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1

2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility 2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility This Performance Assessment (PA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) was prepared to support the operation and eventual closure of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). This PA was prepared to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Change 1, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter IV, and Title 10, of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Subpart C as required by the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, Section 3116. [DOE O 435.1-1, 10 CFR 61, NDAA_3116]

2

Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performing Energy Security Assessments - Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers ii Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................ v 1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Facilities to be Assessed...........................................................................................................................1 2. BEGINNING THE ENERGY SECURITY ASSESSMENT PROCESS ............................... 2 2.1 Assign an Energy Security Manager .........................................................................................................2 2.2 Define the Mission of the Installation

3

Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performing Energy Security Assessments - Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers ii Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................ v 1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Facilities to be Assessed...........................................................................................................................1 2. BEGINNING THE ENERGY SECURITY ASSESSMENT PROCESS ............................... 2 2.1 Assign an Energy Security Manager .........................................................................................................2 2.2 Define the Mission of the Installation

4

Performance assessment for a hypothetical low-level waste disposal facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disposing of low-level waste (LLW) is a concern for many states throughout the United States. A common disposal method is below-grade concrete vaults. Performance assessment analyses make predictions of contaminant release, transport, ingestion, inhalation, or other routes of exposure, and the resulting doses for various disposal methods such as the below-grade concrete vaults. Numerous assumptions are required to simplify the processes associated with the disposal facility to make predictions feasible. In general, these assumptions are made conservatively so as to underestimate the performance of the facility. The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used in conducting a performance assessment for a hypothetical waste facility located in the northeastern United States using real data as much as possible. This report consists of the following: (a) a description of the disposal facility and site, (b) methods used to analyze performance of the facility, (c) the results of the analysis, and (d) the conclusions of this study.

Smith, C.S.; Rohe, M.J.; Ritter, P.D. [and others

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.5 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2010 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Scientific achievements by OLCF users range from collaboration with university experimentalists to produce a working supercapacitor that uses atom-thick sheets of carbon materials to finely determining the resolution requirements for simulations of coal gasifiers and their components, thus laying the foundation for development of commercial-scale gasifiers. OLCF users are pushing the boundaries with software applications sustaining more than one petaflop of performance in the quest to illuminate the fundamental nature of electronic devices. Other teams of researchers are working to resolve predictive capabilities of climate models, to refine and validate genome sequencing, and to explore the most fundamental materials in nature - quarks and gluons - and their unique properties. Details of these scientific endeavors - not possible without access to leadership-class computing resources - are detailed in Section 4 of this report and in the INCITE in Review. Effective operations of the OLCF play a key role in the scientific missions and accomplishments of its users. This Operational Assessment Report (OAR) will delineate the policies, procedures, and innovations implemented by the OLCF to continue delivering a petaflop-scale resource for cutting-edge research. The 2010 operational assessment of the OLCF yielded recommendations that have been addressed (Reference Section 1) and where appropriate, changes in Center metrics were introduced. This report covers CY 2010 and CY 2011 Year to Date (YTD) that unless otherwise specified, denotes January 1, 2011 through June 30, 2011. User Support remains an important element of the OLCF operations, with the philosophy 'whatever it takes' to enable successful research. Impact of this center-wide activity is reflected by the user survey results that show users are 'very satisfied.' The OLCF continues to aggressively pursue outreach and training activities to promote awareness - and effective use - of U.S. leadership-class resources (Reference Section 2). The OLCF continues to meet and in many cases exceed DOE metrics for capability usage (35% target in CY 2010, delivered 39%; 40% target in CY 2011, 54% January 1, 2011 through June 30, 2011). The Schedule Availability (SA) and Overall Availability (OA) for Jaguar were exceeded in CY2010. Given the solution to the VRM problem the SA and OA for Jaguar in CY 2011 are expected to exceed the target metrics of 95% and 90%, respectively (Reference Section 3). Numerous and wide-ranging research accomplishments, scientific support, and technological innovations are more fully described in Sections 4 and 6 and reflect OLCF leadership in enabling high-impact science solutions and vision in creating an exascale-ready center. Financial Management (Section 5) and Risk Management (Section 7) are carried out using best practices approved of by DOE. The OLCF has a valid cyber security plan and Authority to Operate (Section 8). The proposed metrics for 2012 are reflected in Section 9.

Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wells, Jack C [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, CY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.4 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2011 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Users reported more than 670 publications this year arising from their use of OLCF resources. Of these we report the 300 in this review that are consistent with guidance provided. Scientific achievements by OLCF users cut across all range scales from atomic to molecular to large-scale structures. At the atomic scale, researchers discovered that the anomalously long half-life of Carbon-14 can be explained by calculating, for the first time, the very complex three-body interactions between all the neutrons and protons in the nucleus. At the molecular scale, researchers combined experimental results from LBL's light source and simulations on Jaguar to discover how DNA replication continues past a damaged site so a mutation can be repaired later. Other researchers combined experimental results from ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source and simulations on Jaguar to reveal the molecular structure of ligno-cellulosic material used in bioethanol production. This year, Jaguar has been used to do billion-cell CFD calculations to develop shock wave compression turbo machinery as a means to meet DOE goals for reducing carbon sequestration costs. General Electric used Jaguar to calculate the unsteady flow through turbo machinery to learn what efficiencies the traditional steady flow assumption is hiding from designers. Even a 1% improvement in turbine design can save the nation billions of gallons of fuel.

Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wells, Jack C [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL; Hudson, Douglas L [ORNL

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The performance assessment process for DOE low-level waste disposal facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety of the low-level waste disposal facilities, as well as al US DOE facilities, is a primary criterion in their design and operation. Safety of low-level waste disposal facilities is evaluated from two perspectives. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation. The safety evaluations vary from simple safety assessments to very complex safety analysis reports, depending on the degree of hazard associated with the facility operation. Operational requirements for the Department's low-level waste disposal facilities, including long-term safety are contained in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management (1). This paper will focus on the process of conducting long-term performance analyses rather than on operational safety analysis.

Wilhite, E.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The performance assessment process for DOE low-level waste disposal facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety of the low-level waste disposal facilities, as well as al US DOE facilities, is a primary criterion in their design and operation. Safety of low-level waste disposal facilities is evaluated from two perspectives. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation. The safety evaluations vary from simple safety assessments to very complex safety analysis reports, depending on the degree of hazard associated with the facility operation. Operational requirements for the Department`s low-level waste disposal facilities, including long-term safety are contained in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management (1). This paper will focus on the process of conducting long-term performance analyses rather than on operational safety analysis.

Wilhite, E.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools and resources for next-generation systems.

Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools and resources for next-generation systems.

Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Radiological performance assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first revision to ``Radiological Performance Assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility, Revision 0'', which was issued in April 1994 and received conditional DOE approval in September 1994. The title of this report has been changed to conform to the current name of the facility. The revision incorporates improved groundwater modeling methodology, which includes a large data base of site specific geotechnical data, and special Analyses on disposal of cement-based wasteforms and naval wastes, issued after publication of Revision 0.

Cook, J.R.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

13

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NERSC 2011 High Performance Computing Facility Operationalby providing high-performance computing, information, data,s deep knowledge of high performance computing to overcome

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Radiological performance assessment for the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

This radiological performance assessment (RPA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) was prepared in accordance with the requirements of Chapter III of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. The Order specifies that an RPA should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The performance objectives require that: (1) exposures of the general public to radioactivity in the waste or released from the waste will not result in an effective dose equivalent of 25 mrem per year; (2) releases to the atmosphere will meet the requirements of 40 CFR 61; (3) inadvertent intruders will not be committed to an excess of an effective dose equivalent of 100 mrem per year from chronic exposure, or 500 mrem from a single acute exposure; and (4) groundwater resources will be protected in accordance with Federal, State and local requirements.

Cook, J.R.; Fowler, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

E AREA LOW LEVEL WASTE FACILITY DOE 435.1 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Performance Assessment for the Savannah River Site E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility was prepared to meet requirements of Chapter IV of the Department of Energy Order 435.1-1. The Order specifies that a Performance Assessment should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The Order also requires assessments of impacts to water resources and to hypothetical inadvertent intruders for purposes of establishing limits on radionuclides that may be disposed near-surface. According to the Order, calculations of potential doses and releases from the facility should address a 1,000-year period after facility closure. The point of compliance for the performance measures relevant to the all pathways and air pathway performance objective, as well as to the impact on water resources assessment requirement, must correspond to the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste following the assumed end of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure. During the operational and institutional control periods, the point of compliance for the all pathways and air pathway performance measures is the SRS boundary. However, for the water resources impact assessment, the point of compliance remains the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste during the operational and institutional control periods. For performance measures relevant to radon and inadvertent intruders, the points of compliance are the disposal facility surface for all time periods and the disposal facility after the assumed loss of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure, respectively. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is located in the central region of the SRS known as the General Separations Area. It is an elbow-shaped, cleared area, which curves to the northwest, situated immediately north of the Mixed Waste Management Facility. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is comprised of 200 acres for waste disposal and a surrounding buffer zone that extends out to the 100-m point of compliance. Disposal units within the footprint of the low-level waste facilities include the Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Component-in-Grout Trenches, the Low-Activity Waste Vault, the Intermediate-Level Vault, and the Naval Reactor Component Disposal Area. Radiological waste disposal operations at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility began in 1994. E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility closure will be conducted in three phases: operational closure, interim closure, and final closure. Operational closure will be conducted during the 25-year operation period (30-year period for Slit and Engineered Trenches) as disposal units are filled; interim closure measures will be taken for some units. Interim closure will take place following the end of operations and will consist of an area-wide runoff cover along with additional grading over the trench units. Final closure of all disposal units in the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility will take place at the end of the 100-year institutional control period and will consist of the installation of an integrated closure system designed to minimize moisture contact with the waste and to serve as a deterrent to intruders. Radiological dose to human receptors is analyzed in this PA in the all-pathways analysis, the inadvertent intruder analysis and the air pathway analysis, and the results are compared to the relevant performance measures. For the all-pathways analysis, the performance measure of relevance is a 25-mrem/yr EDE to representative members of the public, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. For the inadvertent intruder, the applicable performance measures are 100-mrem/yr EDE and 500 mrem/yr EDE for chronic and exposure scenarios, respectively. The relevant performance measure for the air pathway is 10-mrem/yr EDE via the air pathway, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. Protecti

Wilhite, E

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

NUMERICAL FLOW AND TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS SUPPORTING THE SALTSTONE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment (PA) is being revised to incorporate requirements of Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA), and updated data and understanding of vault performance since the 1992 PA (Cook and Fowler 1992) and related Special Analyses. A hybrid approach was chosen for modeling contaminant transport from vaults and future disposal cells to exposure points. A higher resolution, largely deterministic, analysis is performed on a best-estimate Base Case scenario using the PORFLOW numerical analysis code. a few additional sensitivity cases are simulated to examine alternative scenarios and parameter settings. Stochastic analysis is performed on a simpler representation of the SDF system using the GoldSim code to estimate uncertainty and sensitivity about the Base Case. This report describes development of PORFLOW models supporting the SDF PA, and presents sample results to illustrate model behaviors and define impacts relative to key facility performance objectives. The SDF PA document, when issued, should be consulted for a comprehensive presentation of results.

Flach, G.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

17

Geochemical Data Package for the 2005 Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is designing and assessing the performance of an integrated disposal facility (IDF) to receive low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), and failed or decommissioned melters. The CH2M HILL project to assess the performance of this disposal facility is the Hanford IDF Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of the Hanford IDF PA activity is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the vadose zone to groundwater where contaminants may be re-introduced to receptors via drinking water wells or mixing in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CH2M HILL in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the IDF, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (Kd) and the thermodynamic solubility product (Ksp), respectively. In this data package, we approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. The Kd values and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the IDF system. In addition to the best-estimate Kd values, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. The data package does not list estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, the data package does provide different values for both the Kd values and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the IDF system and does supply time-varying Kd values for the cement solidified waste. The Kd values and solution concentration limits presented for each contaminant were previously presented in a report prepared by Kaplan and Serne (2000) for the 2001 ILAW PA, and have been updated to include applicable data from investigations completed since the issuance of that report and improvements in our understanding of the geochemistry specific to Hanford. A discussion is also included of the evolution of the Kd values recommended from the original 1999 ILAW PA through the 2001 ILAW and 2003 Supplement PAs to the current values to be used for the 2005 IDF PA for the key contaminants of concern: Cr(VI), nitrate, 129I, 79Se, 99Tc, and U(VI). This discussion provides the rationale for why certain Kd have changed with time.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Kaplan, D I.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Program Plan for Revision of the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Saltstone Project, are embarking on the next revision to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) performance assessment (PA). This program plan has been prepared to outline the general approach, scope, schedule and resources for the PA revision. The plan briefly describes the task elements of the PA process. It discusses critical PA considerations in the development of conceptual models and interpretation of results. Applicable quality assurance (QA) requirements are identified and the methods for implementing QA for both software and documentation are described. The plan identifies project resources supporting the core team and providing project oversight. Program issues and risks are identified as well as mitigation of those risks. Finally, a preliminary program schedule has been developed and key deliverables identified. A number of significant changes have been implemented since the last PA revision resulting in a new design for future SDF disposal units. This revision will encompass the existing and planned disposal units, PA critical radionuclides and exposure pathways important to SDF performance. An integrated analysis of the overall facility layout, including all disposal units, will be performed to assess the impact of plume overlap on PA results. Finally, a rigorous treatment of uncertainty will be undertaken using probabilistic simulations. This analysis will be reviewed and approved by DOE-SR, DOE-HQ and potentially the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This revision will be completed and ready for the start of the DOE review at the end of December 2006. This work supports a Saltstone Vault 2 fee-bearing milestone. This milestone includes completion of the Vault 2 module of the PA revision by the end of FY06.

Cook, James R.

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

19

Waste Form Release Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This data package documents the experimentally derived input data on the representative waste glasses; LAWA44, LAWB45, and LAWC22. This data will be used for Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases (STORM) simulations of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) for immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The STORM code will be used to provide the near-field radionuclide release source term for a performance assessment to be issued in July 2005. Documented in this data package are data related to 1) kinetic rate law parameters for glass dissolution, 2) alkali (Na+)-hydrogen (H+) ion exchange rate, 3) chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form in accelerated weathering tests, and 4) thermodynamic equilibrium constants assigned to these secondary phases. The kinetic rate law and Na+-H+ ion exchange rate were determined from single-pass flow-through experiments. Pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) and product consistency (PCT) tests where used for accelerated weathering or aging of the glasses in order to determine a chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form. The majority of the thermodynamic data used in this data package were extracted from the thermody-namic database package shipped with the geochemical code EQ3/6, version 8.0. Because of the expected importance of 129I release from secondary waste streams being sent to IDF from various thermal treatment processes, parameter estimates for diffusional release and solubility-controlled release from cementitious waste forms were estimated from the available literature.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Saripalli, Prasad; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, P. F.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Reed, Lunde R.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Evaluation of a performance assessment methodology for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities: Validation needs. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

In this report, concepts on how validation fits into the scheme of developing confidence in performance assessments are introduced. A general framework for validation and confidence building in regulatory decision making is provided. It is found that traditional validation studies have a very limited role in developing site-specific confidence in performance assessments. Indeed, validation studies are shown to have a role only in the context that their results can narrow the scope of initial investigations that should be considered in a performance assessment. In addition, validation needs for performance assessment of low-level waste disposal facilities are discussed, and potential approaches to address those needs are suggested. These areas of topical research are ranked in order of importance based on relevance to a performance assessment and likelihood of success.

Kozak, M.W.; Olague, N.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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21

Radiological performance assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility. Appendices A through M  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These document contains appendices A-M for the performance assessment. They are A: details of models and assumptions, B: computer codes, C: data tabulation, D: geochemical interactions, E: hydrogeology of the Savannah River Site, F: software QA plans, G: completeness review guide, H: performance assessment peer review panel recommendations, I: suspect soil performance analysis, J: sensitivity/uncertainty analysis, K: vault degradation study, L: description of naval reactor waste disposal, M: porflow input file. (GHH)

Cook, J.R.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Argonne and Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facilitieslike Leadership Computing Facilities at Argonne and Oak

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

RCRA facility assessments  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) broadened the authorities of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by requiring corrective action for releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents at treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. The goal of the corrective action process is to ensure the remediation of hazardous waste and hazardous constituent releases associated with TSD facilities. Under Section 3004(u) of RCRA, operating permits issued to TSD facilities must address corrective actions for all releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from any solid waste management unit (SWMU) regardless of when the waste was placed in such unit. Under RCRA Section 3008(h), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may issue administrative orders to compel corrective action at facilities authorized to operate under RCRA Section 3005(e) (i.e., interim status facilities). The process of implementing the Corrective Action program involves the following, in order of implementation; (1) RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA); (2) RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI); (3) the Corrective Measures Study (CMS); and (4) Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI). The RFA serves to identify and evaluate SWMUs with respect to releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents, and to eliminate from further consideration SWMUs that do not pose a threat to human health or the environment. This Information Brief will discuss issues concerning the RFA process.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizes a separate link to ESnet to provide data-rich largecontinues to partner with ESnet in providing quality networksignificant collaboration with ESnet and other facility

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Environmental Assessment of Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 0 DOEEA-0930 Environmental Assessment of Facility Operations at the US. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Off ice, Grand Junction, Colorado June 1996 U S . Deparfment of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Finding of No Significant Impact, Facility Operations at the U . S . Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION Finding of No Sigdkant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide o S T ~ environmental assessment (EA) @OE/EA-0930) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects office (GJPO) facility

26

Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process RA Bari SJ Johnson J Hockert R Wigeland EF Wonder MD Zentner August 2012 PNNL- 21698 Overview of the Facility...

28

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

facilities or research facilities that involve previously unused processes or technologies, comparison with previously required safeguard design features may not be...

29

Summary of Conceptual Models and Data Needs to Support the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the technical approach and data required to support development of the performance assessment, and composite analysis are presented for the remote handled low-level waste disposal facility on-site alternative being considered at Idaho National Laboratory. Previous analyses and available data that meet requirements are identified and discussed. Outstanding data and analysis needs are also identified and summarized. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of facility performance and of the composite performance are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE Order 435.1, 2001) which stipulate that operation and closure of the disposal facility will be managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. The corresponding established procedures to ensure these protections are contained in DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1 2001). Requirements include assessment of (1) all-exposure pathways, (2) air pathway, (3) radon, and (4) groundwater pathway doses. Doses are computed from radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The performance assessment and composite analysis are being prepared to assess compliance with performance objectives and to establish limits on concentrations and inventories of radionuclides at the facility and to support specification of design, construction, operation and closure requirements. Technical objectives of the PA and CA are primarily accomplished through the development of an establish inventory, and through the use of predictive environmental transport models implementing an overarching conceptual framework. This document reviews the conceptual model, inherent assumptions, and data required to implement the conceptual model in a numerical framework. Available site-specific data and data sources are then addressed. Differences in required analyses and data are captured as outstanding data needs.

A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter; Arthur S. Rood

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

FY2010 ANNUAL REVIEW E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND COMPOSITE ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) consists of a number of disposal units described in the Performance Assessment (PA)(WSRC, 2008b) and Composite Analysis (CA)(WSRC, 1997; WSRC, 1999): Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (IL) Vault, Trenches (Slit Trenches [STs], Engineered Trenches [ETs], and Component-in-Grout [CIG] Trenches), and Naval Reactor Component Disposal Areas (NRCDAs). This annual review evaluates the adequacy of the approved 2008 ELLWF PA along with the Special Analyses (SAs) approved since the PA was issued. The review also verifies that the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 low-level waste (LLW) disposal operations were conducted within the bounds of the PA/SA baseline, the Savannah River Site (SRS) CA, and the Department of Energy (DOE) Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS). Important factors considered in this review include waste receipts, results from monitoring and research and development (R&D) programs, and the adequacy of controls derived from the PA/SA baseline. Sections 1.0 and 2.0 of this review are a summary of the adequacy of the PA/SA and CA, respectively. An evaluation of the FY2010 waste receipts and the resultant impact on the ELLWF is summarized in Section 3.1. The results of the monitoring program, R&D program, and other relevant factors are found in Section 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Section 4.0 contains the CA annual determination similarly organized. SRS low-level waste management is regulated under DOE Order 435.1 (DOE, 1999a) and is authorized under a DAS as a federal permit. The original DAS was issued by the DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) on September 28, 1999 (DOE, 1999b) for the operation of the ELLWF and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The 1999 DAS remains in effect for the regulation of the SDF. Those portions of that DAS applicable to the ELLWF were superseded by revision 1 of the DAS on July 15, 2008 (DOE, 2008b). The 2008 PA and DAS were officially implemented by the facility on October 31, 2008 and are the authorization documents for this FY2010 Annual Review. Department of Energy Headquarters approval of the 2008 DAS was subject to numerous conditions specified in the document. Two of those conditions are to update the ELLWF closure plan and monitoring plan to align with the conceptual model analyzed in the PA. Both of these conditions were met with the issuance of the PA Monitoring Plan (Millings, 2009a) and the Closure Plan (Phifer et al, 2009a). The PA Monitoring Plan was approved by DOE on July 22, 2009 and the Closure Plan was approved by DOE on May 21, 2009. Both will be updated as needed to remain consistent with the PA. The DAS also specifies that the maintenance plan include activities to resolve each of the secondary issues identified in the DOEHQ review of the 2008 PA that were not completely addressed either with supplemental material provided to the review team or in final revisions to the PA. These outstanding issues were originally documented in the 2008 update of the PA/CA Maintenance Plan (WSRC, 2008a) and in subsequent PA/CA Maintenance Plans (most recently SRNS, 2010a) as required and are actively being worked.

Butcher, T.; Swingle, R.; Crapse, K.; Millings, M.; Sink, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Estimation of natural ground water recharge for the performance assessment of a low-level waste disposal facility at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initiated the Recharge Task, under the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project, to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Recharge Task was established to address the issue of ground water recharge in and around the LLW facility and throughout the Hanford Site as it affects the unconfined aquifer under the facility. The objectives of this report are to summarize the current knowledge of natural ground water recharge at the Hanford Site and to outline the work that must be completed in order to provide defensible estimates of recharge for use in the performance assessment of this LLW disposal facility. Recharge studies at the Hanford Site indicate that recharge rates are highly variable, ranging from nearly zero to greater than 100 mm/yr depending on precipitation, vegetative cover, and soil types. Coarse-textured soils without plants yielded the greatest recharge. Finer-textured soils, with or without plants, yielded the least. Lysimeters provided accurate, short-term measurements of recharge as well as water-balance data for the soil-atmosphere interface and root zone. Tracers provided estimates of longer-term average recharge rates in undisturbed settings. Numerical models demonstrated the sensitivity of recharge rates to different processes and forecast recharge rates for different conditions. All of these tools (lysimetry, tracers, and numerical models) are considered vital to the development of defensible estimates of natural ground water recharge rates for the performance assessment of a LLW disposal facility at the Hanford Site.

Rockhold, M.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kincaid, C.T.; Gee, G.W.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

DOE Office of Science Computing Facility Operational Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment (OA) Review of the efficiencies in the steady-state operations of each of the DOE Office of Science High Performance Computing (HPC) Facilities. * OMB requirement for...

33

Readiness Assessment Plan, Hanford 200 areas treated effluent disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Readiness Assessment Plan documents Liquid Effluent Facilities review process used to establish the scope of review, documentation requirements, performance assessment, and plant readiness to begin operation of the Treated Effluent Disposal system in accordance with DOE-RLID-5480.31, Startup and Restart of Facilities Operational Readiness Review and Readiness Assessments.

Ulmer, F.J.

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

34

Facility Representative Program: Program Performance Indicators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Performance Indicators DOE Corporate Reporting Data (ORPS, CAIRS, Others) Facility Representative Performance Indicator Guidance -- Appendix A in DOE-STD-1063-2011,...

35

CRAD, Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan CRAD, Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan Performance Objective: The purpose of this assessment is verify and validate the process for the development of operations procedures and that procedures are in place which provide direction to personnel to ensure that the facility is operated within its design bases. Criteria: Operations procedures should be written to provide specific direction for operating systems and equipment during normal and postulated abnormal and emergency conditions. (DOE O 5480.19 A) Operations procedures should provide appropriate direction to ensure that the facility is operated within its design bases and should be effectively used to support safe operations of the facility. (DOE O

36

Normanskill Hydroelectric Facility Feasibility Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of installing a hydroelectric generating facility at an existing dam of the Normanskill Reservoir in NY. Evaluation of the hydrologic, technical, economic, legal, instrumental and environmental factors led to the conclusion that the project is feasible and advantageous. The proposed project has a present worth net cost of $3,099,800. The benefit cost ratio is 2.36. It is estimated that the proposed hydroelectric generating facility at the French's Mills site, City of Watervliet Reservoir will replace approximately 6,000 barrels of foreign oil per year. (LCL)

Besha, J.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Assessment of criticality safety in DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

A study was made to assess nuclear criticality safety in DOE Facilities and to assess the effects of various types of possible improvements. The accident statistics in DOE operations show that the fatalities caused by Nuclear Criticality accidents are small compared to other accident categories. The data show the safety performance after 1965, compared to prior years, was considerably improved indicating that overall safety programs have been effective. Data on criticality safety violations were collected from eight major facilities. These data were categorized by severity indexes and causes were assigned. A total of 421 violations were used in the data base for analysis in a fault tree model. Calculations were made using the fault tree methodology to show expected improvement in safety (reduction in probability of a criticality accident) for a fixed reduction in the number of criticality violations. Based on this analysis, about equal emphasis should be placed on reducing mechanical failures and operator errors as efforts in these two areas will likely produce the most significant improvements in safety. A criticality safety infraction form was prepared to facilitate uniformity in recording data on infractions for subsequent analysis. Discussions with Nuclear Safety Specialists working in the field instilled confidence that criticality safety is being handled by concerned, capable, and knowledgable persons.

Lloyd, R.C.; Clayton, E.D.; Converse, W.E.; Kottwitz, D.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high.

Calley, M.B.; Jones, J.L. Jr.

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

39

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance .Employees shall be encouraged to become involved in the identification and control of hazards in the workplace. (DOE O 440.1A CRD) Workers shall have the right, without reprisal, to accompany DOE worker

40

Biomass Gasifier Facility (BGF). Environmental Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR) is planning, to design, construct and operate a Biomass Gasifier Facility (BGF). This facility will be located on a site easement near the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar company (KC&S) Paia Sugar Factory on Maui, Hawaii. The proposed BGF Project is a scale-up facility, intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of emerging biomass gasification technology for commercialization. This Executive Summary summarizes the uses of this Environmental Assessment, the purpose and need for the project, project,description, and project alternatives.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HPMSF Overview HPMSF Overview Section 2-4-1 High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility The High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility (HPMSF) provides state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) and separations instrumentation that has been refined for leading-edge analysis of biological problems with a primary emphasis on proteomics. Challenging research in proteomics, cell signaling, cellular molecular machines, and high-molecular weight systems receive the highest priority for access to the facility. Current research activities in the HPMSF include proteomic analyses of whole cell lysates, analyses of organic macro-molecules and protein complexes, quantification using isotopically labeled growth media, targeted proteomics analyses of subcellular fractions, and nucleic acid analysis of

42

Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Preliminary melter performance assessment report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melter Performance Assessment activity, a component of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) effort, was designed to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) melter. The melter performance assessment consisted of several activities, including a literature review of all work done with noble metals in glass, gradient furnace testing to study the behavior of noble metals during the melting process, research-scale and engineering-scale melter testing to evaluate effects of noble metals on melter operation, and computer modeling that used the experimental data to predict effects of noble metals on the full-scale melter. Feed used in these tests simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) feed. This report summarizes the results of the melter performance assessment and predicts the lifetime of the HWVP melter. It should be noted that this work was conducted before the recent Tri-Party Agreement changes, so the reference melter referred to here is the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter design.

Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Mahoney, L.A.; Cooper, M.F.; Whitney, L.D.; Shafer, P.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2011 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

45

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standarf 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January-March 2012 More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

46

Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities -- Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Use in Multibuildings Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuliding Facilities -- 1989 Overview Full Report Analysis of multibuilding facilities containing commercial buildings,...

47

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. 3Q CY2003, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

48

Facility Representative Program Assessment Criteria, Review, and Approach Document (CRAD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 Appendix B B-1 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDE The DOE has implemented its FR Program, and is looking to continuously improve the program's effectiveness DOE-wide. An effective FR Program has many elements, as described in this Standard. These elements are intended to yield a program that provides DOE facilities with well-trained FRs who spend appropriate amounts of time in their facilities and can work effectively with their contractor management counterparts. The program, to be effective, needs the functional support of management. To maintain the continued support of DOE management, the FR program needs to demonstrate its continued performance and effectiveness, which is to be assessed periodically using

49

Environmental assessment: South microwave communication facilities  

SciTech Connect

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain eight microwave repeater stations in southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northern Arizona, in order to meet the minimum fade criteria established by the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) for the operation and protection of electric power systems. The proposed microwave facilities would increase the reliability of communication. This environmental assessment (EA) describes the existing environmental conditions and the impacts from construction of the eight microwave communication facilities. The EA was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the Department of Energy Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). The proposed project would consist of constructing eight microwave facilities, each of which would include a self-supported lattice tower, an equipment building, a propane tank, distribution lines to provide electric power to the sites, and access roads to the sites. The facilities would be constructed in San Miguel and Montezuma Counties in Colorado, San Juan County, Utah, and Navajo, Apache, Coconino, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Performance Assessment Scoping - Hanford Example  

Performance Assessment Scoping - Hanford Example Linda Suttora Office of Environmental Compliance DOE-HQ Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010

51

Decommissioning of Risø's nuclear facilities. Descriptions and cost assessment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear facilities at Risø National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives an assessment of the work to be done and the costs incurred. Three decommissioning scenarios were considered with decay times of 10, 25 and 40 years for the DR 3 reactor. The assessments conclude, however, that there will not be much to gain by allowing for the longer decay periods; some operations still will need to be performed remotely. Furthermore, the report describes some of the legal and licensing framework for the decommissioning and gives an assessment of the amounts of radioactive waste to be transferred to a Danish repository. ISBN 87-550-2844-6; 87-550-2846-2 (Internet)

Edited Kurt Lauridsen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. 2Q CY2006, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

53

Vitrification Facility integrated system performance testing report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of component and system performance testing associated with the Vitrification Facility (VF) following construction turnover. The VF at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass form for eventual disposal in a federal repository. Following an initial Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) Program and subsequent conversion of test stand equipment into the final VF, a testing program was executed to demonstrate successful performance of the components, subsystems, and systems that make up the vitrification process. Systems were started up and brought on line as construction was completed, until integrated system operation could be demonstrated to produce borosilicate glass using nonradioactive waste simulant. Integrated system testing and operation culminated with a successful Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and Department of Energy (DOE) approval to initiate vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) on June 19, 1996. Performance and integrated operational test runs conducted during the test program provided a means for critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the vitrification system. Test data taken for each Test Instruction Procedure (TIP) was used to evaluate component performance against system design and acceptance criteria, while test observations were used to correct, modify, or improve system operation. This process was critical in establishing operating conditions for the entire vitrification process.

Elliott, D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laws & Regulations » Facility Reporting » Federal Facility Annual Laws & Regulations » Facility Reporting » Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance October 8, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis Agencies are required to report annual progress made toward energy- and water-reduction goals. Agencies are required to report annual progress made toward energy- and water-reduction goals. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers information and data sets illustrating Federal agencies' annual progress in meeting facility energy goals. Additional detail about each agency's performance can be found in their Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans on the Performance.Gov website. Federal Facility Efficiency Investment and Progress toward Sustainability Goals: Get an overview of Federal progress made in facility energy

55

Hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. The area surrounding HWSF, the buildings and structures at HWSF, and the processes used at HWSF are described in this report. All nonradiological hazardous materials at the HWSF were identified (radiological hazardous materials are not stored at HWSF) and screened against threshold quantities according to DOE Order 5500.3A guidance. Two of the identified hazardous materials exceeded their specified threshold quantity. This report discusses the potential release scenarios and consequences associated with an accidental release for each of the two identified hazardous materials, lead and mercury. Emergency considerations, such as emergency planning zones, emergency classes, protective actions, and emergency action levels, are also discussed based on the analysis of potential consequences. Evaluation of the potential consequences indicated that the highest emergency class for operational emergencies at the HWSF would be a Site Area Emergency.

Knudsen, J.K.; Calley, M.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 87% Fully Qualifed ( last quarter was 85%) 86% Staffing Level ( last quarter was 88%)

57

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 76% fully qualified 41% staffing level

58

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to impove the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified 94% Staffing Level ( last quarter was

59

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 72% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was

60

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below." 1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representative and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2010 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

62

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarter 's data concluded: 3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

63

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. As of December 31,2003, 93% of all Facility Representatives were fully qualified, exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal for Facility Representative

64

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. A total of 13 Facility Representatives transferred to other positions during the quarter. Five of these accepted Facility Representative positions at other sites. Of the 8 that left the Program. 1 recieved a promotion and 7 accepted lateral positions. All of

65

Residential Fuel Cell Performance Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Currently, the test facility is setup to deliver natural gas as the fuel, but ... A turbine and magnetic flow meter measure the flow of water for the domestic ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM

67

Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3)/1 3)/1 Energy Information Administration Energy Consumption Series Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities August 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore, Director of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202/586-1617) and Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division (EEUISD) (202/586-1112). Specific information regarding the contents or preparation of

68

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data." 1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

69

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from October to December 2001. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data 4Q CY2001, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications

70

4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2004, 86% of all FRs were fully qualified,down from 89% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites added new FRs or switched FRs from their exisiting facilities to new facilities, reducing the overall qualification rate.

71

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The percentage of Facility Representatives who are fully qualified reached 91% across DOE. In EM the percenage of 97%, in Sc the percentage is 95% and in NNSA the percentage is 78%. The DOE goal is 75%. Staffing levels for the three organizations continue to be below

72

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from July to September 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. The percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives in the DOE complex

73

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from April to June 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. Overall, the percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives increased to 80% last quarter, from 78% the previous quarter , and

74

4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The format of the report is changed from past reports. Information will now be provided according to the major offices having field or site office Facility Representative programs: National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSSA), the Office of

75

Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review Report Review Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities May 2011 August 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Table of Contents Background ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Results ........................................................................................................................................................... 2 Conduct of the FCA ......................................................................................................................... 2

76

Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities, August 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review Report Review Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities May 2011 August 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Table of Contents Background ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Results ........................................................................................................................................................... 2 Conduct of the FCA ......................................................................................................................... 2

77

Performance assessment review for Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United State Department of Energy (US DOE) disposes of low-level radioactive waste in near-surface disposal facilities. Safety of the disposal operations is evaluated for operational safety as well as long-term safety. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation and may vary from a simple safety assessment to a safety analysis report. Long-term safety of all low-level waste disposal systems is evaluated through the conduct of a radiological performance assessment. The US DOE has established radiological performance objectives for disposal of low-level waste. They are to protect a member of the general public from receiving over 25 mrem/y, and an inadvertent intruder into the waste from receiving over 100 mrem/y continuous exposure or 400 mrem from a single exposure. For a disposal system to be acceptable, a performance assessment (PA) must be prepared which must be technically accurate and provide reasonable assurance that these performance objectives are met. Technical quality of the performance assessments is reviewed by a panel of experts. A number of lessons have been learned from conducting several preliminary reviews of performance assessments. These lessons are shared among the various US DOE sites to improve the process of evaluating low-level waste disposal sites for long-term performance.

Wilhite, E.L.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Performance assessment review for Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United State Department of Energy (US DOE) disposes of low-level radioactive waste in near-surface disposal facilities. Safety of the disposal operations is evaluated for operational safety as well as long-term safety. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation and may vary from a simple safety assessment to a safety analysis report. Long-term safety of all low-level waste disposal systems is evaluated through the conduct of a radiological performance assessment. The US DOE has established radiological performance objectives for disposal of low-level waste. They are to protect a member of the general public from receiving over 25 mrem/y, and an inadvertent intruder into the waste from receiving over 100 mrem/y continuous exposure or 400 mrem from a single exposure. For a disposal system to be acceptable, a performance assessment (PA) must be prepared which must be technically accurate and provide reasonable assurance that these performance objectives are met. Technical quality of the performance assessments is reviewed by a panel of experts. A number of lessons have been learned from conducting several preliminary reviews of performance assessments. These lessons are shared among the various US DOE sites to improve the process of evaluating low-level waste disposal sites for long-term performance.

Wilhite, E.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Performance Assessment Community of Practice  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L L l W t C t B d High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Community of Practice Community of Practice John E. Marra, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director Associate Laboratory Director 5 March 2009 DOE EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Phoenix, Arizona DOE-EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Performance Assessment Process Community of Practice Background EM Senior Management would like to have g improved consistency in the execution of the Performance Assessment* process; Originally formed a sub-committee to draft a guidance document for practitioners; Th b itt b li C it f The sub-committee now believes a Community of Practice having broader scope should replace it; Draft Charter in review and presented for Draft Charter in review and presented for discussion. * Performance Assessment (PA) is used broadly to encompass assessments for LLW

80

Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This report reflects changes in DOE STD 1063-2011 that deleted one indicator and changed the way two others are calculated. The changes are discussed below. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January - March

82

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. As of June 30,2005, 97% of all FRs were fully qualified, down from 88% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications. 2Q CY2005, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

83

Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) Project. The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at the SWPF Project. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred during August - September 2012. Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -

84

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of September 30,2005, 84% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from 87% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites shifted fully-qualifed FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications. Although the overall percentage of fully qualified FRS

85

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2005 78% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from the 84% the previous quarter, and below the DOE goal of 80%. Site offices hired 11 new FRs in the quarter and several sites moved FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications.

86

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM

87

340 Facility emergency preparedness hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the 340 Facility on the Hanford Site. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and Emergency Planning Zone, is demonstrated.

CAMPBELL, L.R.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and

89

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives. and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR Program. As of March 31st, 2005, 88% of all FRs were fully qualified, up from 86% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several of the new FRs hired recently completed qualifications. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications

90

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of June 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified , exceeding the DOE goal of 80%, but down slightly from the previous quarter. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR staffing is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing

91

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of September 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified, the same as last quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR stadding is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing analysis methodology in

92

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 77% Fully Qualified (last quarter was 78%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 90%); 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%); and 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is > 65%)"

93

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 184 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) which is 92

94

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 76% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 80%) 89% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 89%) 44% Time Spent in the Field ( Department of Energy)(DOE) goal is > 40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

95

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data: * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). Four FRs left due to transfer,

96

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activities (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

97

1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of March 31,2006 81% of all FRs were fully qualified,up from 78% the previous quarter, and just above the DOE goal of 80%. To assist site offices in continuing to meet the qualification goal, there will be two focused training sessions for FR candidates in the coming months. These

98

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

99

2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This memorandum also announces that Mr. James Heffner has turned over FR Program Manager duties to Mr. Earl Huges. Mr. Heffner is assuming expanded team leader duties over several additional programs within the

100

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 78% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 76%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 89%) 47% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%) 74% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is>65%)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 176 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 95 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). This staff reflects a

102

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance

103

2Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

From May 12-13, 2010, 67 FRs attended the annual FR Workshop in Las Vegas, Nevada, to share best practices and lessons learned from their respective sites. Prior to the FR Workshop, FRs were provided Readiness Review Team Member training from May 10-11, 2010. The training provided an overview and familiarized participants with DOE's Readiness Review Process, as described in DOE Order 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities. Training covered the roles and responsibilities of Readiness Review team members with specific emphasis on Performance Assessment methodologies. The FR Steering Committee holds monthly teleconferences to share information on oversight activities, issues identified, and FR program initiatives and improvements. Descriptions of

104

Plantwide Energy Assessment of a Sugarcane Farming and Processing Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plantwide energy assessment was performed at Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co., an integrated sugarcane farming and processing facility on the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii. There were four main tasks performed for the plantwide energy assessment: 1) pump energy assessment in both field and factory operations, 2) steam generation assessment in the power production operations, 3) steam distribution assessment in the sugar manufacturing operation, and 4) electric power distribution assessment of the company system grid. The energy savings identified in each of these tasks were summarized in terms of fuel savings, electricity savings, or opportunity revenue that potentially exists mostly from increased electric power sales to the local electric utility. The results of this investigation revealed eight energy saving projects that can be implemented at HC&S. These eight projects were determined to have potential for $1.5 million in annual fuel savings or 22,337 MWh equivalent annual electricity savings. Most of the savings were derived from pump efficiency improvements and steam efficiency improvements both in generation and distribution. If all the energy saving projects were implemented and the energy savings were realized as less fuel consumed, there would be corresponding reductions in regulated air pollutants and carbon dioxide emissions from supplemental coal fuel. As HC&S is already a significant user of renewable biomass fuel for its operations, the projected reductions in air pollutants and emissions will not be as great compared to using only coal fuel for example. A classification of implementation priority into operations was performed for the identified energy saving projects based on payback period and ease of implementation.

Jakeway, L.A.; Turn, S.Q.; Keffer, V.I.; Kinoshita, C.M.

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

105

ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE, SAFETY CULTURE, AND SAFETY PERFORMANCE AT RESEARCH FACILITIES.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizational culture surveys of research facilities conducted several years ago and archival occupational injury reports were used to determine whether differences in safety performance are related to general organizational factors or to ''safety culture'' as reflected in specific safety-related dimensions. From among the organizations surveyed, a pair of facilities was chosen that were similar in size and scientific mission while differing on indices of work-related injuries. There were reliable differences in organizational style between the facilities, especially among workers in environment, safety, and health functions; differences between the facilities (and among job categories) on the safety scale were more modest and less regular.

BROWN,W.S.

2000-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY Project 39GF71024-GPDI21000000 . PANTEX PLANT AMARILLO, TEXAS DOE/EA-0688 JUNE 1993 MASTER DiSTRiBUTiON OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITEI) ffrl TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 Need for Action 1 2.0 Description of Proposed Facility Action 3.0 Location of the Action 8 4.0 Alternatives to Proposed Action 9 4.1 No Action 9 4.2 Redesign and Modify Existing staging Facilities 9 4.3 Use Other Existing Space at Pantex Plant 9 4.4 Use Temporary Structures 9 4.5 Stage Waste at Other Sites 10 4.6 Stage Wastes Separately 10 5.0 Environmental Impacts of Proposed Action 10 5.1 Archeology 10 5.2 FloodplainlW etlands 10 5.3 Threatened and Endangered Species 10 5.4 Surrounding La,nd Use 11 5.5 Construction 11 5.6 Air Emissions 11

107

4Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 26,2001 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: seph Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. I intend to continue to provide this summary information to you quarterly. These provide

108

1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May May 9,2000 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: .yc,..,%$'! L.W.T oseph Arango, Facl ity Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. You will note that the indicators show the attrition of five Facility Representatives from the program during this reporting period. Of those five, two were promoted

109

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October - December 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR DISTRIBUTION FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: ANDREW C. LAWRENCE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF NUCLEAR SAFETY, QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENVIRONMENT OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October-December (Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2010) This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below:

110

Facility Energy Assessment Matrix | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Energy Assessment Matrix Facility Energy Assessment Matrix Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

111

4Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2008 6, 2008 MEMORANDUM FROM: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATNE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October - December (4th Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%)

112

2Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0,2007 0,2007 M E M 0 R A N D ; p s ' X Z FROM: M RK B. WHI DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June (2nd Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 72%) 94% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 9 1 %)

113

Maintenance Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. Criteria: The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance. The maintenance organization structure is well defined and understood. Responsibilities, organizational interfaces, and administrative activities are adequately defined and implemented to provide timely availability of

114

Non-Facility Contractor Prior Performance, IG-0857  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Facility Contractor Prior Non-Facility Contractor Prior Performance DOE/IG-0857 October 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 28, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Non-Facility Contractor Prior Performance" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy obligated approximately $89 billion during Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010, through various contracts and financial assistance awards, including contracts funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Holding contractors accountable for past performance is an important tool for making sure that the Federal government and the taxpayers that it represents, receive good value from its contracts. To determine whether a prospective

116

Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities -- Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication Publication Publication - Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities Percent of Buildings, Floorspace, and Consumption in Multibuilding Facilities, 1989 Figure on percent of buildings, floorspace, and consumption in multibuilding facilities, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities (file size .53 MB) pages: 105

117

Work Controls Assessment Plan Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WORK CONTROLS WORK CONTROLS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established work control process in place with authorized, controlled and documented methods that provide an accurate status of the work to be performed. Criteria: Work planning addresses applicable laws, codes and regulations. Work planning includes operational configuration constraints; material, tool, and manpower requirements; inter-organizational coordination; operational history; special training; safety considerations; hazards protection requirements; post-maintenance testing; quality control requirements; and other considerations as necessary. The work to be accomplished is defined by identifying the existing

118

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for April - June 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 , 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June 20 1 I This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffin~/Qualification/Oversi~ht Data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

119

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October-December 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN DIRECTOR ~ OFFICE OF :-IDC~AR AFETY OFFICE OF HEAL 'l;H, AFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October- December 20 ll This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full

120

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES FOR TANK FARM CLOSURE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the performance objectives (metrics, times of analyses, and times of compliance) to be used in performance assessments of Hanford Site tank farm closure.

MANN, F.M.; CRUMPLER, J.D.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial energy management Industrial energy management » Measure, track, and benchmark » Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Tools for benchmarking energy management practices

122

International physical protection self-assessment tool for chemical facilities.  

SciTech Connect

This report is the final report for Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project No.130746, International Physical Protection Self-Assessment Tool for Chemical Facilities. The goal of the project was to develop an exportable, low-cost, computer-based risk assessment tool for small to medium size chemical facilities. The tool would assist facilities in improving their physical protection posture, while protecting their proprietary information. In FY2009, the project team proposed a comprehensive evaluation of safety and security regulations in the target geographical area, Southeast Asia. This approach was later modified and the team worked instead on developing a methodology for identifying potential targets at chemical facilities. Milestones proposed for FY2010 included characterizing the international/regional regulatory framework, finalizing the target identification and consequence analysis methodology, and developing, reviewing, and piloting the software tool. The project team accomplished the initial goal of developing potential target categories for chemical facilities; however, the additional milestones proposed for FY2010 were not pursued and the LDRD funding therefore was redirected.

Tewell, Craig R.; Burdick, Brent A.; Stiles, Linda L.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

IMPROVING CONSISTENCY OF PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS IN THE DOE COMPLEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low-level waste (LLW) performance assessment (PA) process has been traditionally focused on disposal facilities at a few United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites and commercial disposal facilities. In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the scope of the use of PA-like modeling approaches, involving multiple activities, facilities, contractors and regulators. The scope now includes, for example: (1) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) assessments, (2) CERCLA disposal cells, (3) Waste Determinations and High-Level Waste (HLW) Closure activities, (4) Potential on-site disposal of Transuranic (TRU) waste, and (5) In-situ decommissioning (including potential use of existing facilities for disposal). The dramatic increase in the variety of activities requiring more detailed modeling has resulted in a similar increase in the potential for inconsistency in approaches both at a site and complexwide scale. This paper includes a summary of USDOE Environmental Management (EM) sponsored initiatives and activities for improved consistency. New initiatives entitled the Performance Assessment Community of Practice and Performance Assessment Assistance Team are also introduced.

Seitz, R; Elmer Wilhite, E

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

124

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Consolidated Transportation Facility. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0822, addressing environmental impacts that could result from siting, construction, and operation of a consolidated transportation facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The DOE proposes to construct and operate a new transportation facility at the Central Facilities Area (CFA) at the INEL. The proposed facility would replace outdated facilities and consolidate in one location operations that are conducted at six different locations at the CFA. The proposed facility would be used for vehicle and equipment maintenance and repair, administrative support, bus parking, and bus driver accommodation. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPT-LSO-2011-001 ARPT-LSO-2011-001 Site: Livermore Site Office Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment Dates of Activity 01/24/2011 - 01/28/2011 Report Preparer Robert Freeman Activity Description/Purpose: This activity report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of and participation in the Livermore Site Office Self-Assessment of the Facility Representative (FR) Program. This self-assessment was led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Livermore Site Office (LSO) and conducted by LSO staff, HSS staff, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety (CDNS) staff, a peer from Los Alamos Site

126

Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (Project W-296) Safety Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Assessment is based on information derived from the Conceptual Design Report for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (DOE/RL 1994) and ancillary documentation developed during the conceptual design phase of Project W-296. The Safety Assessment has been prepared to support the Solid Waste Burial Ground Interim Safety Basis document. The purpose of the Safety Assessment is to provide an evaluation of the design to determine if the process, as proposed, will comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) Limits for radioactive and hazardous material exposures and be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint. The evaluation considered affects on the worker, onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

Armstrong, D.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

High Performance Computing at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Computing at High Performance Computing at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility Go to Menu Page 2 Outline * Our Mission * Computer Systems: Present, Past, Future * Challenges Along the Way * Resources for Users Go to Menu Page 3 Our Mission Go to Menu Page 4 * World's most powerful computing facility * Nation's largest concentration of open source materials research * $1.3B budget * 4,250 employees * 3,900 research guests annually * $350 million invested in modernization * Nation's most diverse energy portfolio * The $1.4B Spallation Neutron Source in operation * Managing the billion-dollar U.S. ITER project ORNL is the U.S. Department of Energy's largest science and energy laboratory Go to Menu Page 5 Computing Complex @ ORNL World's most powerful computer for open science

128

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report Kurt D. Gerdes Harry D. Harmon Herbert G. Sutter Major C. Thompson John R. Shultz Sahid C. Smith July 13, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 ii This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii Signatures SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iv This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility

129

Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on April 13-14, 2010. The Performance Assessment Community of Practice has been chartered to advise the Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board regarding performance assessments and performance assessment-like analyses, promote consistency in the preparation of performance assessments across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, foster exchange of information among performance assessment practitioners, and develop appropriate guidance for performance assessments such that they are based on sound science and are defensible. The purpose of this technical exchange is to provide a venue for performance assessment and risk assessment practitioners, managers and regulators, and contributors to the Cementitious Barriers Partnership and Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management project to share plans and experiences and share ideas for future performance assessment and risk assessment modeling. The technical exchange will include a combination of plenary presentations and discussions with breakout sessions for specific topics. Discussions will emphasize areas for improved consistency and solicit suggestions for future developments related to modeling tools. A breakout discussion session is also planned to address: DOE Order 435.1 Update, regulatory challenges for performance and risk assessment modeling, and other topical areas. Arrangements have also been made for a GoldSim modeling roundtable at the conclusion of the workshop for participants who are interested in sharing experiences related to the use of GoldSim for their simulations.

130

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well developed asset management implementation. Consequently an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in a risk assessment process. However, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require for their successful application some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well-developed asset management implementation. Consequently, an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in the risk assessment process. However, for their application, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment failure. This re...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Assessing Plant Performance for Energy Savings | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Plant Performance for Energy Savings Assessing Plant Performance for Energy Savings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

133

NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 * November 2010 8 * November 2010 The NREL hydrogen safety sensor test facility (Robert Burgess/NREL) PIX 18240 NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance Team: Safety Codes & Standards Group, Hydrogen Technologies & Systems Center Accomplishment: The NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Facility was recently commissioned for the quantitative assessment of hydrogen safety sensors (first reported in April 2010). Testing of sensors has started and is ongoing. Test Apparatus: The Test Facility was designed to test hydrogen sensors under precisely controlled conditions. The apparatus can simultaneously test multiple sensors and can handle all common electronic interfaces, including voltage, current, resistance,

134

Construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calibration of instruments used to detect and measure ionizing radiation has been conducted over the last 20 years at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) Radiation Calibration Facility, Building 348. Growth of research facilities, projects in progress, and more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) orders which involve exposure to nuclear radiation have placed substantial burdens on the existing radiation calibration facility. The facility currently does not meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.4 or American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N323-1978, which establish calibration methods for portable radiation protection instruments used in the detection and measurement of levels of ionizing radiation fields or levels of radioactive surface contaminations. Failure to comply with this standard could mean instrumentation is not being calibrated to necessary levels of sensitivity. The Laboratory has also recently obtained a new neutron source and gamma beam irradiator which can not be made operational at existing facilities because of geometry and shielding inadequacies. These sources are needed to perform routine periodic calibrations of radiation detecting instruments used by scientific and technical personnel and to meet BNL`s substantial increase in demand for radiation monitoring capabilities. To place these new sources into operation, it is proposed to construct an addition to the existing radiation calibration facility that would house all calibration sources and bring BNL calibration activities into compliance with DOE and ANSI standards. The purpose of this assessment is to identify potential significant environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at BNL.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron.1088/0029-5515/53/4/043014 Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron spectrometry J at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides essential information about the implosion performance. From

136

4Q CY2008, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (4QCY2008) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 3 1 100 1 100 100 70 86 ID (EM) 13 12 11 85 0 82 82 43 84 OR (EM) 19 18 18 95 0 72 72 44 66 ORP 15 15 14 93 0 79 64 43 72 PPPO 6 5 5 83 0 80 80 44 70 RL 19 18 18 95 1 84 84 45 70 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 30 80 SR 32 24 24 75 2 71 67 45 74 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 42 70 EM Totals 108 98 94 87 4 77 72 44 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of available work hours is the actual number of hours a Facility Representative works in a calendar quarter, including overtime hours. It does not include

137

Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for US Army Garrison, Japan - Honshu Installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an assessment was performed by a team of engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract to the Installation Management Command (IMCOM) Pacific Region Office (PARO). The effort used the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) model to determine how energy is consumed at five U.S. Army Garrison-Japan (USAG-J) installations in the Honshu area, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

Kora, Angela R.; Brown, Daryl R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

138

2Q CY2004, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment Attachment Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report September 20, 2004 Distribution: Kyle McSlarrow, S-2 Bruce Carnes, S-2 Les Novitsky, S-2 David Garman, S-3 Linton Brooks, NA-1 Tyler Przybylek, NA-1 Everet Beckner, NA-10 James Mangeno, NA-3.6 Glenn Podonsky, SP-1 Mike Kilpatrick, OA-1 Patricia Worthington, OA-40 Paul Golan, EM-1 Inés Triay, EM-3 Patty Bubar, EM-3.2 Raymond Orbach, SC-1 Milt Johnson, SC-3 William Magwood, NE-1 Manager, Ames Site Office Manager, Argonne Site Office Manager, Brookhaven Site Office Manager, Carlsbad Field Office Manager, Fermi Site Office Manager, Idaho Operations Office Manager, Livermore Site Office Manager, Los Alamos Site Office Manager, Nevada Site Office Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office Manager, Office of River Protection

139

1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http: Http: OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (1QCY2010) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 3 100 0 100 33 50 78 ID (EM) 13 13 12 92 0 100 100 50 91 OR (EM) 18 17 18 100 0 100 81 45 67 ORP 15 15 14 93 1 93 80 51 81 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 100 100 43 68 RL 19 19 19 100 0 95 95 43 69 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 50 75 SR 32 29 29 91 1 69 69 43 76 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 60 EM Totals 109 105 104 95 2 89 81 45 75 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key:

140

3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (3QCY2007) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 2 2 200 0 100 50 66 86 ID (ICP) 13 12 11 85 1 100 100 40 65 OR (EM) 19 17 16 84 0 94 88 47 71 ORP 14 14 14 100 0 100 93 46 74 PPPO 4 4 4 100 0 100 100 42 75 RL 19 19 19 100 0 100 95 73 69 SR 31 31 25 81 2 88 80 40 79 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 43 65 EM Totals 103 101 93 90 3 96 89 50 73 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the planned disposal of the vitrified low-level fraction of waste presently contained in Hanford Site tanks. The tank waste is the by-product of separating special nuclear materials from irradiated nuclear fuels over the past 50 years. This waste has been stored in underground single and double-shell tanks. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low and high-activity fractions, and then immobilized by private vendors. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will receive the vitrified waste from private vendors and plans to dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The high-level fraction will be stored at Hanford until a national repository is approved. This report provides the site-specific long-term environmental information needed by the DOE to issue a Disposal Authorization Statement that would allow the modification of the four existing concrete disposal vaults to provide better access for emplacement of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) containers; filling of the modified vaults with the approximately 5,000 ILAW containers and filler material with the intent to dispose of the containers; construction of the first set of next-generation disposal facilities. The performance assessment activity will continue beyond this assessment. The activity will collect additional data on the geotechnical features of the disposal sites, the disposal facility design and construction, and the long-term performance of the waste. Better estimates of long-term performance will be produced and reviewed on a regular basis. Performance assessments supporting closure of filled facilities will be issued seeking approval of those actions necessary to conclude active disposal facility operations. This report also analyzes the long-term performance of the currently planned disposal system as a basis to set requirements on the waste form and the facility design that will protect the long-term public health and safety and protect the environment.

Mann, F.M.

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

User Facilities in the Environmental Assessment Division (EVS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The ARM Climate Research Facility, a Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science user facility, provides data from strategically located climate observatories around the...

143

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Operational Excellence Facilities Facilities...

144

DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Step 2: Assess your clients' energy performance | ENERGY STAR...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry-specific Energy Performance Indicators (EPI) track yearly energy use patterns in industrial facilities. Learn more about Energy Performance Indicators Analyze energy...

146

Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The purpose of this assessment is verify and validate the process for the development of operations procedures and that procedures are in place which provide direction to personnel to ensure that the facility is operated within its design bases. Criteria: Operations procedures should be written to provide specific direction for operating systems and equipment during normal and postulated abnormal and emergency conditions. (DOE O 5480.19 A) Operations procedures should provide appropriate direction to ensure that the facility is operated within its design bases and should be effectively used to support safe operations of the facility. (DOE O 5480.19 A)

147

2Q CY2009, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (2QCY2009) Field or Ops Office * Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time ** % Oversight Time *** CBFO 3 3 2 67 0 50 50 46 76 ID 13 13 11 85 0 100 100 49 90 OR 19 18 17 89 1 71 71 42 57 ORP 15 15 15 100 0 73 73 53 77 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 67 67 42 70 RL 19 19 19 100 0 84 84 45 69 SR 32 28 28 88 0 64 64 47 73 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 70 EM Totals 109 104 100 92 1 74 74 46 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office; ID = Idaho Operations Office; OR = Oak Ridge Office; ORP = Office of River Protection; PPPO = Portsmouth/Paducah

148

WIPP Remote Handled Waste Facility: Performance Dry Run Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Remote Handled (RH) TRU Waste Handling Facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recently upgraded and modified in preparation for handling and disposal of RH Transuranic (TRU) waste. This modification will allow processing of RH-TRU waste arriving at the WIPP site in two different types of shielded road casks, the RH-TRU 72B and the CNS 10-160B. Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the WIPP Management and Operation Contractor (MOC), conducted a performance dry run (PDR), beginning August 19, 2002 and successfully completed it on August 24, 2002. The PDR demonstrated that the RHTRU waste handling system works as designed and demonstrated the handling process for each cask, including underground disposal. The purpose of the PDR was to develop and implement a plan that would define in general terms how the WIPP RH-TRU waste handling process would be conducted and evaluated. The PDR demonstrated WIPP operations and support activities required to dispose of RH-TRU waste in the WIPP underground.

Burrington, T. P.; Britain, R. M.; Cassingham, S. T.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Confined Spaces Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONFINED SPACES CONFINED SPACES Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the safety effectiveness of the contractor's confined or enclosed spaces procedure, and for establishing compliance with DOE and OSHA requirements. Specifically, this assessment is to verify the information and findings of the BN Management Self Assessment Report on "Confined Space", ES&H-MSA-03-13, dated December 31, 2003. Criteria: Practices and procedures are in place to protect employees in general industry from the hazards of entry into permit-required confined spaces. 29 CFR 1910.146 (a) Each employee is instructed in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to

150

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

151

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

152

Operations Authorization Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations Authorization Operations Authorization Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to verify there is documentation in place which accurately describes the safety envelope for a facility, program or project. Criteria: Conditions and requirements should be established to ensure programs addressing all applicable functional areas are adequately implemented to support safe performance of the work. The extent of documentation and level of authority for agreement shall be tailored to the complexity and hazards associated with the work. Personnel shall be responsible and accountable for performance of work in accordance with the controls established. Controls established for safety are a discernible part of the plan for

153

Site selection and assessment for a nuclear storage facility  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the structure and accuracy of the decision making process in finding an optimal location for stored nuclear materials for 25-50 years. Using a well-documented facility design, benefit hierarchy is set up for different sites to rank a given site for different options. Criteria involve safeguards standards, technical viability, environmental effects, economics, political impact, and public acceptance. Problem faced here is multi-criterion decision making. Two approaches are investigated: analytic hierarchy process (AHP) of Saaty, and fuzzy logic approach of Yager. Whereas AHP requires a pairwise comparison of criteria and pairwise comparison of alternatives, in Yager`s approach each alternative is considered independently, allowing one to extend the analysis without performing time-consuming computation.

Rutherford, D.A.; Zardecki, A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site Performance Assessments (PA) are analyses conducted for low level radioactive waste disposal facilities (or appropriate CERCLA documentation for a low level radioactive waste disposal facility), and are critical in determining the nature and extent of the controls that need to be put in place at the facility being evaluated. There are specific requirements for the protection of the public, workers, and environment that are critical to maintaining safe and effective disposal of radioactive waste and the PA is a risk analysis of the potential hazards of disposing of low level radioactive waste. The review and approval of these evaluations is

155

Preliminary Performance Assessment for Disposal of APT and CLWR/TEF Wastes at SRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This section provides the descriptive information for understanding the analyses presented in this preliminary performance assessment. This section addresses the approach taken in the PA, provides a general description of the Savannah River Site E-Area low-level waste facility, and discusses the performance criteria used for evaluating performance.

Wilhite, E.L.

1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

156

Self-Assessment Program Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SELF-ASSESSMENT SELF-ASSESSMENT Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self- assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect people and

157

Organizational Epidemiology and Energy Facilities: Statistical Techniques for Empirical Analysis and Prediction of Human Performance Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an empirical study of the prediction of human performance and energy facility performance based on analysis of historical data relating to worker-, workplace-, management-, and organization-centered factors. Findings verify the relationship between antecedent conditions of human performance and facility productivity, reliability, and safety.

2002-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

158

1Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from January  to March  2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

159

4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

160

Mission and Readiness Assessment for Fusion Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic fusion development toward DEMO will most likely require a number of fusion nuclear facilities (FNF), intermediate between ITER and DEMO, to test and validate plasma and nuclear technologies and to advance the level of system integration. The FNF mission space is wide, ranging from basic materials research to net electricity demonstration, so there is correspondingly a choice among machine options, scope, and risk in planning such a step. Readiness requirements to proceed with a DEMO are examined, and two FNF options are assessed in terms of the contributions they would make to closing DEMO readiness gaps, and their readiness to themselves proceed with engineering design about ten years from now. An advanced tokamak (AT) pilot plant with superconducting coils and a mission to demonstrate net electricity generation would go a long way toward DEMO. As a next step, however, a pilot plant would entail greater risk than a copper-coil FNSF-AT with its more focussed mission and technology requirements. The stellarator path to DEMO is briefly discussed. Regardless of the choice of FNF option, an accompanying science and technology development program, also aimed at DEMO readiness, is absolutely essential.

G.H. Neilson, et. al.

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM In December 2007 the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM More Documents & Publications Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM

162

Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

163

NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Lines of authority are clearly defined with clear and open communications existing between all departments and all levels. Criteria: Dialogue exists between personnel involved in engineering/design, operations, maintenance, safety issues, and remedial actions. Personnel within the departments are promptly informed on issues as they occur on a need-to-know basis. Lessons Learned and feedback is encouraged inter-departmentally regarding safety, adequate resources, and processes to enable prompt and effective corrective actions and resolutions for mission accomplishment. Management has an effective and specified chain of communication in both directions between corporate and facility management. (DOE/EH-0135)

164

A probabilistic risk assessment of the LLNL Plutonium facility`s evaluation basis fire operational accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Facility conducts numerous involving plutonium to include device fabrication, development of fabrication techniques, metallurgy research, and laser isotope separation. A Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the building 332 Plutonium Facility was completed rational safety and acceptable risk to employees, the public, government property, and the environment. This paper outlines the PRA analysis of the Evaluation Basis Fire (EDF) operational accident. The EBF postulates the worst-case programmatic impact event for the Plutonium Facility.

Brumburgh, G.

1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Research Support Facility (RSF): Leadership in Building Performance (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure/poster provides information on the features of the Research Support Facility including a detailed illustration of the facility with call outs of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Imagine an office building so energy efficient that its occupants consume only the amount of energy generated by renewable power on the building site. The building, the Research Support Facility (RSF) occupied by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) employees, uses 50% less energy than if it were built to current commercial code and achieves the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED{reg_sign}) Platinum rating. With 19% of the primary energy in the U.S. consumed by commercial buildings, the RSF is changing the way commercial office buildings are designed and built.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Auxiliary analyses in support of performance assessment of a hypothetical low-level waste facility: Two-phase flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils with application to low-level radioactive waste disposal. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

A numerical model of multiphase air-water flow and contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone is presented. The multiphase flow equations are solved using the two-pressure, mixed form of the equations with a modified Picard linearization of the equations and a finite element spatial approximation. A volatile contaminant is assumed to be transported in either phase, or in both phases simultaneously. The contaminant partitions between phases with an equilibrium distribution given by Henry`s Law or via kinetic mass transfer. The transport equations are solved using a Galerkin finite element method with reduced integration to lump the resultant matrices. The numerical model is applied to published experimental studies to examine the behavior of the air phase and associated contaminant movement under water infiltration. The model is also used to evaluate a hypothetical design for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. The model has been developed in both one and two dimensions; documentation and computer codes are available for the one-dimensional flow and transport model.

Binning, P. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia); Celia, M.A.; Johnson, J.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Operations Research

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for...

168

Welding Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been implemented. Verify that the requirements implemented are appropriate for preventing loss of life and property from fire, and personal injury from contact with or exposure to molten metals, vapors, radiant energy, injurious rays and sparks. Criteria: Establish designated area in which routine and repetitive welding, cutting, and other spark- or flame producing operations are conducted [1910.252(a)(2)(iv),1910.252(a)(2)(vi)(A), 1910.252(a)(2)(xv), General Requirements].

169

Radiological Assessment for the Vance Road Facility Source Vault, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratories had been used for a broad range of nuclear medicine research involving numerous radionuclides. These radionuclides were stored in the a source vault located on the first floor of the facility. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault after it had been remediated and in preparation for converting the area to office space.

J. R. Morton

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controlling summer attic heat gain is important to reducing air conditioning energy use in homes in hot-humid climates. Both heat transfer through ceilings and t attic duct systems can make up a large part of peak cooling demand, Attic ventilation has long been identified as a method to abate such heat gains. We present test results from using the photovoltaic (PV) attic ventilator fans in a test home to assess impact on attic and cooling energy performance.

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Joint Agricultural Weather Facility's Operational Assessment Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Joint Agricultural Weather Facility (JAWF), a cooperative effort between the Climate Analysis Center, NMC/NWS/NOAA (National Meteorological Center/National Weather Service/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and the World ...

Raymond P. Motha; Thomas R. Heddinghaus

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Mission and Readiness Assessment for Fusion Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DEMO and Next-Step Facilities / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 2) Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

G. H. Neilson et al.

174

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (904-113G)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment (RFI/RI/BRA) for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (FDTF) (904-113G).

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 80% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 87%) 89% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 86%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is > 40%) 76% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is >

176

Environmental Assessment for Linac Coherent Light Source Experimental Facility (12/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Stanford Linear A ccelerator Center DOE/EA-1426 Environmental Assessment for Linac Coherent Light Source Experimental Facility LCLS December 2002 LCLS Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1426 December 2002 Page - i - Environmental Assessment for LCLS Experimental Facility Table of Contents Preface ............................................................................................................................................ iii 1.0 Summary ................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Purpose and Need for LCLS ..................................................................................................... 6 3.0 Description of Proposed Action and Alternatives

177

Highlighting High Performance: The Solar Energy Research Facility, Golden, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Energy Research Facility in Golden, Colorado, uses a stair-step configuration to allow daylight and heat into the office areas, while the laboratories in the back of the building are in a more controlled environment where tight levels of ventilation, humidity, temperature, and light are critical. A unique mechanical system makes the most of the natural environment and the building's design to efficiently heat and cool the building at an annual utility bill savings of almost $200,000 per year.

Torcellini, P.; Epstein, K.

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Title Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5545E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Delp, William W., and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Science & Technology Volume 46 Issue 11 Pagination 6167-6173 Date Published 05/08/2012 Keywords Range Hood Test Facility Abstract This study assessed the performance of seven new residential cooking exhaust hoods representing common U.S. designs. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine fan curves relating airflow to duct static pressure, sound levels, and exhaust gas capture efficiency for front and back cooktop burners and the oven. Airflow rate sensitivity to duct flow resistance was higher for axial fan devices than for centrifugal fan devices. Pollutant capture efficiency (CE) ranged from 98%, varying across hoods and with airflow and burner position for each hood. CE was higher for back burners relative to front burners, presumably because most hoods covered only part of the front burners. Open hoods had higher CE than those with grease screen and metal-covered bottoms. The device with the highest CE-exceeding 80% for oven and front burners-had a large, open hood that covered most of the front burners. The airflow rate for this hood surpassed the industry-recommended level of 118 L·s-1 (250 cfm) and produced sound levels too high for normal conversation. For hoods meeting the sound and fan efficacy criteria for Energy Star, CE was <30% for front and oven burners.

179

Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities (1989 data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Use in Multibuildings > Overview Use in Multibuildings > Overview Overview Percent of Buildings, Floorspace, and Consumption in Multibuilding Facilities, 1989 Figure on percent of buildings, floorspace, and consumption in multibuilding facilities, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar Executive Summary The purpose of this report is to address a known problem in the Energy Information AdministrationÆs (EIA) data systems regarding energy consumption in buildings. The problem is in measuring the consumption of energy in a particular building that is located within a multibuilding facility that utilizes district heating and/or cooling. When such a building is surveyed by EIA, total energy use for that particular building is normally not measured and can only be estimated from related information that is provided for the multibuilding facility as a whole. Since a facility usually includes a wide variety of building types with differing heating and/or cooling requirements, the estimation procedures are subject to error. This then adversely affects the quality of the energy consumption estimates that are made for the surveyed building.

180

Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Handling System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report Site Visit Report Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Handling System INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW This report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of a safety system oversight (SSO) assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) tritium gas handling system (TGHS). The assessment evaluated the TGHS's ability to perform as required by safety bases and other applicable requirements. The assessment was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) and was conducted October 25 - November 5, 2010. LASO was the overall lead organization for the evaluation, which included independent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Assessment of Air Emissions at the U S Liquids Exploration and Production Land Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to make the first set of measurements documenting the potential for emissions of pollutants from exploration and production (E&P) waste disposal facilities at Bourg, Louisiana and Bateman Island, Louisiana. The objective of the project was to quantify the emissions and to determine whether the measured emissions were potentially harmful to human health of workers and the adjacent community. The study, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) is designed to complement additional studies funded by Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LADNR) and the American Petroleum Institute. The distinguishing feature of this study is that actual, independent field measurements of emissions were used to assess the potential problems of this disposal technology. Initial measurements were made at the Bourg, LA facility, adjacent to the community of Grand Bois in late 1998-early 1999. Emission measurements were performed using aluminum chambers placed over the surface of the landfarm cells. Air was pulled through the chambers and the concentration of the contaminants in the air exiting the chambers was measured. The contaminants of interest were the ''BTEX'' compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene), commonly found in E&P wastes and hydrogen sulfide, a noxious gas present naturally in many E&P wastes and crude oils. Measurements indicated that emissions were measurable using the techniques developed for the study. However, when the air concentrations of these contaminants that developed above the landfarm cells were compared with standards for workers from the Occupational and Safety and Health Association (''OSHA'') and for communities (Louisiana's ambient air standards), levels were not of concern. Since amounts of wastes being processed by the Bourg facility were considerably lower than normal, a decision was made to continue the study at the Bateman Island facility near Morgan City, LA. This facility was receiving more normal loadings of E&P wastes. Additional emission measurements were made at the Bateman Island facility within cells over a range of ''ages'', from those most recently loaded with E&P wastes to cells that have not received wastes for 9 months or more. As expected the greatest chance for emissions when the cell is most recently loaded. Again, measured fluxes did not produce air concentrations that were of concern. As expected, the highest fluxes were observed in the cells that had recently received wastes and older cells had very low emissions. Measurements of emissions of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) were also conducted at these two facilities. Levels of emissions were similar to the xange observed in the literature for natural salt marshes that surround these facilities. Production of sulfide within the cells was also measured by the most sensitive techniques available and measured sulfide production rates were low in the samples tested. The only potential concern at the facility with regards to sulfide was the levels of sulfide emitted from the sumps. The facility logbook at Bourg was analyzed to determine a time sequence of activities over 1998-1999. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality conducted a time-series of air concentrations for hazardous air pollutants during this period at the fenceline of the Bourg facility. These data were characterized by periods of static concentrations interspersed with peaks. A series of peaks were analyzed and compared with logbook records for the activities occurring at the time. In reverse fashion, a set of activities documented by the logbook was examined and the concentrations of benzene that developed from these activities were documented. No direct correlation could be made with the observed peaks and any activities suggesting that concentrations of benzene at the fenceline may be the result of a complex suite of activities including onsite activities not documented in the logbook (loading of the cells by truck haulers) and offsite activities (automobile traffic). Based on these results several recomme

John H. Pardue; K.T. Valsaraj

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

R and D needs assessment for the Engineering Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Engineering Test Facility (ETF), planned to be the next major US magnetic fusion device, has its mission (1) to provide the capability for moving into the engineering phase of fusion development and (2) to provide a test-bed for reactor components in a fusion environment. The design, construction, and operation of the ETF requires an increasing emphasis on certain key research and development (R and D) programs in magnetic fusion in order to provide the necessary facility design base. This report identifies these needs and discusses the apparent inadequacies of the presently planned US program to meet them, commensurate with the ETF schedule.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

PERFORMANCE STATUS OF THE RF-GUN BASED INJECTOR OF THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE STATUS OF THE RF-GUN BASED INJECTOR OF THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC S. Schreiber£ for the TESLA Collaboration, DESY, 22603 Hamburg, Germany Abstract The TESLA Test Facility Linac (TTFL) at DESY uses two modules with 8 TESLA superconducting accelerat- ing structures each to accelerate an electron

184

Performance assessment task team progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters EM-35, established a Performance Assessment Task Team (referred to as the Team) to integrate the activities of the sites that are preparing performance assessments (PAs) for disposal of new low-level waste, as required by Chapter III of DOE Order 5820.2A, {open_quotes}Low-Level Waste Management{close_quotes}. The intent of the Team is to achieve a degree of consistency among these PAs as the analyses proceed at the disposal sites. The Team`s purpose is to recommend policy and guidance to the DOE on issues that impact the PAs, including release scenarios and parameters, so that the approaches are as consistent as possible across the DOE complex. The Team has identified issues requiring attention and developed discussion papers for those issues. Some issues have been completed, and the recommendations are provided in this document. Other issues are still being discussed, and the status summaries are provided in this document. A major initiative was to establish a subteam to develop a set of test scenarios and parameters for benchmarking codes in use at the various sites. The activities of the Team are reported here through December 1993.

Wood, D.E.; Curl, R.U.; Armstrong, D.R.; Cook, J.R.; Dolenc, M.R.; Kocher, D.C.; Owens, K.W.; Regnier, E.P.; Roles, G.W.; Seitz, R.R. [and others

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

TRANSPORTATION CASK RECEIPT AND RETURN FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Transportation Cask Receipt and Return Facility (TCRRF) of the repository including the personnel at the security gate and cask staging areas. This calculation is required to support the preclosure safety analysis (PCSA) to ensure that the predicted doses are within the regulatory limits prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Cask Receipt and Return Facility receives NRC licensed transportation casks loaded with spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TCRRF operation starts with the receipt, inspection, and survey of the casks at the security gate and the staging areas, and proceeds to the process facilities. The transportation casks arrive at the site via rail cars or trucks under the guidance of the national transportation system. This calculation was developed by the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering organization and is intended solely for the use of Design and Engineering in work regarding facility design. Environmental and Nuclear Engineering personnel should be consulted before using this calculation for purposes other than those stated herein or for use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering organization.

V. Arakali

2005-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

186

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

187

An assessment of the video analytics technology gap for transportation facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conduct an assessment of existing video analytic technology as applied to critical infrastructure protection, particularly in the transportation sector. Based on discussions with security personnel at multiple facilities, ...

Thornton, Jason R.

188

DOE/EA-1613: Environmental Assessment for the Proposed High Explosive Pressing Facility (June 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1613 DOE/EA-1613 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PROPOSED HIGH EXPLOSIVE PRESSING FACILITY PANTEX PLANT * AMARILLO, TEXAS * JUNE 2008 Environmental Assessment for the Proposed High Explosive Pressing Facility Pantex Plant June 2008 Page i CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................................ 1 2.1 Alternatives ........................................................................................................................... 1 2.1.1 Preferred Alternative ..............................................................................................

189

Assessment of a hot hydrogen nuclear propulsion fuel test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subsequent to the announcement of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), several studies and review groups have identified nuclear thermal propulsion as a high priority technology for development. To achieve the goals of SEI to place man on Mars, a nuclear rocket will operate at near 2700K and in a hydrogen environment at near 60 atmospheres. Under these conditions, the operational lifetime of the rocket will be limited by the corrosion rate at the hydrogen/fuel interface. Consequently, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been evaluating requirements and design issues for a test facility. The facility will be able to directly heat fuel samples by electrical resistance, microwave deposition, or radio frequency induction heating to temperatures near 3000K. Hydrogen gas at variable pressure and temperatures will flow through the samples. The thermal gradients, power density, and operating times envisioned for nuclear rockets will be duplicated as close as reasonable. The post-sample flow stream will then be scrubbed and cooled before reprocessing. The baseline design and timetable for the facility will be discussed. 7 refs.

Watanabe, H.H.; Howe, S.D.; Wantuck, P.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Environmental Management Assessment of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, Virginia. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from the CEBAF Site Office; the CEBAF management and operating contractor (M&O), Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc. (SURA); the Oak Ridge Field Office (OR); and the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Office, the Office of Energy Research (ER). The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 8 through March 19, 1993, by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, ``Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,`` and Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN)-6E-92, ``Departmental Organizational and Management Arrangements,`` establish the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and through use of supplemental activities which serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

DOE/EA-1510; Final Environmental Assessment for the Alternate Financed Facility Modernization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment for the Final Environmental Assessment for the Alternate Financed Facility Modernization Alternate Financed Facility Modernization January 2005 January 2005 U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Y-12 Site Office Oak Ridge Y-12 Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration DOE/EA-1510 DOE/EA-1510 Alternate Financed Facility Modernization EA Final i January 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Acronyms and Abbreviations............................................................................................. vi Chemicals and Units of Measure ................................................................................................... ix Conversion Chart ...........................................................................................................................

192

NASA Benchmarks Safety Functions Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAFETY FUNCTIONS SAFETY FUNCTIONS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should be proactive in addressing safety-related issues. Management should have an established system to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. Criteria: A system is in place to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. (DOE/EH-0135) Procedures clearly define management's responsibility for safety- related decisions and provide for the escalation of matters in an appropriate time frame. (DOE/EH-0135) Management promotes safety programs and the organization's safety culture through sponsoring and attending safety meetings. (DOE/EH- 0135) Management encourages and supports effective programs for reporting

193

NASA Benchmarks Lessons Learned Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LESSONS LEARNED LESSONS LEARNED Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established Lessons Learned Program with an effective system to continuously distribute information of improvement in safe operations to all affected personnel. Criteria: Timely and effective action is taken to track and correct identified deficiencies and to prevent their recurrence by addressing their basic causes and related generic problems. (DOE/EH-0135) Management installs an effective corrective action program (caWeb) for safety-related issues, wherein records are updated and actions are tracked through completion. (DOE/EH-0135) Management uses the corrective action program (caWeb) as the database to analyze safety issues, implement corrective actions, and define

194

Modeling and visualization of lifecycle building performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lifecycle building performance assessment (LBPA) ensures that buildings perform and operate as intended during building lifecycle. Such assessment activities are typically multi-phase and multi-disciplinary, and generate large amounts of information ...

Ipek Gursel; Sevil Sariyildiz; Ömer Akin; Rudi Stouffs

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Microsoft PowerPoint - 12_gary_Tuesday 5-21 Facility Performance.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Facility Reporting Analysis and Facility Reporting Analysis and Performance Gary L. Hirsch Project Lead  NMMSS is currently accepting data * Electronically o 80 Column o XML 1 o XML 2 * Paper / PDF 2  Reporting Statistics for 2012 * 179 facilities reporting in XML 2 (56%) * 5 facilities reporting in XML 1 (2%) * 22 facilities reporting in 80 col (7%) * 114 facilities reporting hardcopy input (35%) 3 ~ 65 % of reporting facilities are reporting electronically - This accounts for 97% of the transaction data 4 Reporting Performance - DOE September 2012 Reconciliations * Closed 11/26/2012, 10 day ahead of average * 49 facilities required to be reconciled * 40 facilities reported by 10/15/2012 * 31 facilities either submitted reconciled or reconciled within 2 days of receipt 5 Reporting Performance - NRC 2012 Reconciliations

196

Fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model for critical facilities in combating the terrorism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical facility vulnerability assessment is a highly complex strategic activity in combating the terrorism and necessitates a structured quantified methodology to support the decision-making process in defense planning. In the system perspective, the ... Keywords: Airport, Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCM), Fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model (FIVAM), Fuzzy set theory, Interdependency, Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART), Terrorism

Ilker Akgun; Ahmet Kandakoglu; Ahmet Fahri Ozok

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Near-Field Hydrology Data Package for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste 2001 Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method for disposing of the portion that is classified as immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) is to vitrify the waste and place the product in new-surface, shallow land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford ILAW Performance Assessment (PA) Activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the pore water of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists LMHC in its performance assessment activities. One of PNNL's tasks is to provide estimates of the physical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the materials comprising the disposal facilities and the disturbed region around them. These materials are referred to as the near-field materials. Their properties are expressed as parameters of constitutive models used in simulations of subsurface flow and transport. In addition to the best-estimate parameter values, information on uncertainty in the parameter values and estimates of the changes in parameter values over time are required to complete the PA. These parameter estimates and information are contained in this report, the Near-Field Hydrology Data Package.

PD Meyer; RJ Serne

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

198

Save Energy Now Energy Assessments What Are the Benefits for Small and Medium Facilities?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 19, 2009 February 19, 2009 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? 2 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? Webcast Agenda * Overview of Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program - Bill Prymak, US Department of Energy * Facility Assessment Process - Don Kasten, Rutgers University * Demonstration of IAC Website - Don Kasten/Michael B. Muller, Rutgers University * Q&A 3 DOE Industrial Technologies Goal: Drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. 4 EERE Goals include * Dramatically reduce, or even end, dependence on foreign oil (Goal 1) * Increase the efficiency/ reduce the energy intensity of industry (Goal 6) ITP Goal Drive a 25% reduction in U.S. industrial energy intensity by 2017 in support of the Energy

199

Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 6, 2008 November 6, 2008 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? 2 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? Webcast Agenda * Overview of Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program - Bill Prymak, US Department of Energy * Facility Assessment Process - Don Kasten, Rutgers University * Demonstration of IAC Website - Michael B. Muller, Rutgers University * Q&A 3 DOE Industrial Technologies Goal: Drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. 4 EERE Goals include * Dramatically reduce, or even end, dependence on foreign oil (Goal 1) * Increase the efficiency/ reduce the energy intensity of industry (Goal 6) ITP Goal Drive a 25% reduction in U.S. industrial energy intensity by 2017 in support of the Energy

200

Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sikes, W.C. [Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sikes, W.C. (Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A performance goal-based seismic design philosophy for waste repository facilities  

SciTech Connect

A performance goal-based seismic design philosophy, compatible with DOE`s present natural phenomena hazards mitigation and ``graded approach`` philosophy, has been proposed for high level nuclear waste repository facilities. The rationale, evolution, and the desirable features of this method have been described. Why and how the method should and can be applied to the design of a repository facility are also discussed.

Hossain, Q.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

2011 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE TECHNICAL EXCHANGE - SUMMARY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) was developed in 2008 to improve consistency and quality in the preparation of performance assessments (PAs) and risk assessments across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The term, PA, is used to represent all of these modeling applications in this report. The PA CoP goals are to foster the exchange of information among PA practitioners and to share lessons learned from PAs conducted for DOE, commercial disposal facilities, and international entities. Technical exchanges and workshops are a cornerstone of PA CoP activities. Previous technical exchanges have addressed Engineered Barriers (2009 - http://www.cresp.org/education/workshops/pacop/), the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management and the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (2010 - http://srnl.doe.gov/copexchange/links.htm). Each technical exchange also includes summary presentations regarding activities at DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other organizations (e.g., International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)) as well as a number of presentations from selected sites to provide insight and perspective from on-going modeling activities. Through the deployment of PA Assistance Teams, the PA CoP has also been engaged in the development of new PAs across the DOE Complex. As a way of improving consistency in the preparation of new PAs, the teams provide technical advice and share experiences, noteworthy practices, and lessons learned from previous Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) reviews. Teams have provided support for PAs at Hanford, Idaho, Paducah and Portsmouth. The third annual PA CoP Technical Exchange was held on May 25-26, 2011 in Atlanta, GA. The PA CoP Steering Committee Meeting held its first meeting on May 24 prior to the Technical Exchange. Decision making using models and software quality assurance were the topical emphasis for the exchange. A new feature at the 2011 technical exchange was the use of panel discussions to solicit feedback from regulators and practitioners. This report summarizes discussions and recommendations from the steering committee meeting and presentations and feedback obtained at the technical exchange. Appendix I includes the steering committee meeting agenda and Appendix II includes the agenda for the technical exchange and a screenshot of the presentations and video files that are available online.

Seitz, R.

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Evolution Of USDOE Performance Assessments Over 20 Years  

SciTech Connect

Performance assessments (PAs) have been used for many years for the analysis of post-closure hazards associated with a radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide a reasonable expectation of the ability of the site and facility design to meet objectives for the protection of members of the public and the environment. The use of PA to support decision-making for LLW disposal facilities has been mandated in United States Department of Energy (USDOE) directives governing radioactive waste management since 1988 (currently DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management). Prior to that time, PAs were also used in a less formal role. Over the past 20+ years, the USDOE approach to conduct, review and apply PAs has evolved into an efficient, rigorous and mature process that includes specific requirements for continuous improvement and independent reviews. The PA process has evolved through refinement of a graded and iterative approach designed to help focus efforts on those aspects of the problem expected to have the greatest influence on the decision being made. Many of the evolutionary changes to the PA process are linked to the refinement of the PA maintenance concept that has proven to be an important element of USDOE PA requirements in the context of supporting decision-making for safe disposal of LLW. The PA maintenance concept represents the evolution of the graded and iterative philosophy and has helped to drive the evolution of PAs from a deterministic compliance calculation into a systematic approach that helps to focus on critical aspects of the disposal system in a manner designed to provide a more informed basis for decision-making throughout the life of a disposal facility (e.g., monitoring, research and testing, waste acceptance criteria, design improvements, data collection, model refinements). A significant evolution in PA modeling has been associated with improved use of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques to support efficient implementation of the graded and iterative approach. Rather than attempt to exactly predict the migration of radionuclides in a disposal unit, the best PAs have evolved into tools that provide a range of results to guide decision-makers in planning the most efficient, cost effective, and safe disposal of radionuclides.

Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, Germantown, MD (United States)

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

206

A retrospective tiered environmental assessment of the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility, West Virginia,USA  

SciTech Connect

Bird and bat fatalities from wind energy projects are an environmental and public concern, with post-construction fatalities sometimes differing from predictions. Siting facilities in this context can be a challenge. In March 2012 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines to assess collision fatalities and other potential impacts to species of concern and their habitats to aid in siting and management. The Guidelines recommend a tiered approach for assessing risk to wildlife, including a preliminary site evaluation that may evaluate alternative sites, a site characterization, field studies to document wildlife and habitat and to predict project impacts, post construction studies to estimate impacts, and other post construction studies. We applied the tiered assessment framework to a case study site, the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility in Grant County, West Virginia, USA, to demonstrate the use of the USFWS assessment approach, to indicate how the use of a tiered assessment framework might have altered outputs of wildlife assessments previously undertaken for the case study site, and to assess benefits of a tiered ecological assessment framework for siting wind energy facilities. The conclusions of this tiered assessment for birds are similar to those of previous environmental assessments for Mount Storm. This assessment found risk to individual migratory tree-roosting bats that was not emphasized in previous preconstruction assessments. Differences compared to previous environmental assessments are more related to knowledge accrued in the past 10 years rather than to the tiered structure of the Guidelines. Benefits of the tiered assessment framework include good communication among stakeholders, clear decision points, a standard assessment trajectory, narrowing the list of species of concern, improving study protocols, promoting consideration of population-level effects, promoting adaptive management through post-construction assessment and mitigation, and sharing information that can be used in other assessments.

Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Day, Robin [No Affiliation; Strickland, M. Dale [Western EcoSystems Technology

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

DOE/EA-1837:Final Environmental Assessment for the Performance Verification Laboratory (January 2011)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for the Performance Verification Laboratory January 2011 DOE/EA-1837 This page left intentionally blank. Performance Verification Laboratory DOE/EA-1837 U.S. Department of Energy Final Environmental Assessment National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2011 i National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is proposing to construct and operate a Performance Verification Laboratory (PVL) facility to be located on the Morgantown NETL site in West Virginia. NETL would design, construct, and make operational a DOE PVL facility for verifying the energy performance of selected appliances and equipment to facilitate improved enforcement of DOE energy conservation

208

Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement.

Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert. (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); Sahm, Aaron (University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Crawford, Clark (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S. (Emcore, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Integrated Facilities Disposition Non-Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Technical Assistance Page 1 of 2 Complex-Wide Multi-State Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM Challenge In December 2007 the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Transfers of facilities, materials, and waste to EM will generate liabilities that are currently unfunded. For purposes of overall planning, it is important to understand the impacts of proposed transfers with regard to technical

210

Assessment of Geochemical Environment for the Proposed INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conservative sorption parameters have been estimated for the proposed Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility. This analysis considers the influence of soils, concrete, and steel components on water chemistry and the influence of water chemistry on the relative partitioning of radionuclides over the life of the facility. A set of estimated conservative distribution coefficients for the primary media encountered by transported radionuclides has been recommended. These media include the vault system, concrete-sand-gravel mix, alluvium, and sedimentary interbeds. This analysis was prepared to support the performance assessment required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management.' The estimated distribution coefficients are provided to support release and transport calculations of radionuclides from the waste form through the vadose zone. A range of sorption parameters are provided for each key transport media, with recommended values being conservative. The range of uncertainty has been bounded through an assessment of most-likely-minimum and most-likely-maximum distribution coefficient values. The range allows for adequate assessment of mean facility performance while providing the basis for uncertainty analysis.

D. Craig Cooper

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Performance Assessment Strategy Plan for the Geologic Repository Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations to assess compliance with the performance requirements in the regulations for a geologic repository and to support the development of the repository. The strategy for these evaluations has been documented in the Performance Assessment Strategy Plan (DOE, 1989). The implementation of the performance assessment strategy is defined in this document. This paper discusses the scope and objectives of the implementation plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans, summarizes the performance assessment areas and the integrated strategy of the performance assessment program. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

NONE

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Technical Assistance Page 1 of 2 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Y-12 National Security Complex Tennessee Tennessee Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at ORNL & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Challenge In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). In parallel with the EM-1 initiative, the Oak Ridge Reservation was conducting a Critical

213

Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

King, J.W.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Evaluation of natural phenomena hazards as part of safety assessments for nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continued operation of existing US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and laboratories requires a safety reassessment based on current criteria and guidelines. This also includes evaluations for the effects of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH), for which these facilities may not have been designed. The NPH evaluations follow the requirements of DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation (1993) which establishes NPH Performance Categories (PCs) for DOE facilities and associated target probabilistic performance goals. These goals are expressed as the mean annual probability of exceedance of acceptable behavior for structures, systems and components (SSCs) subjected to NPH effects. The assignment of an NPH Performance Category is based on the overall hazard categorization (low, moderate, high) of a facility and on the function of an SSC under evaluation (DOE-STD-1021, 1992). Detailed guidance for the NPH analysis and evaluation criteria are also provided (DOE-STD-1020, 1994). These analyses can be very resource intensive, and may not be necessary for the evaluation of all SSCs in existing facilities, in particular for low hazard category facilities. An approach relying heavily on screening inspections, engineering judgment and use of NPH experience data (S. J. Eder et al., 1993), can minimize the analytical effort, give reasonable estimates of the NPH susceptibilities, and yield adequate information for an overall safety evaluation of the facility. In the following sections this approach is described in more detail and is illustrated by an application to a nuclear laboratory complex.

Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Shin, Y.W.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Development of a safety assessment approach for decontamination and decommissioning operations at nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for nearly 1000 nuclear facilities which will eventually be decommissioned. In order to ensure that the health and safety of the workers, other personnel on site and the public in general is maintained during decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations, a methodology specifically for use in evaluating the nuclear safety of the associated activities is being developed within the Department. This methodology represents not so much a departure from that currently fish in the DOE when conducting safety assessments of operations at nuclear facilities but, rather, a formalization of those methods specifically adapted to the D&D activities. As such, it is intended to provide the safety assessment personnel with a framework on which they can base their technical judgement, to assure a consistent approach to safety assessment of D&D operations and to facilitate the systematic collection of data from facilities in the post-operational part of the life cycle.

Worthington, P.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Cowgill, M.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Pollution prevention opportunity assessments of US Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project summary describes three Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments conducted at US Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works facilities under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. The purposes of the WREAFS Program are to identify new technologies and techniques for reducing wastes from industrial processes at Federal sites, and to enhance the implementation of pollution prevention through technology transfer. New techniques and technologies for reducing waste generation are identified through pollution prevention opportunity assessments (PPOA) and may be further evaluated through joint research, development, and demonstration projects. The assessments were conducted using the procedures outlined in EPA`s Facility Pollution Prevention Guide. The assessments had two major phases. The first phase quantified waste generation and management practices. The second phase identified and evaluated the feasibility of opportunities and techniques to eliminate, reduce, or recycle wastes. The facilities studied in the PPOAs were: a navigation lock and dam; a warehouse and a maintenance and repair facility; a hydroelectric power plant; and a flood control dam and reservoir with associated public recreation areas. Other Federal agencies, such as the Bureau of Reclamation and the Tennessee Valley Authority have similar functions and facilities, as do states and the private sector. Thus, the results of the PPOAs described in the three full reports have applicability to a broad audience.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Title Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-6349E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Therkelsen, Peter, Aimee T. McKane, Ridah Sabouni, and Tracy Evans Conference Name American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 07/2013 Keywords ACEEE Conference Paper, energy efficiency, Energy Performance Program Abstract Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE's contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEPcertified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

218

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

219

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

220

HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division : To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Community of Practice John E. Marra, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director 21 May 2009 Denver, CO Office of Waste Processing...

222

Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) assessment at Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico, by a team of PNNL engineers under contract to the Installation Management Agency (IMA) Southeast Region Office (SERO). Funding support was also provided by the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The purpose of the assessment was to determine how energy is consumed at Fort Buchanan, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Photovoltaic System Performance Assessment for 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance data from five utility-grade photovoltaic power plants demonstrate not only that plants generally operate well but also that recent designs have resolved problems afflicting earlier installations.

1990-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

224

Seismic performance assessment for structural optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economic impact of earthquakes has spurred the implementation of performance-based design to mitigate damage in addition to protecting human lives. A developing trend is to consider damage directly as a measure of ...

Ghisbain, Pierre

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Environmental Assessment Proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Newport News, Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

84 84 Environmental Assessment Proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Newport News, Virginia June 2002 U. S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Oak Ridge, Tennessee DOE/EA-1384 i TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.....................................................................................................................1 1. INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................................... 6 1.1 PREVIOUS ACTIONS ............................................................................................................................................. 6 1.2 SCOPE OF THIS PROPOSED ACTION..............................................................................................................

226

Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Scoping assessment on medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Scoping Assessment addresses the need for medical isotope production and the capability of the Fast Flux Test Facility to provide such isotopes. Included in the discussion are types of isotopes used in radiopharmaceuticals, which types of cancers are targets, and in what way isotopes provide treatment and/or pain relief for patients.

Scott, S.W.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

228

Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance  

SciTech Connect

In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Photovoltaic system performance assessment for 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Region Experiment Station staff analyzed the performance, operation, and maintenance of five flat-plate photovoltaic plants for the calendar year 1988. These plants are: city of Austin's single-axis tracking system in Austin, Texas; the ARCO Solar, Inc., two-axis tracking system near Hesperia, California; Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) PV1 and PV2 single-axis tracking systems in Sacramento County, California; Florida Power Corporation's Solar Progress fixed-tilt amorphous silicon PV array in Orlando, Florida; and Detroit Edison's fixed-tilt amorphous silicon system in Rochester, Michigan. The performance of each system was determined from hourly data recorded by the data acquisition system at each site. This means that the system performance presented in this report is dependent on the availability and accuracy of the data acquisition system. System operators provided operation, maintenance, and repair data. These activities were categorized and unscheduled operation and maintenance costs were determined. When possible, the performance and reliability of these systems are compared with prior years' performance to provide a long-term perspective on the operation of PV systems. 17 refs., 100 figs., 117 tabs.

Rosenthal, A.L. (Southwest Technology Development Inst., Las Cruces, NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal  Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

231

Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High Performance Computer Facility Designs  

SciTech Connect

High-performance computing facilities in the United States consume an enormous amount of electricity, cutting into research budgets and challenging public- and private-sector efforts to reduce energy consumption and meet environmental goals. However, these facilities can greatly reduce their energy demand through energy-efficient design of the facility itself. Using a case study of a facility under design, this article discusses strategies and technologies that can be used to help achieve energy reductions.

Drewmark Communications; Sartor, Dale; Wilson, Mark

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased recycling efforts would not diminish the potential for incineration with energy recovery from waste and neither would have adverse impacts on the gate fee of the Waste-to-Energy plant. In general, the study highlighted the need for efficient planning in solid waste management, by taking into account multiple criteria and parameters and utilizing relevant tools and methodologies into this context.

Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: giou6@yahoo.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, S. [Waste to Energy Research and Technology Council (Greece)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Photovoltaic Field Test Performance Assessment: 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of performance data from three utility-scale photovoltaic power plants expands the industry's understanding of these systems while suggesting design improvements for future commercialization. The plants studied--which represent three promising technologies--are located near Hesperia, California; near Sacramento, California; and in Phoenix, Arizona.

1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Photovoltaic Field Test Performance Assessment: 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four of the larger U.S. photovoltaic power plants continue to demonstrate excellent performance, with annual availability measures as high as 98% and operations and maintenance costs as low as 0.1 cents per kilowatthour. These findings suggest that no major problems exist with the engineering, construction, and operation of these utility-grade plants.

1989-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

235

Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA  

SciTech Connect

Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico in Fiscal Year 2011. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist organizations in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes and procedures. This report contains a summary of the information collected, the analyses performed, and recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Management System (EMS) and Pollution Prevention (P2) staff will continue to work with the organizations to implement the recommendations.

Gerard, Morgan Evan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fort Irwin integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Sitewide Energy Project identification for buildings and facilities  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Irwin facility located near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 16 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present valve (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; McMordie, K.L.; Richman, E.E.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Hadley, D.L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) The CPAR assesses a contractor's performance, both positive and negative, and provides a record on a given contract during a specified period of time. Each assessment must be based on objective data (or measurable, subjective data when objective data is not available) supportable by program and contract management data. The CPARS process is designed with a series of checks-and-balances to facilitate the objective and consistent evaluation of contractor performance. Both Government and contractor perspectives are captured on the CPAR form. The opportunity to review/comment on the CPAR by the designated Government and contractor personnel together makes a complete CPAR.

239

Historical Relationship Between Performance Assessment for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Other Types of Risk Assessment in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of the process for assessing the hazards of a geologic disposal system for radioactive waste and, similarly, nuclear power reactors, and the relationship of this process with other assessments of risk, particularly assessments of hazards from manufactured carcinogenic chemicals during use and disposal. This perspective reviews the common history of scientific concepts for risk assessment developed to the 1950s. Computational tools and techniques developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to analyze the reliability of nuclear weapon delivery systems were adopted in the early 1970s for probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power reactors, a technology for which behavior was unknown. In turn, these analyses became an important foundation for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the late 1970s. The evaluation of risk to human health and the environment from chemical hazards is built upon methods for assessing the dose response of radionuclides in the 1950s. Despite a shared background, however, societal events, often in the form of legislation, have affected the development path for risk assessment for human health, producing dissimilarities between these risk assessments and those for nuclear facilities. An important difference is the regulator's interest in accounting for uncertainty and the tools used to evaluate it.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

240

Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project, September 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Centered Assessment of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Results .................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Conclusions ............................................................................................................................ 7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project, September 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Centered Assessment of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Results .................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Conclusions ............................................................................................................................ 7

242

Environmental Assessment for decommissioning the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Weeks Island Facility, Iberia Parish, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Weeks Island site is one of five underground salt dome crude oils storage facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). It is located in Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The purpose of the proposed action is to decommission the Weeks Island crude oil storage after the oil inventory has been transferred to other SPR facilities. Water intrusion into the salt dome storage chambers and the development of two sinkholes located near the aboveground facilities has created uncertain geophysical conditions. This Environmental Assessment describes the proposed decommissioning operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. Based on this analyses, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and has issued the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Facility Representative Performance Indicator Report for for Jan-Mar 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Staffing, Qualification, and Utilization Data OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Location Analysis FTE Approved FTE Actual Staff % Staff * Gains / Losses % Core Qualified * % Fully Qualified * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 4 100 0 100 100 63 ID (EM) 1 7 7 6 86 0 71 71 90 OR (EM) 14 14 13 93 0 86 86 75 ORP 13 13 13 100 0 100 100 90 PPPO 2 6 6 6 100 ±1 100 100 74 RL 17 15 15 88 0 88 82 70 SPRU 3 2 2 2 100 0 100 0 90 SR 4 31 31 27 87 -1 87 87 86 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 75 EM Totals 95 93 88 93 +1, -2 89 86 79 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >65 Location Key: CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office ORP = Office of River Protection SPRU = Separations Process Research Unit

245

Organizational Epidemiology and Energy Facilities: Review of Antecedent Conditions for Human Performance Optimization and Error Prev ention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews background literature and prior research and experience related to causes of human error and prediction of human performance in energy facilities and other settings. Strategic research is recommended to explore the influence of organizational factors and other antecedent conditions on human performance and, thus, on outcomes such as facility productivity and safety.

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Level Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee John E. Marra, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director November 6, 2008 Richland, WA DOE-EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Background - Performance Assessment Process Performance assessments are the fundamental risk assessment tool used by the DOE to evaluate and communicate the effectiveness and long-term impact of waste management and cleanup decisions. This includes demonstrations of compliance, NEPA analyses, and decisions about technologies and 2 analyses, and decisions about technologies and waste forms. Background - Process Perception EM-2 'Precepts' for Improved High-Level Waste Management (HLW Corporate Board Meeting - April 2008) Improved Performance Assessments (PA) The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the 3 The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the major HLW sites PA

247

NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in quantitative assessment of hydrogen sensors. Work was performed by the Safety Codes and Standards Group in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in quantitative assessment of hydrogen sensors. Work was performed by the Safety Codes and Standards Group in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

An Initial Assessment of Hanford Impact Performed with the System Assessment Capability  

SciTech Connect

The System Assessment Capability is an integrated system of computer models and databases to assess the impact of waste remaining at Hanford. This tool will help decision makers and the public evaluate the cumulative effects of contamination from Hanford. This report describes the results of an initial assessment performed with the System Assessment Capability tools.

Bryce, Robert W.; Kincaid, Charles T.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Morasch, Launa F.

2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2003 December 2003 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and implemented. The M&O contractor and other NTS Users management actively participate in the ES program. An implemented Work Control process is in place that ensures

252

Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement. Large photovoltaic systems are typically developed as projects which supply electricity to a utility and are owned by independent power producers. Obtaining financing at favorable rates and attracting investors requires confidence in the projected energy yield from the plant. In this paper, various performance models for projecting annual energy yield from Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) systems are assessed by comparing measured system output to model predictions based on measured weather and irradiance data. The results are statistically analyzed to identify systematic error sources.

Stein, Joshua S.; Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert. (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); Sahm, Aaron (University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Crawford, Clark (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S. (Emcore, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Annual Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis Review for the ICDF Landfill FY 2008  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses low-level waste disposal operations at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) landfill from the start of operations in Fiscal Year 2003 through Fiscal Year 2008. The ICDF was authorized in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision for disposal of waste from the Idaho National Laboratory Site CERCLA environmental restoration activities. The ICDF has been operating since 2003 in compliance with the CERCLA requirements and the waste acceptance criteria developed in the CERCLA process. In developing the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision, U.S. Department of Energy Order (DOE) 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', was identified as a 'to be considered' requirement for the ICDF. The annual review requirement under DOE Order 435.1 was determined to be an administrative requirement and, therefore, annual reviews were not prepared on an annual basis. However, the landfill has been operating for 5 years and, since the waste forms and inventories disposed of have changed from what was originally envisioned for the ICDF landfill, the ICDF project team has decided that this annual review is necessary to document the changes and provide a basis for any updates in analyses that may be necessary to continue to meet the substantive requirements of DOE Order 435.1. For facilities regulated under DOE Order 435.1-1, U.S. DOE Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', IV.P.(4)(c) stipulates that annual summaries of low-level waste disposal operations shall be prepared with respect to the conclusions and recommendations of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Important factors considered in this review include facility operations, waste receipts, and results from monitoring and research and development programs. There have been no significant changes in operations at the landfill in respect to the disposal geometry, the verification of waste characteristics, and the tracking of inventories against total limits that would affect the results and conclusions of the performance assessment. Waste receipts to date and projected waste receipts through Fiscal Year 2012 are both greater than the inventory assessed in the performance assessment and composite analysis. The waste forms disposed of to the landfill are different from the waste form (compacted soil) assessed in the performance assessment. The leak detection system and groundwater monitoring results indicate the landfill has not leaked. The results of the performance assessment/composite analysis are valid (i.e., there is still a reasonable expectation of meeting performance objectives) but the new information indicates less conservatism in the results than previously believed.

Karen Koslow Arthur Rood

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Assessing the Potential of Developing a Tool for Residential Facility Management Using Building Information Modeling Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Information Modeling (BIM) has changed the ways buildings are designed and constructed. Along with design and construction, operation and maintenance of the built facility is also gaining importance in the Architecture-Engineering-Construction industry. Facility management (FM) is widely adopted by industrial, healthcare and other types of commercial facilities for better maintenance and management of assets. BIM is being adopted in the field of Facility management and has become one of the most important tools for better application of operation and maintenance. Facility management is performed by professionals with training and experience in the related fields of building operation, maintenance, upgrade and repair. BIM is a professional tool which requires intense training and knowledge. This tool cannot be used and is hard to understand for non-professionals and people who do not have training to use it. Management of residences is as important as management of commercial, industrial and healthcare facilities for the life and smooth running of such facilities. Residential facilities are properties with one or more residential units or buildings. These buildings could be low rise, high rise or individual units. This thesis will help in analyzing the scope of using BIM and Application Programming Interface (API) for management of maintenance in residences by the owner who are not professionally trained. The research analyzes a single, basic function of a BIM tool to determine the potential for such a tool to help non-expert, first time user to be able to understand their residential facilities maintenance requirements. It is an attempt to propose a system which provides alerts to the owners regarding required maintenance and which shows the location of the work in a 3D model. The system was designed and tested in Microsoft Windows 7 operating system by using Autodesk® Revit building information software to make the 3D model, a Revit API plug-in to craft the alerts and show the location of work and Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) to export the model to a web browser. The system worked through Revit program, but the concept of applying the system to work through web browser failed.

Madhani, Himanshu 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Maze hypothesis development in assessing robot performance during teleoperation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) personnel had the opportunity to assess 14 prospective Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) robots, for the purposes of developing performance standards which currently do not exist. During this exercise, ... Keywords: maze, metrics, performance standards, robotics, situation awareness, teleoperation

Salvatore Schipani; Elena Messina

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Performance Assessment of ZIRLO-Clad Fuel from North Anna  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the results from the poolside and hot cell examination of Westinghouse ZIRLO fuel from North Anna relative to Westinghouse experience base and fuel performance code predictions. Key properties measured include fuel rod growth, corrosion, hydrogen pickup, mechanical properties, fuel pellet performance, and fission gas release.

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

257

EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM recently completed its tenth Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) since piloting the TRA process in 2006. A TRA is an intensive peer review process through which the maturity of a technology is evaluated. A TRA utilizes the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale pioneered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

258

EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM recently completed its tenth Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) since piloting the TRA process in 2006. A TRA is an intensive peer review process through which the maturity of a technology is evaluated. A TRA utilizes the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale pioneered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

259

Environmental Assessment for the LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, is being constructed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). In this Environmental Assessment, environmental consequences of spilling hazardous materials in the Frenchman Flat basin are evaluated and mitigations and recommendations are stated in order to protect natural resources and reduce land-use impacts. Guidelines and restrictions concerning spill-test procedures will be determined by the LGF Test Facility Operations Manager and DOE based on toxicity documentation for the test material, provided by the user, and mitigations imposed by the Environmental Assessment. In addition to Spill Test Facility operational procedures, certain assumptions have been made in preparation of this document: no materials will be considered for testing that have cumulative, long-term persistence in the environment; spill tests will consist of releases of 15 min or less; and sufficient time will be allowed between tests for recovery of natural resources. Geographic limits to downwind concentrations of spill materials were primarily determined from meteorological data, human occupational exposure standards to hazardous materials and previous spill tests. These limits were established using maximum spill scenarios and environmental impacts are discussed as worst case scenarios; however, spill-test series will begin with smaller spills, gradually increasing in size after the impacts of the initial tests have been evaluated.

Patton, S.E.; Novo, M.G.; Shinn, J.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Federal Facility Reporting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Facility Reporting Federal Facility Reporting Federal Facility Reporting October 8, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Various legal authorities require agencies to report data on energy and water consumption and resource management efforts within Federal facilities. The Federal Energy Management Program collects this data to assess agency performance toward mandated goals on agency Energy/Sustainability Scorecards and presents it in annual reports to Congress. Find Federal facility reporting information related to: Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, Section 432, Federal Facility Management and Benchmarking Requirements: View information about requirements and data collected to track Federal facility compliance with requirements for performing facility evaluations, implementing and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy Efficiency in Food-Service Facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Food-service facilities have high energy intensities compared to other commercial buildings due to their energy use for cooking and refrigeration. Assessing the energy performance… (more)

Paillat, Etienne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799, 799A, and 770C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials & Fuel Complex (MFC) facilities 799 Sodium Processing Facility (a single building consisting of two areas: the Sodium Process Area (SPA) and the Carbonate Process Area (CPA), 799A Caustic Storage Area, and 770C Nuclear Calibration Laboratory have been declared excess to future Department of Energy mission requirements. Transfer of these facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management, and an associated schedule for doing so, have been agreed upon by the two offices. The prerequisites for this transfer to occur are the removal of nonexcess materials and chemical inventory, deinventory of the calibration source in MFC-770C, and the rerouting and/or isolation of utility and service systems. This report provides a description of the current physical condition and any hazards (material, chemical, nuclear or occupational) that may be associated with past operations of these facilities. This information will document conditions at time of transfer of the facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management and serve as the basis for disposition planning. The process used in obtaining this information included document searches, interviews and facility walk-downs. A copy of the facility walk-down checklist is included in this report as Appendix A. MFC-799/799A/770C are all structurally sound and associated hazardous or potentially hazardous conditions are well defined and well understood. All installed equipment items (tanks, filters, etc.) used to process hazardous materials remain in place and appear to have maintained their integrity. There is no evidence of leakage and all openings are properly sealed or closed off and connections are sound. The pits appear clean with no evidence of cracking or deterioration that could lead to migration of contamination. Based upon the available information/documentation reviewed and the overall conditions observed during the facilities walk-down, it is concluded that these facilities may be disposed of at minimal risk to human health, safety or the environment.

Gary Mecham; Don Konoyer

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Simulated Performance Speaker(s): Emanuele Naboni Date: May 29, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Opaque ventilated façade systems are increasingly used in buildings, even though their effects on the overall thermal performance of buildings have not yet been fully understood. The research reported in this presentation focuses on the modeling of such systems with EnergyPlus. Ventilated façade systems are modeled in EnergyPlus with module "Exterior Naturally Vented Cavity." Not all façade systems can be modeled with this module; this research defined the types of systems that can be modeled, and the limitations of such simulation. The performance of a ventilated façade

264

Use of the UNCLE Facility to Assess Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversions at Uranium Conversion Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, the approach to safeguarding nuclear material in the front end of the fuel cycle was implemented only at the stage when UF6 was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. Recent International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) circulars and policy papers have sought to implement safeguards when any purified aqueous uranium solution or uranium oxides suitable for isotopic enrichment or fuel fabrication exist. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) operating at 6000 MTU/year. Monitoring instruments, including the 3He passive neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter, have been tested at UNCLE and field tested at Springfields. The field trials demonstrated the need to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of operations and safeguards monitoring at additional plants. Currently, UNCLE is testing neutron-based monitoring for detection of noncompliant activities; however, gamma-ray source term monitoring is currently being explored complementary to the neutron detector in order to detect undeclared activities in a more timely manner. The preliminary results of gamma-ray source term modeling and monitoring at UNCLE are being analyzed as part of a comprehensive source term and detector benchmarking effort. Based on neutron source term detection capabilities, alternative gamma-based detection and monitoring methods will be proposed to more effectively monitor NUCP operations in verifying or detecting deviations from declared conversion activities.

Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Rauch, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Environmental Assessment for the Leasing of Facilities and Equipment to USEC Inc. (DOE/EA-1451) (10/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Environmental Assessment for the Leasing of Facilities and Equipment to USEC Inc. United States Department of Energy October 2002 Environmental Assessment for the Leasing of Facilities and Equipment to USEC Inc. i TABLE OF CONTENTS Cover Sheet Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i List of Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Acronyms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii Chemicals and Units of Measure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x Conversion Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Metric Prefixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

266

Geochemical data package for the Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment (ILAW PA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as low-activity waste is to vitrify the liquid/slurry and place the solid product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the porewater of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the disposal facility, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and the thermodynamic solubility product (K{sub sp}), respectively. In this data package, the authors approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. In future geochemical data packages, they will determine whether a more rigorous measure of solubility is necessary or warranted based on the dose predictions emanating from the ILAW 2001 PA and reviewers' comments. The K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the ILAW system. In addition to the best-estimate K{sub d}s, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. They assume that K{sub d} values are log normally distributed over the cited ranges. Currently, they do not give estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, they supply different values for both the K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the ILAW system and supply time-varying K{sub d}s for the concrete zone, should the final repository design include concrete vaults or cement amendments to buffer the system pH.

DI Kaplan; RJ Serne

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

267

Data Quality Assessment and Control for the ARM Climate Research Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is to provide observations of the earth climate system to the climate research community for the purpose of improving the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their coupling with the Earth's surface. In order for ARM measurements to be useful toward this goal, it is important that the measurements are of a known and reasonable quality. The ARM data quality program includes several components designed to identify quality issues in near-real-time, track problems to solutions, assess more subtle long-term issues, and communicate problems to the user community.

Peppler, R

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

268

Improved assessment of aviation hazards to ground facilities using a geographical information system  

SciTech Connect

A computer based system for performing probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) of aircraft crashes to ground structures is under development. The system called ACRA (aircraft crash risk assessment) employs a GIS (geographical information system) for locating, mapping, and characterizing ground structures; and a multiparameter data base system that supports the analytical PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) model for determining PSAs for aircraft crashes. The Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC) is being employed as the base case for study and application of ACRA and evaluation of the projected safety assessment.

Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kimura, C.Y.

1996-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

Quantitative training system assessments using General Systems Performance Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of computers for imparting education and training is rapidly gaining widespread acceptance. There is considerable evidence in literature to show that computer-based training (CBT) can lower training costs and shorten the time taken to complete training. Although considerable work has been done in the area of development of computer-based training systems, there has been little work done in the domain of assessing the effectiveness of using computer-based methods for the purposes of training. Furthermore, performance evaluations of CBT systems to date have been performed using ad-hoc, context-specific methods. There is thus a need to provide a uniform basis for performance assessments of computer-based training systems. This thesis presents a quantitative approach to the problem of performance assessments of CBT systems, using a theoretical framework known as General Systems Performance Theory. We believe the approach presented in this thesis can be used to provide a quantitative characterization of the performance of any training system in any training domain. The thesis also demonstrates the proposed approach by applying it to evaluate the performance of a set of training systems towards achieving the goal of training situational awareness skills.

Kashyap, Sujatha

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

DOE/EA-1310: Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Couples Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 March 2000 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory DOE/EA-1310 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Published March 2000 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS ............................................................................................................................... v HELPFUL INFORMATION ........................................................................................................

271

Thermodynamic data management system for nuclear waste disposal performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic property values for use in assessing the performance of a nuclear waste repository are described. More emphasis is on a computerized data base management system which facilitates use of the thermodynamic data in sensitivity analysis and other studies which critically assess the performance of disposal sites. Examples are given of critical evaluation procedures; comparison of apparent equilibrium constants calculated from the data base, with other work; and of correlations useful in estimating missing values of both free energy and enthalpy of formation for aqueous species. 49 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

Phillips, S.L.; Hale, F.V.; Siegel, M.D.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Environmental Assessment for the Leasing of Facilities and Equipment to USEC Inc.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the lease of facilities and equipment to USEC Inc. (USEC), which would be used in its Gas Centrifuge Research and Development (R&D) Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) [hereinafter referred to as the USEC EA]. The USEC EA analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE leasing facility K-101 and portions of K-1600, K-1220 and K-1037 at the ETTP to USEC for a minimum 3-year period, with additional option periods consistent with the Oak Ridge Accelerated Clean-up Plan (ACP) Agreement. In July 2002, USEC notified DOE that it intends to use certain leased equipment at an off-site facility at the Centrifuge Technology Center (CTC) on the Boeing Property. The purpose of the USEC Gas Centrifuge R&D Project is to develop an economically attractive gas centrifuge machine and process using DOE's centrifuge technology.

N /A

2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

273

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

RELAP5/MOD3.2 Assessment Using CHF Data from the KS-1 and V-200 Experiment Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using rod bundle critical heat flux data from the KS-1 and V-200 facilities. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem 7, these tests addressed one of the important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well, core heat transfer. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data, consistently overpredicting the measured critical heat flux. It is recommended that a model development effort be undertaken to develop a critical heat flux model for RELAP5 that better represents the behavior in VVER rod bundles.

Bayless, Paul David

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment, Phase 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses recent developments of EPRI's Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model applied to the candidate spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Building on earlier work where a probability-based methodology was developed, the report details the recent modifications to the EPRI TSPA code, IMARC, applied to Yucca Mountain. The report also includes performance analyses using IMARC, identifies key technical components important to Yucca...

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

276

Guidelines for Performance of Internal Flooding Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for the performance of an Internal Flood Probabilistic Risk Assessment (IFPRA). The scope of IFPRA tasks supported by this guidance also includes the treatment of High Energy Line Breaks (HELB) which can produce floods as well as other unique challenges to Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) important to the prevention and mitigation of a core damage accident. The guidance includes step-by-step procedures for performing a complete IFPRA, specific examples of approache...

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

277

Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide (AERG): Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Healthcare Facilities (Book)  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Healthcare Facilities is part of a series of retrofit guides commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as detailed descriptions and financial payback metrics for the most important and relevant energy efficiency measures (EEMs), the guides provide a practical roadmap for effectively planning and implementing performance improvements in existing buildings. The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) are intended to address key segments of the U.S. commercial building stock: retail stores, office buildings, K-12 schools, grocery stores, and healthcare facilities. The guides' general project planning considerations are applicable nationwide; the energy and cost savings estimates for recommended EEMs were developed based on energy simulations and cost estimates for an example hospital tailored to five distinct climate regions. These results can be extrapolated to other U.S. climate zones. Analysis is presented for individual EEMs, and for packages of recommended EEMs for two project types: existing building commissioning projects that apply low-cost and no-cost measures, and whole-building retrofits involving more capital-intensive measures.

Hendron, R.; Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Shekhar, D.; Pless, S.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.emt-india.net/Book4/Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: "Energy Standards,Upgrade Requirements" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

279

Historical Background on Assessment the Performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the US Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a research and development facility for the safe management, storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and 25 years after site selection, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance assessment conducted in 1996. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This report provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project. For example, the federal requirement to provide environmental impact statements and negotiated agreements with the State of New Mexico influenced the type of scientific areas that were investigated and the engineering analysis prior to 1989 for the WIPP.

Rechard, R.P.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft{sup 2} mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE/EA-1445: Environmental Assessment for the Construction of a Child-Care Facility (September 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of a Child-Care Facility United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 DOE/EA-1445 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of a Child-Care Facility United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct a child-care facility at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL's) Pittsburgh site in South Park Township, Allegheny County, PA. The proposed facility would be constructed on previously disturbed parcels of Federal property that were previously developed during the mid-1970's for installation of coal

282

SITE: a methodology for assessment of energy facility siting patterns. Regional studies program  

SciTech Connect

The timely development of the nation's energy production capacity in a manner that minimizes potential adverse local and regional impacts associated with energy facilities requires the use of sophisticated techniques for evaluation of siting alternatives and fuel cycle options. This report is a documentation of the computerized SITE methodology that has been developed for evaluating health, environmental, and socioeconomic impacts related to utilization of alternate sites for energy production within a region of interest. The cost, impact, and attribute vectors, which are generated and displayed on density maps, can be used in a multiparameter overlay process to identify preferable siting areas. The assessment of clustered facilities in energy centers is also possible within the SITE analysis framework. An application of the SITE methodology to Northern Illinois is presented. Also included is a description of the ongoing extension of SITE for the accumulative evaluation of alternative regional energy siting patterns and fuel cycle options. An appendix provides documentation and user information for the SITE computer program. (auth)

Frigerio, N.A.; Habegger, L.J.; King, R.F.; Hoover, L.J.; Clark, N.A.; Cobian, J.M.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term.

Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States); Peterson, P.K. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States)

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

285

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

286

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

287

An Evaluation of Long-Term Performance of Liner Systems for Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Traditional liner systems consisting of a geosynthetic membrane underlying a waste disposal facility coupled with a leachate collection system have been proposed as a means of containing releases of low-level radioactive waste within the confines of the disposal facility and thereby eliminating migration of radionuclides into the vadose zone and groundwater. However, this type of hydraulic containment liner system is only effective as long as the leachate collection system remains functional or an overlying cover limits the total infiltration to the volumetric pore space of the disposal system. If either the leachate collection system fails, or the overlying cover becomes less effective during the 1,000’s of years of facility lifetime, the liner may fill with water and release contaminated water in a preferential or focused manner. If the height of the liner extends above the waste, the waste will become submerged which could increase the release rate and concentration of the leachate. If the liner extends near land surface, there is the potential for contamination reaching land surface creating a direct exposure pathway. Alternative protective liner systems can be engineered that eliminate radionuclide releases to the vadose zone during operations and minimizing long term migration of radionuclides from the disposal facility into the vadose zone and aquifer. Non-traditional systems include waste containerization in steel or composite materials. This type of system would promote drainage of clean infiltrating water through the facility without contacting the waste. Other alternatives include geochemical barriers designed to transmit water while adsorbing radionuclides beneath the facility. Facility performance for a hypothetical disposal facility has been compared for the hydraulic and steel containerization liner alternatives. Results were compared in terms of meeting the DOE Order 435.1 low-level waste performance objective of 25 mrem/yr all-pathways dose during the 1) institutional control period (0-100 years), compliance period (0-1000 years) and post-compliance period (>1000 years). Evaluation of the all pathway dose included the dose from ingestion and irrigation of contaminated groundwater extracted from a well 100 meters downgradient, in addition to the dose received from direct contact of radionuclides deposited near the surface resulting from facility overflow. Depending on the disposal facility radionuclide inventory, facility design, cover performance, and the location and environment where the facility is situated, the dose from exposure via direct contact of near surface deposited radionuclides can be much greater than the dose received via transport to the groundwater and subsequent ingestion.

Arthur S. Rood; Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

DOE/EA-0820 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20 20 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669 u.s. Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee April 1994 ER t>ISTRf8UT!Q~~ Or-~I-:r8 DOCUMENT IS UNLlMIT~ DISCLAIMER This report was .prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial

289

Thermal performance assessment of an advanced glazing system  

SciTech Connect

The four different techniques which were used to test an advanced, four-pane glazing system and standard double-glazed unit are described. The results from each test are compared. Where agreement is not good, explanations are suggested. The advanced glazing system was found to have a U-value of 0.9 W/m[sup 2] K and a shading coefficient of 0.48. The glazing simulation models WINDOW (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, Berkeley, CA, US) and MULTB (Pilkington Glass, U.K.) were used to predict glazing performance. Simulation of the two glazing systems which were experimentally assessed allows comparison between models, and between predicted and measured performance. Agreement was within the error bands associated with each assessment. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Robinson, P. (Architectural Association, London (United Kingdom)); Littler, J. (Univ. of Westminster, London (United Kingdom))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

291

Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issue (KTI) agreements, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (CNWRA 2002 [158449]), and 10 CFR Part 63. This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are utilized in this document.

J. McNeish

2002-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

Selection of a computer code for Hanford low-level waste engineered-system performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planned performance assessments for the proposed disposal of low-level waste (LLW) glass produced from remediation of wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington will require calculations of radionuclide release rates from the subsurface disposal facility. These calculations will be done with the aid of computer codes. Currently available computer codes were ranked in terms of the feature sets implemented in the code that match a set of physical, chemical, numerical, and functional capabilities needed to assess release rates from the engineered system. The needed capabilities were identified from an analysis of the important physical and chemical process expected to affect LLW glass corrosion and the mobility of radionuclides. The highest ranked computer code was found to be the ARES-CT code developed at PNL for the US Department of Energy for evaluation of and land disposal sites.

McGrail, B.P.; Mahoney, L.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT APPROACHES: CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

Engineered barriers including cementitious barriers are used at sites disposing or contaminated with low-level radioactive waste to enhance performance of the natural environment with respect to controlling the potential spread of contaminants. Drivers for using cementitious barriers include: high radionuclide inventory, radionuclide characteristics (e.g., long half-live, high mobility due to chemical form/speciation, waste matrix properties, shallow water table, and humid climate that provides water for leaching the waste). This document comprises the first in a series of reports being prepared for the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The document is divided into two parts which provide a summary of: (1) existing experience in the assessment of performance of cementitious materials used for radioactive waste management and disposal and (2) sensitivity and uncertainty analysis approaches that have been applied for assessments. Each chapter is organized into five parts: Introduction, Regulatory Considerations, Specific Examples, Summary of Modeling Approaches and Conclusions and Needs. The objective of the report is to provide perspective on the state of the practice for conducting assessments for facilities involving cementitious barriers and to identify opportunities for improvements to the existing approaches. Examples are provided in two contexts: (1) performance assessments conducted for waste disposal facilities and (2) performance assessment-like analyses (e.g., risk assessments) conducted under other regulatory regimes. The introductory sections of each section provide a perspective on the purpose of performance assessments and different roles of cementitious materials for radioactive waste management. Significant experience with assessments of cementitious materials associated with radioactive waste disposal concepts exists in the US Department of Energy Complex and the commercial nuclear sector. Recently, the desire to close legacy facilities has created a need to assess the behavior of cementitious materials for applications in environmental remediation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) applications. The ability to assess the use and benefits of cementitious materials for these applications can significantly affect decisions related to cleanup activities. For example the need for costly remedial actions may not be necessary if existing or new cementitious barriers were adequately represented. The sections dealing with regulatory considerations include summaries of the different regulations that are relevant for various applications involving cementitious materials. A summary of regulatory guidance and/or policies pertaining to performance assessment of cementitious materials and sensitivity and uncertainty analyses is also provided in the following chapters. Numerous examples of specific applications are provided in each report. The examples are organized into traditional waste disposal applications (performance assessments), applications related to environmental remediation and D&D, and reactor and spent fuel related assessments. Sections that discuss specific facilities or sites contain: (1) descriptions of the role of the cementitious barriers or sensitivity/uncertainty analysis, (2) parameter assumptions and conceptual models, and (3) a relative discussion of the significance in the context of the assessment. Examples from both the U.S. Department of Energy Sites and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission are provided to illustrate the variety of applications and approaches that have been used. In many cases, minimal credit was taken for cementitious barriers. However, in some of those cases, benefits of being able to take credit for barriers were identified. The examples included: (1) disposal facilities (vaults, trenches, tank closures, cementitious waste forms and containers, etc.), (2) environmental remediation (old disposal facilities), (3) reactor and large structure decommissioning, and (4) spent fuel pools. These examples were selected to provide a perspective on the various ne

Langton, C.; Burns, H.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

294

Performance Improvements to the Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A team headed by LANL and including many members from LLNL and NSTec LO and NSTec LAO fielded a neutron imaging system (NIS) at the National Ignition Facility at the start of 2011. The NIS consists of a pinhole array that is located 32.5 cm from the source and that creates an image of the source in a segmented scintillator 28 m from the source. The scintillator is viewed by two gated, optical imaging systems: one that is fiber coupled, and one that is lens coupled. While there are a number of other pieces to the system related to pinhole alignment, collimation, shielding and data acquisition, those pieces are discussed elsewhere and are not relevant here. The system is operational and has successfully obtained data on more that ten imaging shots. This remainder of this whitepaper is divided in five main sections. In Section II, we identify three critical areas of improvement that we believe should be pursued to improve the performance of the system for future experiments: spatial resolution, temporal response and signal-to-noise ratio. In Section III, we discuss technologies that could be used to improve these critical performance areas. In Section IV, we describe a path to evolve the current system to achieve improved performance with minimal impact on the ability of the system to operate on shots. In Section V, we discuss the abilities, scope and timescales of the current teams and the Commissariat energie atomique (CEA). In Section VI, we summarize and make specific recommendations for collaboration on improvements to the NIS.

Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Hatarik, R; Merrill, F E; Grim, G P; Wilde, C H; Wilson, D C; Landoas, O; Caillaud, T; Bourgade, J; Buckles, R A; Lee, J; Weiss, P B

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

295

RELAP/MOD3.2 Assessment Using an 11% Upper Plenum Break Experiment in the PSB Facility  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using an 11% upper plenum break experiment in the PSB test facility at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem PSBV1, the test addressed several important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well. The code was judged to reasonably model the phenomena of two-phase flow natural circulation in the primary coolant system, asymmetric loop behavior, leak flow, loop seal clearance in the cold legs, heat transfer in a covered core, heat transfer in a partially covered core, pressurizer thermal-hydraulics, and integral system effects. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data for the mixture level and entrainment in the core, leading to a user recommendation to assess the sensitivity of transient calculations to the interphase drag modeling in the core. No judgments were made for the phenomena of phase separation without mixture level formation, mixture level and entrainment in the steam generators, pool formation in the upper plenum, or flow stratification in horizontal pipes because either the phenomenon did not occur in the test or there were insufficient measurements to characterize the behavior.

Bayless, P.D.

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

296

RELAP-5/MOD 3.2 Assessment Using an 11% Upper Plenum Break Experiment in the PSB Facility  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using an 11% upper plenum break experiment in the PSB test facility at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem PSBV1, the test addressed several important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well. The code was judged to reasonably model the phenomena of two-phase flow natural circulation in the primary coolant system, asymmetric loop behavior, leak flow, loop seal clearance in the cold legs, heat transfer in a covered core, heat transfer in a partially covered core, pressurizer thermal-hydraulics, and integral system effects. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data for the mixture level and entrainment in the core, leading to a user recommendation to assess the sensitivity of transient calculations to the interphase drag modeling in the core. No judgments were made for the phenomena of phase separation without mixture level formation, mixture level and entrainment in the steam generators, pool formation in the upper plenum, or flow stratification in horizontal pipes because either the phenomenon did not occur in the test or there were insufficient measurements to characterize the behavior.

Paul D. Bayless

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Computational Fluid Dynamics Framework for Turbine Biological Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment is introduced to bridge the gap between field and laboratory studies on fish injury and turbine design. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. If the relationship between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose-response) is known from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from various turbine designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising designs. Discussion here is focused on Kaplan-type turbines, although the method could be extended to other designs. Following the description of the general methodology, we will present sample risk assessment calculations based on CFD data from a model of the John Day Dam on the Columbia River in the USA.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Sick, Mirjam; Cada, G. F.

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

298

DOE/EA-1605: Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

605 605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE This page intentionally left blank - i - TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................1 1.1 Background and Proposed Action ...............................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need ........................................................................................4

299

Preliminary assessment of Fort Hood solar cogeneration plant performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis has been performed to enable a preliminary assessment of the performance that can be expected of a solar thermal cogeneration system designed to serve a selected group of buildings at Fort Hood, Texas. A central receiver system utilizing a molten salts mixture as the receiver coolant, heat transfer fluid, and storage medium is assumed. The system is to supply a large share of the space heating, air conditioning, domestic hot water, and electricity needs of a 20-building Troop Housing Complex. Principal energy loads are graphed and tabulated, and the principal electric parasitic loads are tabulated and the methodology by which they are estimated is reviewed. The plant model and the performance calculations are discussed. Annual energy displacement results are given. (LEW)

Ator, J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Evaluation of the Candidate High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain Using Total System Performance Assessment: Phase 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful license application for the candidate spent-fuel and high level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain depends on a robust demonstration of long-term safety. This report presents EPRI's independent review to identify any conservatisms in the U.S. Depawrtment of Energy's (DOE's) Phase 5 Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The review specifically identifies key facility components, makes recommendations regarding technical development work priorities, and evaluates ove...

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Mobile Solar Tracker Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile Solar Tracker Facility. ... NIST's mobile solar tracking facility is used to characterize the electrical performance of photovoltaic panels. ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

MHD seawater thruster performance: A comparison of predictions with experimental results from a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate a design oriented MHD thruster performance computer code. The thruster performance code consists of a one-dimensional MHD hydrodynamic model coupled to a two-dimensional electrical model. The code includes major loss mechanisms affecting the performance of the thruster. Among these losses are the joule dissipation losses, frictional losses, electrical end losses, and single electrode potential losses. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

Picologlou, B.F.; Doss, E.D.; Geyer, H.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sikes, W.C.; Ranellone, R.F. (Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate.  To ensure that an effective labeling...

304

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Â… 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICALITY SAFETY CRITICALITY SAFETY OBJECTIVE CS.1 Facility safety documentation that describes the "safety envelope" for the AR Project II activities is in place and has been implemented and administrative and engineering controls to prevent and mitigate hazards associated with commencing the AR Project II activities are tailored to the work being performed and the associated hazards to meet the following criteria: CRITERIA: CS. 1.1 Criticality safety requirements are current, approved, and properly controlled. CS. 1.2 Facility safety and criticality requirements have been incorporated into applicable procedures and documents. REVIEW APPROACH: Document Reviews: * Review applicable CSEs for identification of facility hazards and development

305

Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

Schneider, K.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Environmental assessment for the construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Waste Segregation Facility at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction, operation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Waste Segregation Facility (WSF) for the sorting, shredding, and compaction of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The LLW to be processed consists of two waste streams: legacy waste which is currently stored in E-Area Vaults of SRS and new waste generated from continuing operations. The proposed action is to construct, operate, and D&D a facility to process low-activity job-control and equipment waste for volume reduction. The LLW would be processed to make more efficient use of low-level waste disposal capacity (E-Area Vaults) or to meet the waste acceptance criteria for treatment at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at SRS.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

DOE/EA-1149; Environmental Assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility, Idaho Nation Engineering Laboratory (and FONSI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 July 1996 Environmental Assessment Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE CLOSURE OF THE WASTE CALCINING FACILITY AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce the risks to human

308

Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Strategy for experimental validation of waste package performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

A strategy for the experimental validation of waste package performance assessment has been developed as part of a program supported by the Repository Technology Program. The strategy was developed by reviewing the results of laboratory analog experiments, in-situ tests, repository simulation tests, and material interaction tests. As a result of the review, a listing of dependent and independent variables that influence the ingress of water into the near-field environment, the reaction between water and the waste form, and the transport of radionuclides from the near-field environment was developed. The variables necessary to incorporate into an experimental validation strategy were chosen by identifying those which had the greatest effect of each of the three major events, i.e., groundwater ingress, waste package reactions, and radionuclide transport. The methodology to perform validation experiments was examined by utilizing an existing laboratory analog approach developed for unsaturated testing of glass waste forms. 185 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Gerding, T.J.; Seils, C.A.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

PORFLOW Modeling Supporting The H-Tank Farm Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vadose and saturated zones have been conducted using the PORFLOW code in support of an overall Performance Assessment (PA) of the H-Tank Farm. This report provides technical detail on selected aspects of PORFLOW model development and describes the structure of the associated electronic files. The PORFLOW models for the H-Tank Farm PA, Rev. 1 were updated with grout, solubility, and inventory changes. The aquifer model was refined. In addition, a set of flow sensitivity runs were performed to allow flow to be varied in the related probabilistic GoldSim models. The final PORFLOW concentration values are used as input into a GoldSim dose calculator.

Jordan, J. M.; Flach, G. P.; Westbrook, M. L.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design  

SciTech Connect

Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

1993-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

312

Performance assessment of DOE spent nuclear fuel and surplus plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is under consideration by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a potential site for the disposal of the nation`s radioactive wastes in a geologic repository. The wastes consist of commercial spent fuel, DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF), high level waste (HLW), and surplus plutonium. The DOE was mandated by Congress in the fiscal 1997 Energy and Water Appropriations Act to complete a viability assessment (VA) of the repository in September of 1998. The assessment consists of a preliminary design concept for the critical elements of the repository, a total system performance assessment (TSPA), a plan and cost estimate for completion of the license application, and an estimate of the cost to construct and operate the repository. This paper presents the results of the sensitivity analyses that were conducted to examine the behavior of DOE SNF and plutonium waste forms in the environment of the base case repository that was modeled for the TSPA-VA. Fifteen categories of DOE SNF and two Plutonium waste forms were examined and their contribution to radiation dose to humans was evaluated.

Duguid, J.O.; Vallikat, V.; McNeish, J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following analogous characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site: (1) Analogous source--UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geology--(i.e. fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs); (3) Analogous climate--Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous setting--Volcanic tuffs overlie carbonate rocks; and (5) Analogous geochemistry--Oxidizing conditions Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table.

G. Saulnier and W. Statham

2006-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

314

Incorporating uncertainties into risk assessment with an application to the exploratory studies facilities at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology that incorporates variability and reducible sources of uncertainty into the probabilistic and consequence components of risk was developed. The method was applied to the north tunnel of the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. In this assessment, variability and reducible sources of uncertainty were characterized and propagated through the risk assessment models using a Monte Carlo based software package. The results were then manipulated into risk curves at the 5% and 95% confidence levels for both the variability and overall uncertainty analyses, thus distinguishing between variability and reducible sources of uncertainty. In the Yucca Mountain application, the designation of the north tunnel as an item important to public safety, as defined by 10 CFR 60, was determined. Specifically, the annual frequency of a rock fall breaching a waste package causing an off-site dose of 500 mrem (5x10{sup -3} Sv) was calculated. The annual frequency, taking variability into account, ranged from 1.9x10{sup -9} per year at the 5% confidence level to 2.5x10{sup -9} per year at the 95% confidence level. The frequency range after including all uncertainty was 9.5x10{sup -10} to 1.8x10{sup -8} per year. The maximum observable frequency, at the 100% confidence level, was 4.9x10{sup -8} per year. This is below the 10{sup -6} per year frequency criteria of 10 CFR 60. Therefore, based on this work, the north tunnel does not fall under the items important to public safety designation for the event studied.

Fathauer, P.M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Draft environmental assessment -- Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce these risks to human health and the environment and to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. The WCF closure project is described in the DOE Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement (Programmatic EIS). DOE determined in the Programmatic EIS Record of Decision (ROD) that certain actions would be implemented and other actions deferred. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and evaluated reasonable alternatives, including the no action alternative in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations. Based on the analysis in the EA, the action will not have a significant effect on the human environment.

Braun, J.B.; Irving, J.S.; Staley, C.S.; Stanley, N.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Machine Shop Safe Operations Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2003 - Machine Shop Safe Operations July 2003 - Machine Shop Safe Operations Utilize 29 CFR 1910 Utilize applicable LLNL, LANL, DTRA, BN procedures VALUE ADDED FOR: AMTS Contractor Assurance Focus Area AMTS ISM Improvements Focus Area AMTS Safety Precursors/Hazards Analysis Focus Area AMTS Environment, Safety, & Health Division MACHINE SHOP SAFE OPERATIONS Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The purpose of this assessment is to verify that machine shop operators are provided a safe and healthful workplace which will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses. Criteria: A worker protection program shall be implemented that provides a place of employment free from recognized hazards that are causing or likely to cause

317

Measuring and Testing Equipment Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measuring and Test Equipment Measuring and Test Equipment Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to determine whether a program is in place which assures that Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used in activities affecting quality and safety are properly controlled, calibrated, and adjusted at specified times to maintain accuracy within necessary limits. Criteria: All M&TE is uniquely identified, calibrated, controlled, and provides accuracy traceability. A recall program maintains the total inventory and status of all M&TE. Out-of-tolerance M&TE is removed from service. Plant equipment calibrated with out-of-tolerance M&TE is evaluated in a timely manner for impact on previous output, current operability and is re-

318

Measuring and Testing Equipment Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measuring and Test Equipment Measuring and Test Equipment Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to determine whether a program is in place which assures that Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used in activities affecting quality and safety are properly controlled, calibrated, and adjusted at specified times to maintain accuracy within necessary limits. Criteria: All M&TE is uniquely identified, calibrated, controlled, and provides accuracy traceability. A recall program maintains the total inventory and status of all M&TE. Out-of-tolerance M&TE is removed from service. Plant equipment calibrated with out-of-tolerance M&TE is evaluated in a timely manner for impact on previous output, current operability and is re-

319

Documentation assessment, Project C-018H, 200-E area effluent treatment facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project C-018H is one of the fourteen subprojects to the Hanford Environmental Compliance (HEC) Project. Project C-018H provides treatment and disposal for the 242-A Evaporator and PUREX plant process condensate waste streams. This project used the Integrated Management Team (IMT) approach proposed by RL. The IMT approach included all affected organizations on the project team to coordinate and execute all required project tasks, while striving to integrate and satisfy all technical, operational, functional, and organizational objectives. The HEC Projects were initiated in 1989. Project C-018H began in early 1990, with completion of construction currently targeted for mid-1995. This assessment was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the management control on design documents and quality assurance records developed and submitted for processing, use, and retention for the Project. The assessment focused primarily on the overall adequacy and quality of the design documentation currently being submitted to the project document control function.

Peres, M.W.; Connor, M.D.; Mertelendy, J.I.

1994-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Environmental Assessment for the Decontamination, Demolition, and Removal of Certain Facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

52 52 Environmental Assessment for the Decontamination, Demolition, and Removal of Certain Facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project Final U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley, New York September 14, 2006 Final EA - Decontamination, Demolition, and Removal of Certain Facilities at WVDP i Table of Contents CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION................ 1 1.1 Overview....................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 West Valley Demonstration Project.............................................................................. 2 1.3 Purpose and Need for Agency Action ..........................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Conceptual adsorption models and open issues pertaining to performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

Recently several articles have been published that question the appropriateness of the distribution coefficient, Rd, concept to quantify radionuclide migration. Several distinct issues are raised by various critics. In this paper I provide some perspective on issues surrounding the modeling of nuclide retardation. The first section defines adsorption terminology and discusses various adsorption processes. The next section describes five commonly used adsorption conceptual models, specifically emphasizing what attributes that affect adsorption are explicitly accommodated in each model. I also review efforts to incorporate each adsorption model into performance assessment transport computer codes. The five adsorption conceptual models are (1) the constant Rd model, (2) the parametric Rd model, (3) isotherm adsorption models, (4) mass-action adsorption models, and (5) surface-complexation with electrostatics models. The final section discusses the adequacy of the distribution ratio concept, the adequacy of transport calculations that rely on constant retardation factors and the status of incorporating sophisticated adsorption models into transport codes.

Serne, R.J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1943 the Hanford Site was chosen as a location for the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for use in nuclear weapons. The 100-N Area at Hanford was used from 1963 to 1987 for a dual-purpose, plutonium production and steam generation reactor and related operational support facilities (Diediker and Hall 1987). In November 1989, the reactor was put into dry layup status. During operations, chemical and radioactive wastes were released into the area soil, air, and groundwater. The 1325-N LWDF was constructed in 1983 to replace the 1301-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility (1301-N LWDF). The two facilities operated simultaneously from 1983 to 1985. The 1301-N LWDF was retired from use in 1985 and the 1325-N LWDF continued operation until April 1991, when active discharges to the facility ceased. Effluent discharge to the piping system has been controlled by administrative means. This report discusses ground water contamination resulting from the 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal facility.

Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

324 Facility special-case waste assessment in support of 324 closure (TPA milestone M-89-05)  

SciTech Connect

Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-89-05, requires US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office to complete a 324 Facility Special-Case Waste Assessment in Support of 324 Closure. This document, HNF-1270, has been prepared with the intent of meeting this regulatory commitment. Alternatives for the special-case wastes located in the 324 Building were defined and analyzed. Based on the criteria of safety, environmental, complexity of interfaces, risk, cost, schedule, and long-term operability and maintainability, the best alternative was chosen. Waste packaging and transportation options are also included in the recommendations. The waste disposition recommendations for the B-Cell dispersibles/tank heels and High-Level Vault packaged residuals are to direct them to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX) Number 2 storage tunnel.

Hobart, R.L.

1998-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

324

Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Data-Based Performance Assessments for the DOE Hydropower Advancement Project  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy s Hydropower Advancement Project (HAP) was initiated to characterize and trend hydropower asset conditions across the U.S.A. s existing hydropower fleet and to identify and evaluate the upgrading opportunities. Although HAP includes both detailed performance assessments and condition assessments of existing hydropower plants, this paper focuses on the performance assessments. Plant performance assessments provide a set of statistics and indices that characterize the historical extent to which each plant has converted the potential energy at a site into electrical energy for the power system. The performance metrics enable benchmarking and trending of performance across many projects in a variety contexts (e.g., river systems, power systems, and water availability). During FY2011 and FY2012, assessments will be performed on ten plants, with an additional fifty plants scheduled for FY2013. This paper focuses on the performance assessments completed to date, details the performance assessment process, and describes results from the performance assessments.

March, Patrick [Hydro Performance Processes, Inc.; Wolff, Dr. Paul [WolffWare Ltd.; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL; Zhang, Qin Fen [ORNL; Dham, Rajesh [U.S. Department of Energy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Environmental assessment of oil degasification at four Strategic Petroleum Reserve facilities in Texas and Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to treat gassy oil at four Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage sites to lower the gas content of the stored crude oil and help ensure safe transfer of the oil during drawdown. The crude oil is stored underground in caverns created in salt domes. The degree of gassiness of the oil varies substantially among sites and among caverns within a site. This environmental assessment describes the proposed degasification operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. The need for degasification has arisen because over time, gases, principally methane and nitrogen, have migrated into and become dissolved in the stored crude oil. This influx of gas has raised the crude oil vapor pressure above limits required by safety and emission guidelines. When oil is drawn from the caverns, excess gases may come out of solution. Based on preliminary data from an ongoing sampling program, between 200 and 350 million of the 587 million barrels of crude oil stored at these four sites would require processing to remove excess gas. Degasification, a commonly used petroleum industry process, would be done at four crude oil storage facilities: Bryan Mound and Big Hill in Texas, and West Hackberry and Bayou Choctaw in Louisiana. DOE would use a turnkey services contract for engineering, procurement, fabrication, installation, operation and maintenance of two degasification plants. These would be installed initially at Bryan Mound and West Hackberry. Degasification would be complete in less than three years of continuous operations. This report summarizes the environmental impacts of this gasification process.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Impact assessment and performance targets for lighting and envelope systems  

SciTech Connect

Electric lighting loads and cooling from solar heat gains and from lights are the two largest components of peak demand in commercial buildings. The most cost effective demand side management solutions are generally those that directly reduce or eliminate these loads. Existing technologies can provide modest reductions, however they are typically applied an a piecemeal manner that yields less than optimal results. The full potential of existing technologies will be realized when they are commercially available in an integrated package easily specifiable by architects and engineers. Emerging technologies can also be developed to provide even greater savings and extend the savings over a greater portion of the building floor area. This report assesses achievable energy and peak demand performance in California commercial buildings with technologies available today and in the future. We characterize energy performance over a large range of building envelope and lighting conditions, both through computer simulation models and through case study measured data, and subsequently determine reasonable energy targets if building design were further optimized with integrated systems of current or new technologies. Energy targets are derived from the study after consideration of industry priorities, design constraints, market forces, energy code influence, and the state of current building stock.

Sullivan, R.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of performance for the closed HTF facilities over time based on the total remaining inventory. Section 4.1 provides an overview of the ICM comprised of three components: 1)...

329

Eleventh annual Department of Energy low-level waste management conference. Volume 1: Regulatory updates, performance assessment, understanding remedial action efforts  

SciTech Connect

Eighteen papers are presented in this volume. The section on regulatory updates present papers on EPA, NRC, and DOE regulations. The performance assessment section presents studies on disposal facilities at ORNL, Hanford, and the Feed Materials Production Center. The remedial action section papers discuss programs and remedial action activities. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

Sharry, J A

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Enhanced Performance Assessment System (EPAS) for carbon sequestration.  

SciTech Connect

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is an option to mitigate impacts of atmospheric carbon emission. Numerous factors are important in determining the overall effectiveness of long-term geologic storage of carbon, including leakage rates, volume of storage available, and system costs. Recent efforts have been made to apply an existing probabilistic performance assessment (PA) methodology developed for deep nuclear waste geologic repositories to evaluate the effectiveness of subsurface carbon storage (Viswanathan et al., 2008; Stauffer et al., 2009). However, to address the most pressing management, regulatory, and scientific concerns with subsurface carbon storage (CS), the existing PA methodology and tools must be enhanced and upgraded. For example, in the evaluation of a nuclear waste repository, a PA model is essentially a forward model that samples input parameters and runs multiple realizations to estimate future consequences and determine important parameters driving the system performance. In the CS evaluation, however, a PA model must be able to run both forward and inverse calculations to support optimization of CO{sub 2} injection and real-time site monitoring as an integral part of the system design and operation. The monitoring data must be continually fused into the PA model through model inversion and parameter estimation. Model calculations will in turn guide the design of optimal monitoring and carbon-injection strategies (e.g., in terms of monitoring techniques, locations, and time intervals). Under the support of Laboratory-Directed Research & Development (LDRD), a late-start LDRD project was initiated in June of Fiscal Year 2010 to explore the concept of an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS) for carbon sequestration and storage. In spite of the tight time constraints, significant progress has been made on the project: (1) Following the general PA methodology, a preliminary Feature, Event, and Process (FEP) analysis was performed for a hypothetical CS system. Through this FEP analysis, relevant scenarios for CO{sub 2} release were defined. (2) A prototype of EPAS was developed by wrapping an existing multi-phase, multi-component reservoir simulator (TOUGH2) with an uncertainty quantification and optimization code (DAKOTA). (3) For demonstration, a probabilistic PA analysis was successfully performed for a hypothetical CS system based on an existing project in a brine-bearing sandstone. The work lays the foundation for the development of a new generation of PA tools for effective management of CS activities. At a top-level, the work supports energy security and climate change/adaptation by furthering the capability to effectively manage proposed carbon capture and sequestration activities (both research and development as well as operational), and it greatly enhances the technical capability to address this national problem. The next phase of the work will include (1) full capability demonstration of the EPAS, especially for data fusion, carbon storage system optimization, and process optimization of CO{sub 2} injection, and (2) application of the EPAS to actual carbon storage systems.

Wang, Yifeng; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; McNeish, Jerry A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dewers, Thomas A.; Hadgu, Teklu; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Performance assessment on continuous air monitors under real operating conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the nuclear industry, workers may be exposed to artificial radioactive aerosols. These aerosols are generally composed of particles with a diameter measuring between 0.1 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m. To protect workers in nuclear facilities, monitors that continuously measure radioactivity in the air are used. The main function of the monitor is to provide real-time measurement of activity concentration. Measurement of aerosol activity concentration can be affected by a number of factors specific to the aerosols and the instrument. The first part of the article will present the general operating principles of continuous air monitors (CAMs) and inherent measurement difficulties, as well as the main standard tests. The second section describes the experimental ICARE facility The ICARE facility generates standard artificial and natural radioactive aerosols for calibrating continuous air monitors under real operating conditions. (authors)

Monsanglant-Louvet, C.; Liatimi, N.; Gensdarmes, F. [Inst. of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety- IRSN, Saclay (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

DOE Order 435.1- Performance Assessments and Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page focuses on DOE Order 435.1, Performance Assessments and Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluations.

334

Review of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections), Novvember 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections) May 2011 November 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1

335

October 24, 2003, Criteria and Guidelines For the Assessment of Safety System Software and Firmware at Defense Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3.1 3.1 Revision 3 October 24, 2003 U. S. Department of Energy Criteria and Guidelines For the Assessment of Safety System Software and Firmware at Defense Nuclear Facilities October 24, 2003 CRAD - 4.2.3.1 Revision 3 October 24, 2003 i TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS...................................................................................................................................ii GLOSSARY ...................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 INTRODUCTION .....................................................................................................................1 2.0 BACKGROUND .......................................................................................................................2

336

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is dependent on the confidence that DOE has in the long term mission for T Plant, is proposed: (1) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is high, then the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) would continue to implement the path forward previously described in the Alternatives Report (HNF-39744). Risks to the sludge project can be minimized through the establishment of an Interface Control Document (ICD) defining agreed upon responsibilities for both the STP and T Plant Operations regarding the transfer and storage of sludge and ensuring that the T Plant upgrade and operational schedule is well integrated with the sludge storage activities. (2) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is uncertain, then the ASF conceptual design should be pursued on a parallel path with preparation of T Plant for sludge storage until those uncertainties are resolved. (3) Finally, if the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is low, then the ASF design should be selected to provide independence from the T Plant mission risk.

RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

337

Environmental assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to close the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). The WCF is a surplus DOE facility located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Six facility components in the WCF have been identified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Ace (RCRA)-units in the INEL RCRA Part A application. The WCF is an interim status facility. Consequently, the proposed WCF closure must comply with Idaho Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste contained in the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) Section 16.01.05. These state regulations, in addition to prescribing other requirements, incorporate by reference the federal regulations, found at 40 CFR Part 265, that prescribe the requirements for facilities granted interim status pursuant to the RCRA. The purpose of the proposed action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce potential risks to human health and the environment, and to comply with the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) requirements.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Literature Review and Assessment of Plant and Animal Transfer Factors Used in Performance Assessment Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A literature review and assessment was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update information on plant and animal radionuclide transfer factors used in performance-assessment modeling. A group of 15 radionuclides was included in this review and assessment. The review is composed of four main sections, not including the Introduction. Section 2.0 provides a review of the critically important issue of physicochemical speciation and geochemistry of the radionuclides in natural soil-water systems as it relates to the bioavailability of the radionuclides. Section 3.0 provides an updated review of the parameters of importance in the uptake of radionuclides by plants, including root uptake via the soil-groundwater system and foliar uptake due to overhead irrigation. Section 3.0 also provides a compilation of concentration ratios (CRs) for soil-to-plant uptake for the 15 selected radionuclides. Section 4.0 provides an updated review on radionuclide uptake data for animal products related to absorption, homeostatic control, approach to equilibration, chemical and physical form, diet, and age. Compiled transfer coefficients are provided for cow’s milk, sheep’s milk, goat’s milk, beef, goat meat, pork, poultry, and eggs. Section 5.0 discusses the use of transfer coefficients in soil, plant, and animal modeling using regulatory models for evaluating radioactive waste disposal or decommissioned sites. Each section makes specific suggestions for future research in its area.

Robertson, David E.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Sasser, Lyle B.

2003-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

Assessment and Mitigation of Diagnostic-Generated Electromagnetic Interference at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is an ever-present challenge at laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The major source of EMI at such facilities is laser-target interaction that can generate intense electromagnetic fields within, and outside of, the laser target chamber. In addition, the diagnostics themselves can be a source of EMI, even interfering with themselves. In this paper we describe EMI generated by ARIANE and DIXI, present measurements, and discuss effects of the diagnostic-generated EMI on ARIANE's CCD and on a PMT nearby DIXI. Finally we present some of the efforts we have made to mitigate the effects of diagnostic-generated EMI on NIF diagnostics.

Brown, C G; Ayers, M J; Felker, B; Ferguson, W; Holder, J P; Nagel, S R; Piston, K W; Simanovskaia, N; Throop, A L; Chung, M; Hilsabeck, T

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Feed Variability and Bulk Vitrification Glass Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The supplemental treatment (ST) bulk vitrification process will obtain its feed, consisting of low-activity waste (LAW), from more than one source. One purpose of this letter report is to describe the compositional variability of the feed to ST. The other is to support the M-62-08 decision by providing a preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of bulk vitrification (BV), the process that has been selected to perform supplemental treatment, in handling the ST feed envelope. Roughly nine-tenths of the ST LAW feed will come from the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) pretreatment. This processed waste is expected to combine (1) a portion of the same LAW feed sent to the WTP melters and (2) a dilute stream that is the product of the condensate from the submerged-bed scrubber (SBS) and the drainage from the electrostatic precipitator (WESP), both of which are part of the LAW off-gas system. The manner in which the off-gas-product stream is concentrated to reduce its volume, and the way in which the excess LAW and off-gas product streams are combined, are part of the interface between WTP and ST and have not been determined. This letter report considers only one possible arrangement, in which half of the total LAW is added to the off-gas product stream, giving an estimated ST feed stream from WTP. (Total LAW equals that portion of LAW sent to the WTP LAW vitrification plant (WTP LAW) plus the LAW not currently treatable in the LAW vitrification plant due to capacity limitations (excess)).

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Vienna, John D.

2005-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cost Estimation Methodology for NETL Assessments of Power Plant Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q Q Q U U A A L L I I T T Y Y G G U U I I D D E E L L I I N N E E S S F F O O R R E E N N E E R R G G Y Y S S Y Y S S T T E E M M S S T T U U D D I I E E S S C C o o s s t t E E s s t t i i m m a a t t i i o o n n M M e e t t h h o o d d o o l l o o g g y y f f o o r r N N E E T T L L A A s s s s e e s s s s m m e e n n t t s s o o f f P P o o w w e e r r P P l l a a n n t t P P e e r r f f o o r r m m a a n n c c e e March 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/???? April 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1455 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Program Planning and Analysis 2 Power Plant Cost Estimation Methodology Quality Guidelines for Energy Systems Studies April 2011 Quality Guidelines for Energy Systems Studies Cost Estimation Methodology for NETL Assessments of Power Plant Performance Introduction This paper summarizes the costing methodology employed by NETL in its costing models and baseline reports. Further, it defines the specific levels of capital cost as well as outlines the costing metrics by which

342

DOE/EA-1638: Environmental Assessment for the Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Solyndra, Inc. for Construction of A Photovoltaic Manufacturing Facility and Leasing of an Existing Commercial Facility in Fremont, California (March 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

38 38 Environmental Assessment FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE TO SOLYNDRA, INC. FOR CONSTRUCTION OF A PHOTOVOLTAIC MANUFACTURING FACILITY AND LEASING OF AN EXISTING COMMERCIAL FACILITY IN FREMONT, CALIFORNIA U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 March 2009 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT March 2009 Environmental Assessment i Proposed Guarantee of Loan to Solyndra, Inc. TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1. PURPOSE AND NEED..................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Purpose of and Need for Action ...................................................................... 1-1 1.2 Background .....................................................................................................

343

Environmental assessment of facility operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Because DOE-GJPO regularly proposes and conducts many different on-site activities, DOE decided to evaluate these activities in one sitewide EA rather than in multiple, activity-specific documents. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for facility operations, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory analysis of the saturated zone water chemistry. The results of the field investigations and laboratory analyses of rock and water samples collected at Nopal I are used to calibrate the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model.

G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

345

Performance assessment for the disposal of low-level waste in the 200 east area burial grounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A performance assessment analysis was completed for the 200 East Area Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) to satisfy compliance requirements in DOE Order 5820.2A. In the analysis, scenarios of radionuclide release from the 200 East Area Low-Level waste facility was evaluated. The analysis focused on two primary scenarios leading to exposure. The first was inadvertent intrusion. In this scenario, it was assumed that institutional control of the site and knowledge of the disposal facility has been lost. Waste is subsequently exhumed and dose from exposure is received. The second scenario was groundwater contamination.In this scenario, radionuclides are leached from the waste by infiltrating precipitation and transported through the soil column to the underlying unconfined aquifer. The contaminated water is pumped from a well 100 m downstream and consumed,causing dose. Estimates of potential contamination of the surrounding environment were developed and the associated doses to the maximum exposed individual were calculated. The doses were compared with performance objective dose limits, found primarily in the DOE order 5850.2A. In the 200 East Area LLBG,it was shown that projected doses are estimated to be well below the limits because of the combination of environmental, waste inventory, and disposal facility characteristics of the 200 East Area LLBG. Waste acceptance criteria were also derived to ensure that disposal of future waste inventories in the 200 East Area LLBG will not cause an unacceptable increase in estimated dose.

Wood, M.I., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Residential commissioning to assess envelope and HVAC system performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

qualitatively during air-sealing work to assess progresssealing or for separation of the supply and return systems at the airby poor sealing or seal failure during the test. Air leakage

Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010  

SciTech Connect

Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

348

Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007  

SciTech Connect

Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Tritium Facilities Modernization and Consolidation Project Process Waste Assessment (Project S-7726)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the Tritium Facility Modernization {ampersand} Consolidation (TFM{ampersand}C) Project (S-7726) at the Savannah River Site (SS), all tritium processing operations in Building 232-H, with the exception of extraction and obsolete/abandoned systems, will be reestablished in Building 233-H. These operations include hydrogen isotopic separation, loading and unloading of tritium shipping and storage containers, tritium recovery from zeolite beds, and stripping of nitrogen flush gas to remove tritium prior to stack discharge. The scope of the TFM{ampersand}C Project also provides for a new replacement R&D tritium test manifold in 233-H, upgrading of the 233- H Purge Stripper and 233-H/234-H building HVAC, a new 234-H motor control center equipment building and relocating 232-H Materials Test Facility metallurgical laboratories (met labs), flow tester and life storage program environment chambers to 234-H.

Hsu, R.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Oji, L.N.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designer’s attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

Coles, Garill A.; Hockert, John; Gitau, Ernest TN; Zentner, Michael D.

2013-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designer’s attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

Coles, Garill A.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

354

Assessment of Potential Flood Events and Impacts at INL's Proposed Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rates, depths, erosion potential, increased subsurface transport rates, and annual exceedance probability for potential flooding scenarios have been evaluated for the on-site alternatives of Idaho National Laboratory’s proposed remote handled low-level waste disposal facility. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of flood impacts are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE-O 435.1), its natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95), and the Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) guidance in addition to being required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental assessment (EA). Potential sources of water evaluated include those arising from (1) local precipitation events, (2) precipitation events occurring off of the INL (off-site precipitation), and (3) increased flows in the Big Lost River in the event of a Mackay Dam failure. On-site precipitation events include potential snow-melt and rainfall. Extreme rainfall events were evaluated for the potential to create local erosion, particularly of the barrier placed over the disposal facility. Off-site precipitation carried onto the INL by the Big Lost River channel was evaluated for overland migration of water away from the river channel. Off-site precipitation sources evaluated were those occurring in the drainage basin above Mackay Reservoir. In the worst-case scenarios, precipitation occurring above Mackay Dam could exceed the dam’s capacity, leading to overtopping, and eventually complete dam failure. Mackay Dam could also fail during a seismic event or as a result of mechanical piping. Some of the water released during dam failure, and contributing precipitation, has the potential of being carried onto the INL in the Big Lost River channel. Resulting overland flows from these flood sources were evaluated for their erosion potential, ability to overflow the proposed disposal facility, and for their ability to increase migration of contaminants from the facility. The assessment of available literature suggests that the likelihood of detrimental flood water impacting the proposed RH-LLW facility is extremely low. The annual exceedance probability associated with uncontrolled flows in the Big Lost River impacting either of the proposed sites is 1x10-5, with return interval (RI) of 10,000yrs. The most probable dam failure scenario has an annual exceedance probability of 6.3x10-6 (1.6x105 yr RI). In any of the scenarios generating possible on-site water, the duration is expected to be quite short, water depths are not expected to exceed 0.5 m, and the erosion potential can easily be mitigated by emplacement of a berm (operational period), and an engineered cover (post closure period). Subsurface mobilization of radionuclides was evaluated for a very conservative flooding scenario resulting in 50 cm deep, 30.5 day on-site water. The annual exceedance probability for which is much smaller than 3.6x10-7 (2.8x106 yr RI). For the purposes of illustration, the facility was assumed to flood every 500 years. The periodically recurring flood waters were predicted to marginally increase peak radionuclide fluxes into the aquifer by at most by a factor of three for non-sorbing radionuclides, and to have limited impact on peak radionuclide fluxes into the aquifer for contaminants that do sorb.

A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

LPAT: An interactive simulation tool for assessing the lightning performance of Hellenic high voltage transmission lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the Lightning Performance Assessment Tool (LPAT), an interactive simulation tool which assesses the lightning performance of high voltage transmission lines. The LPAT design was based on a recently published methodology that has been ... Keywords: Lightning performance, Optical transient density, Overhead transmission lines, Simulation, Software tool, User interface

P. Karampelas; L. Ekonomou; S. Panetsos; G. E. Chatzarakis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Divisionn  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been implemented.   Verify that...

357

DOE/EA-1444: Environmental Assessment for the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond (September 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 DOE/EA-1444 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade facilities and infrastructure at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV, through acquisition of a 5-acre

358

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site The PAs are used to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment and provide the Department Of Energy with reasonable assurance that the removal from service of the Savannah River Site tank farm underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment will meet defined performance objectives for the protection of human health and the environment into the future. First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 1 First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 2

359

Communications-based automated assessment of team cognitive performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we performed analysis of speech communications in order to determine if we can differentiate between expert and novice teams based on communication patterns. Two pairs of experts and novices performed numerous test sessions on the E-2 Enhanced ...

Kiran Lakkaraju; Susan Stevens-Adams; Robert G. Abbott; Chris Forsythe

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor employing the coupled NJOY/AMPX-II/TORT systems was successfully accomplished. All the analysis was performed employing ENDF/B-VII.0. The theoretical approach follows all the steps of the subcritical model of Gandini and Salvatores. The theory/experiment comparison reveals that the calculated subcritical reactivity is in a very good agreement to the experimental values. The subcritical index ({xi}) shows some discrepancies although in this particular case some work still have to be made to model in a better way the neutron source present in the experiments. (authors)

Lee, S. M.; Dos Santos, A. [Inst. de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitaria, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo - SP (Brazil)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Density Functional (NP) Objective: Develop and use ab initio predictive power to test nuclear theory

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inability to meet DOE IPv6 requirements Med High ImpactMitigation NERSC/DOE has a requirement for IPv6 andscale. Science Requirements Workshops In 2009 NERSC and DOE

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 of 6) Section 7. Is NERSC effectively managing risk? (continued) Recommendation NERSC Response DOEProgram Manager Response NERSC should consider developing

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

targets used by OLCF and ALCF: 80% overall, 85% scheduledto be the same as OLCF and ALCF (20% of the cores on theDirect NERSC users to the ALCF and the OLCF. Status The

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

direction. Disagee. OLCF has been asked to develop anmetric targets used by OLCF and ALCF: 80% overall, 85%increased to be the same as OLCF and ALCF (20% of the cores

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metrics, target values, projections (July 1–December 31,CY 2011 capability projections, as outlined in the overviewdata. When we made the projections on the original August

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

46 / JOURNAL OF PERFORMANCE OF CONSTRUCTED FACILITIES / MAY 2001 EVOLUTION OF FORMAL MAINTAINABILITY PROGRAM FOR LARGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of operations and maintenance per- sonnel. In addition, the team selected a maintenance manage- ment system (MMS of project from project design team to end-users -- Maintenance management system tracked project performance equipment information, including the preventive maintenance tasks was input into the maintenance management

Sheridan, Jennifer

368

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

369

Beyond integrated safeguards: performance-based assessments for future nuclear controls.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the future, iE the nuclear nonproliferation and arms control agendas are to advance, they will likely become increasingly seen as parallel undertakings with the objective of comprehensive cradle-to-grave controls over nuclear materials and possibly even warheads removed from defense programs along with materials in civilian use. This 'back to the future' prospect was envisioned in the Acheson-Lillienthal Report and the Baruch Plan, and more modestly in the Atoms-for-Peace Proposal. Unlike the grand plans of the early nuclear years, today's and tomorrow's undertakings will more likely consist of a series of incremental steps with the goal of expanding nuclear controls. These steps will be undertaken at a time of fundamental change in the IAEA safeguards system, and they will be influenced by those changes in profound ways. This prospective influence needs to be taken into account as the IAEA develops and implements integrated safeguards, including its efforts to establish new safeguards criteria, undertake technological and administrative improvements in safeguards, implement credible capabilities for the detection of undeclared nuclear facilities and activities and, perhaps, provide for a more intensive involvement in applying safeguards in new roles such as the verification of a fissile materials cutoff treaty. Performance-based criteria offer one promising way to address the effectiveness of integrated safeguards and to provide a common means of assessing the other key areas of a comprehensive approach to nuclear controls as these develop independently and to the extent that they are coordinated in the future.

Pilat, Joseph F.; Budlong-Sylvester, K. W. (Kory W.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Assessment of the feasibility of recommissioning the French Landing Hydroelectric Facility in Van Buren Township, Michigan. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study of the feasibility of recommissioning a small, low-head hydroelectric facility in southeastern Michigan are presented. The study concludes that there are several cost-effective designs for recommissioning the site, based on the use of vertical turbines and the sale of power to nearby industrial markets. In terms of the bulk sale of power to the local electric utility, no cost-effective alternatives were found to exist. A major burden on project cost-effectiveness was found to be the relatively large costs for structural repairs to the dam and powerhouse needed to insure safe operation and on adequate service life. From an engineering standpoint it was found that the items of equipment needed to recommission the site are readily available from both US and foreign manufacturers. A variety of hydraulic turbine designs could be successfully adapted to the existing powerhouse, without extensive new construction. It was determined that the production capacity of the facility had an important influence on the cost-effectiveness of the project. A detailed benefit/cost analysis was conducted to identify the optimum facility size in terms of incremental costs and revenues. A detailed environmental assessment using an impact matrix methodology concluded that the development of the facility for hydroelectric generation would have important positive environmental consequences related to improved impoundment and flow management techniques as well as enhanced public safety due to structural repairs to the dam. The institutional and regulatory implications of developing the site for hydroelectric generation were found to be significant but manageable.

Not Available

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Assessment of nuclear safety and nuclear criticality potential in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will initially process Batch 1 sludge in the sludge-only processing mode, with simulated non-radioactive Precipitate Hydrolysis, Aqueous (PHA) product, without the risk of nuclear criticality. The dilute concentration of fissile material in the sludge combined with excess of neutron absorbers during normal operations make criticality throughout the whole process incredible. Subsequent batches of the DWPF involving radioactive precipitate slurry and PHA will require additional analysis. Any abnormal or upset process operations, which are not considered in this report and could potentially separate fissile material, must be individually evaluated. Scheduled maintenance operation procedures are not considered to be abnormal.

Ha, B.C.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

Addressing Facility Needs for Concrete Assessment Using Ultrasonic Testing: Mid-year Report  

SciTech Connect

The UFD Gap Analysis to Support Extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel (June 30, 2011) emphasizes the need for the development of monitoring techniques and technologies for dry storage cask materials. A high priority is given to the development of 'systems for early detection of confinement boundary degradation.' This requires both new techniques for monitoring and inspection, as well as new measurable parameters to quantify mechanical degradation. The use of Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) has been shown to provide sensitive parameters correlating to mechanical degradation in a wide variety of materials. Herein we report upon recent research performed to address the high priority of concrete degradation using a selection of these techniques and compare to a ASTM standard ultrasonic technique. Also reported are the near term plans to continue this research in the remaining FY and into the coming years. This research was conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the Acoustics Lab of the Geophysics group in the Earth and Environmental Sciences division, and in collaboration with the Laboratory for Nondestructive Evaluation at the University of the Mediterranean (Aix en Provence, France) and the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI). The objective of this research project was to determine the feasibility of using an NDE technique based on non-linear ultrasound for determining the depth and degree of microcracking in the near surface of concrete and to assess the degree of sensitivity of such technique. This objective is reached by the means of combining linear and nonlinear measurements, associated with numerical simulation. We first study the global effect of thermal damage on concrete's linear and nonlinear properties by resonance inspection techniques. We show that standard pulse wave speed techniques are not relevant to extract mechanical properties of concrete. The high sensitivity of measured nonlinearity is shown and serves as a validation tool for the rest of the study, i.e., probing the material nonlinearity at various depths through the use of Time Reversal Elastic Nonlinearity Diagnostic (TREND). The basic idea of probing the material nonlinearity at various depths by changing the frequency is validated by exhibiting a similar trend as nonlinear resonance measurements. We address at the end of this report, the potentialities of applying these procedures to real concrete structures.

Ulrich, Timothy J. II [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Payan, Cedric [EES-17: GEOPHYSICS, Visitor; Roberts, Peter M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

373

Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

Kaplan, D

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 requires that performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities be maintained by the field offices. This plan describes the activities to be performed in maintaining the Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the continuing operations of a LLW facility at the DOE complex specifies the conditions for operations based on approval of a PA and CA, and requires the facility to implement a maintenance program to assure that these conditions will remain protective of the public health and the environment in the future. The goal of the maintenance program is to provide that assurance. The maintenance process is an iterative one in which changing conditions may result in a revision of PA and CA; the revised PA and CA may impose a different set of conditions for facility operation, closure, and postclosure. The maintenance process includes managing uncertainty, performing annual reviews, submitting annual summary reports to DOE Headquarters (DOE/HQ), carrying out special analyses, and revising the PAs and CAs, if necessary. Management of uncertainty is an essential component of the maintenance program because results of the original PAs and CAs are understood to be based on uncertain assumptions about the conceptual models; the mathematical models and parameters; and the future state of the lands, disposal facilities, and human activities. The annual reviews for the PAs include consideration of waste receipts, facility specific factors, results of monitoring, and results of research and development (R&D) activities. Likewise, results of ongoing R&D, changes in land-use planning, new information on known sources of residual radioactive materials, and identification of new sources may warrant an evaluation to determine the impacts on the conclusions of the CAs.

V. Yucel

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Assessment of performance in the domain of product development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement of business performance is an enduring subject of research across a diverse set of disciplines such as accounting, operations management, marketing, finance, economics and even psychology and sociology. In any ...

Eralp, Ziya Deniz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hybrid wing-body aircraft noise and performance assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid wing-body aircraft noise generation and boundary layer ingestion (BLI) performance trends with increased fan face Mach number inlet designs are investigated. The presented topics are in support of the NASA subsonic ...

Weed, Philip Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The power balance method For aerodynamic performance assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the use of the power balance method for performance estimation of aircraft configurations. In this method, mechanical power production and mechanical power consumption of the aircraft are balanced, ...

Sato, Sho, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Thermionic cogeneration burner assessment study performance analysis results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this contract was to (1) test and evaluate two of the more important engineering aspects of designing and building thermionic cogeneration burners (TCB's); (2) make a cost and performance estimate of the TCB; and identify and evaluate industries where TCB's could be installed and where that the electrical power (dc) produced by the TCB's would be used directly in the process. The results of the performance analysis are detailed.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Feasibility assessment: Lake Frances power generation facilities for the city of Siloam Springs, Arkansas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of developing the power potential of the Illinois River at the Lake Frances Dam for utilization by the city of Siloam Springs, Arkansas, was studied. It was found that the average annual power production potential of this site is 3.8 MWh; the cost saving produced by the proposed hydropower project will not support any remedial rehabilitation costs of the entire dam structure; development and operation of this hydropower project would save nonrenewal types of energy; if the capital cost can be fixed at present day prices, the development will become economically feasible when electric costs increase by 43%; and there will be no significant adverse environmental impact resulting from either the construction or operation of the hydropower facilities. It was concluded that the hydropower facilities should be constructed, owned and operated by the city of Siloam Springs, provided the dam safety can be assured and sources of funding can be made available so that the annual costs will not exceed the annual savings. (LCL)

None

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS MODELING FOR PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS OF SHALLOW LAND BURIAL OF LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE - 9243  

SciTech Connect

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) was created to develop predictive capabilities for the aging of cementitious barriers over long timeframes. The CBP is a multi-agency, multi-national consortium working under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM-21) funded Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as the lead laboratory. Members of the CBP are SRNL, Vanderbilt University, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), SIMCO Technologies, Inc. (Canada), and the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN). A first step in developing advanced tools is to determine the current state-of-the-art. A review has been undertaken to assess the treatment of cementitious barriers in Performance Assessments (PA). Representatives of US DOE sites which have PAs for their low level waste disposal facilities were contacted. These sites are the Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nevada Test Site, and Hanford. Several of the more arid sites did not employ cementitious barriers. Of those sites which do employ cementitious barriers, a wide range of treatment of the barriers in a PA was present. Some sites used conservative, simplistic models that even though conservative still showed compliance with disposal limits. Other sites used much more detailed models to demonstrate compliance. These more detailed models tend to be correlation-based rather than mechanistically-based. With the US DOE's Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Review Group (LFRG) moving towards embracing a risk-based, best estimate with an uncertainties type of analysis, the conservative treatment of the cementitious barriers seems to be obviated. The CBP is creating a tool that adheres to the LFRG chairman's paradigm of continuous improvement.

Taylor, G

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

382

Design and Construction of a Guarded Hot Box Facility for Evaluating the Thermal Performance of Building Wall Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this study was to design and build a guarded hot box to test the R-Value of building materials. The Riverside Energy Efficiency Laboratory is looking to expand their testing capabilities by including this service. Eventually, the laboratory will become energy star certified. A guarded hot box facility consists of two boxes maintained at specific temperatures and a guard box around each one that is maintained at the same temperature as the box it surrounds. The ASTM C1363 standard was used as guide for the construction and testing of sample specimen. This standard called for an air velocity profile uniform within 10 percent of the average. Velocity tests were performed with various different configurations to give a uniform velocity. Although the velocity did not meet standards, the configuration chosen included a piece of 1/4" pegboard placed 2" away from the top and the bottom of the inner box. By using the known overall heat added and removed from the system, as well as all the heat losses the heat transferred through the specimen and its R-Value can be calculated. The uncertainty of the R-Value and the accuracy of the testing facility gave conflicting results. Future experiments will use improved testing methods that include differential thermocouples to obtain better uncertainty for the R-Value calculations.

Mero, Claire Renee

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Environmental Assessment for the Ammunition Storage Facility at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t30. t30. U.S. DEPARTHEHT OF EMERCT , FXNIDIIG OF It0 SIONI~ICAMT. IMPACT -1TIOH STORAGE E'ACXLITX AT THE SAVAxmAa RI-R iIT@ " Afl[EN, 6OtfTE CAROLXNA AGEYCT: U.S. Department of Energy ACTIOR: Finding of No Significant Impact s-r: The Department of Energy (DOE1 hqe prepared an Environmental ~Asscssx~ent (EA), DOE/EA-0820, for the proposed construction and operation of ~rl Ammunition Storage Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the &A, DOE ha8 determined that the propoeed action ie aot a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the Natioaal Eavironmcatal Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparatioa of an environruents~,impaCt Statement iS not required

384

Assessment of nuclear safety and nuclear criticality potential in the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

A panel of experts in the fields of process engineering, process chemistry, and safety analysis met together on January 26, 1993, and February 19, 1993, to discuss nuclear safety and nuclear criticality potential in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes. Nuclear safety issues and possibilities of nuclear criticality incidents in the DWPF were examined in depth. The discussion started at the receipt of slurry feeds: The Low Point Pump Pit Precipitate Tank (LPPPPT) and the Low Point Pump Pit Sludge Tank (LPPPST), and went into detail the whole DWPF processes. This report provides discussion of each of the areas and processes of the DWPF in terms of potential nuclear safety issues and nuclear criticality concerns.

Ha, B.C.

1993-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Construction of a Solid State Research Facility, Building 3150. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct a new facility to house the Materials Synthesis Group (MSG) and the Semiconductor Physics Group (SPG) of the Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The location of the proposed action is Roane County, Tennessee. MSG is involved in the study of crystal growth and the preparation and characterization of advanced materials, such as high-temperature superconductors, while SPG is involved in semiconductor physics research. All MSG and a major pardon of SPG research activities are now conducted in Building 2000, a deteriorating structure constructed in the 1940. The physical deterioration of the roof; the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system; and the plumbing make this building inadequate for supporting research activities. The proposed project is needed to provide laboratory and office space for MSG and SPG and to ensure that research activities can continue without interruption due to deficiencies in the building and its associated utility systems.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Preliminary assessment of radiological doses in alternative waste management systems without an MRS facility  

SciTech Connect

This report presents generic analyses of radiological dose impacts of nine hypothetical changes in the operation of a waste management system without a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The waste management activities examined in this study include those for handling commercial spent fuel at nuclear power reactors and at the surface facilities of a deep geologic repository, and the transportation of spent fuel by rail and truck between the reactors and the repository. In the reference study system, the radiological doses to the public and to the occupational workers are low, about 170 person-rem/1000 metric ton of uranium (MTU) handled with 70% of the fuel transported by rail and 30% by truck. The radiological doses to the public are almost entirely from transportation, whereas the doses to the occupational workers are highest at the reactors and the repository. Operating alternatives examined included using larger transportation casks, marshaling rail cars into multicar dedicated trains, consolidating spent fuel at the reactors, and wet or dry transfer options of spent fuel from dry storage casks. The largest contribution to radiological doses per unit of spent fuel for both the public and occupational workers would result from use of truck transportation casks, which are smaller than rail casks. Thus, reducing the number of shipments by increasing cask sizes and capacities (which also would reduce the number of casks to be handled at the terminals) would reduce the radiological doses in all cases. Consolidating spent fuel at the reactors would reduce the radiological doses to the public but would increase the doses to the occupational workers at the reactors.

Schneider, K.J.; Pelto, P.J.; Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C.; Fecht, B.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

210 King Street: a dataset for integrated performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a Building Information Modeling (BIM) re-creation of a designated heritage building located in Toronto, Canada. By taking advantage of BIM as a centralized database, which describes both geometric and semantic aspects of a building, ... Keywords: building information modeling, dataset, performance analysis, point cloud

Ramtin Attar; Venk Prabhu; Michael Glueck; Azam Khan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Environmentally based siting assessment for synthetic-liquid-fuels facilities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed assessment of the major environmental constraints to siting a synthetic fuels industry and the results of that assessment are used to determine on a regional basis the potential for development of such an industry with minimal environmental conflicts. Secondly, the ability to mitigate some of the constraining impacts through alternative institutional arrangements, especially in areas that are judged to have a low development potential is also assessed. Limitations of the study are delineated, but specifically, the study is limited geographically to well-defined boundaries that include the prime coal and oil shale resource areas. The critical factors used in developing the framework are air quality, water availability, socioeconomic capacity, ecological sensitivity, environmental health, and the management of Federally owned lands. (MCW)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Performance Assessment of High Burnup Fuel From Limerick  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GE11 design (9x9 lattice) fuel was irradiated to ~52 and ~65 GWd/MTU average bundle exposures at Exelon's Limerick Unit 1 and Limerick Unit 2 reactors. The project goal was to characterize the behavior of modern boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel at exposures beyond current fuel licensing limits. Additionally, the program examined both GE11 and GE13 fuel rods (irradiated to ~51-55 GWd/MTU) to assess the effects of noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and variations in fuel cladding fabrication processes on...

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Assessment of ice-condenser containment performance issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vulnerabilities of an ice-condenser containment to challenges that could arise from severe accidents have been assessed. The phenomenological issues associated with containment challenges have been evaluated. A number of containment improvements which have the potential to mitigate severe accident challenges have been evaluated. This report is intended to provide a comprehensive statement of the relevant issues that can be used in the NRC staff's evaluation process and by the utilities during their individual plant examinations (IPEs). 44 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

Nourbakhsh, H.P. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Final Environmental Assessment for the Construction and Operation of a Physical Sciences Facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

562 562 Environmental Assessment Construction and Operation of a Physical Sciences Facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Pacific Northwest Site Office Richland, Washington 99352 Final January 2007 U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA-1562 Environmental Assessment S-1 January 2007 Summary Introduction. This Environmental Assessment (EA) provides information and analyses of proposed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with constructing and operating a new Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) complex on DOE property located in Benton County, north of Richland, Washington. The proposed PSF would replace a number of existing research laboratories in the Hanford

392

Performance of the beamlet laser, a testbed for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present initial performance studies for Beamlet, a single-beam prototype for megajoule-class neodymium-glass laser fusion drivers using a multipass main amplifier, adaptive optics, and efficient, high-fluence conversion to the third harmonic. The Beamlet final amplifier uses Brewsters-angle glass slabs with a square 39 {times} 39 cm{sup 2} aperture and a full-aperture plasma-electrode Pockels cell switch. The laser has been tested at the fundamental wavelength over a range of pulselengths from 1-10 ns up to energies of 5.8 kJ at 10 ns and 17.3 kJ at 10 ns at a beam area of 35 {times} 35 cm{sup 2}. A 39-actuator deformable mirror system corrects the beam to a Strehl ratio of 0.4.

van Wonterghem, B.M.; Caird, J.A.; Barker, C.E.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.R.; Speck, D.R.

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Models used to assess the performance of photovoltaic systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization. Energy storage plays an important role in reducing PV intermittency and battery storage models are used to understand the best configurations and technologies to store PV generated electricity. Other researcher's models used by SNL are discussed including some widely known models that incorporate algorithms developed at SNL. There are other models included in the discussion that are not used by or were not adopted from SNL research but may provide some benefit to researchers working on PV array performance, hybrid system models and energy storage. The paper is organized into three sections to describe the different software models as applied to photovoltaic performance, hybrid systems, and battery storage. For each model, there is a description which includes where to find the model, whether it is currently maintained and any references that may be available. Modeling improvements underway at SNL include quantifying the uncertainty of individual system components, the overall uncertainty in modeled vs. measured results and modeling large PV systems. SNL is also conducting research into the overall reliability of PV systems.

Stein, Joshua S.; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Integrated Substation Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment Tool for Asset Management and Smart Grid Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and risk management are key elements in any well-developed asset management plan, and an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to improving their ability to understand and make risk-based decisions. Consequently, there is growing interest in the tools and methodologies required to better assess equipment performance and risk and provide quantitative information to drive asset management decision processes. In addition, risk and performance assessment tools can be in...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

PU/SS EUTECTIC ASSESSMENT IN 9975 PACKAGINGS IN A STORAGE FACILITY DURING EXTENDED FIRE  

SciTech Connect

In a radioactive material (RAM) packaging, the formation of eutectic at the Pu/SS (plutonium/stainless steel) interface is a serious concern and must be avoided to prevent of leakage of fissile material to the environment. The eutectic temperature for the Pu/SS is rather low (410 C) and could seriously impact the structural integrity of the containment vessel under accident conditions involving fire. The 9975 packaging is used for long term storage of Pu bearing materials in the DOE complex where the Pu comes in contact with the stainless steel containment vessel. Due to the serious consequences of the containment breach at the eutectic site, the Pu/SS interface temperature is kept well below the eutectic formation temperature of 410 C. This paper discusses the thermal models and the results for the extended fire conditions (1500 F for 86 minutes) that exist in a long term storage facility and concludes that the 9975 packaging Pu/SS interface temperature is well below the eutectic temperature.

Gupta, N.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

396

Technical assessment of workplace air sampling requirements at tank farm facilities. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WHC-CM-1-6 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). It was written to implement DOE N 5480.6 ``US Department of Energy Radiological Control Manual`` as it applies to programs at Hanford which are now overseen by WHC. As such, it complies with Title 10, Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In addition to WHC-CM-1-6, there is HSRCM-1, the ``Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual`` and several Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, national consensus standards, and reports that provide criteria, standards, and requirements for workplace air sampling programs. This document provides a summary of these, as they apply to WHC facility workplace air sampling programs. This document also provides an evaluation of the compliance of Tank Farms` workplace air sampling program to the criteria, standards, and requirements and documents compliance with the requirements where appropriate. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance.

Olsen, P.A.

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Style, content and format guide for writing safety analysis documents: Volume 2, Safety assessment reports for DOE non-nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Volume 2 of this 4-volume style guide is to furnish guidelines on writing and publishing Safety Assessment Reports (SAs) for DOE non-nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories. The scope of Volume 2 encompasses not only the general guidelines for writing and publishing, but also the prescribed topics/appendices contents along with examples from typical SAs for DOE non-nuclear facilities.

Mahn, J.A.; Silver, R.C.; Balas, Y.; Gilmore, W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Pressurized Items and Cryogens Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pressurized Systems and Cryogens Pressurized Systems and Cryogens Performance Objective: Assure personnel health and safety through regularly scheduled inspections and maintenance on pressure vessels and equipment, compressed gases and gas cylinders, vacuum equipment and systems, hydraulics, and cryogenic materials and systems. Performance Criteria: BN inspects, operates and safely stores unmodified compressed-gas or liquid cylinders approved by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the appropriate regulators. BN inspects, operates and maintains refrigeration systems that comply with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes, and applicable Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) standards. BN inspects, operates and maintains pressure systems that operate at an

399

Photovoltaic field test performance assessment, 1986: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance, operation and maintenance of three large photovoltaic plants for calendar year 1986 were analyzed. The plants examined were Arizona Public Service Company's Sky Harbor plant in Phoenix, Sacramento Municipal Utility District's PV1 and PV2 systems in Sacramento County, California, and Arco Solar's plant near the Lugo substation in Hesperia, California. Hourly data were obtained from each plant's data acquisition system and calculations made of the following: (1) energy production; (2) system ratings; normalized to standard conditions used in the industry; (3) efficiency; (4) availability; (5) capacity factor. Operation, maintenance, and repair activities were examined by component for the three plants, and operation and maintenance costs were determined for Phoenix and the SMUD systems. 6 refs., 65 figs., 6 tabs.

Stokes, K.W.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Photovoltaic field test performance assessment, 1987: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Under contract to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Southwest Technology Development Institute analyzed the performance, operation and maintenance of four large photovoltaic plants for calendar year 1987. The plants examined were the City of Austin's plant in Austin, Texas, Arco Solar's plant near the Lugo substation in Hesperia, California, Sacramento Municipal Utility District's PV1 and PV2 systems in Sacramento County, California, and Arizona Public Service Company's Sky Harbor plant in Phoenix, Arizona. Hourly data were obtained from each plant's data acquisition system and calculations made of the following: Energy production, System ratings, normalized to standard conditions used in the industry, Efficiency, Availability, Capacity factor. Operation, maintenance, and repair activities were examined by subsystem/component for the four plants, and unscheduled operation and maintenance costs were determined. 12 refs., 77 refs., 9 tabs.

Stokes, K.W.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Efficiency - Assessment and Analysis of Energy Consumption at TAMK Kuntokatu 3 Campus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The energy efficiency assessment, implemented at Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Kuntokatu 3 campus, investigated the efficiency performance of the campus buildings. Facility Assessment is… (more)

Emuraishe, Irikefe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Revised: March 1, 2010 i ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY SAFETY ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NFPA Standards. 07.A.09 If work is to be performed at night, a night operations' lighting plan shall outdoor - tunnels and general underground work areas (minimum 110 lux required at tunnel and shaft heading during drilling, mucking, and scaling) 110 50 110 10 5 10 Conveyor routes 110 10 Dam Operating Areas

Brookhaven National Laboratory

403

Tools and Methods to Perform Live Work on Reduced-Clearance Facilities: Electrical Performance of Pole Wraps and Guards: Electrical Performance of Pole Wraps and Guards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To ensure that transmission lines remain in service every day of the year, transmission owners are increasingly turning to live-line working techniques as standard practice. Earlier EPRI research showed that the ac performance of pole wraps and guards holds promise for use above stated ratings in live-line work. This report summarizes the results obtained from recent tests on pole wraps using ac and switching impulse voltages.

2003-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

Experiences with early life-cycle performance modeling for architecture assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe our preliminary experiences of a performance modeling "Blending" approach for early life-cycle architecture assessment and risk mitigation in a large enterprise integration project. The goal was to use performance modeling to ... Keywords: blended performance modeling, early life-cycle risk mitigation

Paul C. Brebner

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Supercomputing | Facilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Systems Infrastructure High Performance Storage Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Facilities and Capabilities...

406

Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

66 of 864 66 of 864 3.0 DISPOSAL FACILITY CHARACTERISTICS Section 3.1 provides information regarding site characteristics including detailed information furnished for those characteristics that influence the contaminant transport modeling assumptions provided in Chapter 4. ï‚· Section 3.1.1 provides a general description and layout of the site and the HTF to orient the reader and includes the current (as of 2009) estimated population distribution of the surrounding area as well as future land use planning for information purposes. ï‚· Section 3.1.2 describes meteorological and climatological data collection at SRS. This data collection determines appropriate modeling assumptions related to rainfall and temperature to assess the performance of the HTF closure cap presented in SRNL-ESB-

408

Nuclear power plant performance assessment pertaining to plant aging in France and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of aging on nuclear power plant performance has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The approaches used to make an assessment of this effect strongly influence the economics of nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment Summary at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities; Willamette River Basin, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat based assessments were conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, to determine losses or gains to wildlife and/or wildlife habitat resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the facilities. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project sites were mapped based on aerial photographs. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected areas and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the projects. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each project for each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the projects. The Willamette projects extensively altered or affected 33,407 acres of land and river in the McKenzie, Middle Fork Willamette, and Santiam river drainages. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 5184 acres of old-growth conifer forest, and 2850 acres of riparian hardwood and shrub cover types. Impacts resulting from the Willamette projects included the loss of critical winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, upland game birds, furbearers, spotted owls, pileated woodpeckers, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagles and ospreys were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected areas to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Willamette projects. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the lives of the projects. Cumulative or system-wide impacts of the Willamette projects were not quantitatively assessed.

Noyes, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Risk-Informed and Performance-Based Safety Culture Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update of the risk management effectiveness assessment (RMEA) described in EPRI Report 1011761, Risk Management Effectiveness Assessment Application Guide. This update was performed to evaluate the capability of the RMEA to assess the effectiveness of the plant safety culture. The update considered results reported in the research literature since the 2005 publication of the application guide. It also evaluated the RMEA against the safety culture components identified by the U.S. ...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

EPRI Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment Code (IMARC) Version 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1989, EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level radioactive waste (HLW) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. EPRI pioneered application of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) approach for evaluating performance of geologic repository systems on a probabilistic basis. Along the way, EPRI developed the Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code (IMARC) as its primary analytical tool for ...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

April 27, 2010, Department letter transmitting revised Implementation Plan for Recommendation 2009-1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 27, 20 10 April 27, 20 10 The Honorable Peter S. Winokur Chairman Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana Avenue, NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20004-294 1 Dear Mr. Chairman: In a letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board dated February 1, 20 10, I reaffirmed our acceptance of Recommendation 2009- 1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities, and committed to several changes to the Department's Plan for implementing the recommendations therein. Enclosed please find the revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safity Board Recommendation 2009-1 that incorporates those changes. I want to express my thanks for your staffs input on this revision and look forward to similar contributions as we revise the Department's Nuclear Safety Policy and implement

413

Facility Representative Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

414

An appraisal of the 1992 preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The WIPP Project, located in southeastern New Mexico, is being constructed as a repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes generated by the national defense programs. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has reviewed the WIPP 1992 Performance Assessment (Sandia WIPP Performance Assessment Department, 1992). Although this performance assessment was released after the October 1992 passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (PL 102-579), the work preceded the Act. For individual and ground-water protection, calculations have been done for 1000 years post closure, whereas the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Standards (40 CFR 191) issued in 1993 require calculations for 10,000 years. The 1992 Performance Assessment continues to assimilate improved understanding of the geology and hydrogeology of the site, and evolving conceptual models of natural barriers. Progress has been made towards assessing WIPP`s compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Standards (40 CFR 191). The 1992 Performance Assessment has addressed several items of major concern to EEG, outlined in the July 1992 review of the 1991 performance assessment (Neill et al., 1992). In particular, the authors are pleased that some key results in this performance assessment deal with sensitivity of the calculated complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDF) to alterative conceptual models proposed by EEG -- that flow in the Culebra be treated as single-porosity fracture-flow; with no sorption retardation unless substantiated by experimental data.

Lee, W.W.L.; Chaturvedi, L.; Silva, M.K.; Weiner, R.; Neill, R.H. [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Environmental Evaluation Group, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT TO SUPPORT CLOSURE OF SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTE MANAGEMENT AREA C AT THE HANFORD SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current proposed regulatory agreements (Consent Decree) at the Hanford Site call for closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C in the year 2019. WMA C is part of the SST system in 200 East area ofthe Hanford Site and is one of the first tank farm areas built in mid-1940s. In order to close WMA C, both tank and facility closure activities and corrective actions associated with existing soil and groundwater contamination must be performed. Remedial activities for WMA C and corrective actions for soils and groundwater within that system will be supported by various types of risk assessments and interim performance assessments (PA). The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the State ofWashington Department of Ecology (Ecology) are sponsoring a series of working sessions with regulators and stakeholders to solicit input and to obtain a common understanding concerning the scope, methods, and data to be used in the planned risk assessments and PAs to support closure of WMA C. In addition to DOE-ORP and Ecology staff and contractors, working session members include representatives from the U.S. Enviromnental Protection A