unit. 12) Using the geotechnical units to define the site's character, determine the most economical and desirable location for the facility within each site, and recommend at least two sites for final consideration...

Conover, Dale Everette

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its...

127

Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Site Inspection and Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites November 2012 LMS/S09415 ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site, 2012 Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site, 2012 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site, 2012 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site, 2012 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

128

GRR/Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Regulations & Policies RCW 80.50.60(1) WAC 463-60 RCW 80.50.090(2) WAC 463-30-270 WAC 463-30-320 Triggers None specified Under RCW 80.50.60(1) a developer may not begin construction of a new energy facility site until they obtain Energy Facility Siting certification

129

Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

Cody, Tom

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: Site description Facility and system description Permit required monitoring data and loading rates Status of compliance conditions and activities Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Environmental Assessment for the Ammunition Storage Facility at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t30. t30. U.S. DEPARTHEHT OF EMERCT , FXNIDIIG OF It0 SIONI~ICAMT. IMPACT -1TIOH STORAGE E'ACXLITX AT THE SAVAxmAa RI-R iIT@ " Afl[EN, 6OtfTE CAROLXNA AGEYCT: U.S. Department of Energy ACTIOR: Finding of No Significant Impact s-r: The Department of Energy (DOE1 hqe prepared an Environmental ~Asscssx~ent (EA), DOE/EA-0820, for the proposed construction and operation of ~rl Ammunition Storage Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the &A, DOE ha8 determined that the propoeed action ie aot a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the Natioaal Eavironmcatal Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparatioa of an environruents~,impaCt Statement iS not required

133

Determination of DCGL for Site Closure of Nuclear Facility  

SciTech Connect

To measure the degree of radioactive contamination of industrial facilities using depleted uranium as catalysts, and to release the site on this basis, RESRAD 6.21 was used to radiological impact assessment. Samples were taken from 20 points. Among the 20 sampling points, the highest point artificially contaminated (upper and lower part of point 16) was selected, and radiological impact was assessed and assessment and DCGL (Derived concentration guideline level) was computed. As a result, individual doses by nuclide were U-234: 4.162E-03 mSv/yr, U-235: 8.762E-04 mSv/yr, U-238: 2.204E-02 mSv/yr. In addition, the domestic dose standard relating to self-disposal and IAEA TECDOC-855 Clearance levels define the individual dose as 10 {mu}Sv. On this basis DCGL (Derived concentration guideline level) was computed, and it was 6.35E-02 Bq/g for U-238. (authors)

Kim, J.; Shin, S.; Whang, J. [Kyung Hee Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

I.C. 61-17 - Siting of Certain Electrical Transmission Facilities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 - Siting of Certain Electrical Transmission Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 61-17 - Siting of...

135

EA-1106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence 106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California EA-1106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to build, permit, and operate the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility to treat explosive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site, Site 300. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 16, 1996 EA-1106: Finding of No Significant Impact Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory April 16, 1996

136

2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites  

SciTech Connect

This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978.1 These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE operates 18 UMTRCA Title I sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.27 (10 CFR 40.27). As required under the general license, a long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for each site was prepared by DOE and accepted by NRC. The Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site, one of the 19 Title I sites, will not be included under the general license until the open, operating portion of the cell is closed. The open portion will be closed either when it is filled or in 2023. This site is inspected in accordance with an interim LTSP. Long-term surveillance and maintenance services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective actions; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder relations, and other regulatory stewardship functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific LTSPs and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up or contingency inspections, or corrective action in accordance with the LTSP. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available on the Internet at http://www.lm.doe.gov/.

none,

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Consultation draft: Site characterization plan overview, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a site characterization plan for the candidate site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The DOE has provided, for information and review, a consultation draft of the plan to the State of Texas and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The site characterization plan is a lengthy document that describes in considerable detail the program that will be conducted to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and other conditions relevant to the suitability of the site for a repository. The overview presented here consists of brief summaries of important topics covered in the consultation draft of the site characterization plan; it is not a substitute for the site characterization plan. The arrangement of the overview is similar to that of the plan itself, with brief descriptions of the repository system - the site, the repository, and the waste package - preceding the discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Deaf Smith County site. It is intended primarily for the management staff of organizations involved in the DOE's repository program or other persons who might wish to understand the general scope of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed rather than the technical details of site characterization. 15 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1

139

Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1

140

2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites  

SciTech Connect

This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE manages six UMTRCA Title II disposal sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.28. Reclamation and site transition activities continue at other sites, and DOE ultimately expects to manage approximately 27 Title II disposal sites. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities and services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective action; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder services, and other regulatory functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSPs) and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up inspections, or corrective action. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available online at http://www.lm.doe.gov

none,

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cost-Efficient Work Rids Paducah Site of Old Facilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost-Efficient Work Rids Paducah Site of Old Facilities Cost-Efficient Work Rids Paducah Site of Old Facilities Cost-Efficient Work Rids Paducah Site of Old Facilities April 25, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Old trailers that had sat for decades in the southwestern part of the Paducah site were cut up and placed in containers so that the debris could be placed in the site’s industrial landfill. Old trailers that had sat for decades in the southwestern part of the Paducah site were cut up and placed in containers so that the debris could be placed in the site's industrial landfill. Workers cut up old trailers and placed them in containers so that the debris could be placed in the site’s industrial landfill. Workers cut up old trailers and placed them in containers so that the debris could be placed in the site's industrial landfill.

142

Major Facility Siting Program - Circular 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

included in a linear facility application; including but not limited to: the need for the transmission line or pipeline, the proposed location, baseline data and reasonable...

143

Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

DOE has prepared an environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site. This (new) facility would meet requirements of the site radiological protection program and would ensure site compliance with regulations. It was determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and no environmental impact statement is needed.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Performance Assessment Program for the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Facilities - 13610  

SciTech Connect

The Liquid Waste facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) are operated by Liquid Waste Operations contractor Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR). A separate Performance Assessment (PA) is prepared to support disposal operations at the Saltstone Disposal Facility and closure evaluations for the two liquid waste tank farm facilities at SRS, F-Tank Farm and H-Tank Farm. A PA provides the technical basis and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements identified in operations and closure regulatory guidance. The Saltstone Disposal Facility is subject to a State of South Carolina industrial solid waste landfill permit and the tank farms are subject to a state industrial waste water permit. The three Liquid Waste facilities are also subject to a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Due to the regulatory structure, a PA is a key technical document reviewed by the DOE, the State of South Carolina and the EPA. As the waste material disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility and the residual material in the closed tank farms is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is also a reviewing agency for the PAs. Pursuant to the Act, the NRC also has a continuing role to monitor disposal actions to assess compliance with stated performance objectives. The Liquid Waste PA program at SRS represents a continual process over the life of the disposal and closure operations. When the need for a PA or PA revision is identified, the first step is to develop a conceptual model to best represent the facility conditions. The conceptual model will include physical dimensions of the closed system, both the engineered and natural system, and modeling input parameters associated with the modeled features, both initial values (at the time of facility closure) and degradation rates/values. During the development of the PA, evaluations are conducted to reflect not only the results associated with the best available information at the time but also to evaluate potential uncertainties and sensitivities associated with the modeled system. While the PA will reflect the modeled system results from the best available information, it will also identify areas for future work to reduce overall PA uncertainties moving forward. DOE requires a PA Maintenance Program such that work continues to reduce model uncertainties, thus bolstering confidence in PA results that support regulatory decisions. This maintenance work may include new Research and Development activities or modeling as informed by previous PA results and other new information that becomes available. As new information becomes available, it is evaluated against previous PAs and appropriate actions are taken to ensure continued confidence in the regulatory decisions. Therefore, the PA program is a continual process that is not just the development of a PA but seeks to incorporate new information to reduce overall model uncertainty and provide continuing confidence in regulatory decisions. (author)

Rosenberger, Kent H. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Building 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Building 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

EIS-0385: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the 85: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi EIS-0385: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi Overview DOE announced the cancellation of a supplemental environmental impact statement for certain facilities associated with the 2007 selection of Richton, Mississippi, as the location of a new storage site for expanding the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 9, 2011 EIS-0385-S1: Notice of Cancellation of a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi March 21, 2008

146

Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 27, 2011 July 27, 2011 Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule RICHLAND, Wash. - The Hanford Site re- cently surpassed American Recovery and Reinvestment Act goals to accelerate the cleanup of legacy waste and fuels. Workers recently achieved three waste management goals ahead of a Sept. 30, 2011 target. The three goals focus on re- ducing Hanford's onsite waste inventory as part of the work funded by $1.6 billion the Richland Operations Office received from the Recovery Act. The three goals are: * Retrieve 50 cubic meters of Remote-Handled (RH) Transuranic (TRU) waste. Workers have re- trieved 84 cubic meters of the waste to date. Compared to contact-handled TRU waste, RH TRU waste requires additional radiation dose

147

Finishing Strong in 2011: The Recovery Act at Work at Savannah River Site  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act's highlights and accomplishments for 2011 projects. Covers the latest technology and robotics used for waste management. This video is an overview of the success ARRA brought to the Savannah River Site, the environment, the econonmy, and the surrounding communities.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

148

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

SciTech Connect

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF{sub 6} from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (United States Code, Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a Federal Register Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; from the transportation of all ETTP cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF6 [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) to Portsmouth; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). An option of shipping the ETTP cylinders to Paducah is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Portsmouth and ETTP sites. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0359) evaluates potential environmental impacts for the proposed Paducah conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

149

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW November 22, 2006 Conducted by: Harry Harmon, Team Lead Civil/Structural Sub Team Facility Safety Sub Team Engineering Sub Team Peter Lowry, Lead James Langsted, Lead George Krauter, Lead Robert Kennedy Chuck Negin Art Etchells Les Youd Jerry Evatt Oliver Block Loring Wyllie Richard Stark Tim Adams Tom Anderson Todd LaPointe Stephen Gosselin Carl Costantino Norman Moreau Patrick Corcoran John Christian Ken Cooper Kari McDaniel _____________________________ Harry D. Harmon ITR Team Leader SPD-SWPF-217 SPD-SWPF-217: Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review 11/22/2006 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The ITR Team wishes to thank Shari Clifford of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for

150

Head of EM Program Tours Hanford Site Facilities | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

November 26, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Office of River Protection (ORP) Manager Kevin Smith, right, discusses the Low-Activity Waste Facility design and construction with Waste...

151

Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford Site facilities for 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 20 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring projects and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Most of the projects no longer receive dangerous waste; a few projects continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 20 RCRA projects comprise 30 waste management units. Ten of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration, distribution, and rate of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect contamination, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1992 and September 1993. Recent groundwater quality is also described for the 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas and for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Department of Energy Announces Two Year Pay Freeze on Site and Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Two Year Pay Freeze on Site and Two Year Pay Freeze on Site and Facility Management Contractor Employees Department of Energy Announces Two Year Pay Freeze on Site and Facility Management Contractor Employees December 17, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington DC - Following President Obama's recent proposal for a two-year pay freeze for all civilian federal workers, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced a decision to stop salary and bonus pool increases for site and facility management contractor employees, who manage day-to-day operations at certain Department of Energy sites and facilities, including national laboratories. "As our nation continues to recover from these challenging economic times, households and small businesses across the country are making sacrifices,"

153

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Animation of a Telecommunications Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animation of a Telecommunications Site Example Layout Animation of a Telecommunications Site Example Layout The animation below provides an example of a telecommunications site layout that uses hydrogen fuel cells for backup power along with some of the codes and standards that apply to such a site. Roll over each of the colored bars below to reveal individual setback requirements, which identify the mandatory separation distances of the site's various components, or select the "Go to Setback Details" button for a chart that summarizes these requirements as defined by the 2006 International Fire Code. Select the "Construction Approval" button for a detailed list of codes and standards related to the construction of a site, or select the "Operation Approval" button for codes and standards related to ongoing operation and

154

Facility Siting and Layout Optimization Based on Process Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) that identifies potential layouts by minimizing overall costs. This approach gives the coordinates of each facility in a continuous plane, and estimates for the total length of pipes, the land area, and the selection of safety devices. Finally, the 3D...

Jung, Seungho

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Site Resources, Facilities & Operations Directorate, Brookhaven National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Resources Division Site Resources Division Homepage The mission of the Site Resources Division is to enhance the site aesthetic so as to improve staff recruitment and retention, safety, and customer satisfaction, and to support the overall Laboratory mission. To that end, we are dedicated to providing services to the Laboratory at the highest standard per science dollar. The Site Resources Division is responsible for the following: Custodial Services BNL Recycling Program Sanitation Grounds Maintenance, including limited herbicide applications Masonry Operation and maintenance of light and heavy machine equipment, including elevators and emergency generators Rigging & Hoisting Pest control Clean-up of outdoor and select indoor spills Top of Page Last Modified: February 28, 2011

156

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes  

SciTech Connect

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3258 3258 (08.93) United States Government Department of Energy - memorandum DATE: REPLY TO ATTN OF: SUBJECT: TO: December 15, 1994 Office of NEPA 0versight:Strickler:202-568-2410 Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review Distribution The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement or environmental assessment). I believe that this information will help program and field offices prepare their annual NEPA planning summaries and their overall NEPA compliance strategies. Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and the public, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Background on DOE's at)proachto site-wide

158

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

SciTech Connect

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the ''Federal Register'' (FR) on September 18, 2001 (''Federal Register'', Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (''United States Code'', Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (''Code of Federal Regulations'', Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a ''Federal Register'' Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). Although not part of the proposed action, an option of shipping all cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF{sub 6} [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Paducah rather than to Portsmouth is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Paducah site. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0360) evaluates the potential environmental impacts for the proposed Portsmouth conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

159

Enterprise Assessments, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Constructio...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

of liquid or semi-solid radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. DOE-ORP serves as DOE line management for two functions: the Tank...

160

National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements NIF site improvements SSDR 1.2.1  

SciTech Connect

This Subsystem Design Requirements (SSDR) document establishes the performance, design, and verification requirements associated with the NIF Project Site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Livermore, California. It identifies generic design conditions for all NIF Project facilities, including siting requirements associated with natural phenomena, and contains specific requirements for furnishing site-related infrastructure utilities and services to the NIF Project conventional facilities and experimental hardware systems. Three candidate sites were identified as potential locations for the NIF Project. However, LLNL has been identified by DOE as the preferred site because of closely related laser experimentation underway at LLNL, the ability to use existing interrelated infrastructure, and other reasons. Selection of a site other than LLNL will entail the acquisition of site improvements and infrastructure additional to those described in this document. This SSDR addresses only the improvements associated with the NIF Project site located at LLNL, including new work and relocation or demolition of existing facilities that interfere with the construction of new facilities. If the Record of Decision for the PEIS on Stockpile Stewardship and Management were to select another site, this SSDR would be revised to reflect the characteristics of the selected site. Other facilities and infrastructure needed to support operation of the NIF, such as those listed below, are existing and available at the LLNL site, and are not included in this SSDR. Office Building. Target Receiving and Inspection. General Assembly Building. Electro- Mechanical Shop. Warehousing and General Storage. Shipping and Receiving. General Stores. Medical Facilities. Cafeteria services. Service Station and Garage. Fire Station. Security and Badging Services.

Kempel, P.; Hands, J.

1996-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Facility Utilization and Risk Analysis for Remediation of Legacy Transuranic Waste at the Savannah River Site - 13572  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) completed the Accelerated TRU Project for remediating legacy waste at the Savannah River Site with significant cost and schedule efficiencies due to early identification of resources and utilization of risk matrices. Initial project planning included identification of existing facilities that could be modified to meet the technical requirements needed for repackaging and remediating the waste. The project schedule was then optimized by utilization of risk matrices that identified alternate strategies and parallel processing paths which drove the overall success of the project. Early completion of the Accelerated TRU Project allowed SRNS to pursue stretch goals associated with remediating very difficult TRU waste such as concrete casks from the hot cells in the Savannah River National Laboratory. Project planning for stretch goals also utilized existing facilities and the risk matrices. The Accelerated TRU project and stretch goals were funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). (authors)

Gilles, Michael L.; Gilmour, John C. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 2, Risk evaluation work procedure for the retired Hanford Site facilities  

SciTech Connect

Risk from retired surplus facilities has always been assumed to be low at the Hanford Site as the facilities are inactive and have few potentials for causing an offsite hazardous material release. However,the fatal accident that occurred in the spring of 1992 in which an employee fell through a deteriorated roof at the 105-F Reactor Building has raised the possibility that retired facilities represent a greater risk than was originally assumed. Therefore, Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy management have determined that facility risk management strategies and programmatic plans should be reevaluated to assure risks are identified and appropriate corrective action plans are developed. To evaluate risk management strategies, accurate risk information about the current and projected condition of the facilities must be developed. This work procedure has been created to address the development of accurate and timely risk information. By using the evaluation results in this procedure, it will be possible to create a prioritized baseline for managing facility risk until all retired surplus facilities are demolished.

Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance

164

Lessons learned -- a comparison of the proposed on-site waste management facilities at the various Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Sites (DOE) are faced with the challenge of managing several categories of waste generated from past or future cleanup activities, such as 11(e)2 byproduct material, low-level radioactive (LL), low-level radioactive mixed (LLM), transuranic (TRU), high level radioactive (HL), and hazardous waste (HW). DOE must ensure safe and efficient management of these wastes while complying with all applicable federal and state laws. Proposed waste management strategies for the EM-40 Environmental Restoration (ER) program at these sites indicate that on-site disposal is becoming a viable option. For purposes of this paper, on-site disposal cells managed by the EM-40 program at Hanford, Weldon Spring, Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) and Rocky Flats were compared. Programmatic aspects and design features were evaluated to determine what comparisons can be made, and to identify benefits lessons learned that may be applicable to other sites. Based on comparative analysis, it can be concluded that the DOE EM-40 disposal cells are very unique. Stakeholders played a major role in the decision to locate the various DOE on-site disposal facilities. The disposal cells will be used to manage 11(e)2 by-product materials, LL, LLM, and/or HLW. The analysis further suggests that the design criteria are comparable. Lessons learned relative to the public involvement activities at Weldon Spring, and the design approach at Hanford should be considered when planning future on-site disposal facilities at DOE sites. Further, a detailed analysis of progress made at Hanford should be evaluated for application at sites such as Rocky Flats that are currently planning on-site disposal facilities.

Ciocco, J. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Singh, D. [Booz Allen and Hamilton, Germantown, MD (United States); Survochak, S. [DOE RFETS, Golden, CO (United States); Elo, M. [Burns and Roe, Germantown, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

EIS-0385-S1: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since selecting the Richton site, DOE has engaged in further consultations with Federal and Mississippi state agencies and is now considering different locations from those addressed in DOE/EIS0385 for certain facilities associated with the Richton SPR expansion site.

166

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) legislation and its implication on speech privacy design in health care facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 (104th Congress H.R. 3103 January 3 1986) among many things individual patient records and information be protected from unnecessary issue. This responsibility is assigned to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) which has issued a Privacy Rule most recently dated August 2002 with a revision being proposed in 2005 to strengthen penalties for inappropriate breaches of patient privacy. Despite this speech privacy in many instances in health care facilities need not be guaranteed by the facility. Nevertheless the regulation implies that due regard be given to speech privacy in both facility design and operation. This presentation will explore the practical aspects of implementing speech privacy in health care facilities and make recommendations for certain specific speech privacy situations.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OH OH EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: February 2008 ETR-12 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) is proposed for long-term containment of contaminated materials from the planned Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Acceptable performance of the proposed OSWDF will depend on interactions between engineered landfill features and operations methods that recognize the unique characteristics of the waste stream and site-

168

Hanford Site near-facility environmental monitoring data report for calendar year 1998  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the U.S. Department of Energy's Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring program conducted by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. for Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. for 1998 in the 100,200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in southcentral Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

DIEDIKER, L.P.

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

Finding of no significant impact shipment of stabilized mixed waste from the K-25 Site to an off-site commercial disposal facility, Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the shipment of stabilized mixed waste, removed from K-1407-B and -C ponds, to an off-site commercial disposal facility (Envirocare) for permanent land disposal. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Design report for the interim waste containment facility at the Niagara Falls Storage Site. [Surplus Facilities Management Program  

SciTech Connect

Low-level radioactive residues from pitchblende processing and thorium- and radium-contaminated sand, soil, and building rubble are presently stored at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York. These residues and wastes derive from past NFSS operations and from similar operations at other sites in the United States conducted during the 1940s by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and subsequently by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The US Department of Energy (DOE), successor to MED/AEC, is conducting remedial action at the NFSS under two programs: on-site work under the Surplus Facilities Managemnt Program and off-site cleanup of vicinity properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. On-site remedial action consists of consolidating the residues and wastes within a designated waste containment area and constructing a waste containment facility to prevent contaminant migration. The service life of the system is 25 to 50 years. Near-term remedial action construction activities will not jeopardize or preclude implementation of any other remedial action alternative at a later date. Should DOE decide to extend the service life of the system, the waste containment area would be upgraded to provide a minimum service life of 200 years. This report describes the design for the containment system. Pertinent information on site geology and hydrology and on regional seismicity and meteorology is also provided. Engineering calculations and validated computer modeling studies based on site-specific and conservative parameters confirm the adequacy of the design for its intended purposes of waste containment and environmental protection.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Case History of a Clean Water Act Compliance Agreement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Golden, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

A major Clean Water Act (CWA) Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement was signed on March 25, 1991 by the US Department of Energy, Rocky Flats Field Office (DOE, RFFO) and the Water Enforcement Division of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VIII. The agreement revised the Rocky Flats Plant`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and arose from pemittee-requested changes in effluent monitoring points and permit violations, most notably the February 22, 1989 Chromic Acid Incident. The Rocky Flats Plant, now called the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) near Golden Colorado was operated at that time by Rockwell International Corporation, who later plead guilty to six misdemeanor and felony counts of the CWA (the aforementioned NPDES permit violations) and paid a $4 million fine on March 26, 1992. The Compliance Agreement, hereafter referred to as the NPDES FFCA, called for three separate remedial action plans and contained a schedule for their submittal to the EPA. The compliance plans focussed on: (1) Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) performance upgrades, (2) source control and surface water protection, and (3) characterization of the impacts from past sludge disposal practices. Projects that implemented the compliance plans were initiated soon after submittal to the EPA and are forecast to complete in 1997 at a total cost of over $35 million. This paper presents a case history of NPDES FFCA compliance projects and highlights the successes, failures, and lessons learned.

Thompson, J.S.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives, Railcars  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 8, 2011 August 8, 2011 RICHLAND, Wash. - With the help of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Hanford Site is preserving the history of its locomo- tives and railcars as workers clean up the legacy of the Cold War. In the recently completed railcar project - a $5.5 million effort funded by the Recovery Act - the Richland Operations Office and its contrac- tors moved two locomotives and two cask cars onto reclaimed track at the B Reactor for permanent public display. Designated a National Historic Landmark in August 2008, the B Reactor is slated to become part of the national park system commemorating the Manhattan Project and is open for public tours. Hanford once had 158 miles of railroad track that crisscrossed the 586-square-mile reservation. For more than 50 years, diesel locomotives

173

FOIA/Privacy Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act The Oak Ridge Office of Chief Counsel is responsible for administering policies, programs, and procedures to ensure DOE compliance with the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and the Privacy Act (PA), 5 U.S.C. 552 and 5 U.S.C. 552a, respectively. DOE continuously gathers site specific information about its facilities and record repositories. Links to DOE sites and major contractors are found at Energy.gov. The resources on these pages are provided to aid in finding answers to your questions about programs of the Department of Energy and to obtain information that is publicly available without submitting a FOIA request. If the information is not available here or on another Department website, submit a Freedom of Information Act request electronically.

174

US Department of Energy`s Federal Facility Compliance Act Chief Financial Officer`s Report to Congress for fiscal year 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992 (FFCAct) (Public Law 102-386) was enacted into law on October 6, 1992. In addition to amending the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the FFCAct requires the US Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare an annual report from the Chief Financial Officer to the Congress on compliance activities undertaken by the DOE with regard to mixed waste streams and provide an accounting of the fines and penalties imposed upon the DOE for violations involving mixed waste. This document has been prepared to report the necessary information. Mixed waste is defined by the FFCAct to include those wastes containing both hazardous waste as defined in the RCRA and source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. Section 2001 et seq.). Section 2 of this report briefly summarizes DOE Headquarters` activities conducted during Fiscal Year 1993 (FY 1993) to comply with the requirements of the FFCAct. Section 3 of this report provides an overview of the site-specific RCRA compliance activities, relating to mixed waste streams, conducted in FY 1993 for those sites that currently generated or store mixed waste that are subject to regulation under RCRA. Section 4 provides information on notifications of alleged RCRA violations involving mixed waste imposed upon the DOE during FY 1993 and an accounting of any fines and penalties associated with these violations. Appendix A provides site-specific summaries of RCRA compliance activities, relating to mixed waste streams, conducted in FY 1993 for those sites that currently generate or store mixed waste that are subject to regulation under RCRA.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Review at the Nevada National Security Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSS-2011-001 NNSS-2011-001 Site: Nevada National Security Site Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Review at the Nevada National Security Site Dates of Activity 02/14/2011 - 02/17/2011 Report Preparer William Macon Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), visited the Nevada Site Office (NSO) and the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) from February 14-17, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to observe the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) review and maintain operational awareness of NNSS activities. Result:

176

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25 R-MAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25, Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Building 3110, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, DOE/NV--891-VOL I-Rev. 1, dated July 2003, provides details of demolition, waste disposal, and use restriction (UR) modification for Corrective Action Unit 113, Area 25 R-MAD Facility. Demolition was completed on July 15, 2010, when the last of the building debris was disposed. Final field activities were concluded on August 30, 2010, after all equipment was demobilized and UR signs were posted. This work was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

File:07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 3 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:39, 27 December 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:39, 27 December 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 3 pages (124 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information)

178

DOE Programs and Major Site/Facility Contractors | Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Programs and Major Site/Facility Contractors DOE Programs and Major Site/Facility Contractors Print page Print page Email page Email page DOE Programs and Major Site/Facility Contractors have the option to provide metadata via the Announcement Notice 241.1 web notice, Batch Upload, or Harvesting. The metadata-based announcement notice generated and supplied by DOE and contractors for unclassified STI products includes the basic Dublin Core metadata elements, supplemented by a few DOE data elements, and a minimal number of subelements necessary to further identify the announcement/availability of the STI product. Principal Investigators and Authors A Principal Investigator is designated by a research organization to have an appropriate level of authority and responsibility for the proper conduct of the research, the use of funds, and administrative requirements,

179

Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

This guide was prepared to provide the experienced safety analyst with accident analysis guidance in greater detail than is possible in Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. The guide addresses analysis of postulated serious accidents considered in the siting and selection of major design features of DOE nuclear facilities. Its scope has been limited to radiological accidents at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The analysis steps addressed in the guide lead to evaluation of radiological dose to exposed persons for comparison with siting guideline doses. Other possible consequences considered are environmental contamination, population dose, and public health effects. Choices of models and parameters leading to estimation of source terms, release fractions, reduction and removal factors, dispersion and dose factors are discussed. Although requirements for risk analysis have not been established, risk estimates are finding increased use in siting of major nuclear facilities, and are discussed in the guide. 3 figs., 9 tabs.

Elder, J.C.; Graf, J.M.; Dewart, J.M.; Buhl, T.E.; Wenzel, W.J.; Walker, L.J.; Stoker, A.K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Decommissioning an Active Historical Reactor Facility at the Savannah River Site - 13453  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, where Management and Operations are performed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS). In 2004, DOE recognized SRS as structure within the Cold War Historic District of national, state and local significance composed of the first generation of facilities constructed and operated from 1950 through 1989 to produce plutonium and tritium for our nation's defense. DOE agreed to manage the SRS 105-C Reactor Facility as a potentially historic property due to its significance in supporting the U.S. Cold War Mission and for potential for future interpretation. This reactor has five primary areas within it, including a Disassembly Basin (DB) that received irradiated materials from the reactor, cooled them and prepared the components for loading and transport to a Separation Canyon for processing. The 6,317 square meter area was divided into numerous work/storage areas. The walls between the individual basin compartments have narrow vertical openings called 'slots' that permit the transfer of material from one section to another. Data indicated there was over 830 curies of radioactivity associated with the basin sediments and approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated water, not including a large quantity of activated reactor equipment, scrap metal, and debris on the basin floor. The need for an action was identified in 2010 to reduce risks to personnel in the facility and to eliminate the possible release of contaminants into the environment. The release of DB water could potentially migrate to the aquifer and contaminate groundwater. DOE, its regulators [U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)] and the SC Historical Preservation Office (SHPO) agreed/concurred to perform a non-time critical removal action for the In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) of the 105-C Disassembly Basin. ISD consisted of stabilization/isolation of remaining contaminated water, sediment, activated reactor equipment, and scrap metal by filling the DB with underwater non-structural grout to the appropriate (-4.877 meter) grade-level, thence with dry area non-structural grout to the final -10 centimeter level. The roof over the DB was preserved due to its potential historical significance and to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. Forced evaporation was the form of treatment implemented to remove the approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated basin water. Using specially formulated grouts, irradiated materials and sediment were treated by solidification/isolation thus reducing their mobility, reducing radiation exposure and creating an engineered barrier thereby preventing access to the contaminants. Grouting provided a low permeability barrier to minimize any potential transport of contaminants to the aquifer. Efforts were made to preserve the historical significance of the Reactor in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act. ISD provides a cost effective means to isolate and contain residual radioactivity from past nuclear operations allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce hazards to manageable levels. This method limits release of radiological contamination to the environment, minimizes radiation exposure to workers, prevents human/animal access to the hazardous substances, and allows for ongoing monitoring of the decommissioned facility. Field construction was initiated in August 2011; evaporator operations commenced January 2012 and ended July 2012 with over 9 M liters of water treated/removed. Over 8,525 cubic meters of grout were placed, completing in August 2012. The project completed with an excellent safety record, on schedule and under budget. (authors)

Bergren, Christopher L.; Long, J. Tony; Blankenship, John K. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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181

Summary - Salt Waste Processing Facility Design at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility ETR Report Date: November 2006 ETR-4 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Salt Waste Processing Facility Design at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is intended to remove and concentrate the radioactive strontium (Sr), actinides, and cesium (Cs) from the bulk salt waste solutions in the SRS high-level waste tanks. The sludge and strip effluent from the SWPF that contain concentrated Sr, actinide, and Cs wastes will be sent to the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), where they will be vitrified. The decontaminated salt solution (DSS) that is left after removal of the highly

182

Engineering Facilities Having the facilities to develop and test spacecraft on-site is a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concerning the level of allowable contamination for space-bound products. LASP's four on-site cleanrooms. Cleanroom standards are federally and internationally regulated and designated by class, which for Standardization (ISO) Class-5 cleanroom has at most 100,000 particles bigger than a half micron per cubic meter

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

183

Maintenance Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. Criteria: The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance. The maintenance organization structure is well defined and understood. Responsibilities, organizational interfaces, and administrative activities are adequately defined and implemented to provide timely availability of

184

Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

185

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H CANYON FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H Canyon Facility is the only large scale, heavily shielded, nuclear chemical separations plant still in operation in the U.S. The facility's operations historically recovered uranium-235 (U-235) and neptunium-237 (Np-237) from aluminum-clad, enriched-uranium fuel tubes from Site nuclear reactors and other domestic and foreign research reactors. Today the facility, in conjunction with HB Line, is working to provide the initial feed material to the Mixed Oxide Facility also located on SRS. Many additional campaigns are also in the planning process. Furthermore, the facility has started to integrate collaborative research and development (R&D) projects into its schedule. H Canyon can serve as the appropriate testing location for many technologies focused on monitoring the back end of the fuel cycle, due to the nature of the facility and continued operation. H Canyon, in collaboration with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), has been working with several groups in the DOE complex to conduct testing demonstrations of novel technologies at the facility. The purpose of conducting these demonstrations at H Canyon will be to demonstrate the capabilities of the emerging technologies in an operational environment. This paper will summarize R&D testing activities currently taking place in H Canyon and discuss the possibilities for future collaborations.

Sexton, L.; Fuller, Kenneth

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

186

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

27, 2009 [Facility News] 27, 2009 [Facility News] Arrival of Recovery Act Funds Sets Wheels In Motion Bookmark and Share So that people can easily recognize the effects of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, all projects will be stamped with the Recovery Act logo. So that people can easily recognize the effects of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, all projects will be stamped with the Recovery Act logo. Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (aka stimulus), the Department of Energy's Office of Science received $1.2 billion. In late May, DOE released approximately $54 million-90 percent-of the $60 million allocated to the ARM Climate Research Facility. During the next 18 months, the ARM Climate Research Facility will purchase and deploy dual-frequency scanning cloud radars to all the ARM sites, enhance several

187

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey and Dismantling of Building 3126. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred CAA chosen on technical merit was Alternative 2. This CAA was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and reduce the potential for future exposure pathways.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H 1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET * RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Ports_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

189

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Ports_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

190

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process,

191

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H 1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET * RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

192

Recovery Act-Funded 90-m Blade Test Facility Commissioned May 18, 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Technology Testing Center (WTTC) in Boston, Massachusetts, now offers a full suite of certification tests for turbine blades up to 90 m in length as the state-of-the-art facility opened May 18, 2011.

193

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

194

Optimal Siting of Regional Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rural wastewater treatment. However, there are serious environmental and human health effects associ for wastewater treatment. Fecal sludge FS is defined as the sludge of variable consistency collected from onOptimal Siting of Regional Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica Ana Martha

Vogel, Richard M.

195

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description.

Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

197

EIS-0089: PUREX Plant and Uranium Oxide Plant Facilities, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of resumption of operations of the PUREX/Uranium Oxide facilities at the Hanford Site to produce plutonium and other special nuclear materials for national defense needs.

198

: The Resumption of Criticality Experiments Facility Operations at the Nevada National Security Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resumption of Criticality Resumption of Criticality Experiments Facility Operations at the Nevada National Security Site OAS-M-13-09 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 30, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE PRINCIPAL DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: George W. Collard Assistant Inspector General for Audits Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Resumption of Criticality Experiments Facility Operations at the Nevada National Security Site" BACKGROUND The mission of the Criticality Experiments Facility, located at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) was to conduct nuclear criticality experiments and hands-on training in nuclear safeguards, criticality safety and emergency response in support of the National

199

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Recovery and Reinvestment American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Sa- vannah River Site this month after they safely re- moved its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the work- ers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Workers will cut the dome into smaller pieces for disposal. Removal of the dome allows workers to access the 219,000-pound reactor vessel and two steam generators so they can remove and permanently dispose them onsite. Re- maining equipment will be moved to the cavity vacated by the vessel, and below-grade portions of the reactor will be

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - act proposed site Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Recovery Act) Frequently Asked Questions Summary: and in requests to the community to review proposals in response to the Recovery Act? 7. What method should... and who...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division : To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001

202

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2009 [Facility News] 7, 2009 [Facility News] Town Hall Meeting at AGU 2009 Fall Meeting Bookmark and Share ARM Climate Research Facility - New Measurement Capabilities for Climate Research Thursday, December 17, 6:15-7:15 pm, Moscone West Room 2002 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Scientists from around the world use data from the ARM Climate Research Facility to study the interactions between clouds, aerosol and radiation. Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the DOE Office of Science received $1.2 billion, with $60 million allocated to the ARM Climate Research Facility. With these funds, ARM will purchase and deploy dual-frequency scanning cloud radars to all the ARM sites, enhance several sites with precipitation radars and energy flux measurement capabilities,

203

DECOMMISSIONING OF THE NUCLEAR FACILITIES OF VKTA AT THE ROSSENDORF RESEARCH SITE  

SciTech Connect

VKTA decommissioned the old nuclear facilities of former GDR's (German Democratic Republic) Central Institute of Nuclear Research which was closed end of 1991. VKTA is responsible for fissile material and waste management, environmental and radiation protection and runs an accredited laboratory for environmental and radionuclide analytics. The Rossendorf research site is located east of the city of Dresden. The period from 1982 to about 1997 was mainly characterized by obtaining the necessary licenses for decommissioning and developing a new infrastructure (i.e. waste treatment facility, interim storages for fissile material and waste, clearance monitoring facility). The decommissioning work has been in progress since that time. The decommissioning projects are concentrated on three complexes: (1) the reactors and a fuel development and testing facility, (2) the radioisotope production facilities, and (3) the former liquid and solid waste storage facilities. The status of decommissioning progress and treatment of the residues will be demonstrated. Finally an outlook will be given on the future tasks of VKTA based on the ''Conception VKTA 2000 plus'', which was confirmed by the Saxonian government last year.

U. Helwig, W. Boessert

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

204

Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA  

SciTech Connect

Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

DOE/EA-1605: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Action: Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1605) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of new biomass cogeneration and heating facilities located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The draft EA was made available to the States of South Carolina and Georgia, and to the public, for a 30-day comment period. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the

207

Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah Siver Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

T T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A D E P A R T M E NT O F E N E R G Y DOE/EIS-0271 Construction & Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah River Site Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office Aiken, South Carolina Final Environmental Impact Statement March 1999 DOE/EIS-0271 March 1999 Preface iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement: Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah River Site (DOE/EIS-0271) LOCATION: Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina CONTACT: For additional information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), write or call: Andrew R. Grainger, NEPA Compliance Officer U.S. Department of Energy

208

Finding of No Significant Impact, Consolidated Incineration Facility at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

92 WL 381301 (F.R.) 92 WL 381301 (F.R.) NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Finding of No Significant Impact, Consolidated Incineration Facility at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC Thursday, December 24, 1992 *61402 AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Finding of no significant impact. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA -0400) for the proposed construction and operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. The CIF would be for the treatment of hazardous, low- level radioactive, and mixed (both hazardous and radioactive) wastes from SRS. Incineration would reduce the volume and toxicity of these wastes. Construction and operation of the

209

Field operations plan for permeability testing in the WIPP-site underground facility  

SciTech Connect

This Field Operations Plan (FOP) describes the objectives, design, equipment, and methodology for permeability tests to be conducted in boreholes drilled from the underground facility currently under construction at the 655-meter depth level at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico into relatively undisturbed portions of the Salado formation. The WIPP is a U. S. Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic radioactive wastes resulting from the United States`s defense programs. The testing described in this FOP will be conducted by INTERA Technologies, Inc., under contract to the Earth Sciences Division of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The testing program is part of the WIPP-site Hydrogeologic Characterization and Plugging and Sealing programs being conducted by SNL`s Earth Sciences and Experimental Programs Divisions, respectively.

Saulnier, G.J. Jr. [Intera Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1988-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

210

Field operations plan for permeability testing in the WIPP-site underground facility  

SciTech Connect

This Field Operations Plan (FOP) describes the objectives, design, equipment, and methodology for permeability tests to be conducted in boreholes drilled from the underground facility currently under construction at the 655-meter depth level at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico into relatively undisturbed portions of the Salado formation. The WIPP is a U. S. Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic radioactive wastes resulting from the United States's defense programs. The testing described in this FOP will be conducted by INTERA Technologies, Inc., under contract to the Earth Sciences Division of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The testing program is part of the WIPP-site Hydrogeologic Characterization and Plugging and Sealing programs being conducted by SNL's Earth Sciences and Experimental Programs Divisions, respectively.

Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (Intera Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1988-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hanford Site near-facility environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect

Near-facility environmental monitoring provides a means to measure the impacts of operations, waste management, and remediation activities on the environment adjacent to facilities and ensure compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Specifically, near-facility environmental monitoring monitors new and existing sites, processes, and facilities for potential impacts and releases; fugitive emissions and diffuse sources associated with contaminated areas, facilities (both active and those undergoing surveillance and maintenance), and environmental restoration activities. External radiation, ambient air particulates, ground and surface water, soil, sediment, and biota (plants and animals) are sampled or monitored. Parameters include, as appropriate, radionuclides; radiation fields; chemical or physical constituents, such as nitrates; pH; and water temperature. All ambient air results were below the US Department of Energy (DOE) Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs). Groundwater concentrations at the two wells at the 107-N Facility were below both the DOE DCG and US Environmental Protection Agency Interim Drinking Water Standards for gamma emitting radionuclides. Soil and vegetation results were generally within historic ranges and mostly below the Accessible Soil Concentration limits (included in HNF-PRO-454, Inactive Waste Sites) with the exception of one soil sampling location at 1 00 N Area. External radiation fields continued an overall downward trend. Surface water disposal unit samples (water, sediment, and aquatic vegetation) showed radionuclide concentrations below their respective DCG and Accessible Soil Concentration limits. The 100 N Area Columbia river shoreline springs results were below DCGs with the exception of one Sr concentration. More than 4,600 ha (11,300 acres) of radiologically controlled areas were surveyed in 1997, approximately the same as in 1996.

Perkins, C.J.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Second performance assessment iteration of the Greater Confinement Disposal facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) facility was established in Area 5 at the Nevada Test Site for containment of waste inappropriate for shallow land burial. Some transuranic (TRU) waste has been disposed of at the GCD facility, and compliance of this disposal system with EPA regulation 40 CFR 191 must be evaluated. We have adopted an iterative approach in which performance assessment results guide site data collection, which in turn influences the parameters and models used in performance assessment. The first iteration was based upon readily available data, and indicated that the GCD facility would likely comply with 40 CFR 191 and that the downward flux of water through the vadose zone (recharge) had a major influence on the results. Very large recharge rates, such as might occur under a cooler, wetter climate, could result in noncompliance. A project was initiated to study recharge in Area 5 by use of three environmental tracers. The recharge rate is so small that the nearest groundwater aquifer will not be contaminated in less than 10,000 years. Thus upward liquid diffusion of radionuclides remained as the sole release pathway. This second assessment iteration refined the upward pathway models and updated the parameter distributions based upon new site information. A new plant uptake model was introduced to the upward diffusion pathway; adsorption and erosion were also incorporated into the model. Several modifications were also made to the gas phase radon transport model. Plutonium solubility and sorption coefficient distributions were changed based upon new information, and on-site measurements were used to update the moisture content distributions. The results of the assessment using these models indicate that the GCD facility is likely to comply with all sections of 40 CFR 191 under undisturbed conditions.

Baer, T.A.; Emery, J.N. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Price, L.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olague, N.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

File:07MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:07MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 72 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 15:21, 9 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 15:21, 9 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (72 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 13:17, 9 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:17, 9 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (71 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 12:15, 1 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:15, 1 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (62 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs)

214

Site characterization report for the Old Hydrofracture Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Several Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) structures (i.e., Building 7852, the bulk storage bins, the pump house, water tank T-5, and pump P-3) are surplus facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). OHF was constructed in 1963 to allow experimentation and operations with an integrated solids storage, handling, mixing, and grout injection facility. It was shut down in 1980 and transferred to ORNL`s Surveillance and Maintenance Program. The hydrofracture process was a unique disposal method that involved injecting waste materials mixed with grout and additives under pumping pressures of 2,000 psi or greater into a deep, low-permeability shale formation. The injected slurry spread along fractures and bedding planes for hundreds of feet from the injection points, forming thin grout sheets (often less than 1/8 in. thick). The grout ostensibly immobilized and solidified the liquid wastes. Site characterization activities were conducted in the winter and spring of 1994 to collect information necessary to plan the D and D of OHF structures. This site characterization report documents the results of the investigation of OHF D and D structures, presenting data from the field investigation and laboratory analyses in the form of a site description, as-built drawings, summary tables of radiological and chemical contaminant concentrations, and a waste volume estimate. 25 refs., 54 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Critical Protection Item classification for a waste processing facility at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the methodology for Critical Protection Item (CPI) classification and its application to the Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) of a waste processing facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The WSRC methodology for CPI classification includes the evaluation of the radiological and non-radiological consequences resulting from postulated accidents at the waste processing facility and comparison of these consequences with allowable limits. The types of accidents considered include explosions and fire in the facility and postulated accidents due to natural phenomena, including earthquakes, tornadoes, and high velocity straight winds. The radiological analysis results indicate that CPIs are not required at the waste processing facility to mitigate the consequences of radiological release. The non-radiological analysis, however, shows that the Waste Storage Tank (WST) and the dike spill containment structures around the formic acid tanks in the cold chemical feed area and waste treatment area of the facility should be identified as CPIs. Accident mitigation options are provided and discussed.

Ades, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Garrett, R.J. [ABB Government Services, Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

banner banner Home | People | Site Index Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility US Department of Energy About Science Campaigns Sites Instruments Measurements Data News Publications Education Become a User Recovery Act Mission FAQ Outreach Displays History Organization Participants Facility Statistics Forms Contacts Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings Propose a Campaign Submitting Proposals: Guidelines Featured Campaigns Campaign Data List of Campaigns Aerial Facility Eastern North Atlantic Mobile Facilities North Slope of Alaska Southern Great Plains Tropical Western Pacific Location Table Contacts Instrument Datastreams Value-Added Products PI Data Products Field Campaign Data Related Data

217

Niagara Falls Storage Site, Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar year 1986: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)  

SciTech Connect

During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the interim storage of radioactive residues and contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at the NFSS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is 10 mrem/yr above background. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Monticello NPL Sites Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting Minutes & Action Items  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NPL Sites NPL Sites Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting Minutes & Action Items Location Monticello, Utah- DOE Office of Legacy Management field office Date September 27,2006 Attendees David Bird- Utah Department of Environmental Quality Paul Mushovic- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Att Kleinrath- U.S. Depmtment of Energy Tim Bartlett- S. M. Stoller Meeting topics and discussion points are summarized separately under the headings that follow. Attaclunent 1 to this report includes the agenda and handout materials provided at the meeting. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data (Attachment 2), quarterly site inspection results (Attachment 3), and project schedule and deliverables through the next two qumters (October 2006 through March 2007). With this

219

The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility at the Nevada National Security Site, OAS-L-12-05  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility at the Nevada National Security Site OAS-L-12-05 April 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 23, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, NEVADA SITE OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility at the Nevada National Security Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration's, Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) facility plays an integral role in the certification of the Nation's nuclear weapons stockpile by providing a method to generate and measure data

220

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12  

SciTech Connect

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

223

Draft environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified the Richton dome site as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geo

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

ARM - Site Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govSite Index govSite Index Expand | Collapse Site Index Videos Image Library About ARM About ARM (home) ARM and the Recovery Act ARM and the Recovery Act (home) ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Recovery Act Instruments ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) (home) ARM Education and Outreach Efforts Support IPY Research Support for International Polar Year (IPY) ARM Organization ARM Organization (home) Laboratory Partners ARM Safety Policy ARM Science Board ARM Science Board (home) Board Business Become a User Comments and Questions Contacts Contacts (home) ARM Engineering and Operations Contacts Facility Statistics Facility Statistics (home) Historical Field Campaign Statistics

225

Microsoft Word - FINAL 7-12-10 Site Visit Report - LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Facility FCA.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility - June 2010 This site visit report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of the Facility Centered Assessment (FCA) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLW). This review, conducted June 9-25, 2010, was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) and LANL, and conducted jointly by HSS, LASO, and LANL staff. The Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations was the overall lead organization for evaluation of the FCA process with the participation of the LASO Facility Representative assigned to RLW.

226

Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 1 - Future Uses of the Subtitle D Landfill 2 3. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 2 - OSDF Siting in a Brownfield Area 3 4. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 3 - Seismic Issues 4 5. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 4 - Post-Closure Public Use of the OSDF 5 6. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 5 - Public Communication Plan 7 7. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 6 - Baseline Schedule 8 8. RECOMMENDATIONS 8 9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 10 10. REFERENCES 10 APPENDIX 11 1 1. INTRODUCTION The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Uranium enrichment facilities at PGDP are leased to and operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. In 1994, PGDP was placed

227

NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Lines of authority are clearly defined with clear and open communications existing between all departments and all levels. Criteria: Dialogue exists between personnel involved in engineering/design, operations, maintenance, safety issues, and remedial actions. Personnel within the departments are promptly informed on issues as they occur on a need-to-know basis. Lessons Learned and feedback is encouraged inter-departmentally regarding safety, adequate resources, and processes to enable prompt and effective corrective actions and resolutions for mission accomplishment. Management has an effective and specified chain of communication in both directions between corporate and facility management. (DOE/EH-0135)

228

MONTICELLO NPL SITES Minutes and Action Items of the Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Minutes and Action Items of the Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting Minutes and Action Items of the Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting September 16 and 17,2008 Meeting Location U.S. Department of Energy Site Office, Monticello, Utah Meeting Attendees Jalena Dayvault- U.S. Department of Energy Tim Bartlett- S.M. Stoller Todd Moon- S.M. Stoller Linda Sheader- S. M. Stoller Paul Wetherstein- S.M. Stoller Brent Everett- Utah Department of Environmental Quality Duane Mortensen- Utah Department of Environmental Quality Paul Mushovic- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Rob Stites- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (participated by phone) Christina Wilson- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (participated by phone) Meeting topics and discussion points are summarized under the headings listed below. The agenda and copies of handouts presented during the meeting are attached to this report.

229

Annual update for the Nevada Test Site site treatment plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the purpose and scope of the Draft Annual Update for the Nevada Test Site Treatment Plan, the framework for developing the Annual Update, and the current inventory of mixed waste covered under the Site Treatment Plan and the Federal Facility Compliance Act Consent Order and stored at the Nevada Test Site. No Site Treatment Plan milestones or Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order deadlines have been missed for fiscal year 1996. The Shipping Cask, a portion of the solvent sludge waste stream, and eight B-25 boxes from the lead-contaminated soil waste stream have been deleted from the Site Treatment Plan and the Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order, in accordance with Part XI of the Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Vegetation communities associated with the 100-Area and 200-Area facilities on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, lies within the broad semi-arid shrub-steppe vegetation zone of the Columbia Basin. Thirteen different habitat types on the Hanford Site have been mapped in Habitat Types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and Plant Species of Concern (Downs et al. 1993). In a broad sense, this classification is correct. On a smaller scale, however, finer delineations are possible. This study was conducted to determine the plant communities and estimate vegetation cover in and directly adjacent to the 100 and 200 Areas, primarily in relation to waste sites, as part of a comprehensive ecological study for the Compensation Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) characterization of the 100 and 200 Areas. During the summer of 1993, field surveys were conducted and a map of vegetation communities in each area, including dominant species associations, was produced. The field surveys consisted of qualitative community delineations. The community delineations described were made by field reconnaissance and are qualitative in nature. The delineations were made by visually determining the dominant plant species or vegetation types and were based on the species most apparent at the time of inspection. Additionally, 38 transects were run in these plant communities to try to obtain a more accurate representation of the community. Because habitat disturbances from construction/operations activities continue to occur in these areas, users of this information should be cautious in applying these maps without a current ground survey. This work will complement large-scale habitat maps of the Hanford Site.

Stegen, J.A.

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

232

DOE/EA-1605: Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

605 605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE This page intentionally left blank - i - TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................1 1.1 Background and Proposed Action ...............................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need ........................................................................................4

233

Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility  

SciTech Connect

The 216-B-3 Pond system was a series of ponds used for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation from 1945 to 1997, the B Pond System has been a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility since 1986, with RCRA interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994 the expansion ponds of the facility were clean closed, leaving only the main pond and a portion of the 216-B-3-3 ditch as the currently regulated facility. In 2001, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued a letter providing guidance for a two-year, trial evaluation of an alternate, intrawell statistical approach to contaminant detection monitoring at the B Pond system. This temporary variance was allowed because the standard indicator-parameters evaluation (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and accompanying interim status statistical approach is ineffective for detecting potential B-Pond-derived contaminants in groundwater, primarily because this method fails to account for variability in the background data and because B Pond leachate is not expected to affect the indicator parameters. In July 2003, the final samples were collected for the two-year variance period. An evaluation of the results of the alternate statistical approach is currently in progress. While Ecology evaluates the efficacy of the alternate approach (and/or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit), the B Pond system will return to contamination-indicator detection monitoring. Total organic carbon and total organic halides were added to the constituent list beginning with the January 2004 samples. Under this plan, the following wells will be monitored for B Pond: 699-42-42B, 699-43-44, 699-43-45, and 699-44-39B. The wells will be sampled semi-annually for the contamination indicator parameters (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and annually for water quality parameters (chloride, iron, manganese, phenols, sodium, and sulfate). This plan will remain in effect until superseded by another plan or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit.

Barnett, D BRENT.; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.; McDonald, John P.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Review of the Implementation Verification Rev iew Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities, September 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implementation Verification Review Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Review of the Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1

235

Review of the Implementation Verification Rev iew Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities, September 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation Verification Review Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Review of the Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1

236

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Recovery Act Recovery Act Center Map PERFORMANCE The Department estimates the $6 billion Recovery Act investment will allow us to complete work now that would cost approximately $13 billion in future years, saving $7 billion. As Recovery Act work is completed through the cleanup of contaminated sites, facilities, and material disposition, these areas will becoming available for potential reuse by other entities. Recovery Act funding is helping the Department reach our cleanup goals faster. Through the end of December 2012, EM achieved a total footprint reduction of 74%, or 690 of 931 square miles. EM achieved its goal of 40% footprint reduction in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule. Recovery Act payments exceeded $5.9 billion in December 2012. Recovery Act

237

U.S. Federal Facility Compliance Agreement for the Hanford Site, February 7, 1994 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Radionuclide for Radionuclide NESHAP State Washington Agreement Type Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Legal Driver(s) CAA Scope Summary Bring DOE's Hanford site into compliance with CAA Parties EPA; DOE; Richland Operations Office (RL) Date 02/07/1994 SCOPE * Bring DOE's Hanford site into compliance with CAA. This Compliance Plan contains a schedule for DOE to evaluate the monitoring systems associated with Designated Stacks to ensure that these systems conform to the standards for continuous monitoring systems in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES * Beginning 30 days after the effective date of this Agreement, DOE shall submit quarterly progress reports to EPA until the requirements contained in Amendment A

238

Interaction of Sr-90 with site candidate soil for demonstration disposal facility at Serpong  

SciTech Connect

Interaction of radiostrontium (Sr-90) with site candidate soil for demonstration disposal facility to be constructed in the near future at Serpong has been done. This activity is to anticipate the interim storage facility at Serpong nuclear area becomes full off condition, and show to the public how radioactive waste can be well managed with the existing technology. To ensure that the location is save, a reliability study of site candidate soil becomes very importance to be conducted through some experiments consisted some affected parameters such as contact time, effect of ionic strength, and effect of Sr{sup +} ion in solution. Radiostrontium was used as a tracer on the experiments and has role as radionuclide reference in low-level radioactive waste due to its long half-live and it's easy to associate with organism in nature. So, interaction of radiostrontium and soil samples from site becomes important to be studied. Experiment was performed in batch method, and soil sample-solution containing radionuclide was mixed in a 20 ml of PE vial. Ratio of solid: liquid was 10{sup ?2} g/ml. Objective of the experiment is to collect the specific characteristics data of radionuclide sorption onto soil from site candidate. Distribution coefficient value was used as indicator where the amount of initial and final activities of radiostrontium in solution was compared. Result showed that equilibrium condition was reached after contact time 10 days with Kd values ranged from 1600-2350 ml/g. Increased in ionic strength in solution made decreased of Kd value into soil sample due to competition of background salt and radiostrontium into soil samples, and increased in Sr ion in solution caused decreased of Kd value in soil sample due to limitation of sorption capacity in soil samples. Fast condition in saturated of metal ion into soil samples was reached due to a simple reaction was occurred.

Setiawan, Budi, E-mail: bravo@batan.go.id [Radwaste Technology Center-National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Serpong-Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia); Mila, Oktri; Safni [Dept. of Chemistry, Fac. of Math. and Nat. Sci., Andalas University, Kampus Limau Manis, Padang-West Sumatra 25163 (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

Environmental Assessment for the LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, is being constructed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). In this Environmental Assessment, environmental consequences of spilling hazardous materials in the Frenchman Flat basin are evaluated and mitigations and recommendations are stated in order to protect natural resources and reduce land-use impacts. Guidelines and restrictions concerning spill-test procedures will be determined by the LGF Test Facility Operations Manager and DOE based on toxicity documentation for the test material, provided by the user, and mitigations imposed by the Environmental Assessment. In addition to Spill Test Facility operational procedures, certain assumptions have been made in preparation of this document: no materials will be considered for testing that have cumulative, long-term persistence in the environment; spill tests will consist of releases of 15 min or less; and sufficient time will be allowed between tests for recovery of natural resources. Geographic limits to downwind concentrations of spill materials were primarily determined from meteorological data, human occupational exposure standards to hazardous materials and previous spill tests. These limits were established using maximum spill scenarios and environmental impacts are discussed as worst case scenarios; however, spill-test series will begin with smaller spills, gradually increasing in size after the impacts of the initial tests have been evaluated.

Patton, S.E.; Novo, M.G.; Shinn, J.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Savannah River Site- Salt Waste Processing Facility: Briefing on the Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a presentation outlining the Salt Waste Processing Facility process, major risks, approach for conducting reviews, discussion of the findings, and conclusions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental Quality is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to all aspects of hazardous waste storage and disposal, and the Act addresses permitting requirements for disposal

242

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-1 Regional Map of the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site Vicinity Summary S-18 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-3 Three Alternative Conversion Facility Locations within the Portsmouth Site, with Location A Being the Preferred Alternative (A representative conversion facility footprint is shown within each location.) Summary S-20 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-4 Conceptual Overall Material Flow Diagram for the Portsmouth Conversion Facility Summary S-21 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-5 Conceptual Conversion Facility Site Layout for Portsmouth Summary S-25 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-6 Potential Locations for Construction of a New Cylinder Storage Yard at Portsmouth

243

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-1 Regional Map of the Paducah, Kentucky, Site Vicinity Summary S-18 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-3 Three Alternative Conversion Facility Locations within the Paducah Site, with Location A Being the Preferred Alternative (A representative conversion facility footprint is shown within each location.) Summary S-20 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-4 Conceptual Overall Material Flow Diagram for the Paducah Conversion Facility Summary S-21 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-5 Conceptual Conversion Facility Site Layout for Paducah Summary S-28 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-6 Areas of Potential Impact Evaluated for Each Alternative Alternatives 2-7 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS

244

Allowable residual-contamination levels for decommissioning facilities in the 100 areas of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of a study sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries to determine Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for five generic categories of facilities in the 100 Areas of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to provide ARCL data useful to UNC engineers in conducting safety and cost comparisons for decommissioning alternatives. The ARCL results are based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for three specific modes of future use of the land and facilities. These modes of use are restricted, controlled, and unrestricted. The information on ARCL values for restricted and controlled use provided by this report is intended to permit a full consideration of decommissioning alternatives. ARCL results are presented both for surface contamination remaining in facilities (in dpm/100 cm/sup 2/), and for unconfined surface and confined subsurface soil conditions (in pCi/g). Two confined soil conditions are considered: contamination at depths between 1 and 4 m, and contamination at depths greater than or equal to 5 m. A set of worksheets are presented in an appendix for modifying the ARCL values to accommodate changes in the radionuclide mixture or concentrations, to consider the impacts of radioactive decay, and to predict instrument responses. Finally, a comparison is made between the unrestricted release ARCL values for the 100 Area facilities and existing decommissioning and land disposal regulations. For surface contamination, the comparison shows good agreement. For soil contamination, the comparison shows good agreement if reasonable modification factors are applied to account for the differences in modeling soil contamination and licensed low-level waste.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

246

Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping and Pipe Supports, September 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports September 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1

247

Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping and Pipe Supports, September 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports September 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1

248

YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT RECOMMENDATION BY THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY REGARDING THE SUITABILITY OF THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE FOR A REPOSITORY UNDER THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982  

SciTech Connect

For more than half a century, since nuclear science helped us win World War II and ring in the Atomic Age, scientists have known that !he Nation would need a secure, permanent facility in which to dispose of radioactive wastes. Twenty years ago, when Congress adopted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA or ''the Act''), it recognized the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community that the best option for such a facility would be a deep underground repository. Fifteen years ago, Congress directed the Secretary of Energy to investigate and recommend to the President whether such a repository could be located safely at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since then, our country has spent billions of dollars and millions of hours of research endeavoring to answer this question. I have carefully reviewed the product of this study. In my judgment, it constitutes sound science and shows that a safe repository can be sited there. I also believe that compelling national interests counsel in favor of proceeding with this project. Accordingly, consistent with my responsibilities under the NWPA, today I am recommending that Yucca Mountain be developed as the site for an underground repository for spent fuel and other radioactive wastes. The first consideration in my decision was whether the Yucca Mountain site will safeguard the health and safety of the people, in Nevada and across the country, and will be effective in containing at minimum risk the material it is designed to hold. Substantial evidence shows that it will. Yucca Mountain is far and away the most thoroughly researched site of its kind in the world. It is a geologically stable site, in a closed groundwater basin, isolated on thousands of acres of Federal land, and farther from any metropolitan area than the great majority of less secure, temporary nuclear waste storage sites that exist in the country today. This point bears emphasis. We are not confronting a hypothetical problem. We have a staggering amount of radioactive waste in this country--nearly 100,000,000 gallons of high-level nuclear waste and more than 40,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel with more created every day. Our choice is not between, on the one hand, a disposal site with costs and risks held to a minimum, and, on the other, a magic disposal system with no costs or risks at all. Instead, the real choice is between a single secure site, deep under the ground at Yucca Mountain, or making do with what we have now or some variant of it--131 aging surface sites, scattered across 39 states. Every one of those sites was built on the assumption that it would be temporary. As time goes by. every one is closer to the limit of its safe life span. And every one is at least a potential security risk--safe for today, but a question mark in decades to come.

NA

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

249

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

WIPP - Public Reading Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Reading Facilities/Electronic Reading Facilities The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Electronic FOIA (E-FOIA) require that various specific types of records, as well as various other records, be maintained in public reading facilities. Before you submit a FOIA request, we recommend you contact or visit the appropriate public reading facility to determine if the records you are seeking have already been released. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as other related DOE sites, have established home pages on the Internet with links to other web sites. If you determine a specific facility might have records in which you are interested, requests for those records can be made directly to the public reading rooms identified below. Copying of records located in the public reading rooms must be made by the staff of those facilities.

251

NASA Benchmarks Lessons Learned Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LESSONS LEARNED LESSONS LEARNED Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established Lessons Learned Program with an effective system to continuously distribute information of improvement in safe operations to all affected personnel. Criteria: Timely and effective action is taken to track and correct identified deficiencies and to prevent their recurrence by addressing their basic causes and related generic problems. (DOE/EH-0135) Management installs an effective corrective action program (caWeb) for safety-related issues, wherein records are updated and actions are tracked through completion. (DOE/EH-0135) Management uses the corrective action program (caWeb) as the database to analyze safety issues, implement corrective actions, and define

252

Confined Spaces Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONFINED SPACES CONFINED SPACES Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the safety effectiveness of the contractor's confined or enclosed spaces procedure, and for establishing compliance with DOE and OSHA requirements. Specifically, this assessment is to verify the information and findings of the BN Management Self Assessment Report on "Confined Space", ES&H-MSA-03-13, dated December 31, 2003. Criteria: Practices and procedures are in place to protect employees in general industry from the hazards of entry into permit-required confined spaces. 29 CFR 1910.146 (a) Each employee is instructed in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to

253

NASA Benchmarks Safety Functions Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAFETY FUNCTIONS SAFETY FUNCTIONS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should be proactive in addressing safety-related issues. Management should have an established system to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. Criteria: A system is in place to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. (DOE/EH-0135) Procedures clearly define management's responsibility for safety- related decisions and provide for the escalation of matters in an appropriate time frame. (DOE/EH-0135) Management promotes safety programs and the organization's safety culture through sponsoring and attending safety meetings. (DOE/EH- 0135) Management encourages and supports effective programs for reporting

254

Operations Authorization Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations Authorization Operations Authorization Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to verify there is documentation in place which accurately describes the safety envelope for a facility, program or project. Criteria: Conditions and requirements should be established to ensure programs addressing all applicable functional areas are adequately implemented to support safe performance of the work. The extent of documentation and level of authority for agreement shall be tailored to the complexity and hazards associated with the work. Personnel shall be responsible and accountable for performance of work in accordance with the controls established. Controls established for safety are a discernible part of the plan for

255

Multiattribute utility analysis as a framework for public participation siting a hazardous waste facility  

SciTech Connect

How can the public play a role in decisions involving complicated scientific arguments? This paper describes a public participation exercise in which stakeholders used multiattribute utility analysis to select a site for a hazardous waste facility. Key to success was the ability to separate and address the two types of judgements inherent in environmental decisions: technical judgements on the likely consequences of alternative choices and value judgements on the importance or seriousness of those consequences. This enabled technical specialists to communicate the essential technical considerations and allowed stakeholders to establish the value judgements for the decision. Although rarely used in public participation, the multiattribute utility approach appears to provide a useful framework for the collaborative resolution of many complex environmental decision problems.

Merkhofer, M.W. [Applied Decision Analysis, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

257

INSTALLATION OF BUBBLERS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITED DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC assumed the liquid waste contract at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the summer of 2009. The main contractual agreement was to close 22 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks in eight years. To achieve this aggressive commitment, faster waste processing throughout the SRS liquid waste facilities will be required. Part of the approach to achieve faster waste processing is to increase the canister production rate of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) from approximately 200 canisters filled with radioactive waste glass per year to 400 canisters per year. To reach this rate for melter throughput, four bubblers were installed in the DWPF Melter in the late summer of 2010. This effort required collaboration between SRR, SRR critical subcontractor EnergySolutions, and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, including the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The tasks included design and fabrication of the bubblers and related equipment, testing of the bubblers for various technical issues, the actual installation of the bubblers and related equipment, and the initial successful operation of the bubblers in the DWPF Melter.

Smith, M.; Iverson, D.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

258

Type B Investigation Board Report on the April 2, 2002, Worker Fall from Shoring/Scaffolding Structure at the Savannah River Site Tritium Extraction Facility Construction Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On April 2, 2002, a carpenter helping to erect shoring/scaffolding fell about 52 and struck his head. He sustained head injuries requiring hospitalization that exceeded the threshold for a Type B investigation in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 225.1A, Accident Investigation. The accident occurred at the DOEs Savannah River Site (SRS) at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) construction site.

259

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The HASP is written to make use of past experience and best management practices to eliminate or minimize hazards to workers or the environment from events such as fires, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release to the environment.

Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

260

Inadvertent Intruder Analysis For The Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF)  

SciTech Connect

The inadvertent intruder analysis considers the radiological impacts to hypothetical persons who are assumed to inadvertently intrude on the Portsmouth OSWDF site after institutional control ceases 100 years after site closure. For the purposes of this analysis, we assume that the waste disposal in the OSWDF occurs at time zero, the site is under institutional control for the next 100 years, and inadvertent intrusion can occur over the following 1,000 year time period. Disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the OSWDF must meet a requirement to assess impacts on such individuals, and demonstrate that the effective dose equivalent to an intruder would not likely exceed 100 mrem per year for scenarios involving continuous exposure (i.e. chronic) or 500 mrem for scenarios involving a single acute exposure. The focus in development of exposure scenarios for inadvertent intruders was on selecting reasonable events that may occur, giving consideration to regional customs and construction practices. An important assumption in all scenarios is that an intruder has no prior knowledge of the existence of a waste disposal facility at the site. Results of the analysis show that a hypothetical inadvertent intruder at the OSWDF who, in the worst case scenario, resides on the site and consumes vegetables from a garden established on the site using contaminated soil (chronic agriculture scenario) would receive a maximum chronic dose of approximately 7.0 mrem/yr during the 1000 year period of assessment. This dose falls well below the DOE chronic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr. Results of the analysis also showed that a hypothetical inadvertent intruder at the OSWDF who, in the worst case scenario, excavates a basement in the soil that reaches the waste (acute basement construction scenario) would receive a maximum acute dose of approximately 0.25 mrem/yr during the 1000 year period of assessment. This dose falls well below the DOE acute dose limit of 500 mrem/yr. Disposal inventory constraints based on the intruder analysis are well above conservative estimates of the OSWDF inventory and, based on intruder disposal limits; about 7% of the disposal capacity is reached with the estimated OSWDF inventory.

Smith, Frank G.; Phifer, Mark A.

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The purpose of this assessment is verify and validate the process for the development of operations procedures and that procedures are in place which provide direction to personnel to ensure that the facility is operated within its design bases. Criteria: Operations procedures should be written to provide specific direction for operating systems and equipment during normal and postulated abnormal and emergency conditions. (DOE O 5480.19 A) Operations procedures should provide appropriate direction to ensure that the facility is operated within its design bases and should be effectively used to support safe operations of the facility. (DOE O 5480.19 A)

262

Addendum to environmental monitoring plan Nevada Test Site and support facilities  

SciTech Connect

This 1992 Addendum to the ``Environmental Monitoring Plan Nevada Test Site and Support Facilities -- 1991,`` Report No. DOE/NV/1 0630-28 (EMP) applies to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) operations on the Continental US (including Amchitka Island, Alaska) that are under the purview of the DOE Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV). The primary purpose of these operations is the conduct of the nuclear weapons testing program for the DOE and the Department of Defense. Since 1951, these tests have been conducted principally at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. In accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, this 1992 Addendum to the EMP brings together, in one document, updated information and/or new sections to the description of the environmental activities conducted at the NTS by user organizations, operations support contractors, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) originally published in the EMP. The EPA conducts both the offsite environmental monitoring program around the NTS and post-operational monitoring efforts at non-NTS test locations used between 1961 and 1973 in other parts of the continental US All of these monitoring activities are conducted under the auspices of the DOE/NV, which has the stated policy of conducting its operations in compliance with both the letter and the spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards.

NONE

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A successful effort to involve stakeholders in a facility siting decision using LIPS with stakeholder involvement  

SciTech Connect

Local public opposition to federal bureaucratic decisions has resulted in public agencies rethinking the role of stakeholders in decision making. Efforts to include stakeholders directly in the decision-making process are on the increase. Unfortunately, many attempts to involve members of the public in decisions involving complex technical issues have failed. A key problem has been defining a meaningful role for the public in the process of arriving at a technical decision. This paper describes a successful effort by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in New Mexico to involve stakeholders in an important technical decision associated with its Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The decision was where to locate a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), a facility intended to consolidate and store wastes generated from the cleanup of hazardous waste sites. A formal priority setting process known as the Laboratory Integration Prioritization System (LIPS) was adapted to provide an approach for involving the public. Although rarely applied to stakeholder participation, the LIPS process proved surprisingly effective. It produced a consensus over a selected site and enhanced public trust and understanding of Project activities.

Merkhofer, L. [Applied Decision Analysis, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report Kurt D. Gerdes Harry D. Harmon Herbert G. Sutter Major C. Thompson John R. Shultz Sahid C. Smith July 13, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 ii This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii Signatures SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iv This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility

265

Exploratory shaft facility: It`s role in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site for a potential nuclear repository  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is characterizing Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to assess its suitability as a potential site for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and defense related activities. The assessment activities include surface investigations, drill holes from the surface, and an underground facility for in situ characterization tests. This underground exploratory shaft facility is being designed to meet the criteria for characterizing the mountain as described in the Site Characterization Plan. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Kalia, H.N.; Merson, T.J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.  

SciTech Connect

Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Recovery Act:Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources in Colorado Using Remoter Sensing and On-Site Exploration, Testing and Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Recovery Act:Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources in Colorado Using Remoter Sensing and On-Site Exploration, Testing and Analysis presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

268

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development May 2011 August 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology ......................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................................... 3

269

Savannah River Site, Liquid Waste Program, Savannah River Remediation American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Benefits and Lessons Learned - 12559  

SciTech Connect

Utilizing funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River site successfully executed forty-one design, procurement, construction, and operating activities in the period from September 2009 through December 2011. Project Management of the program included noteworthy practices involving safety, integrated project teams, communication, and cost, schedule and risk management. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure were accomplished. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually identified and applied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. The funding of a portion of the Liquid Waste Program at SRS by ARRA was a major success. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure was accomplished. Integrated Project Teams ensured quality products and services were provided to the Operations customers. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually reviewed and reapplied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. (authors)

Schmitz, Mark A.; Crouse, Thomas N. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CANOGA PARK, Calif. - Workers in a study funded by $38 million from the American Recovery CANOGA PARK, Calif. - Workers in a study funded by $38 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to assess radiological contamination have collected more than 600 soil samples and surveyed 120 acres of land for gamma radiation. Under an interagency agreement with DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conduct- ing the study at Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) Area IV and the Northern Undeveloped Land. DOE's Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is located in Area IV. Results of the study will guide cleanup decisions for this portion of SSFL, which was once used for a broad range of energy related research and development. The EPA is collecting soil samples to determine the nature and extent of radiological contamina-

271

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility: Briefing on the Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review Harry Harmon January 9, 2007 2 U.S. Department of Energy Outline * SWPF Process Overview * Major Risks * Approach for Conducting Review * Discussion of Findings * Conclusions 3 U.S. Department of Energy Salt Waste Processing Facility 4 U.S. Department of Energy SWPF Process Overview Alpha Finishing Process CSSX Alpha Strike Process MST/ Sludge Cs Strip Effluent DSS 5 U.S. Department of Energy BOTTOM LINE The SWPF Project is ready to move into final design. 6 U.S. Department of Energy Major Risks * Final geotechnical data potentially could result in redesign of the PC-3 CPA base mat and structure. * Cost and schedule impacts arising from the change from ISO-9001 to NQA-1 quality assurance requirements. * The "de-inventory, flush, and then hands-on

272

Hanford Site Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring Data Report for Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

Near-facility environmental monitoring is defined as monitoring near facilities that have the potential to discharge or have discharged, stored, or disposed of radioactive or hazardous materials. Monitoring locations are associated with nuclear facilities such as the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Canister Storage Building, and the K Basins; inactive nuclear facilities such as N Reactor and the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility; and waste storage or disposal facilities such as burial grounds, cribs, ditches, ponds, tank farms, and trenches. Much of the monitoring consists of collecting and analyzing environmental samples and methodically surveying areas near facilities. The program is also designed to evaluate acquired analytical data, determine the effectiveness of facility effluent monitoring and controls, assess the adequacy of containment at waste disposal units, and detect and monitor unusual conditions.

Perkins, Craig J.; Dorsey, Michael C.; Mckinney, Stephen M.; Wilde, Justin W.; Poston, Ted M.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Review of Documented Safety Analysis Development for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (LBL Facilities), April 23, 2013 (HSS CRAD 45-58, Rev. 0)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of U.S. Department of Energy Subject: Review of Documented Safety Analysis Development for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immob ilization Plant (LBL Facilities) - C riteria and Review Approach D oc um~ HS: HSS CRAD 45-58 Rev: 0 Eff. Date: April 23, 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Acting Di rec or, Office of Safety and Emergency Nltanagement Evaluations Date: Apri l 23 , 20 13 Criteria and Review Approach Document ~~ trd,James Low Date: April 23 , 20 13 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of H.ealth, Safety and Security (HSS), the Office of Enforcement and Overs ight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) miss io n is to assess the effectiveness of the environment, safety, health, and emergency management systems and practices used by line and

274

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Paducah DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 SUMMARY S.1 INTRODUCTION This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register (FR) on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF 6 conversion facilities at Portsmouth,

275

CHARACTERIZING DOE HANFORD SITE WASTE ENCAPSULATION STORAGE FACILITY CELLS USING RADBALL  

SciTech Connect

RadBall{trademark} is a novel technology that can locate and quantify unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semi-sphere. The collimator has a number of small holes with tungsten inserts; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semi-sphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data using a reverse ray tracing or backprojection technique provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} was originally designed for dry deployments and several tests, completed at Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, substantiate its modeled capabilities. This study involves the investigation of the RadBall{trademark} technology during four submerged deployments in two water filled cells at the DOE Hanford Site's Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility.

Farfan, E.; Coleman, R.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y Y : J O H N D . S T E V E N S O N C O N S U L T I N G E N G I N E E R 6 6 1 1 R O C K S I D E R D . I N D E P E N D E N C E , O H I O 4 4 1 3 1 T E L . 2 1 6 - 4 4 7 - 9 4 4 0 E M A I L : J S T E V E N S O N 4 @ E A R T H L I N K . N E T SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES Categorization of Natural Hazard Phenomenon and Operational Load Combinations Prior to the 1988 Uniform Building Code, UBC (1) natural hazard phenomenon (earthquake, wind, flooding and precipitation) and operational load combinations were divided into two categories: NORMAL- Loads such as dead, live and design basis pressure. Expected frequency: 1.0 per yr with a limiting acceptance criteria Allowable stress design criteria: equal to one-half to two-thirds of specified minimum yield stress. SEVERE - Natural hazard and operational transient loads.

277

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Savannah River Site Hand Injury at the Salt Waste Processing Facility on October 6, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report documents the results of the Type B Accident Investigation Board (Board) investigation of the October 6, 2009, hand injury at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Salt Waste Processing Facility construction site.

278

Fermilab | Recovery Act | Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Videos Videos Watch videos documenting progress on Fermilab projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. NOvA - Community Voices - September 2009 Residents of northern Minnesota and construction workers building the NOvA detector facility discuss the benefits the high-energy physics research project has brought their communities. Congressman Bill Foster at Fermilab Congressman Bill Foster speaks to Fermilab Technical Division employees and members of the media at a press conference on Wednesday, August 5 to announce an additional $60.2 million in Recovery Act funds for the lab. NOvA first blast On July 20, construction crews began blasting into the rock at the future site of the NOvA detector facility in northern Minnesota. NOvA groundbreaking ceremony

279

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 11, 2011 [Facility News] October 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final Recovery Act Milestone Complete! Bookmark and Share To support all the new instruments from the Recovery Act, infrastructure upgrades ranging from power and platforms to communications and data systems required a focused team effort. To support all the new instruments from the Recovery Act, infrastructure upgrades ranging from power and platforms to communications and data systems required a focused team effort. For the past year and a half, ARM scientists, engineers, operations, and data systems staff have been working tirelessly to support the installation and operation of nearly 150 new and upgraded instruments throughout the user facility. In September, ARM received its final three instruments - a radar wind profiler; a micropulse lidar for the Darwin, Australia site; and

280

Summary environmental site assessment report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oxnard Facility, Oxnard, California  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the investigations conducted by Rust Geotech at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oxnard facility, 1235 East Wooley Road, Oxnard, California. These investigations were designed to locate, identify, and characterize any regulated contaminated media on the site. The effort included site visits; research of ownership, historical uses of the Oxnard facility and adjacent properties, incidences of and investigations for contaminants on adjacent properties, and the physical setting of the site; sampling and analysis; and reporting. These investigations identified two friable asbestos gaskets on the site, which were removed, and nonfriable asbestos, which will be managed through the implementation of an asbestos management plan. The California primary drinking water standards were exceeded for aluminum on two groundwater samples and for lead in one sample collected from the shallow aquifer underlying the site; remediation of the groundwater in this aquifer is not warranted because it is not used. Treated water is available from a municipal water system. Three sludge samples indicated elevated heavy metals concentrations; the sludge must be handled as a hazardous waste if disposed. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were detected at concentrations below remediation criteria in facility soils at two locations. In accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and State of California guidance, remediation of the PCBs is not required. No other hazardous substances were detected in concentrations exceeding regulatory limits.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control technology.1 46 sions from the list of regulated hazardous air pollutantsAir Act includes "only those pollutants subject to a statutory or regulatory provision that requires actual control

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Environmental assessment for the construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Waste Segregation Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction, operation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Waste Segregation Facility (WSF) for the sorting, shredding, and compaction of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The LLW to be processed consists of two waste streams: legacy waste which is currently stored in E-Area Vaults of SRS and new waste generated from continuing operations. The proposed action is to construct, operate, and D&D a facility to process low-activity job-control and equipment waste for volume reduction. The LLW would be processed to make more efficient use of low-level waste disposal capacity (E-Area Vaults) or to meet the waste acceptance criteria for treatment at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at SRS.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction Suspension/Delay, June 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-Hanford-2013-06-10 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction Suspension/Delay Dates of Activity : June 10, 2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Perform an inspection of the project site to examine the contractor's actions to protect completed work from deteriorating during the current suspension of construction work activities. 2. Inspect storage areas to determine if construction materials are stored in a manner that will prevent deterioration during possible long-term storage while construction work is suspended.

286

Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction Suspension/Delay, June 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-Hanford-2013-06-10 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction Suspension/Delay Dates of Activity : June 10, 2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Perform an inspection of the project site to examine the contractor's actions to protect completed work from deteriorating during the current suspension of construction work activities. 2. Inspect storage areas to determine if construction materials are stored in a manner that will prevent deterioration during possible long-term storage while construction work is suspended.

287

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITY AT THE PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, SITE DECEMBER 2003 U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Paducah DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831

288

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITY AT THE PORTSMOUTH, OHIO, SITE DECEMBER 2003 U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Portsmouth DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831

289

Nevada Test Site, site treatment plan 1999 annual update  

SciTech Connect

A Site Treatment Plan (STP) is required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) generates or stores mixed waste (MW), defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFC Act) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. This STP was written to identify specific treatment facilities for treating DOE/NV generated MW and provides proposed implementation schedules. This STP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and provided the basis for the negotiation and issuance of the FFC Act Consent Order (CO) dated March 6, 1996, and revised June 15, 1998. The FFC Act CO sets forth stringent regulatory requirements to comply with the implementation of the STP.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

ALL-PATHWAYS DOSE ANALYSIS FOR THE PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) All-Pathways analysis has been conducted that considers the radiological impacts to a resident farmer. It is assumed that the resident farmer utilizes a farm pond contaminated by the OSWDF to irrigate a garden and pasture and water livestock from which food for the resident farmer is obtained, and that the farmer utilizes groundwater from the Berea sandstone aquifer for domestic purposes (i.e. drinking water and showering). As described by FBP 2014b the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model (Schroeder et al. 1994) and the Surface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) model (White and Oostrom 2000, 2006) were used to model the flow and transport from the OSWDF to the Points of Assessment (POAs) associated with the 680-ft elevation sandstone layer (680 SSL) and the Berea sandstone aquifer. From this modeling the activity concentrations radionuclides were projected over time at the POAs. The activity concentrations were utilized as input to a GoldSimTM (GTG 2010) dose model, described herein, in order to project the dose to a resident farmer over time. A base case and five sensitivity cases were analyzed. The sensitivity cases included an evaluation of the impacts of using a conservative inventory, an uncased well to the Berea sandstone aquifer, a low waste zone uranium distribution coefficient (Kd), different transfer factors, and reference person exposure parameters (i.e. at 95 percentile). The maximum base case dose within the 1,000 year assessment period was projected to be 1.5E-14 mrem/yr, and the maximum base case dose at any time less than 10,000 years was projected to be 0.002 mrem/yr. The maximum projected dose of any sensitivity case was approximately 2.6 mrem/yr associated with the use of an uncased well to the Berea sandstone aquifer. This sensitivity case is considered very unlikely because it assumes leakage from the location of greatest concentration in the 680 SSL in to the Berea sandstone aquiver over time and does not conform to standard private water well construction practices. The bottom-line is that all predicted doses from the base case and five sensitivity cases fall well below the DOE all-pathways 25 mrem/yr Performance Objective.

Smith, F.; Phifer, M.

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

291

National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Strategy for the Remote-Handled Low-level Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to have disposal capability for remote-handled low level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the time the existing disposal facility is full or must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the INL Subsurface Disposal Area in approximately the year 2017.

Peggy Hinman

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Manhattan Project buildings and facilities at the Hanford Site: A construction history  

SciTech Connect

This document thoroughly examines the role that the Hanford Engineer Works played in the Manhattan project. The historical aspects of the buildings and facilities are characterized. An in depth look at the facilities, including their functions, methods of fabrication and appearance is given for the 100 AREAS, 200 AREAS, 300 AREAS, 500, 800 and 900 AREAS, 600 AREA, 700 AREA, 1100 AREA and temporary construction structures.

Gerber, M.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

King, J.W.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

EM Recovery Act Press Releases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Recovery Act Press EM Recovery Act Press Releases EM Recovery Act Press Releases RSS December 22, 2011 Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility A gravel mound, larger than half a city block and several feet thick, is the only visible feature that remains at the site of a Cold War-era spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho site. About $44 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds helped Idaho Cleanup Project crews accelerate the demolition of the facility that during its 40 years of operation recovered more than $1 billion worth of uranium. September 30, 2011 Department of Energy Completes Demolition of K-33 Building - Largest Completed Demo Project in Oak Ridge History OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge

295

Niagara falls storage site: Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar Year 1988: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)  

SciTech Connect

The monitoring program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual receives an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than a person receives during two round-trip flights from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1988 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with applicable DOE radiation protection standards. 17 refs., 31 figs., 20 tabs.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Processing capabilties for the elimination of contaminated metal scrapyards at DOE/ORO-managed sites. [Metal smelting facility  

SciTech Connect

Capabilities exist for reducing all the contaminated nickel, aluminum, and copper scrap to ingot form by smelting. Processing these metals at existing facilities could be completed in about 5 or 6 years. However, these metals represent only about 20% of the total metal inventories currently on hand at the DOE/ORO-managed sites. No provisions have been made for the ferrous scrap. Most of the ferrous scrap is unclassified and does not require secured storage. Also, the potential resale value of the ferrous scrap at about $100 per ton is very low in comparison. Consequently, this scrap has been allowed to accumulate. With several modifications and equipment additions, the induction melter at PGDP could begin processing ferrous scrap after its commitment to nickel and aluminum. The PGDP smelter is a retrofit installation, and annual throughput capabilities are limited. Processing of the existing ferrous scrap inventories would not be completed until the FY 1995-2000 time frame. An alternative proposal has been the installation of induction melters at the other two enrichment facilities. Conceptual design of a generic metal smelting facility is under way. The design study includes capital and operating costs for scrap preparation through ingot storage at an annual throughput of 10,000 tons per year. Facility design includes an induction melter with the capability of melting both ferrous and nonferrous metals. After three years of operation with scrapyard feed, the smelter would have excess capacity to support on-site decontamination and decomissioning projects or upgrading programs. The metal smelting facility has been proposed for FY 1984 line item funding with start-up operations in FY 1986.

Mack, J.E.; Williams, L.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Implementation of the Clean Air Act, Title V operating permit program requirements for the U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation facilities  

SciTech Connect

Title V of the Clean Air Act (CAA) establishes a new permit program requiring major sources and sources subject to Title III (Hazardous Air Pollutants) to obtain a state operating permit. Historically, most states have issued operating permits for individual emission units. Under the Title V permit program, a single permit will be issued for all of the emission units at the facility much like the current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program. The permit will specify all reporting, monitoring, and record-keeping requirements for the facility. Sources required to obtain permits include (a) major sources that emit 100 tons per year or more of any criteria air contaminant, (b) any source subject to the HAP provisions of Title III, (c) any source subject to the acid rain provisions of Title IV, (d) any source subject to New Source Performance Standards, and (e) any source subject to new source review under the nonattainment or Prevention of Significant Deterioration provisions. The State of Tennessee Title V Operating Permit Program was approved by EPA on August 28, 1996. This paper will provide details of initiatives underway at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title V Operating Permit Program. The ORR encompasses three DOE Facilities: the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The Y-12 Plant manufactures component parts for the national nuclear weapons program; the ORNL is responsible for research and development activities including nuclear engineering, engineering technologies, and the environmental sciences; and the ETTP conducts a variety of research and development activities and is the home of a mixed waste incinerator. Each of the three DOE Facilities is considered a major source under Title V of the CAA.

Humphreys, M.P. [Dept. of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office, TN (United States). Environmental Protection Div.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility, July 19-22, 210  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadowing of the Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility on July 19-22, 2010 A Department of Energy Construction Project Review (CPR) of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) project was conducted on July 19-22, 2010, at the request of the Principal Deputy Secretary, Office of Environmental Management (EM-2). The purpose of the review was to assess the cost, schedule, and technical progress against the approved Performance Baseline. Specific review areas were Engineering; Commissioning; Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance; Cost, Schedule, and Risk; and Management and Acquisition.

299

Technical assistance to Ohio closure sites; Technologies to address leachate from the on-site disposal facility at Fernald Environmental Management Project, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

On August 6-7, 2002, a Technical Assistance Team (''Team'') from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) met with Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) personnel in Ohio to assess approaches to remediating uranium-contaminated leachate from the On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF). The Team was composed of technical experts from national labs, technology centers, and industry and was assembled in response to a request from the FEMP Aquifer Restoration Project. Dave Brettschneider of Fluor Fernald, Inc., requested that a Team of experts be convened to review technologies for the removal of uranium in both brine ion exchange regeneration solution from the Advanced Wastewater Treatment facility and in the leachate from the OSDF. The Team was asked to identify one or more technologies for bench-scale testing as a cost effective alternative to remove uranium so that the brine regeneration solution from the Advanced Waste Water Treatment facility and the leachate from the OSDF can be discharged without further treatment. The Team was also requested to prepare a recommended development and demonstration plan for the alternative technologies. Finally, the Team was asked to make recommendations on the optimal technical solution for field implementation. The Site's expected outcomes for this effort are schedule acceleration, cost reduction, and better long-term stewardship implementation. To facilitate consideration of the most appropriate technologies, the Team was divided into two groups to consider the brine and the leachate separately, since they represent different sources with different constraints on solutions, e.g., short-term versus very long-term and concentrated versus dilute contaminant matrices. This report focuses on the technologies that are most appropriate for the leachate from the OSDF. Upon arriving at FEMP, project personnel asked the Team to concentrate its efforts on evaluating potential technologies and strategies to reduce uranium concentration in the leachate.

Hazen, Terry

2002-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

300

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1990--September 30, 1990, Number 3; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the requirements of Section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, the US Department of Energy has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the period April 1 through September 30, 1990. This report is the third of a series of reports that are issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization. The report covers a number of new initiatives to improve the effectiveness of the site characterization program and covers continued efforts related to preparatory activities, study plans, and performance assessment. 85 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

NONE

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report Employee Puncture Wound at the F-TRU Waste Remediation Facility at the Savannah River Site on June 14, 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report documents the results of the Type B Accident Investigation Board investigation of the June 14, 2010, employee puncture wound at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) F-TRU Wste Facility located in the F Canyon Facility.

302

Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year  

SciTech Connect

This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year.

Silviera, D.J.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cushing, C.E.; Marshall, A.; Scott, M.J.; Sewart, G.H.; Strenge, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Work Controls Assessment Plan Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WORK CONTROLS WORK CONTROLS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established work control process in place with authorized, controlled and documented methods that provide an accurate status of the work to be performed. Criteria: Work planning addresses applicable laws, codes and regulations. Work planning includes operational configuration constraints; material, tool, and manpower requirements; inter-organizational coordination; operational history; special training; safety considerations; hazards protection requirements; post-maintenance testing; quality control requirements; and other considerations as necessary. The work to be accomplished is defined by identifying the existing

304

Summary - Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

was to provide input on (1) the most effective use of the existing RCRA Subtitle D landfill, (2) site considerations such as seismic and brown versus green field, (3) the public...

305

Siting of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the proper geologic environment. The object of disposal is to prevent exposure of the public to radioactive waste in potentially harmful concentrations. The most likely route for buried wastes to reach the public is through the ground- water system... disposal site for low- level radioactive waste is predictability, A disposal site should "be capable of being characterized, modeled, analyzed and monitored" ISiefken, et al. , 1982). Simplicity and homogeneity with respect to hydrogeologic conditions...

Isenhower, Daniel Bruce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ( ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance, U.S. General Services Administration - Project 194 U.S. Custom Cargo Inspection Facility, Detroit, MI  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the findings of an on-site audit of the U.S. Customs Cargo Inspection Facility (CIF) in Detroit, Michigan. The federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy-efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would reduce electrical and gas consumption and increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

308

ARM - SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

309

Results of Surveys for Special Status Reptiles at the Site 300 Facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present the results of a live-trapping and visual surveys for special status reptiles at the Site 300 Facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The survey was conducted under the authority of the Federal recovery permit of Swaim Biological Consulting (PRT-815537) and a Memorandum of Understanding issued from the California Department of Fish and Game. Site 300 is located between Livermore and Tracy just north of Tesla road (Alameda County) and Corral Hollow Road (San Joaquin County) and straddles the Alameda and San Joaquin County line (Figures 1 and 2). It encompasses portions of the USGS 7.5 minute Midway and Tracy quadrangles (Figure 2). Focused surveys were conducted for four special status reptiles including the Alameda whipsnake (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus), the San Joaquin Whipsnake (Masticophis Hagellum ruddock), the silvery legless lizard (Anniella pulchra pulchra), and the California horned lizard (Phrynosoma coronanum frontale).

Woollett, J J

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

310

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 7, 2011 February 7, 2011 Mechanics train with plasma arc cutting equipment at the Paducah Site | Courtesy of Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant 240 Jobs Later: The Recovery Act's Impact at the Paducah Site Workers at the Department of Energy's Paducah Site are doing great things with the training they've received as part of the Recovery Act. January 25, 2011 Watercolor print of the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC) with new facilities. How a Wisconsin Nature Center is Leading by Example With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, this Wisconsin nature center will be at the forefront in demonstrating the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to thousands of visitors every year. January 24, 2011 Vids 4 Grids: Surge Arresters and Switchgears A new video series is increasing general public knowledge of the cutting

311

Allowable residual contamination levels for decommissioning the 115-F and 117-F facilities at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of a study sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries to determine Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for the 115-F and 117-F facilities at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to provide data useful to UNC engineers in conducting safety and cost comparisons for decommissioning alternatives. The ARCL results are based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for three specific modes of future use of the land and facilities. These modes of use are restricted, controlled, and unrestricted. Information on restricted and controlled use is provided to permit a full consideration of decommissioning alternatives. Procedures are presented for modifying the ARCL values to accommodate changes in the radionuclide mixture or concentrations and to determine instrument responses for various mixtures of radionuclides. Finally, a comparison is made between existing decommissioning guidance and the ARCL values calculated for unrestricted release of the 115-F and 117-F facilities. The comparison shows a good agreement.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Recent ORNL experience in site performance prediction: the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The suitability of the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Landfill and the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Central Waste Disposal Facility for disposal of low-level radioactive waste was evaluated using pathways analyses. For these evaluations, a conservative approach was selected; that is, conservatism was built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events had to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics existed. Data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations were used in developing the conceptual and numerical models that served as the basis for the numerical simulations of the long-term transport of contamination to man. However, the analyses relied on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Maximum potential doses to man were calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. Even under this conservative framework, the sites were found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations and conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability were drawn. Our experience through these studies has shown that in reaching conclusions in such studies, some consideration must be given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and to quantitatively determine the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed.

Pin, F.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506  

SciTech Connect

The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States)] [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States); Boyle, James D. [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 The Energy Policy Act of 2005 added section 216(h) to the Federal Power Act providing for the Department of Energy to act as the lead agency for coordinating all applicable Federal authorizations and related environmental reviews required under Federal law in order to site an electric transmission facility. The Act authorized DOE to issue any regulations necessary to implement the provisions of 216(h). SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 More Documents & Publications SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 Comments on Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Coordination of Federal

315

Evaluation of the 183-D Water Filtration Facility for Bat Roosts and Development of a Mitigation Strategy, 100-D Area, Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The 183-D Water Filtration Facility is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington. It was used to provide filtered water for cooling the 105-D Reactor and supplying fire-protection and drinking water for all facilities in the 100-D Area. The facility has been inactive since the 1980s and is now scheduled for demolition. Therefore, an evaluation was conducted to determine if any part of the facility was being used as roosting habitat by bats.

Lindsey, C. T.; Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fermilab | Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOvA NOvA In April 2010, workers set up two cranes at the construction site for the NOvA detector facility in Ash River, Minnesota. In 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, provided DOE's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory with $114.2 million. Fermilab invested the funds in critical scientific infrastructure to strengthen the nation's global scientific leadership as well as to provide immediate economic relief to local communities. This Web site provided citizens with clear and accurate information about how Fermilab used the new funding and its immediate benefits for our neighbors and our nation. Features photo Industrial Building 3 addition Fermilab Today-November 5, 2010 IB3 addition nears completion

317

DOE site facility mgt contracts Internet Posting 5-2-11.xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6/30/2011 6/30/2011 2 three month option periods until protest resolved 9/30/2011 M&O 1999 http://www.id.energy.gov/PSD/AMWTPHomepage.html Mike Adams 208-526-5277 Wendy Bauer 208-526-2808 Paducah Remediation EM LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky 4/22/2010 7/21/2015 7/21/2015 Site Clean up 2009 http://www.emcbc.doe.gov/dept/contracting/primecontracts.php Pam Thompson 859-219-4056 Bill Creech 859-219-4044 West Valley Demonstration Project EM West Valley Environmental Svcs 6/29/2007 6/30/2011 6/30/2011 Site Clean up 2007 http://www.emcbc.doe.gov/dept/contracting/primecontracts.php Ralph Holland 513-246-0550 Derrick Franklin 513-246-0103 Argonne National Laboratory SC UChicago Argonne, LLC 7/31/2006 9/30/2011 4 yrs Award Term Earned/additional 11 yrs Award

318

Process centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures in canyon reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) maintains a compilation of operating problems and equipment failures that have occurred in the fuel reprocessing areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). At present, the data bank contains more than 230,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with the potential for injury or contamination of personnel, or for economic loss. The data bank has been used extensively for a wide variety of purposes, such as failure analyses, trend analyses, and preparation of safety analyses. Typical of the data are problems associated with the canyon process centrifuges. This report contains a compilation of the centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures primarily as an aid to organizations with related equipment. Publication of these data was prompted by a number of requests for this information by other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 11 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Durant, W.S.; Baughman, D.F.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to result in measurable long-term changes to the floodplain. Approximately 0.16 acre (0.064 ha) of palustrine emergent wetlands would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material within Location A. Some wetlands that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime, due to the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Indirect impacts could be minimized by maintaining a buffer near adjacent wetlands. Wetlands would likely be impacted by construction at Location B; however, placement of a facility in the northern portion of this location would minimize wetland impacts. Construction at Location C could potentially result in impacts to wetlands, however placement of a facility in the southeastern portion of this location may best avoid direct impacts to wetlands. The hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 as well as Executive Order 11988, ''Floodplain Management'', are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. Mitigation for unavoidable impacts may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to floodplains and wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor under the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found i

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

320

Recent characterization activities of Midway Valley as a potential repository surface facility site  

SciTech Connect

Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, has been identified as a possible location for the surface facilities of a potential high-level nuclear-waste repository. This structural and topographic valley is bounded by two north- trending, down-to-the-west normal faults: the Paintbrush Canyon fault on the east and the Bow Ridge fault on the west. Surface and near-surface geological data have been acquired from Midway Valley during the past three years with particular emphasis on evaluating the existence of Quaternary faults. A detailed (1:6000) surficial geological map has been prepared based on interpretation of new and existing aerial photographs, field mapping, soil pits, and trenches. No evidence was found that would indicate displacement of these surficial deposits along previously unrecognized faults. However, given the low rates of Quaternary faulting and the extensive areas that are covered by late Pleistocene to Holocene deposits south of Sever Wash, Quaternary faulting between known faults cannot be precluded based on surface evidence alone. Middle to late Pleistocene alluvial fan deposits (Unit Q3) exist at or near the surface throughout Midway Valley. Confidence is increased that the potential for surface fault rupture in Midway Valley can be assessed by excavations that expose the deposits and soils associated with Unit Q3 or older units (middle Pleistocene or earlier).

Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wesling, J.R.; Swan, F.H.; Bullard, T.F. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Welding Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been implemented. Verify that the requirements implemented are appropriate for preventing loss of life and property from fire, and personal injury from contact with or exposure to molten metals, vapors, radiant energy, injurious rays and sparks. Criteria: Establish designated area in which routine and repetitive welding, cutting, and other spark- or flame producing operations are conducted [1910.252(a)(2)(iv),1910.252(a)(2)(vi)(A), 1910.252(a)(2)(xv), General Requirements].

322

Remedial investigation of the High Explosives Burn Pit facility, Building 829 complex, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site 300  

SciTech Connect

To assess any impact on the environment resulting from operations at the High Explosives (HE) Burn Pits at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300, we evaluated the soil, rock, and ground water beneath the burn pit facility. Between November 16, 1986, and January 12, 1987, we drilled eight exploratory holes; one was converted to a monitor well, and another was converted to a piezometer. Seven holes were drilled, geologically logged, and sampled to determine the concentration and extent of substances that may have infiltrated to the subsurface from the burn pits. The eighth hole was completed as a monitor well but was not sampled, and no detailed log was prepared. Electric logging was performed in one exploratory hole further evaluate the geologic conditions. 27 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Webster-Scholten, C.P.; Crow, N.B.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Site Characterization Plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The aboveground structures of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This Site Characterization Plan presents the strategy and techniques to be used to characterize the OHF D&D structures in support of D&D planning, design, and implementation. OHF is located approximately 1 mile southwest of the main ORNL complex. From 1964 to 1979, OHF was used in the development and full-scale application of hydrofracture operations in which 969,000 gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) was mixed with grout and then injected under high pressure into a low-permeability shale formation approximately 1/6 mile underground.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Measuring and Testing Equipment Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measuring and Test Equipment Measuring and Test Equipment Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to determine whether a program is in place which assures that Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used in activities affecting quality and safety are properly controlled, calibrated, and adjusted at specified times to maintain accuracy within necessary limits. Criteria: All M&TE is uniquely identified, calibrated, controlled, and provides accuracy traceability. A recall program maintains the total inventory and status of all M&TE. Out-of-tolerance M&TE is removed from service. Plant equipment calibrated with out-of-tolerance M&TE is evaluated in a timely manner for impact on previous output, current operability and is re-

325

Measuring and Testing Equipment Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measuring and Test Equipment Measuring and Test Equipment Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to determine whether a program is in place which assures that Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used in activities affecting quality and safety are properly controlled, calibrated, and adjusted at specified times to maintain accuracy within necessary limits. Criteria: All M&TE is uniquely identified, calibrated, controlled, and provides accuracy traceability. A recall program maintains the total inventory and status of all M&TE. Out-of-tolerance M&TE is removed from service. Plant equipment calibrated with out-of-tolerance M&TE is evaluated in a timely manner for impact on previous output, current operability and is re-

326

Machine Shop Safe Operations Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2003 - Machine Shop Safe Operations July 2003 - Machine Shop Safe Operations Utilize 29 CFR 1910 Utilize applicable LLNL, LANL, DTRA, BN procedures VALUE ADDED FOR: AMTS Contractor Assurance Focus Area AMTS ISM Improvements Focus Area AMTS Safety Precursors/Hazards Analysis Focus Area AMTS Environment, Safety, & Health Division MACHINE SHOP SAFE OPERATIONS Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The purpose of this assessment is to verify that machine shop operators are provided a safe and healthful workplace which will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses. Criteria: A worker protection program shall be implemented that provides a place of employment free from recognized hazards that are causing or likely to cause

327

Self-Assessment Program Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SELF-ASSESSMENT SELF-ASSESSMENT Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self- assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect people and

328

Environmentally based siting assessment for synthetic-liquid-fuels facilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A detailed assessment of the major environmental constraints to siting a synthetic fuels industry and the results of that assessment are used to determine on a regional basis the potential for development of such an industry with minimal environmental conflicts. Secondly, the ability to mitigate some of the constraining impacts through alternative institutional arrangements, especially in areas that are judged to have a low development potential is also assessed. Limitations of the study are delineated, but specifically, the study is limited geographically to well-defined boundaries that include the prime coal and oil shale resource areas. The critical factors used in developing the framework are air quality, water availability, socioeconomic capacity, ecological sensitivity, environmental health, and the management of Federally owned lands. (MCW)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Site Characterization Report ORGDP Diffusion Facilities Permanent Shutdown K-700 Power House and K-27 Switch Yard/Switch House  

SciTech Connect

The K-700 Power House area, initially built to supply power to the K-25 gaseous diffusion plant was shutdown and disassembled in the 1960s. This shutdown was initiated by TVA supplying economical power to the diffusion plant complex. As a result of world wide over production of enriched, reactor grade U{sup 235}, the K-27 switch yard and switch house area was placed in standby in 1985. Subsequently, as the future production requirements decreased, the cost of production increased and the separation technologies for other processes improved, the facility was permanently shutdown in December, 1987. This Site Characterization Report is a part of the FY-88 engineering Feasibility Study for placing ORGDP Gaseous Diffusion Process facilities in 'Permanent Shutdown'. It is sponsored by the Department of Energy through Virgil Lowery of Headquarters--Enrichment and through Don Cox of ORO--Enrichment Operations. The primary purpose of these building or site characterization reports is to document, quantify, and map the following potential problems: Asbestos; PCB containing fluids; Oils, coolants, and chemicals; and External contamination. With the documented quantification of the concerns (problems) the Engineering Feasibility Study will then proceed with examining the potential solutions. For this study, permanent shutdown is defined as the securing and/or conditioning of each facility to provide 20 years of safe service with minimal expenditures and, where feasible, also serving DOE's needs for long-term warehousing or other such low-risk use. The K-700 power house series of buildings were either masonry construction or a mix of masonry and wood. The power generating equipment was removed and sold as salvage in the mid 1960s but the buildings and auxiliary equipment were left intact. The nine ancillary buildings in the power house area use early in the Manhattan Project for special research projects, were left intact minus the original special equipment. During the late 1960s and 1970s, some of the abandoned buildings were used for offices, special projects, and storage. Some of the remaining electrical transformers contain PCBs in concentrations less than 500 ppm. Many of the steam and hot water pipes in the buildings are insulated with asbestos insulation, but none of the equipment or buildings have high counts of surface radioactive contamination. The general conditions of the buildings are from fair to poor. Many should be boarded-up to prevent personnel entry and in some cases demolitions would be the safer alternative.

Thomas R.J., Blanchard R.D.

1988-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

Hanford Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site Hanford Site Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds Slurry pumps are used in the tank farms to pick up liquid and solid particle mixture, or slurry, and provide the force necessary to transport the waste from tank to tank during retrieval operations Slurry pumps are used in the tank farms to pick up liquid and solid particle mixture, or slurry, and provide the force necessary to transport the waste from tank to tank during retrieval operations The Pretreatment Facility control room building pad (foreground) and the Low-Activity Waste Facility (background)

331

Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 18.2 MT of plutonium using existing facilities at the Savannah River site: alternatives 3A/5A/6A/6B/7A/9A  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 18.2 metric tons (nominal) of plutonium using ceramic in a new facility at Savannah River Site (SRS).

DiSabatino, A., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 2011 [Facility News] 9, 2011 [Facility News] Forecasting Exercise Begins Oklahoma Storm Study Count Down Bookmark and Share Clouds like this, called by the name "anvil" for its shape, are one type of cloud system researchers hope to encounter during MC3E. Clouds like this, called by the name "anvil" for its shape, are one type of cloud system researchers hope to encounter during MC3E. Beginning April 2011, the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma will host the first major field campaign to take advantage of numerous new radars and other remote sensing instrumentation installed throughout the site with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will use two aircraft and a comprehensive array of ground-based

333

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 6, 2010 [Facility News] October 6, 2010 [Facility News] New Raman Lidar En Route to Australia Bookmark and Share Since 1996, the ARM Southern Great Plains site has maintained one of the few operational Raman lidars in the world. Now, thanks to funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the ARM Tropical Western Pacific site is about to join that exclusive group. A new Raman lidar, built by Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, is on its way to Darwin, Australia. Optics contained inside the Raman lidar shelter guide backscattered laser radiation in order to measure signals collected by the telescope. Optics contained inside the Raman lidar shelter guide backscattered laser radiation in order to measure signals collected by the telescope. The Raman lidar (light detection and ranging) uses pulses of laser

334

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 25, 2010 [Facility News] October 25, 2010 [Facility News] Testing Underway for New Doppler Lidars Bookmark and Share Two of the three new Doppler lidars are shown here during testing at the Southern Great Plains site in October. Two of the three new Doppler lidars are shown here during testing at the Southern Great Plains site in October. To improve climate models, the scientific community needs accurate and routine measurements of atmospheric winds with high vertical and temporal resolution under clear-air conditions. In particular, measurements of clear-air vertical air velocities will compliment in-cloud vertical velocity measurements from existing 35 and 95 gigahertz ARM cloud radars. In response to this need, three new Doppler lidars were purchased with funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and began a test

335

Ecological Monitoring - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

support of the National Environmental Protection Act, Endangered Species Act, Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and other laws and regulations. Management Plans Hanford Site Revegetation...

336

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Interim Measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed interim measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MW) groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE proposes to install a small metal sheet pile dam to impound water around and over the BGC groundwater seepline. In addition, a drip irrigation system would be installed. Interim measures will also address the reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from ''hot-spot'' regions associated with the Southwest Plume Area (SWPA). This action is taken as an interim measure for the MWMF in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to reduce the amount of tritium seeping from the BGC southwest groundwater plume. The proposed action of this EA is being planned and would be implemented concurrent with a groundwater corrective action program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). On September 30, 1999, SCDHEC issued a modification to the SRS RCRA Part B permit that adds corrective action requirements for four plumes that are currently emanating from the BGC. One of those plumes is the southwest plume. The RCRA permit requires SRS to submit a corrective action plan (CAP) for the southwest plume by March 2000. The permit requires that the initial phase of the CAP prescribe a remedy that achieves a 70-percent reduction in the annual amount of tritium being released from the southwest plume area to Fourmile Branch, a nearby stream. Approval and actual implementation of the corrective measure in that CAP may take several years. As an interim measure, the actions described in this EA would manage the release of tritium from the southwest plume area until the final actions under the CAP can be implemented. This proposed action is expected to reduce the release of tritium from the southwest plume area to Fourmile Branch between 25 to 35 percent. If this proposed action is undertaken and its effectiveness is demonstrated, it may become a component of the final action in the CAP. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended; the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508); and the DOE Regulations for Implementing NEPA (10 CFR 1021). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. Based on the potential for impacts described herein, DOE will either publish a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) or prepare an environmental impact statement (EM).

N /A

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Review of the Pantex Site Office's Compliance with DOE Order 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities, June 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pantex Site Office's Compliance with Pantex Site Office's Compliance with DOE Order 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1 1.0 Purpose .................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Assessment Methodologies and Approach ........................................................................................... 1

338

Review of the Pantex Site Office's Compliance with DOE Order 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities, June 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Site Office's Compliance with Pantex Site Office's Compliance with DOE Order 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1 1.0 Purpose .................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Assessment Methodologies and Approach ........................................................................................... 1

339

Photo Gallery - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

100DX Groundwater Treatment Facility The 100DX Groundwater Treatment Facility was built in 2009-2010 using Recovery Act funds. Search Search Search Filter: 100DX Groundwater...

340

AN APPLICATION OF THE SSHAC LEVEL 3 PROCESS TO THE PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE, EASTERN WASHINGTON, USA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An Application of the SSHAC Level 3 Process to the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for Nuclear Facilities at the Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Kevin J. Coppersmith Coppersmith Consulting, Inc. Julian J. Bommer Consultant Robert W. Bryce Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21-22, 2014 Germantown, MD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Geological and Geotechnical Site Investigation for the Design of a CO2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection and Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

With international efforts to limit anthropogenic carbon in the atmosphere, various CO{sub 2} sequestration methods have been studied by various facilities worldwide. Basalt rock in general has been referred to as potential host material for mineral carbonation by various authors, without much regard for compositional variations due to depositional environment, subsequent metamorphism, or hydrothermal alteration. Since mineral carbonation relies on the presence of certain magnesium, calcium, or iron silicates, it is necessary to study the texture, mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry of specific basalts before implying potential for mineral carbonation. The development of a methodology for the characterization of basalts with respect to their susceptibility for mineral carbonation is proposed to be developed as part of this research. The methodology will be developed based on whole rock data, petrography and microprobe analyses for samples from the Caledonia Mine in Michigan, which is the site for a proposed small-scale demonstration project on mineral carbonation in basalt. Samples from the Keweenaw Peninsula will be used to determine general compositional trends using whole rock data and petrography. Basalts in the Keweenaw Peninsula have been subjected to zeolite and prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism with concurrent native copper deposition. Alteration was likely due to the circulation of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids at slightly elevated temperatures and pressures, which is the process that is attempted to be duplicated by mineral carbonation.

Metz, Paul; Bolz, Patricia

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

342

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This document presents guidance for implementing the process that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) will use for assuming perpetual responsibility for a closed uranium mill tailings site. The transition process specifically addresses sites regulated under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) but is applicable in principle to the transition of sites under other regulatory structures, such as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program.

none,

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Recovery Act State Memos Delaware  

Energy Savers (EERE)

go to energyempowers.govDelaware Recovery Act Success Stories ENERGYEMPOWERS.GOV less heat and cooling loss so our facility is more efficient." Buying domestically For the...

344

DOE Site List  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Links Links Central Internet Database CID Photo Banner DOE Site List Site Geo Site Code State Operations Office1 DOE Programs Generating Streams at Site DOE Programs Managing Facilities Associated Data2 Acid/Pueblo Canyons ACPC NM Oak Ridge Waste/Media, Facilities Airport Substation CA Western Area Power Administration Facilities Akron Hill Communication Site CO Western Area Power Administration Facilities Akron Substation CO Western Area Power Administration Facilities AL Complex NM Albuquerque DP Facilities Alba Craft ALCL OH Oak Ridge Facilities Albany Research Center AMRC OR Oak Ridge Facilities Alcova Switchyard WY Western Area Power Administration Facilities Aliquippa Forge ALFO PA Oak Ridge Facilities

345

EM American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Program Recovery Act Program www.em.doe.gov 1 Thomas Johnson, Jr. Recovery Act Program Director PRESENTED TO: Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) December 5, 2011 EM's Mission "Complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons www.em.doe.gov 2 nuclear weapons development, production, and Government- sponsored nuclear energy research." EM's Recovery Act Program $6 Billion at 17 sites (12 states) Accelerated existing scope › Soil and groundwater remediation › Radioactive solid waste disposition › Facility decontamination & decommissioning www.em.doe.gov 3 Selected projects were "shovel-ready" › Fully-defined cost, scope, and schedule › Established regulatory framework › Proven technology

346

The utility of a geographic information system in facility/land use-related opportunities and constraints analysis for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

Facility/land use-related opportunities and constraints analysis, which is indispensable for the evaluation of potential future uses for a site, is essentially spatial in nature. Spatial analysis is best accomplished using a geographic information system (GIS), as a GIS allows the identification and reporting or mapping of complex relationships among multiple data layers such as geology, soils, vegetation, contamination, and facilities. GIS-based maps and reports are valuable tools for communicating facility/land use-related opportunities and constraints to decision makers. This paper defines the term {open_quotes}GIS,{close_quotes}, provides an example of how a GIS could be used to conduct opportunities and constraints analysis at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and summarizes the benefits of using a GIS for this analysis. Because a GIS is often seen as a {open_quotes}black box{close_quotes} shrouded in technical jargon, this paper attempts to describe the concepts and benefits of a GIS in language understandable to decision makers who are not GIS experts but who migth profit from the use of GIS products. The purpose of this paper is to alert DOE decision makers to a valuable source of facility/land use-related information that already exists at many sites and that should not be overlook during the analysis of future use options.

Stewart, J. [S.M. Stoller Corp., Boulder, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Estimation of natural ground water recharge for the performance assessment of a low-level waste disposal facility at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initiated the Recharge Task, under the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project, to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Recharge Task was established to address the issue of ground water recharge in and around the LLW facility and throughout the Hanford Site as it affects the unconfined aquifer under the facility. The objectives of this report are to summarize the current knowledge of natural ground water recharge at the Hanford Site and to outline the work that must be completed in order to provide defensible estimates of recharge for use in the performance assessment of this LLW disposal facility. Recharge studies at the Hanford Site indicate that recharge rates are highly variable, ranging from nearly zero to greater than 100 mm/yr depending on precipitation, vegetative cover, and soil types. Coarse-textured soils without plants yielded the greatest recharge. Finer-textured soils, with or without plants, yielded the least. Lysimeters provided accurate, short-term measurements of recharge as well as water-balance data for the soil-atmosphere interface and root zone. Tracers provided estimates of longer-term average recharge rates in undisturbed settings. Numerical models demonstrated the sensitivity of recharge rates to different processes and forecast recharge rates for different conditions. All of these tools (lysimetry, tracers, and numerical models) are considered vital to the development of defensible estimates of natural ground water recharge rates for the performance assessment of a LLW disposal facility at the Hanford Site.

Rockhold, M.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kincaid, C.T.; Gee, G.W.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Georgia Radiation Control Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Radiation Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Radiation Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Radiation Control Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Radiation Control Act is designed to prevent any associated harmful effects upon the environment or the health and safety of the public through the institution and maintenance of a regulatory program for radioactive material waste sources. The act provides that all facilities or sites for the concentration, storage or burial of radioactive waste must be constructed and operate pursuant to a permit issued by the Director of the Environmental Protection Division (EPD). The director may specify in the

349

Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or clean, building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room into one of three categories: Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 (a fourth category is a Non-Impacted Class which in the case of Building 2201 only pertained to exterior surfaces of the building.) The majority of the rooms were determined to fall in the less restrictive Class 3 category, however, Rooms 102, 104, 106, and 107 were identified as containing Class 1 and 2 areas. Building 2201 was divided into survey units and surveyed following the requirements of the Final Status Survey Plan for each particular class. As each survey unit was completed and documented, the survey results were evaluated. Each sample (static measurement) with units of counts per minute (cpm) was corrected for the appropriate background and converted to a value with units of dpm/100 cm2. With a surface contamination value in the appropriate units, it was compared to the surface contamination limits, or in this case the derived concentration guideline level (DCGLw). The appropriate statistical test (sign test) was then performed. If the survey unit was statistically determined to be below the DCGLw, then the survey unit passed and the null hypothesis (that the survey unit is above limits) was rejected. If the survey unit was equal to or below the critical value in the sign test, the null hypothesis was not rejected. This process was performed for all survey units within Building 2201. A total of thirty-three Class 1, four Class 2, and one Class 3 survey units were developed, surveyed, and evaluated. All survey units successfully passed the statistical test. Building 2201 meets the release criteria commensurate with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (for radiological purposes) of the U10C landfill permit residing within NNSS boundaries. Based on the thorough statistical sampling and scanning of the buildings interior, Building 2201 may be considered radiologically clean, or free of contamination.

Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Rocky Flats CAAS System Recalibrated, Retested, and Analyzed to Install in the Criticality Experiments Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Facilities, DOE- HDBK-3010-94, Vol. 1 (1994). 8. T.in the DOE Handbook, DOE-HDBK-3010-94 (Ref. 7). According to

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-@-Y? ALTERNATE -@-Y? ALTERNATE NfiME: --___---------------___________________N~ME:---------------------- CITY- - .---------------^---------- STATE: wz ------ OWNER(S) -------- Past: Current: ------------------------ _~~--___~~-----_~~----~~-- Owner contacted [3 yes 0 no; if yes, date contacted ------------- TYPE OF ' OPERATION ____-------~----- q Research & Development !zl Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Manufactuiinq 0 Pilot Scale [7 University 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Research Organization 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Government Sponsored Faci 1 i ty 0 Sample & Analysis Cl Other ---_-~~----_~~---~-~ 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT -_---------~~~~~ q Prime q Subcontract& 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information (i.e., c&t

352

Hanford's Recovery Act Payments Jump Past $1 Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASH. - The Richland Operations Office's WASH. - The Richland Operations Office's (RL) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act payments at Hanford recently surpassed $1 billion. RL was allocated $1.63 billion from the Recovery Act in 2009 in order to create jobs and reduce the footprint of active cleanup at Hanford. In key Recovery Act accomplishments, RL: * Reduced Hanford's cleanup footprint by a total of 143 square miles by re- moving more than 20 facilities and hundreds of debris sites on the Hanford Reach National Monument, a 300-square mile area around Hanford formerly used for military activity and research. * Demolished 56 facilities, which reduces surveillance and maintenance costs. * Completed expansion of Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facil- ity (ERDF) ahead of schedule and under budget, increasing its capacity to

353

DOE/EA-1660: Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Land's Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, WA (07/20/09)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2009 July 2009 DOE/EA-1660F Environmental Assessment Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 Final Environmental Assessment July 2009 Sum-1 Summary Introduction. This Environmental Assessment (EA) provides information and analyses of proposed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with consolidating existing communications operations and removing excess facilities and infrastructure within the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington. Purpose and Need. To meet long-term federal agency missions, DOE needs to reduce indirect costs and

354

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Geothermal Test Facility...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Geothermal Test Facility - 001 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Geothermal Test Facility (001) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

355

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act provides a comprehensive strategy for the siting of commercial low-level waste compactors and other waste management facilities, and to ensure the proper transportation, disposal and storage of low-level radioactive waste. Commercial incineration of radioactive wastes is prohibited. Licenses are required for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities not licensed to accept low-level radioactive waste. Disposal at

356

Author's personal copy Cost analysis of the US spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this, a 1987 amendment to the US Nuclear Waste Policy Act mandates the Secretary of Energy to report on a site for a second repository by 2010 (Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act, 1987). HoweverAuthor's personal copy Cost analysis of the US spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility E

Deinert, Mark

357

ARM - ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ActARM Recovery Act Project FAQs ActARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Recovery Act Logo Subscribe FAQs Recovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Fact Sheet March 2010 Poster (PDF, 10MB) External Resources Recovery Act - Federal Recovery Act - DOE Recovery Act - ANL Recovery Act - BNL Recovery Act - LANL Recovery Act - PNNL Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Why is ARM buying new instruments and equipment? The ARM Climate Research Facility (ARM) is receiving $60 million dollars in Recovery Act funding from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science to build the next generation facility for climate change research. Using input from past ARM user workshops and ARM working group discussion, ARM has planned for the purchase and deployment of an expansive array of new

358

S. 522: A Bill to provide for a limited exemption to the hydroelectric licensing provisions of part I of the Federal Power Act for certain transmission facilities associated with the El Vado Hydroelectric Project in New Mexico. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses a bill that provides for a limited exemption to part I of the Federal Power Act dealing with the hydroelectric licensing provisions for certain transmission facilities associated with the El Vado Hydroelectric project in New Mexico.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act (CERCLA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act (CERCLA) Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA, also known as "Superfund") in response to a growing national concern about the release of hazardous substances from abandoned waste sites. Under CERCLA Congress gave the federal government broad authority to regulate hazardous substances, to respond to hazardous substance emergencies, and to develop long-term solutions for the Nation's most serious hazardous waste problems. CERCLA also created a Hazardous Substance Response Trust Fund, supported by an excise tax on feedstock chemicals and petroleum, to pay for cleanup activities at abandoned waste sites. In 1986 CERCLA was reauthorized and amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). SARA expanded the federal government's response authorities and clarified that federal facilities are subject to the same CERCLA requirements as private industry. The Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act of 1992 amended the CERCLA provisions dealing with federal activities on any real property owned by the government. It requires the federal government to identify those parts of that real property where no hazardous substance had been stored, released, or disposed of.

360

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four structures: (1) Building 5400A, Reactor High Bay; (2) Building 5400, Reactor Building and access tunnel; (3) Building 5410, Mechanical Building; and (4) Wooden Shed, a.k.a. ''Brock House''. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and site confirmation data collected in 2005 and 2006 to recommend closure of CAU 118 using the SAFER process. The Data Quality Objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure option: closure in place with use restrictions. This expected closure option was selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine the nature of contaminants of concern in environmental media or potential source material that could impact human health or the environment. Decision II is to determine whether or not sufficient information has been obtained to confirm that closure objectives were met. This decision includes determining whether the extent of any contamination remaining on site has been defined, and whether actions have been taken to eliminate exposure pathways.

David Strand

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mobile Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

362

Department of Energy Completes Five Recovery Act Projects - Moves...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Five Recovery Act Projects - Moves Closer to Completing Recovery Act Funded Work at Oak Ridge Site Department of Energy Completes Five Recovery Act Projects - Moves Closer to...

363

Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project: Feasibility of BNFP Site as MOX Fuel Supply Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation was made of the technical feasibility, cost, and schedule for converting the existing unused Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Facility (BNFP) into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) CANDU fuel fabrication plant for disposition of excess weapons plutonium. This MOX fuel would be transported to Ontario where it would generate electricity in the Bruce CANDU reactors. Because CANDU MOX fuel operates at lower thermal load than natural uranium fuel, the MOX program can be licensed by AECB within 4.5 years, and actual Pu disposition in the Bruce reactors can begin in 2001. Ontario Hydro will have to be involved in the entire program. Cost is compared between BNFP and FMEF at Hanford for converting to a CANDU MOX facility.

NONE

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Safety Basis Requirements for Nonnuclear Facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site-Specific Work Smart Standards Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This standard establishes requirements that, when coupled with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) methods and other Work Smart Standards for assuring worker safety, assure that the impacts of nonnuclear operations authorized in LLNL facilities are well understood and controlled in a manner that protects the health of workers, the public, and the environment. All LLNL facilities shall be classified based on potential for adverse impact of operations to the health of co-located (i.e., nearby) workers and the public in accordance with this standard, Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) 830, Subpart B, and Department of Energy Order (DOE O) 420.2A. This standard provides information on: Objectives; Applicability; Safety analysis requirements; Control selection and maintenance; Documentation requirements; Safety basis review, approval, and renewal; and Safety basis implementation.

Beach, R; Brereton, S; Failor, R; Hildum, S; Spagnolo, S; Van Warmerdam, C

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

365

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This CR provides documentation and justification for the closure of CAU 118 without further corrective action. This justification is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative and closure activities conducted in accordance with the CAU 118 SAFER Plan: Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for CAU 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The SAFER Plan provides information relating to site history as well as the scope and planning of the investigation. This CR also provides the analytical and radiological survey data to confirm that the remediation goals were met as specified in the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) approved the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (Murphy, 2006), which recommends closure in place with use restrictions (URs).

Mark Burmeister

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Nevada Test Site FFCA Consent Order, March 27, 1996 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Test Site Federal Facility Compliance Act Test Site Federal Facility Compliance Act Consent Order, March 27, 1996 State Nevada Agreement Type Consent Order Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Enforce the STP and establish procedures for reviewing schedules, deleting waste streams, and administrative procedures Parties DOE; Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Date 3/27/1996 SCOPE * Require DOE to achieve compliance with the requirements of the FFCAct through the STP which contains schedules and applicable strategies for achieving compliance with the applicable LDR standards. * Establish procedures for reviewing schedules, deleting waste streams, and administrative procedures. * Establish enforceable schedules and milestones applicable to this Order. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES *

367

Grout Isolation and Stabilization of Structures and Materials within Nuclear Facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford Site, Summary - 12309  

SciTech Connect

Per regulatory agreement and facility closure design, U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site nuclear fuel cycle structures and materials require in situ isolation in perpetuity and/or interim physicochemical stabilization as a part of final disposal or interim waste removal, respectively. To this end, grout materials are being used to encase facilities structures or are being incorporated within structures containing hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Facilities where grout materials have been recently used for isolation and stabilization include: (1) spent fuel separations, (2) uranium trioxide calcining, (3) reactor fuel storage basin, (4) reactor fuel cooling basin transport rail tanker cars and casks, (5) cold vacuum drying and reactor fuel load-out, and (6) plutonium fuel metal finishing. Grout components primarily include: (1) portland cement, (2) fly ash, (3) aggregate, and (4) chemical admixtures. Mix designs for these typically include aggregate and non aggregate slurries and bulk powders. Placement equipment includes: (1) concrete piston line pump or boom pump truck for grout slurry, (2) progressive cavity and shearing vortex pump systems, and (3) extendable boom fork lift for bulk powder dry grout mix. Grout slurries placed within the interior of facilities were typically conveyed utilizing large diameter slick line and the equivalent diameter flexible high pressure concrete conveyance hose. Other facilities requirements dictated use of much smaller diameter flexible grout conveyance hose. Placement required direct operator location within facilities structures in most cases, whereas due to radiological dose concerns, placement has also been completed remotely with significant standoff distances. Grout performance during placement and subsequent to placement often required unique design. For example, grout placed in fuel basin structures to serve as interim stabilization materials required sufficient bearing i.e., unconfined compressive strength, to sustain heavy equipment yet, low breakout force to permit efficient removal by track hoe bucket or equivalent construction equipment. Further, flow of slurries through small orifice geometries of moderate head pressures was another typical design requirement. Phase separation of less than 1 percent was a typical design requirement for slurries. On the order of 30,000 cubic meters of cementitious grout have recently been placed in the above noted U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site facilities or structures. Each has presented a unique challenge in mix design, equipment, grout injection or placement, and ultimate facility or structure performance. Unconfined compressive and shear strength, flow, density, mass attenuation coefficient, phase separation, air content, wash-out, parameters and others, unique to each facility or structure, dictate the grout mix design for each. Each mix design was tested under laboratory and scaled field conditions as a precursor to field deployment. Further, after injection or placement of each grout formulation, the material was field inspected either by standard laboratory testing protocols, direct physical evaluation, or both. (authors)

Phillips, S.J.; Phillips, M.; Etheridge, D. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States); Chojnacki, D.W.; Herzog, C.B.; Matosich, B.J.; Steffen, J.M.; Sterling, R.T. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States); Flaucher, R.H.; Lloyd, E.R. [Fluor Federal Services, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 13  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery and Reinvestment Act Newsletter d Volume 2, No. 3 d March 2010 Recovery and Reinvestment Act Newsletter d Volume 2, No. 3 d March 2010 Fusion Researchers Gather to Say Goodbye to Pioneering Facility TSTA building saw early advances in nuclear fusion  Fusion Researchers Gather to Say Goodbye to Pioneering Facility ...1  Offi cials Brief Stakeholders on Progress .......................................2  Paul Bellesen is Thrilled to Trade Sun for Dirt ..................................3  'Chem Plant' Decontamination and Decommissioning Advances at Idaho Site .................................4  Demolition Efforts Under Way at ORNL's 2000 Complex ...........5  The Recovery Act Effect .............6  Cleanout Boxes Removal Complete at Hanford Tank Farms ................7  Over 116,000 Tons of Contaminated

369

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 19  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

With all of the Oak Ridge Office With all of the Oak Ridge Office Environ- mental Management (EM) program's $755 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds obligated to 36 proj- ects, the division is now focused on successfully completing the site's remaining work by September 2011. The past 20 months have seen a noticeable transformation in Oak Ridge's skyline following the demolition of several build- ings used in the Manhattan Project and the Cold War. More significant changes are coming in the months ahead as Re- covery Act workers tear down facilities at the Oak Ridge Na- tional Laboratory, Y-12 National Security Complex, and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). A notable 1.4 million square feet of facilities will be demolished at ETTP , which was originally built as a uranium enrichment facility.

370

FACET User Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

AD SLACPortal > Accelerator Research Division > FACET User Facility AD SLACPortal > Accelerator Research Division > FACET User Facility Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content

371

Final closure plan for the high-explosives open burn treatment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site 300  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses the interim status closure of the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility, as detailed by Title 22, Division 4.5, Chapter 15, Article 7 of the Califonia Code of Regulations (CCR) and by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, Subpart G, ``Closure and Post Closure.`` The Closure Plan (Chapter 1) and the Post- Closure Plan (Chapter 2) address the concept of long-term hazard elimination. The Closure Plan provides for capping and grading the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility and revegetating the immediate area in accordance with applicable requirements. The Closure Plan also reflects careful consideration of site location and topography, geologic and hydrologic factors, climate, cover characteristics, type and amount of wastes, and the potential for contaminant migration. The Post-Closure Plan is designed to allow LLNL to monitor the movement, if any, of pollutants from the treatment area. In addition, quarterly inspections will ensure that all surfaces of the closed facility, including the cover and diversion ditches, remain in good repair, thus precluding the potential for contaminant migration.

Mathews, S.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Application of pathways analyses for site performance prediction for the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The suitability of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility for shallow-land burial of low-level radioactive waste is evaluated using pathways analyses. The analyses rely on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Conceptual and numerical models are developed using data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations and are used to simulate the long-term transport of contamination to man. Conservatism is built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events have to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics exist. Maximum potential doses to man are calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. The sites are found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations. Conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability are drawn. In reaching these conclusions, some consideration is given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed. 18 refs., 9 figs.

Pin, F.G.; Oblow, E.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Piqua Nuclear Power Facility...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Piqua Nuclear Power Facility - OH 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Piqua Nuclear Power Facility (OH.08 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site...

374

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: 25-41-03, EMAD Facility 25-99-20, EMAD Facility Exterior Releases This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 114. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 114: Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a COC to environmental media. If no COCs or PSMs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. If a COC or PSM is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

Mark Burmeister

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act calls for the establishment of a tax-exempt, tax-deductible decommissioning fund by the licensee of any nuclear power generating facility to pay for the...

376

RECOVERY ACT: TAPOCO PROJECT: CHEOAH UPGRADE  

SciTech Connect

Under Funding Opportunity Announcement Number: DE-FOA-0000120, Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Modernization, Alcoa Power Generating Inc. (APGI), a fully owned subsidiary of Alcoa Inc., implemented major upgrades at its Cheoah hydroelectric facility near Robbinsville, North Carolina.

Paul Tran; 293 Highway 740; Baden, NC 28009

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Public Law 107-206 A-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Public Law 107-206 A-3 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Section 502 of Public Law 107-206, "2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States" (signed by the President 08/02/2002) SEC. 502. Section 1 of Public Law 105-204 (112 Stat. 681) is amended - (1) in subsection (b), by striking "until the date" and all that follows and inserting "until the date that is 30 days after the date on which the Secretary of Energy awards a contract under

379

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Public Law 107-206 A-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Public Law 107-206 A-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Section 502 of Public Law 107-206, "2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States" (signed by the President 08/02/2002) SEC. 502. Section 1 of Public Law 105-204 (112 Stat. 681) is amended - (1) in subsection (b), by striking "until the date" and all that follows and inserting "until the date that is 30 days after the date on which the Secretary of Energy awards a contract under

380

Preclosure radiological safety analysis for accident conditions of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository: Underground facilities; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This preliminary preclosure radiological safety analysis assesses the scenarios, probabilities, and potential radiological consequences associated with postulated accidents in the underground facility of the potential Yucca Mountain repository. The analysis follows a probabilistic-risk-assessment approach. Twenty-one event trees resulting in 129 accident scenarios are developed. Most of the scenarios have estimated annual probabilities ranging from 10{sup {minus}11}/yr to 10{sup {minus}5}/yr. The study identifies 33 scenarios that could result in offsite doses over 50 mrem and that have annual probabilities greater than 10{sup {minus}9}/yr. The largest offsite dose is calculated to be 220 mrem, which is less than the 500 mrem value used to define items important to safety in 10 CFR 60. The study does not address an estimate of uncertainties, therefore conclusions or decisions made as a result of this report should be made with caution.

Ma, C.W.; Sit, R.C.; Zavoshy, S.J.; Jardine, L.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Laub, T.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the website still features the familiar faces of Professor Polar Bear, Teacher Turtle, and PI Prairie Dog (each representing an ARM Climate Research Facility site), but now...

382

A manual for applying the allowable residual contamination level method for decommissioning facilities on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the modifications that have been made to enhance the original Allowable Residual Contamination Level (ARCL) method to make it more applicable to site-specific analyses. This version considers the mixture of radionuclides present at the time of site characterization, the elapsed time after decommissioning when exposure to people could occur, and includes a calculation of the upper confidence limit of the potential dose based on sampling statistics that are developed during the site characterization efforts. The upper confidence limit of potential exposure can now be used for comparison against applicable radiation dose limits (i.e., 25 mrem/yr at Hanford). The level of confidence can be selected by the user. A wide range of exposure scenarios were evaluated; the rationale used to select the most limiting scenarios is explained. The radiation dose factors used for the inhalation and ingestion pathways were also updated to correspond with the radiation dosimetry methods utilized in the International Commission of Radiological Protection Publications 26 and 30 (ICRP 1977; 1979a,b, 1980, 1981, 1982a,b). This simplifies the calculations, since ''effective whole body'' doses are now calculated, and also brings the dosimetry methods used in the ARCL method in conformance with the rationale used by DOE in developing the 25 mrem/yr limit at Hanford. 46 refs., 21 figs., 15 tabs.

Napier, B.A.; Piepel, G.F.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Schreckhise, R.G.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

EM Recovery Act Press Releases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 23, 2011 February 23, 2011 Recovery Act's HWCTR Project Empty of Equipment, Ready for Grouting AIKEN, S.C. - Thanks to investments from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the next phase has begun on decommissioning the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). February 23, 2011 Major Recovery Act Project Completed at Hanford: Two New Super Cells Go Into Service To Accept Contaminated Soil and Debris Months Ahead of Schedule and Millions Under Budget RICHLAND, WASH. - Two new super cells are going into service to expand disposal capacity for contaminated soil and debris at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. February 9, 2011

384

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 17  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About one year of American Recovery About one year of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work remains, but the $1.6 billion Re- covery Act investment provided to the Richland Operations Office at the Hanford Site has already accelerated dozens of cleanup projects, created work for thousands of people, and helped hundreds of small businesses. As of late September 2010, the Richland Operations Office had spent more than $727 million of its Recovery Act allo- cation since launching work in April 2009, and progress in cleanup projects has been swift. Workers have demolished 30 facilities, remediated 23 waste sites, and installed more than 250 wells for monitoring and treating groundwater. They have excavated 3.3 million cubic yards of soil for two new disposal cells that will increase ca-

385

Mr. William f. Crow, Acting Director . Uranium Fuel Licensing...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Director Division of Facility and Site Decomnlssioning Projects Office of Nuclear Energy 3 Enclosures , ---- - . . : . ' . . . . ENCLOSURE 7 FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES...

386

NPDES Rule for Coal Mining Facilities (West Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NPDES Rule for Coal Mining Facilities (West Virginia) NPDES Rule for Coal Mining Facilities (West Virginia) NPDES Rule for Coal Mining Facilities (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This rule establishes requirements implementing the powers, duties, and responsibilities of State's Water Pollution Control Act with respect to all

387

Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site: Results of Technology Down-Selection and Research and Development to Support New Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of HLW for disposal. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) is the salt waste (water-soluble) treatment portion of this effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction, and operation of technologies to prepare the salt-waste feed material for immobilization at the site's Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility [DWPF]). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to DWPF include cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and actinides. In April 2000, the DOE Deputy Secretary for Project Completion (EM-40) established the SRS Salt Processing Project Technical Working Group (TWG) to manage technology development of treatment alternatives for SRS high-level salt wastes. The separation alternatives investigated included three candidate Cs-removal processes selected, as well as actinide and Sr removal that are also required as a part of each process. The candidate Cs-removal processes are: crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange (CST); caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX); and small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). The Tanks Focus Area was asked to assist DOE by managing the SPP research and development (R&D), revising roadmaps, and developing down-selection criteria. The down-selection decision process focused its analysis on three levels: (a) identification of goals that the selected technology should achieve, (b) selection criteria that are a measure of performance of the goal, and (c) criteria scoring and weighting for each technology alternative. After identifying the goals and criteria, the TWG analyzed R&D results and engineering data and scored the technology alternatives versus the criteria. Based their analysis and scoring, the TWG recommended CSSX as the preferred alternative. This recommendation was formalized in July 2001 when DOE published the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and was finalized in the DOE Record of Decision issued in October 2001.

Lang, K.; Gerdes, K.; Picha, K.; Spader, W.; McCullough, J.; Reynolds, J.; Morin, J. P.; Harmon, H. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

388

Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) presents opportunities with potential for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Signed into law by President Obama on February 17,...

389

Requests by Political Candidates to Tour DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REQUESTS BY POLITICAL CANDIDATES TO TOUR DOE FACILITIES REQUESTS BY POLITICAL CANDIDATES TO TOUR DOE FACILITIES * Requests by political candidates to tour DOE facilities are subject to the provisions of the Hatch Act; the statute regulating the political activity of Federal employees. Any proposed site visit by a candidate MUST go through legal review before it can go forward. DOE employees authorizing prohibited political activities by candidates in DOE facilities or on DOE property are subject to penalties under the Hatch act. * DOE employees may not engage in political activity: (1) while on duty; (2) while on Federal property or in a room or building engaged for the purpose of conducting official duties; (3) while wearing a uniform or other item identifying the employee as a Federal employee; or (4) while using a government vehicle. Federal employees may not engage

390

Nevada Test Site site treatment plan, final annual update. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

A Site Treatment Plan (STP) is required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) generates or stores mixed waste (MW), defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. This STP was written to identify specific treatment facilities for treating DOE/NV generated MW and provides proposed implementation schedules. This STP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and provided the basis for the negotiation and issuance of the FFCAct Consent Order (CO) dated March 6, 1996. The FFCAct CO sets forth stringent regulatory requirements to comply with the implementation of the STP.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15, 2005 [Facility News] 15, 2005 [Facility News] Aging, Overworked Computer Network at SGP Gets Overhauled Bookmark and Share This aerial map of instruments deployed at the SGP Central Facility provides an indication of the computer resources needed to manage data at the site, let alone communicate with other ARM sites. This aerial map of instruments deployed at the SGP Central Facility provides an indication of the computer resources needed to manage data at the site, let alone communicate with other ARM sites. Established as the first ARM research facility in 1992, the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma is the "old man on the block" when it comes to infrastructure. Though significant improvements have been made to facilities and equipment throughout the years, the computer network at the

392

Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info Start Date 1985 Program Type Environmental Regulations Equipment Certification Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Generation Disclosure Industry Recruitment/Support Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Canada National Energy Board The purpose of this Act is to promote safety, the protection of the environment, the conservation of oil and gas resources, joint production arrangements, and economically efficient infrastructures.

393

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

394

Preliminary identification of potentially disruptive scenarios at the Greater Confinement Disposal Facility, Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Greater Confinement Disposal location is being evaluated to determine whether defense-generated transuranic waste buried at this location complies with the Containment Requirements established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. One step in determining compliance is to identify those combinations of events and processes (scenarios) that define possible future states of the disposal system for which performance assessments must be performed. An established scenario-development procedure was used to identify a comprehensive set of mutually exclusive scenarios. To assure completeness, 761 features, events, processes, and other listings (FEPS) were compiled from 11 references. This number was reduced to 205 primarily through the elimination of duplications. The 205 FEPs were screened based on site-specific, goal-specific, and regulatory criteria. Four events survived screening and were used in preliminary scenario development: (1) exploratory drilling penetrates a GCD borehole, (2) drilling of a withdrawal/injection well penetrates a GCD borehole, (3) subsidence occurs at the RWMS, and (4) irrigation occurs at the RWMS. A logic diagram was used to develop 16 scenarios from the four events. No screening of these scenarios was attempted at this time. Additional screening of the currently retained events and processes will be based on additional data and information from site-characterization activities. When screening of the events and processes is completed, a final set of scenarios will be developed and screened based on consequence and probability of occurrence.

Guzowski, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newman, G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hanford Site baseline risk assessment methodology. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This methodology has been developed to prepare human health and environmental evaluations of risk as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act remedial investigations (RIs) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facility investigations (FIs) performed at the Hanford Site pursuant to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement. Development of the methodology has been undertaken so that Hanford Site risk assessments are consistent with current regulations and guidance, while providing direction on flexible, ambiguous, or undefined aspects of the guidance. The methodology identifies Site-specific risk assessment considerations and integrates them with approaches for evaluating human and environmental risk that can be factored into the risk assessment program supporting the Hanford Site cleanup mission. Consequently, the methodology will enhance the preparation and review of individual risk assessments at the Hanford Site.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

397

Suspect Counterfeit Items Criteria Review and Approach Document , Phase 1 - Management - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Suspect/Counterfeit Items Suspect/Counterfeit Items Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Phase 1 - Management Performance Objective: Management should have a formal system under Quality Assurance with adequate controls defined and implemented to identify and preclude Suspect/Counterfeit Items (S/CI) from being introduced into safety systems and applications that create potential hazards. CRITERIA: Management should have a formal system of controls in place for assurance that all items procured meet the requirements for their intended use. Management should have a system of mechanisms to continuously maintain current, accurate, updated information on SC/Is and associated suppliers using all available sources. Management should have a training program with detailed records that

398

DOE-STD-1024-92; DOE Standard Guidelines For Use of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Curves at Department of Energy Sites for Department of Energy Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1024-92 STD-1024-92 December 1992 Change Notice #1 January 1996 DOE STANDARD GUIDELINES FOR USE OF PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD CURVES AT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SITES FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; prices available from (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161. Order No. DE93005386 DOE-STD-1024-92 (CH - 1) Subject: CHANGE NOTICE #1

399

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

400

Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon May 17, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Jim Giusti, DOE (803) 952-7697 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS (803) 646-6075 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov AIKEN, S.C. - The F Canyon box remediation program, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project at Savannah River Site (SRS), has come online to process legacy transuranic (TRU) waste for off-site shipment and permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a geological repository in New Mexico. The $40-million facility will process approximately 330 boxes containing TRU waste with a radiological risk higher than seen in the rest of the Site's original 5,000-cubic-meter

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401

Energy and Water Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acquisition Letter 2004-02 - FY 2004 Le2islation Provisions (dated March 1.2004) Acquisition Letter 2004-02 - FY 2004 Le2islation Provisions (dated March 1.2004) Energy and Water Act AL-2004-02 provides guidance regarding the implementation of Section 30 I. 304. 307. 501,502, and Legislative Direction as provided in the Energy and Water Development Appropriation:) Act Pub. L, 108-137, also known as the E&W Act. RFP's for unfunded programs, UseJ' facilities, lobbying restrictions, and purchase of American made products are carried ovc:r from the FY 2003 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act Pub, L, 108-7 {Division D), However, while the provision regarding competition still exists in the F'" 2004 legislation, the direction provided by Congress regarding the extend/compete process for 5 Management and Operating (M&O)contracts is

402

Progress report on the scientific investigation program for the Nevada Yucca Mountain site, September 15, 1988--September 30, 1989; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113), Number 1  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. This report is the first of a series of reports that will hereafter be issued at intervals of approximately 6-months during site characterization. The DOE`s plans for site characterization are described in the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site. The SCP has been reviewed and commented on by the NRC, the State of Nevada, the affected units of local government, other interested parties, and the public. More detailed information on plans for site characterization is being presented in study plans for the various site characterization activities. This progress report presents short summaries of the status of site characterization activities and cites technical reports and research products that provide more detailed information on the activities. The report provides highlights of work started during the reporting period, work in progress, and work completed and documented during the reporting period. In addition, the report is the vehicle for discussing major changes, if any, to the DOE`s site characterization program resulting from ongoing collection and evaluation of site information; the development of repository and waste-package designs; receipt of performance-assessment results; and changes, if any, that occur in response to external comments on the site characterization programs. 80 refs.

NONE

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Site Management Guide (Blue Book)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) Office of Legacy Management (LM), established in 2003, manages the Departments postclosure responsibilities and ensures the future protection of human health and the environment. During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Since 1989, the Department has taken an aggressive accelerated cleanup approach to reduce risks and cut costs. At most Departmental sites undergoing cleanup, some residual hazards will remain at the time cleanup is completed due to financial and technical impracticality. However, the Department still has an obligation to protect human health and the environment after cleanup is completed. LM fulfills DOEs postclosure obligation by providing long-term management of postcleanup sites which do not have continuing missions. LM is also responsible for sites under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Currently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for site surveys and remediation at FUSRAP sites. Once remediation is completed, LM becomes responsible for long-term management. LM also has responsibility for uranium processing sites addressed by Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. For license termination, the owner must conduct an NRC-approved cleanup of any on-site radioactive waste remaining from former uranium ore-processing operations. The site owner must also provide full funding for inspections and, if necessary, ongoing maintenance. Once site cleanup is complete, LM accepts title to these sites on behalf of the United States and assumes long-term management.

None

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Estimated duration of the subsurface reduction environment produced by the salt-stone disposal facility on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The formula for Savannah River Site (SRS) salt-stone includes {approx}25 wt% slag to create a reducing environment for mitigating the subsurface transport of several radionuclides, including Tc-99. Based on laboratory measurements and two-dimensional reactive transport calculations, it was estimated that the SRS salt-stone waste form will maintain a reducing environment, and therefore its ability to sequester Tc-99, for well over 10,000 years. For example, it was calculated that {approx}16% of the salt-stone reduction capacity would be consumed after 213,000 years. For purposes of comparison, a second calculation was presented that was based on entirely different assumptions (direct spectroscopic measurements and diffusion calculations). The results from this latter calculation were near identical to those from this study. Obtaining similar conclusions by two extremely different calculations and sets of assumptions provides additional credence to the conclusion that the salt-stone will likely maintain a reducing environment in excess of 10,000 years. (authors)

Kaplan, D.I.; Hang, T. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Carolina (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Energy Secretary Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 at Iowa Wind Turbine Facility Energy Secretary Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 at Iowa Wind Turbine Facility August 2, 2006 - 8:36am Addthis CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today visited a wind turbine manufacturer to reinforce DOE's commitment to diversifying America's sources of renewable energy and to celebrate the anniversary of the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) - the first comprehensive energy legislation signed into law in more than a decade. The site of the visit was Clipper Windpower's Liberty Turbine production facility in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. "Clipper's Liberty Turbine is not only one of the most advanced wind

406

Acoustical design issues for library facility planners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acting under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services retained Charles M. Salter Associates Inc. to provide a document explaining acoustical and audio/visual requirements for libraries to library planners architects and lay people. Acoustical design issues for libraries discussed on the website include site noise considerations noise standards for each use space room acoustics considerations sound isolation between various use spaces vibration control for mechanical equipment and audio/visual system considerations. The completed document forms a part of the Libris Design library facility planning information system which includes a website with recent information on facility planning topics and a database of recently constructed California public libraries.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Recovery Act: Oxy-Combustion Technology Development for Industrial-Scale Boiler Applications Task 4 Testing in Alstoms 15 MWth Boiler Simulation Facility  

SciTech Connect

Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), under U.S. DOE/NETL Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NT0005290, is conducting a development program to generate detailed technical information needed for application of oxy-combustion technology. The program is designed to provide the necessary information and understanding for the next step of large-scale commercial demonstration of oxy combustion in tangentially fired boilers and to accelerate the commercialization of this technology. The main project objectives include: Design and develop an innovative oxyfuel system for existing tangentially-fired boiler units that minimizes overall capital investment and operating costs. Evaluate performance of oxyfuel tangentially fired boiler systems in pilot scale tests at Alstoms 15 MWth tangentially fired Boiler Simulation Facility (BSF). Address technical gaps for the design of oxyfuel commercial utility boilers by focused testing and improvement of engineering and simulation tools. Develop the design, performance and costs for a demonstration scale oxyfuel boiler and auxiliary systems. Develop the design and costs for both industrial and utility commercial scale reference oxyfuel boilers and auxiliary systems that are optimized for overall plant performance and cost. Define key design considerations and develop general guidelines for application of results to utility and different industrial applications. The project was initiated in October 2008 and the scope extended in 2010 under an ARRA award. The project is scheduled for completion by April 30, 2014. Central to the project is 15 MWth testing in the BSF, which provided in-depth understanding of oxy-combustion under boiler conditions, detailed data for improvement of design tools, and key information for application to commercial scale oxy-fired boiler design. Eight comprehensive 15 MWth oxy-fired test campaigns were performed with different coals, providing detailed data on combustion, emissions, and thermal behavior over a matrix of fuels, oxy-process variables and boiler design parameters. Significant improvement of CFD modeling tools and validation against 15 MWth experimental data has been completed. Oxy-boiler demonstration and large reference designs have been developed, supported with the information and knowledge gained from the 15 MWth testing. This report addresses the results from the 15 MWth testing in the BSF.

Levasseur, Armand

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 7, 2011 [Facility News] April 7, 2011 [Facility News] Review Panel States ARM Facility "Without Peer" Bookmark and Share Every three years, DOE Office of Science user facilities undergo a review to evaluate their effectiveness in contributing to their respective science areas. The latest ARM Facility review was conducted in mid-February by a six-member review panel led by Minghua Zhang of Stony Brook University. Notably, in a debriefing following the review, the panel stated that ARM was a "world class facility without peer." The panel convened in Ponca City, Oklahoma, near ARM's Southern Great Plains site to conduct their review. Their first agenda item was an SGP site tour, which provided a realtime example of the scope and expertise of site operations and included a demonstration of the site's newly

409

MOX Lead Assembly Fabrication at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) on the disposition of the nations weapon-usable surplus plutonium.This EIS is tiered from the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Material Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement issued in December 1996,and the associated Record of Decision issued on January, 1997. The EIS will examine reasonable alternatives and potential environmental impacts for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three types of facilities for plutonium disposition. The three types of facilities are: a pit disassembly and conversion facility, a facility to immobilize surplus plutonium in a glass or ceramic form for disposition, and a facility to fabricate plutonium oxide into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel.As an integral part of the surplus plutonium program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Fissile Material Disposition(MD) as the technical lead to organize and evaluate existing facilities in the DOE complex which may meet MD`s need for a domestic MOX fuel fabrication demonstration facility. The Lead Assembly (LA) facility is to produce 1 MT of usable test fuel per year for three years. The Savannah River Site (SRS) as the only operating plutonium processing site in the DOE complex, proposes two options to carry out the fabrication of MOX fuel lead test assemblies: an all Category I facility option and a combined Category I and non-Category I facilities option.

Geddes, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Spiker, D.L.; Poon, A.P.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 15, 2005 [Facility News] October 15, 2005 [Facility News] Room to Share-New Guest Facility Ready for Users at North Slope of Alaska Bookmark and Share In September, installation was completed on the new Guest Instrument Facility in Barrow to provide additional space and ease crowded conditions. In September, installation was completed on the new Guest Instrument Facility in Barrow to provide additional space and ease crowded conditions. To alleviate crowded conditions at its research facilities on the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, ARM operations staff recently completed the installation of a new Guest Instrument Facility. Similar to the platform at the Atqasuk site, the facility consists of two insulated shipping containers mounted on pilings, with a mezzanine to accommodate

411

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Independence and Security Act,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility Management and Benchmarking Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility Management and Benchmarking Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility Management and Benchmarking Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility Management and Benchmarking Requirements on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 432: Federal Facility Management and Benchmarking Requirements on Delicious

412

Facility Representative Program: 2007 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Facility Representative Workshop 7 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2007 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks Joanne Lorence, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office Gerald Talbot, Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:45 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight Perspective and Expectations Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Office of Health, Safety and Security 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board,

413

Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Privacy Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Privacy Act Privacy Act Privacy Act Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the Privacy Act is 10CFR 1008 Privacy Act of 1974 and Amendments (as of Jan 2, 1991) From GPO US Code on CD-ROM (GPO S/N 052-001-004-00439-6) $30.00 -CITE- 5 USC Sec. 552a -EXPCITE- TITLE 5 PART I CHAPTER 5 SUBCHAPTER II -HEAD- Sec. 552a. Records maintained on individuals -EXPCITE- TITLE 5 PART I CHAPTER 5 SUBCHAPTER II -HEAD- Sec. 552a. Records maintained on individuals -STATUTE- (a) Definitions. - For purposes of this section - (1) the term 'agency' means agency as defined in section 552(e) (FOOTNOTE 1) of this title; (FOOTNOTE 1) See References in Text note below. (2) the term 'individual' means a citizen of the United States or an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence (3) the term 'maintain' includes maintain, collect, use, or disseminate;

415

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 30, 2006 [Facility News] April 30, 2006 [Facility News] Disdrometer Joins Tipping Bucket to Improve Precipitation Measurements Bookmark and Share At the SGP site, the disdrometer is installed near the site's main instrument cluster, approximately 50 feet east of the Central Facility. To avoid secondary splash contamination, the disdrometer's sensor cone is surrounded by splash-resistant material. At the SGP site, the disdrometer is installed near the site's main instrument cluster, approximately 50 feet east of the Central Facility. To avoid secondary splash contamination, the disdrometer's sensor cone is surrounded by splash-resistant material. This spring, a pair of new distrometers began collecting data at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the ARM Darwin site in the Tropical

416

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1991--September 30, 1991, Number 5; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect

The Site Characterization Progress Report of Yucca Mountain (PR) presents brief summaries of the status of site characterization activities and cites the technical reports and research products that provide more detailed information on the activities. The report provides highlights of work started during the reporting period, work in progress, and work completed and documented during the reporting period. In addition, the report is the vehicle for the discussion of changes to the DOE`s site characterization program resulting from ongoing collection and evaluation of site information; the development of repository and waste-package designs; the results of performance assessments; and any changes that occur in response to external comments. Information covered includes geochemistry, hydrology, geology, climate, and radiation dose estimate calculations.

NONE

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada For Fiscal Year 2012 (October 2011September 2012)  

SciTech Connect

This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater CAU 111, Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches This report covers fiscal year 2012 (October 2011September 2012).

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for fiscal year 2013 (October 2012 - September 2013)  

SciTech Connect

This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment; CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well; CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility; CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater; CAU 111, Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits; and, CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches.

None,

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

One-of-a-Kind Facility Now in Safe Shutdown | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

One-of-a-Kind Facility Now in Safe Shutdown One-of-a-Kind Facility Now in Safe Shutdown One-of-a-Kind Facility Now in Safe Shutdown January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Members of the team that helped safely close the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator at Oak Ridge gather for a photo. The team is from URS|CH2M, Oak Ridge, the prime contractor for the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management. Members of the team that helped safely close the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator at Oak Ridge gather for a photo. The team is from URS|CH2M, Oak Ridge, the prime contractor for the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is home to many unique facilities, each constructed for a specific purpose. Today, almost all of the facilities at the site are in the process of being

420

One-of-a-Kind Facility Now in Safe Shutdown | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

One-of-a-Kind Facility Now in Safe Shutdown One-of-a-Kind Facility Now in Safe Shutdown One-of-a-Kind Facility Now in Safe Shutdown January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Members of the team that helped safely close the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator at Oak Ridge gather for a photo. The team is from URS|CH2M, Oak Ridge, the prime contractor for the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management. Members of the team that helped safely close the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator at Oak Ridge gather for a photo. The team is from URS|CH2M, Oak Ridge, the prime contractor for the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is home to many unique facilities, each constructed for a specific purpose. Today, almost all of the facilities at the site are in the process of being

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility siting act" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 30, 2008 [Facility News] April 30, 2008 [Facility News] Team Scouts Graciosa Island for 2009 Mobile Facility Deployment Site Bookmark and Share A location near the airport on the northern end of Graciosa Island was identified as an excellent location for operating the ARM Mobile Facility. Image source: Luis Miguens A location near the airport on the northern end of Graciosa Island was identified as an excellent location for operating the ARM Mobile Facility. Image source: Luis Miguens Indications from a scouting trip by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) science and operations management team are that an excellent site for the 2009 deployment may have been found. From April 8 through April 16, the team traveled to Graciosa Island in the Azores to scout sites for the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) field

422

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central FacilityInstruments Central FacilityInstruments SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility [ Single installation ] ACSM Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Aerosols Browse Data [ Single installation ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] AOS Aerosol Observing System Aerosols Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] BRS Broadband Radiometer Station Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] BSRN Baseline Solar Radiation Network

423

Procuring Solar for Federal Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Facilities Procuring Solar Energy: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers is a Web guide for federal site managers, site contractors, and procurement specialists to help...

424

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2007 [Facility News] 30, 2007 [Facility News] High-Speed Internet Deflects Information Overload Bookmark and Share Covering approximately 143,000 square kilometers in Oklahoma and Kansas, instruments at the various facilities throughout the SGP site generate approximately 27 gigabytes of data every day. Covering approximately 143,000 square kilometers in Oklahoma and Kansas, instruments at the various facilities throughout the SGP site generate approximately 27 gigabytes of data every day. A little more room in the internet link at the ARM Southern Great Plains site is providing needed relief to the crowded lines that keep data flowing from the site. In July 2007, the internet service from the SGP Central Facility was switched to a higher speed (6 megabits) link, increasing the

425

CRAD, Facility Safety - Nuclear Facility Safety Basis | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Facility Safety - Nuclear Facility Safety Basis CRAD, Facility Safety - Nuclear Facility Safety Basis CRAD, Facility Safety - Nuclear Facility Safety Basis A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Facility Safety - Nuclear Facility Safety Basis More Documents & Publications CRAD, Facility Safety - Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 FAQS Job Task Analyses - Nuclear Safety Specialist