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1

2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility 2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility This Performance Assessment (PA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) was prepared to support the operation and eventual closure of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). This PA was prepared to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Change 1, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter IV, and Title 10, of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Subpart C as required by the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, Section 3116. [DOE O 435.1-1, 10 CFR 61, NDAA_3116]

2

Performance assessment for the class L-II disposal facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This draft radiological performance assessment (PA) for the proposed Class L-II Disposal Facility (CIIDF) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. This PA considers the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) over the operating life of the facility and the long-term performance of the facility in providing protection to public health and the environment. The performance objectives contained in the order require that the facility be managed to accomplish the following: (1) Protect public health and safety in accordance with standards specified in environmental health orders and other DOE orders. (2) Ensure that external exposure to the waste and concentrations of radioactive material that may be released into surface water, groundwater, soil, plants, and animals results in an effective dose equivalent (EDE) that does not exceed 25 mrem/year to a member of the public. Releases to the atmosphere shall meet the requirements of 40 CFR Pt. 61. Reasonable effort should be made to maintain releases of radioactivity in effluents to the general environment as low as reasonably achievable. (1) Ensure that the committed EDEs received by individual who inadvertently may intrude into the facility after the loss of active institutional control (100 years) will not exceed 100 mrem/year for continuous exposure of 500 mrem for a single acute exposure. (4) Protect groundwater resources, consistent with federal, state, and local requirements.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performing Energy Security Assessments - Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers ii Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................ v 1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Facilities to be Assessed...........................................................................................................................1 2. BEGINNING THE ENERGY SECURITY ASSESSMENT PROCESS ............................... 2 2.1 Assign an Energy Security Manager .........................................................................................................2 2.2 Define the Mission of the Installation

4

Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performing Energy Security Assessments - Performing Energy Security Assessments - A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers ii Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................ v 1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Facilities to be Assessed...........................................................................................................................1 2. BEGINNING THE ENERGY SECURITY ASSESSMENT PROCESS ............................... 2 2.1 Assign an Energy Security Manager .........................................................................................................2 2.2 Define the Mission of the Installation

5

Performance assessment handbook for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessments of proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities must be conducted to support licensing. This handbook provides a reference document that can be used as a resource by management and staff responsible for performance assessments. Brief discussions describe the performance assessment process and emphasize selected critical aspects of the process. References are also provided for additional information on many aspects of the performance assessment process. The user's manual for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program's Performance Assessment Center (PAC) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cray computer is included as Appendix A. The PAC provides users an opportunity to experiment with a number of performance assessment computer codes on a Cray computer. Appendix B describes input data required for 22 performance assessment codes.

Seitz, R.R.; Garcia, R.S.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Starmer, R.J.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Performing Energy Security Assessments- A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Guide describes the best practices and recommended process for federal facility managers to prepare for the following sections of a facility’s energy security plan: vulnerability assessments, energy preparedness and operations plans, and remedial action plans.

7

Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools and resources for next-generation systems.

Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NERSC 2011 High Performance Computing Facility Operationalby providing high-performance computing, information, data,s deep knowledge of high performance computing to overcome

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Second performance assessment iteration of the Greater Confinement Disposal facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) facility was established in Area 5 at the Nevada Test Site for containment of waste inappropriate for shallow land burial. Some transuranic (TRU) waste has been disposed of at the GCD facility, and compliance of this disposal system with EPA regulation 40 CFR 191 must be evaluated. We have adopted an iterative approach in which performance assessment results guide site data collection, which in turn influences the parameters and models used in performance assessment. The first iteration was based upon readily available data, and indicated that the GCD facility would likely comply with 40 CFR 191 and that the downward flux of water through the vadose zone (recharge) had a major influence on the results. Very large recharge rates, such as might occur under a cooler, wetter climate, could result in noncompliance. A project was initiated to study recharge in Area 5 by use of three environmental tracers. The recharge rate is so small that the nearest groundwater aquifer will not be contaminated in less than 10,000 years. Thus upward liquid diffusion of radionuclides remained as the sole release pathway. This second assessment iteration refined the upward pathway models and updated the parameter distributions based upon new site information. A new plant uptake model was introduced to the upward diffusion pathway; adsorption and erosion were also incorporated into the model. Several modifications were also made to the gas phase radon transport model. Plutonium solubility and sorption coefficient distributions were changed based upon new information, and on-site measurements were used to update the moisture content distributions. The results of the assessment using these models indicate that the GCD facility is likely to comply with all sections of 40 CFR 191 under undisturbed conditions.

Baer, T.A.; Emery, J.N. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Price, L.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olague, N.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

E AREA LOW LEVEL WASTE FACILITY DOE 435.1 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Performance Assessment for the Savannah River Site E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility was prepared to meet requirements of Chapter IV of the Department of Energy Order 435.1-1. The Order specifies that a Performance Assessment should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The Order also requires assessments of impacts to water resources and to hypothetical inadvertent intruders for purposes of establishing limits on radionuclides that may be disposed near-surface. According to the Order, calculations of potential doses and releases from the facility should address a 1,000-year period after facility closure. The point of compliance for the performance measures relevant to the all pathways and air pathway performance objective, as well as to the impact on water resources assessment requirement, must correspond to the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste following the assumed end of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure. During the operational and institutional control periods, the point of compliance for the all pathways and air pathway performance measures is the SRS boundary. However, for the water resources impact assessment, the point of compliance remains the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste during the operational and institutional control periods. For performance measures relevant to radon and inadvertent intruders, the points of compliance are the disposal facility surface for all time periods and the disposal facility after the assumed loss of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure, respectively. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is located in the central region of the SRS known as the General Separations Area. It is an elbow-shaped, cleared area, which curves to the northwest, situated immediately north of the Mixed Waste Management Facility. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is comprised of 200 acres for waste disposal and a surrounding buffer zone that extends out to the 100-m point of compliance. Disposal units within the footprint of the low-level waste facilities include the Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Component-in-Grout Trenches, the Low-Activity Waste Vault, the Intermediate-Level Vault, and the Naval Reactor Component Disposal Area. Radiological waste disposal operations at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility began in 1994. E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility closure will be conducted in three phases: operational closure, interim closure, and final closure. Operational closure will be conducted during the 25-year operation period (30-year period for Slit and Engineered Trenches) as disposal units are filled; interim closure measures will be taken for some units. Interim closure will take place following the end of operations and will consist of an area-wide runoff cover along with additional grading over the trench units. Final closure of all disposal units in the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility will take place at the end of the 100-year institutional control period and will consist of the installation of an integrated closure system designed to minimize moisture contact with the waste and to serve as a deterrent to intruders. Radiological dose to human receptors is analyzed in this PA in the all-pathways analysis, the inadvertent intruder analysis and the air pathway analysis, and the results are compared to the relevant performance measures. For the all-pathways analysis, the performance measure of relevance is a 25-mrem/yr EDE to representative members of the public, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. For the inadvertent intruder, the applicable performance measures are 100-mrem/yr EDE and 500 mrem/yr EDE for chronic and exposure scenarios, respectively. The relevant performance measure for the air pathway is 10-mrem/yr EDE via the air pathway, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. Protecti

Wilhite, E

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Development of an ASTM standard guide on performing vulnerability assessments for nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an effort undertaken by subcommittee C26.12 (Safeguards) of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) to develop a standard guide for performing vulnerability assessments (VAs). VAs are performed to determine the effectiveness of safeguards and security systems for both domestic and international nuclear facilities. These assessments address a range of threats, including theft of nuclear material and sabotage, and use an array of methods. The approach to performing and documenting VAs is varied and is largely dependent upon the tools used to perform them. This diversity can lead to tools being misused, making validation of VAs more difficult. The development of a standard guide for performing VAs would, if generally accepted, alleviate these concerns. ASTM provides a forum for developing guides that includes a high level of peer review to assure that the result is acceptable to all potential users. Additionally, the ASTM is widely recognized for setting standards, and endorsement by the Society may increase the likelihood of acceptance by the nuclear community. The goal of this work is to develop a guide that is independent of the tools being used to perform the VA and applicable to the spectrum of threats described above.

Wilkey, D.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Performance Assessment Program for the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Facilities - 13610  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Liquid Waste facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) are operated by Liquid Waste Operations contractor Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR). A separate Performance Assessment (PA) is prepared to support disposal operations at the Saltstone Disposal Facility and closure evaluations for the two liquid waste tank farm facilities at SRS, F-Tank Farm and H-Tank Farm. A PA provides the technical basis and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements identified in operations and closure regulatory guidance. The Saltstone Disposal Facility is subject to a State of South Carolina industrial solid waste landfill permit and the tank farms are subject to a state industrial waste water permit. The three Liquid Waste facilities are also subject to a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Due to the regulatory structure, a PA is a key technical document reviewed by the DOE, the State of South Carolina and the EPA. As the waste material disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility and the residual material in the closed tank farms is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is also a reviewing agency for the PAs. Pursuant to the Act, the NRC also has a continuing role to monitor disposal actions to assess compliance with stated performance objectives. The Liquid Waste PA program at SRS represents a continual process over the life of the disposal and closure operations. When the need for a PA or PA revision is identified, the first step is to develop a conceptual model to best represent the facility conditions. The conceptual model will include physical dimensions of the closed system, both the engineered and natural system, and modeling input parameters associated with the modeled features, both initial values (at the time of facility closure) and degradation rates/values. During the development of the PA, evaluations are conducted to reflect not only the results associated with the best available information at the time but also to evaluate potential uncertainties and sensitivities associated with the modeled system. While the PA will reflect the modeled system results from the best available information, it will also identify areas for future work to reduce overall PA uncertainties moving forward. DOE requires a PA Maintenance Program such that work continues to reduce model uncertainties, thus bolstering confidence in PA results that support regulatory decisions. This maintenance work may include new Research and Development activities or modeling as informed by previous PA results and other new information that becomes available. As new information becomes available, it is evaluated against previous PAs and appropriate actions are taken to ensure continued confidence in the regulatory decisions. Therefore, the PA program is a continual process that is not just the development of a PA but seeks to incorporate new information to reduce overall model uncertainty and provide continuing confidence in regulatory decisions. (author)

Rosenberger, Kent H. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Building 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Building 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Program Plan for Revision of the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Saltstone Project, are embarking on the next revision to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) performance assessment (PA). This program plan has been prepared to outline the general approach, scope, schedule and resources for the PA revision. The plan briefly describes the task elements of the PA process. It discusses critical PA considerations in the development of conceptual models and interpretation of results. Applicable quality assurance (QA) requirements are identified and the methods for implementing QA for both software and documentation are described. The plan identifies project resources supporting the core team and providing project oversight. Program issues and risks are identified as well as mitigation of those risks. Finally, a preliminary program schedule has been developed and key deliverables identified. A number of significant changes have been implemented since the last PA revision resulting in a new design for future SDF disposal units. This revision will encompass the existing and planned disposal units, PA critical radionuclides and exposure pathways important to SDF performance. An integrated analysis of the overall facility layout, including all disposal units, will be performed to assess the impact of plume overlap on PA results. Finally, a rigorous treatment of uncertainty will be undertaken using probabilistic simulations. This analysis will be reviewed and approved by DOE-SR, DOE-HQ and potentially the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This revision will be completed and ready for the start of the DOE review at the end of December 2006. This work supports a Saltstone Vault 2 fee-bearing milestone. This milestone includes completion of the Vault 2 module of the PA revision by the end of FY06.

Cook, James R.

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

15

Recharge Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assisted CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., (CHG) by providing estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The IDF will be located in the 200 East Area at the Hanford Site and will receive several types of waste including immobilized low-activity waste. The recharge estimates for each scenario were derived from lysimeter and tracer data collected by the IDF PA Project and from modeling studies conducted for the project. Recharge estimates were provided for three specific site features (the surface barrier; possible barrier side slopes; and the surrounding soil) and four specific time periods (pre-Hanford; Hanford operations; surface barrier design life; post-barrier design life). CHG plans to conduct a performance assessment of the latest IDF design and call it the IDF 2005 PA; this recharge data package supports the upcoming IDF 2005 PA.

Fayer, Michael J.; Szecsody, Jim E.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

How expensive is Big Science? Consequences of using simple publication counts in performance assessment of large scientific facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the nuclear era and the Cold War superpower competition have long since passed, governments are still investing in Big Science, although these large facilities are nowadays mostly geared towards areas of use closer to utility. Investments in ... Keywords: Big Science, Performance assessment, Productivity, Publication counts, Quality assessment

Olof Hallonsten

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment Charley Yu*, Argonne National Laboratory ; Emmanuel Gnanapragasam, Argonne National Laboratory; Carlos Corredor, U.S. Department of Energy; W. Alexander Williams, U.S. Department of Energy Abstract: The RESRAD-OFFSITE code was developed to evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of initial (primary) contamination. The primary contamination, which is the source of all releases modeled by the code, is assumed to be a layer of soil. The code considers the release of contamination from the source to the atmosphere, to surface runoff, and to groundwater. The radionuclide leaching was modeled as a first order (without transport) release using radionuclide distribution coefficient and infiltration rate calculated from water balance (precipitation, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, etc.). Recently, a new source term model was added the RESRAD-OFFSITE code so that it can be applied to the evaluation of Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal facility performance assessment. This new improved source term model include (1) first order with transport, (2) equilibrium desorption (rinse) release, and (3) uniform release (constant dissolution). With these new source release options, it is possible to simulate both uncontainerized (soil) contamination and containerized (waste drums) contamination. A delay time in the source release was also added to the code. This allows modeling the LLW container degradation as a function of time. The RESRAD-OFFSITE code also allows linking to other codes using improved flux and concentration input options. Additional source release model such as diffusion release may be added later. In addition, radionuclide database with 1252 radionuclides (ICRP 107) and the corresponding dose coefficients (DCFPAK 3.02) and the Department of Energy’s new gender- and age-averaged Reference Person dose coefficients (DOE-STD-1196-2011) which is based on the US census data will be added to the next version of RESRAD-OFFSITE code.

18

The assess facility descriptor module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Facility Descriptor (Facility) module is part of the Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS). Facility is the foundational software application in the ASSESS system for modelling a nuclear facility's safeguards and security system to determine the effectiveness against theft of special nuclear material. The Facility module provides the tools for an analyst to define a complete description of a facility's physical protection system which can then be used by other ASSESS software modules to determine vulnerability to a spectrum of insider and outsider threats. The analyst can enter a comprehensive description of the protection system layout including all secured areas, target locations, and detailed safeguards specifications. An extensive safeguard component catalog provides the reference data for calculating delay and detection performance. Multiple target locations within the same physical area may be specified, and the facility may be defined for two different operational states such as dayshift and nightshift. 6 refs., 5 figs.

Jordan, S.E.; Winblad, A.; Key, B.; Walker, S.; Renis, T.; Saleh, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Waste Form Release Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package documents the experimentally derived input data on the representative waste glasses; LAWA44, LAWB45, and LAWC22. This data will be used for Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases (STORM) simulations of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) for immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The STORM code will be used to provide the near-field radionuclide release source term for a performance assessment to be issued in July 2005. Documented in this data package are data related to 1) kinetic rate law parameters for glass dissolution, 2) alkali (Na+)-hydrogen (H+) ion exchange rate, 3) chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form in accelerated weathering tests, and 4) thermodynamic equilibrium constants assigned to these secondary phases. The kinetic rate law and Na+-H+ ion exchange rate were determined from single-pass flow-through experiments. Pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) and product consistency (PCT) tests where used for accelerated weathering or aging of the glasses in order to determine a chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form. The majority of the thermodynamic data used in this data package were extracted from the thermody-namic database package shipped with the geochemical code EQ3/6, version 8.0. Because of the expected importance of 129I release from secondary waste streams being sent to IDF from various thermal treatment processes, parameter estimates for diffusional release and solubility-controlled release from cementitious waste forms were estimated from the available literature.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Saripalli, Prasad; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, P. F.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Reed, Lunde R.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Abstract: The RESRAD-OFFSITE code was developed to evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of initial (primary) contamination. The primary contamination, which is the source of all releases modeled by the code, is assumed to be a layer of soil. The code considers the release of contamination from the source to the atmosphere, to surface runoff, and to groundwater. The radionuclide leaching was modeled as a first order (without transport) release using radionuclide distribution coefficient and infiltration rate calculated from water balance (precipitation, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, etc.). Recently, a new source term model was added the RESRAD-OFFSITE code so that it can be applied to the evaluation of Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal facility performance assessment. This new improved source term model include (1) first order with transport, (2) equilibrium desorption (rinse) release, and (3) uniform release (constant dissolution). With these new source release options, it is possible to simulate both uncontainerized (soil) contamination and containerized (waste drums) contamination. A delay time in the source release was also added to the code. This allows modeling the LLW container degradation as a function of time. The RESRAD-OFFSITE code also allows linking to other codes using improved flux and concentration input options. Additional source release model such as diffusion release may be added later. In addition, radionuclide database with 1252 radionuclides (ICRP 107) and the corresponding dose coefficients (DCFPAK 3.02) and the Department of Energy’s new gender- and age-averaged Reference Person dose coefficients (DOE-STD-1196-2011) which is based on the US census data will be added to the next version of RESRAD-OFFSITE code

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Radiological performance assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The E-Area Vaults (EAVs) located on a 200 acre site immediately north of the current LLW burial site at Savannah River Site will provide a new disposal and storage site for solid, low-level, non-hazardous radioactive waste. The EAV Disposal Facility will contain several large concrete vaults divided into cells. Three types of structures will house four designated waste types. The Intermediate Level Non-Tritium Vaults will receive waste radiating greater than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container. The Intermediate Level Tritium Vaults will receive waste with at least 10 Ci of tritium per package. These two vaults share a similar design, are adjacent, share waste handling equipment, and will be closed as one facility. The second type of structure is the Low Activity Waste Vaults which will receive waste radiating less than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container and containing less than 10 Ci of tritium per package. The third facility, the Long Lived Waste Storage Building, provides covered, long term storage for waste containing long lived isotopes. Two additional types of disposal are proposed: (1) trench disposal of suspect soil, (2) naval reactor component disposal. To evaluate the long-term performance of the EAVs, site-specific conceptual models were developed to consider: (1) exposure pathways and scenarios of potential importance; (2) potential releases from the facility to the environment; (3) effects of degradation of engineered features; (4) transport in the environment; (5) potential doses received from radionuclides of interest in each vault type.

Cook, J.R.; Hunt, P.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

RCRA facility assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) broadened the authorities of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by requiring corrective action for releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents at treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. The goal of the corrective action process is to ensure the remediation of hazardous waste and hazardous constituent releases associated with TSD facilities. Under Section 3004(u) of RCRA, operating permits issued to TSD facilities must address corrective actions for all releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from any solid waste management unit (SWMU) regardless of when the waste was placed in such unit. Under RCRA Section 3008(h), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may issue administrative orders to compel corrective action at facilities authorized to operate under RCRA Section 3005(e) (i.e., interim status facilities). The process of implementing the Corrective Action program involves the following, in order of implementation; (1) RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA); (2) RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI); (3) the Corrective Measures Study (CMS); and (4) Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI). The RFA serves to identify and evaluate SWMUs with respect to releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents, and to eliminate from further consideration SWMUs that do not pose a threat to human health or the environment. This Information Brief will discuss issues concerning the RFA process.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Environmental Assessment of Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 0 DOEEA-0930 Environmental Assessment of Facility Operations at the US. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Off ice, Grand Junction, Colorado June 1996 U S . Deparfment of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Finding of No Significant Impact, Facility Operations at the U . S . Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION Finding of No Sigdkant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide o S T ~ environmental assessment (EA) @OE/EA-0930) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects office (GJPO) facility

24

Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from the commercial facilities. In support of the development of the CRWMS, OCRWM sponsored the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project. The objective of this project was to assess the capability of each commercial facility to handle various spent nuclear fuel shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. The project was conducted in two phases. During Phase I, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the data base for the project was created. During Phase II, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the data base was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed.

Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States); Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Annual summary of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment for 2003 Incorporating the Integrated Disposal Facility Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To Erik Olds 09/30/03 - An annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a full performance assessment is not issued.

MANN, F M

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to present and analyze the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. During Phase 1, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the database for the project was created. During Phase 2, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the database was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed. Each assessment of cask-handling capability contains three parts: the current capability of the facility (planning base); the potential enhanced capability if revisions were made to the facility licensing and/or administrative controls; and the potential enhanced capability if limited physical modifications were made to the facility. The main conclusion derived from the planning base assessments is that the current facility capabilities will not allow handling of any of the FICA Casks at 49 of the 122 facilities evaluated. However, consideration of potential revisions and/or modifications showed that all but one of the 49 facilities could be adapted to handle at least one of the FICA Casks. For this to be possible, facility licensing, administrative controls, and/or physical aspects of the facility would need to be modified.

Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); MacDonald, R.R. [ed.] [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Vienna, VA (United States); Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

340 Facility compliance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provides an environmental compliance evaluation of the RLWS and the RPS systems of the 340 Facility. The emphasis of the evaluation centers on compliance with WAC requirements for hazardous and mixed waste facilities, federal regulations, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) requirements pertinent to the operation of the 340 Facility. The 340 Facility is not covered under either an interim status Part A permit or a RCRA Part B permit. The detailed discussion of compliance deficiencies are summarized in Section 2.0. This includes items of significance that require action to ensure facility compliance with WAC, federal regulations, and WHC requirements. Outstanding issues exist for radioactive airborne effluent sampling and monitoring, radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, non-radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, less than 90 day waste storage tanks, and requirements for a permitted facility.

English, S.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System Facilities Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System ­ Facilities Center I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: Facilities Management System - FacilityCenter 2. IT System Sponsor: Office. IT System Manager: Michelle T. Gooch, Facilities Management Systems Manager 5. PIA Author: Michelle T. Gooch

Mathis, Wayne N.

29

Estimation of natural ground water recharge for the performance assessment of a low-level waste disposal facility at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initiated the Recharge Task, under the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project, to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Recharge Task was established to address the issue of ground water recharge in and around the LLW facility and throughout the Hanford Site as it affects the unconfined aquifer under the facility. The objectives of this report are to summarize the current knowledge of natural ground water recharge at the Hanford Site and to outline the work that must be completed in order to provide defensible estimates of recharge for use in the performance assessment of this LLW disposal facility. Recharge studies at the Hanford Site indicate that recharge rates are highly variable, ranging from nearly zero to greater than 100 mm/yr depending on precipitation, vegetative cover, and soil types. Coarse-textured soils without plants yielded the greatest recharge. Finer-textured soils, with or without plants, yielded the least. Lysimeters provided accurate, short-term measurements of recharge as well as water-balance data for the soil-atmosphere interface and root zone. Tracers provided estimates of longer-term average recharge rates in undisturbed settings. Numerical models demonstrated the sensitivity of recharge rates to different processes and forecast recharge rates for different conditions. All of these tools (lysimetry, tracers, and numerical models) are considered vital to the development of defensible estimates of natural ground water recharge rates for the performance assessment of a LLW disposal facility at the Hanford Site.

Rockhold, M.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kincaid, C.T.; Gee, G.W.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Energy Performance Contracting in State Facilities | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Contracting in State Facilities Energy Performance Contracting in State Facilities Provides a brief overview of the performance contracting process, the benefits of using...

31

Superior Energy Performance Industrial Facility Best Practice...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Facility Best Practice Scorecard to assess the maturity of the facility's energy management system. This scorecard describes credits that can be earned by implementing...

32

Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy...

33

Power Systems Development Facility. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the PSDF would be to provide a modular facility which would support the development of advanced, pilot-scale, coal-based power systems and hot gas clean-up components. These pilot-scale components would be designed to be large enough so that the results can be related and projected to commercial systems. The facility would use a modular approach to enhance the flexibility and capability for testing; consequently, overall capital and operating costs when compared with stand-alone facilities would be reduced by sharing resources common to different modules. The facility would identify and resolve technical barrier, as well as-provide a structure for long-term testing and performance assessment. It is also intended that the facility would evaluate the operational and performance characteristics of the advanced power systems with both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Five technology-based experimental modules are proposed for the PSDF: (1) an advanced gasifier module, (2) a fuel cell test module, (3) a PFBC module, (4) a combustion gas turbine module, and (5) a module comprised of five hot gas cleanup particulate control devices. The final module, the PCD, would capture coal-derived ash and particles from both the PFBC and advanced gasifier gas streams to provide for overall particulate emission control, as well as to protect the combustion turbine and the fuel cell.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Superior Energy Performance Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Industrial facilities seeking to use the Mature Energy Pathway to qualify for Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) certification will use the SEP Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard to assess the maturity of the facility’s energy management system. This scorecard describes credits that can be earned by implementing energy management system activities, processes or procedures that are “above and beyond” the requirements of ISO 50001.

35

CRAD, Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan CRAD, Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan Performance Objective: The purpose of this assessment is verify and validate the process for the development of operations procedures and that procedures are in place which provide direction to personnel to ensure that the facility is operated within its design bases. Criteria: Operations procedures should be written to provide specific direction for operating systems and equipment during normal and postulated abnormal and emergency conditions. (DOE O 5480.19 A) Operations procedures should provide appropriate direction to ensure that the facility is operated within its design bases and should be effectively used to support safe operations of the facility. (DOE O

36

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance .Employees shall be encouraged to become involved in the identification and control of hazards in the workplace. (DOE O 440.1A CRD) Workers shall have the right, without reprisal, to accompany DOE worker

37

NETL's Hybrid Performance, or Hyper, facility  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Hybrid Performance, or Hyper, facility is a one-of-a-kind laboratory built to develop control strategies for the reliable operation of fuel cell/turbine hybrids and enable the simulation, design, and implementation of commercial equipment. The Hyper facility provides a unique opportunity for researchers to explore issues related to coupling fuel cell and gas turbine technologies.

None

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

Context for performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In developing its recommendations on performance assessment for disposal of low-level radioactive waste, Scientific committee 87-3 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has considered a number of topics that provide a context for the development of suitable approaches to performance assessment. This paper summarizes the Committee` discussions on these topics, including (1) the definition of low-level waste and its sources and properties, as they affect the variety of wastes that must be considered, (2) fundamental objectives and principles of radioactive waste disposal and their application to low-level waste, (3) current performance objectives for low-level waste disposal in the US, with particular emphasis on such unresolved issues of importance to performance assessment as the time frame for compliance, requirements for protection of groundwater and surface water, inclusion of doses from radon, demonstrating compliance with fixed performance objectives using highly uncertain model projections, and application of the principle that releases to the environment should be maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (4) the role of active and passive institutional controls over disposal sites, (5) the role of the inadvertent human intruder in low-level waste disposal, (6) model validation and confidence in model outcomes, and (7) the concept of reasonable assurance of compliance.

Kocher, D.C.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Preliminary melter performance assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melter Performance Assessment activity, a component of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) effort, was designed to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) melter. The melter performance assessment consisted of several activities, including a literature review of all work done with noble metals in glass, gradient furnace testing to study the behavior of noble metals during the melting process, research-scale and engineering-scale melter testing to evaluate effects of noble metals on melter operation, and computer modeling that used the experimental data to predict effects of noble metals on the full-scale melter. Feed used in these tests simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) feed. This report summarizes the results of the melter performance assessment and predicts the lifetime of the HWVP melter. It should be noted that this work was conducted before the recent Tri-Party Agreement changes, so the reference melter referred to here is the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter design.

Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Mahoney, L.A.; Cooper, M.F.; Whitney, L.D.; Shafer, P.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Survey of computer codes applicable to waste facility performance evaluations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is an effort to review existing information that is useful to develop an integrated model for predicting the performance of a radioactive waste facility. A summary description of 162 computer codes is given. The identified computer programs address the performance of waste packages, waste transport and equilibrium geochemistry, hydrological processes in unsaturated and saturated zones, and general waste facility performance assessment. Some programs also deal with thermal analysis, structural analysis, and special purposes. A number of these computer programs are being used by the US Department of Energy, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and their contractors to analyze various aspects of waste package performance. Fifty-five of these codes were identified as being potentially useful on the analysis of low-level radioactive waste facilities located above the water table. The code summaries include authors, identification data, model types, and pertinent references. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

Alsharif, M.; Pung, D.L.; Rivera, A.L.; Dole, L.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY SAFETY ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT TABLE OF...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Revised: March 1, 2010 i ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY SAFETY ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION AND DESCRIPTION OF THE FACILITY ......

43

High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HPMSF Overview HPMSF Overview Section 2-4-1 High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility The High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility (HPMSF) provides state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) and separations instrumentation that has been refined for leading-edge analysis of biological problems with a primary emphasis on proteomics. Challenging research in proteomics, cell signaling, cellular molecular machines, and high-molecular weight systems receive the highest priority for access to the facility. Current research activities in the HPMSF include proteomic analyses of whole cell lysates, analyses of organic macro-molecules and protein complexes, quantification using isotopically labeled growth media, targeted proteomics analyses of subcellular fractions, and nucleic acid analysis of

44

Facility Representative Program Assessment Criteria, Review, and Approach Document (CRAD)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 Appendix B B-1 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDE The DOE has implemented its FR Program, and is looking to continuously improve the program's effectiveness DOE-wide. An effective FR Program has many elements, as described in this Standard. These elements are intended to yield a program that provides DOE facilities with well-trained FRs who spend appropriate amounts of time in their facilities and can work effectively with their contractor management counterparts. The program, to be effective, needs the functional support of management. To maintain the continued support of DOE management, the FR program needs to demonstrate its continued performance and effectiveness, which is to be assessed periodically using

45

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standarf 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January-March 2012 More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

46

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2011 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

47

Environmental assessment: South microwave communication facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain eight microwave repeater stations in southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northern Arizona, in order to meet the minimum fade criteria established by the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) for the operation and protection of electric power systems. The proposed microwave facilities would increase the reliability of communication. This environmental assessment (EA) describes the existing environmental conditions and the impacts from construction of the eight microwave communication facilities. The EA was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the Department of Energy Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). The proposed project would consist of constructing eight microwave facilities, each of which would include a self-supported lattice tower, an equipment building, a propane tank, distribution lines to provide electric power to the sites, and access roads to the sites. The facilities would be constructed in San Miguel and Montezuma Counties in Colorado, San Juan County, Utah, and Navajo, Apache, Coconino, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. 3Q CY2003, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

49

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. 2Q CY2006, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

50

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM

51

Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3)/1 3)/1 Energy Information Administration Energy Consumption Series Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities August 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore, Director of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202/586-1617) and Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division (EEUISD) (202/586-1112). Specific information regarding the contents or preparation of

52

NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - High-Performance...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-Performance Computing and Analytics High-performance computing and analytic capabilities at the Energy Systems Integration Facility enable study and simulation of material...

53

Performance Assessment Community of Practice  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

L L l W t C t B d High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Community of Practice Community of Practice John E. Marra, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director Associate Laboratory Director 5 March 2009 DOE EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Phoenix, Arizona DOE-EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Performance Assessment Process Community of Practice Background EM Senior Management would like to have g improved consistency in the execution of the Performance Assessment* process; Originally formed a sub-committee to draft a guidance document for practitioners; Th b itt b li C it f The sub-committee now believes a Community of Practice having broader scope should replace it; Draft Charter in review and presented for Draft Charter in review and presented for discussion. * Performance Assessment (PA) is used broadly to encompass assessments for LLW

54

Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laws & Regulations » Facility Reporting » Federal Facility Annual Laws & Regulations » Facility Reporting » Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance October 8, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis Agencies are required to report annual progress made toward energy- and water-reduction goals. Agencies are required to report annual progress made toward energy- and water-reduction goals. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers information and data sets illustrating Federal agencies' annual progress in meeting facility energy goals. Additional detail about each agency's performance can be found in their Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans on the Performance.Gov website. Federal Facility Efficiency Investment and Progress toward Sustainability Goals: Get an overview of Federal progress made in facility energy

55

Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) Project. The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at the SWPF Project. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred during August - September 2012. Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -

56

Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities, August 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review Report Review Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities May 2011 August 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Table of Contents Background ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Results ........................................................................................................................................................... 2 Conduct of the FCA ......................................................................................................................... 2

57

Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities, August 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Review Report Review Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities May 2011 August 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Table of Contents Background ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Results ........................................................................................................................................................... 2 Conduct of the FCA ......................................................................................................................... 2

58

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 76% fully qualified 41% staffing level

59

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to impove the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified 94% Staffing Level ( last quarter was

60

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 72% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 87% Fully Qualifed ( last quarter was 85%) 86% Staffing Level ( last quarter was 88%)

62

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below." 1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

63

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representative and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2010 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

64

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarter 's data concluded: 3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

65

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. A total of 13 Facility Representatives transferred to other positions during the quarter. Five of these accepted Facility Representative positions at other sites. Of the 8 that left the Program. 1 recieved a promotion and 7 accepted lateral positions. All of

66

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. As of December 31,2003, 93% of all Facility Representatives were fully qualified, exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal for Facility Representative

67

Integrated performance validation facility for KNICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the application of new digital control and monitoring systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs), it is required to satisfy the proven technology requirements. They should have at least three years of documented, satisfactory service as modules of subsystems in power plant applications similar to that of NPP, or it should have three years of documented, satisfactory service in other plant applications which are similar to the use in NPP (EPRI-URD's first option). However, tlte digital control and monitoring systems developed by Korea Nuclear Instrumentation A Control System (KNICS) R and D Center, due to the nature of the firstly developed system, have had no prior application in any NPPs as well as industrial and fossil power plants. Therefore, well defined program using 'Integrated Performance Validation Facility (IPVF) 'for prototype testing has been prepared to verify their performance, operability and reliability according to EPRI-URD's second option: It has satisfactorily completed a defined program of prototype testing which has been designed to verify its performance. The IPVF for KNICS is being designed to justify that new control systems are proven to meet utility's requirements. The IPVF comprises Virtual Operating Crew (VOC) and Test Commander (TC). Human System Interface (HIS). Evaluation System, and Simulator and Interface System. PLC and DCS developed by KNICS are connected with IPVF. Control logics and HIS of real NPP are implemented in the KNICS PLC and DCS, which are the validation object. Finally. IPVF will be extremely valuable for other activities in addition to the validation of the new control system equipment, including the testing and evaluation of plant control algorithms, personnel training, and support for long-term maintenance of the control systems. (authors)

Kim, D. G.; Choi, J. J.; Choi, M. J.; Choe, I. N. [I and C Engineering Dept., Korea Power Engineering Company, 360-9, Mabuk-Dong, Yongin-Si. Gyeonggi-Do. 446-713 (Korea, Republic of); Gong, Y. H.; Kim, K. H. [KNICS R and D Center, 28-1, Seongju-Dong, Changwon-Si. 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data." 1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

69

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from October to December 2001. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data 4Q CY2001, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications

70

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM

71

Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and

73

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from April to June 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. Overall, the percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives increased to 80% last quarter, from 78% the previous quarter , and

74

4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The format of the report is changed from past reports. Information will now be provided according to the major offices having field or site office Facility Representative programs: National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSSA), the Office of

75

4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2004, 86% of all FRs were fully qualified,down from 89% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites added new FRs or switched FRs from their exisiting facilities to new facilities, reducing the overall qualification rate.

76

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The percentage of Facility Representatives who are fully qualified reached 91% across DOE. In EM the percenage of 97%, in Sc the percentage is 95% and in NNSA the percentage is 78%. The DOE goal is 75%. Staffing levels for the three organizations continue to be below

77

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from July to September 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. The percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives in the DOE complex

78

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance

79

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. As of June 30,2005, 97% of all FRs were fully qualified, down from 88% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications. 2Q CY2005, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

80

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This report reflects changes in DOE STD 1063-2011 that deleted one indicator and changed the way two others are calculated. The changes are discussed below. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January - March

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Performance viewing and editing in ASSESS Outsider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Analytic System and Software for Evaluation of Safeguards and Security (ASSESS) Facility module records site information in the path elements and areas of an Adversary Sequence Diagram. The ASSESS Outsider evaluation module takes this information and first calculates performance values describing how much detection and delay is assigned at each path element and then uses the performance values to determine most-vulnerable paths. This paper discusses new Outsider capabilities that allow the user to view how elements are being defeated and to modify some of these values in Outsider. Outsider now displays how different path element segments are defeated and contrasts the probability of detection for alternate methods of defeating a door (e.g., the lock or the door face itself). The user can also override element segment delays and detection probabilities directly during analysis in Outsider. These capabilities allow users to compare element performance and to verify correct path element performance for all elements, not just those on the most-vulnerable path as is the case currently. Improvements or reductions in protection can be easily checked without creating a set of new facility files to accomplish it.

Snell, M.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Key, B.; Bingham, B. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2005 78% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from the 84% the previous quarter, and below the DOE goal of 80%. Site offices hired 11 new FRs in the quarter and several sites moved FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications.

83

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of September 30,2005, 84% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from 87% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites shifted fully-qualifed FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications. Although the overall percentage of fully qualified FRS

84

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data: * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). Four FRs left due to transfer,

85

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activities (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

86

1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of March 31,2006 81% of all FRs were fully qualified,up from 78% the previous quarter, and just above the DOE goal of 80%. To assist site offices in continuing to meet the qualification goal, there will be two focused training sessions for FR candidates in the coming months. These

87

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

88

2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This memorandum also announces that Mr. James Heffner has turned over FR Program Manager duties to Mr. Earl Huges. Mr. Heffner is assuming expanded team leader duties over several additional programs within the

89

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 78% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 76%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 89%) 47% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%) 74% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is>65%)"

90

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 176 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 95 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). This staff reflects a

91

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives. and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR Program. As of March 31st, 2005, 88% of all FRs were fully qualified, up from 86% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several of the new FRs hired recently completed qualifications. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications

92

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of June 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified , exceeding the DOE goal of 80%, but down slightly from the previous quarter. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR staffing is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing

93

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of September 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified, the same as last quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR stadding is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing analysis methodology in

94

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 77% Fully Qualified (last quarter was 78%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 90%); 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%); and 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is > 65%)"

95

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 184 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) which is 92

96

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 76% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 80%) 89% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 89%) 44% Time Spent in the Field ( Department of Energy)(DOE) goal is > 40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

97

2Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

From May 12-13, 2010, 67 FRs attended the annual FR Workshop in Las Vegas, Nevada, to share best practices and lessons learned from their respective sites. Prior to the FR Workshop, FRs were provided Readiness Review Team Member training from May 10-11, 2010. The training provided an overview and familiarized participants with DOE's Readiness Review Process, as described in DOE Order 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities. Training covered the roles and responsibilities of Readiness Review team members with specific emphasis on Performance Assessment methodologies. The FR Steering Committee holds monthly teleconferences to share information on oversight activities, issues identified, and FR program initiatives and improvements. Descriptions of

98

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY Project 39GF71024-GPDI21000000 . PANTEX PLANT AMARILLO, TEXAS DOE/EA-0688 JUNE 1993 MASTER DiSTRiBUTiON OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITEI) ffrl TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 Need for Action 1 2.0 Description of Proposed Facility Action 3.0 Location of the Action 8 4.0 Alternatives to Proposed Action 9 4.1 No Action 9 4.2 Redesign and Modify Existing staging Facilities 9 4.3 Use Other Existing Space at Pantex Plant 9 4.4 Use Temporary Structures 9 4.5 Stage Waste at Other Sites 10 4.6 Stage Wastes Separately 10 5.0 Environmental Impacts of Proposed Action 10 5.1 Archeology 10 5.2 FloodplainlW etlands 10 5.3 Threatened and Endangered Species 10 5.4 Surrounding La,nd Use 11 5.5 Construction 11 5.6 Air Emissions 11

99

Impacts assessment for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the economic and other impacts that will be created by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction and ongoing operation, as well as the impacts that may be created by new technologies that may be developed as a result of NIF development and operation.

Bay Area Economics

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Facility Energy Assessment Matrix | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Energy Assessment Matrix Facility Energy Assessment Matrix Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Performance assessment of cogeneration plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, performance assessment of various building cogeneration systems is conducted through energy and exergy efficiencies. The cogeneration plants considered include steam-turbine system, gas-turbine system, diesel-engine system, and geothermal system. Here, the cogeneration operation refers to the simultaneous generation of electrical power and heating for buildings (especially for space heating and hot water). Selected actual operating data are employed for analysis and performance assessment. The same amount of electrical and thermal product outputs is considered for all systems, except the diesel, to facilitate comparisons. Also, the effects of certain operating parameters (e.g., steam pressure, water temperature) on the energy and exergy efficiencies are investigated. The diesel-engine and geothermal systems appear to be thermodynamically more attractive, in that they have higher exergy efficiencies, than steam-turbine and gas-turbine systems. The results demonstrate that exergy analysis is a useful tool in performance assessments of cogeneration systems and permits meaningful comparisons of different cogeneration systems based on their merits. Such results can allow the efficiency of cogeneration systems to be increased, and the applications of cogeneration in larger energy systems to be configured more beneficially, leading to reductions in fuel use and environmental emissions.

Mehmet Kanoglu; Ibrahim Dincer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Safety assessment for the rf Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) is a part of the Magnetic Fusion Program's rf Heating Experiments. The goal of the Magnetic Fusion Program (MFP) is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion. RFTF is an experimental device which will provide an essential link in the research effort aiming at the realization of fusion power. This report was compiled as a summary of the analysis done to ensure the safe operation of RFTF.

Nagy, A.; Beane, F. (eds.)

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Performance Tools & APIs | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Storage & File Systems Compiling & Linking Queueing & Running Jobs Data Transfer Debugging & Profiling Performance Tools & APIs Tuning MPI on BGQ Tuning and Analysis...

104

Maintenance Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. Criteria: The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance. The maintenance organization structure is well defined and understood. Responsibilities, organizational interfaces, and administrative activities are adequately defined and implemented to provide timely availability of

105

1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May May 9,2000 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: .yc,..,%$'! L.W.T oseph Arango, Facl ity Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. You will note that the indicators show the attrition of five Facility Representatives from the program during this reporting period. Of those five, two were promoted

106

4Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 26,2001 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: seph Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. I intend to continue to provide this summary information to you quarterly. These provide

107

Work Controls Assessment Plan Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WORK CONTROLS WORK CONTROLS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established work control process in place with authorized, controlled and documented methods that provide an accurate status of the work to be performed. Criteria: Work planning addresses applicable laws, codes and regulations. Work planning includes operational configuration constraints; material, tool, and manpower requirements; inter-organizational coordination; operational history; special training; safety considerations; hazards protection requirements; post-maintenance testing; quality control requirements; and other considerations as necessary. The work to be accomplished is defined by identifying the existing

108

Guidance for performing preliminary assessments under CERCLA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EPA headquarters and a national site assessment workgroup produced this guidance for Regional, State, and contractor staff who manage or perform preliminary assessments (PAs). EPA has focused this guidance on the types of sites and site conditions most commonly encountered. The PA approach described in this guidance is generally applicable to a wide variety of sites. However, because of the variability among sites, the amount of information available, and the level of investigative effort required, it is not possible to provide guidance that is equally applicable to all sites. PA investigators should recognize this and be aware that variation from this guidance may be necessary for some sites, particularly for PAs performed at Federal facilities, PAs conducted under EPA`s Environmental Priorities Initiative (EPI), and PAs at sites that have previously been extensively investigated by EPA or others. The purpose of this guidance is to provide instructions for conducting a PA and reporting results. This guidance discusses the information required to evaluate a site and how to obtain it, how to score a site, and reporting requirements. This document also provides guidelines and instruction on PA evaluation, scoring, and the use of standard PA scoresheets. The overall goal of this guidance is to assist PA investigators in conducting high-quality assessments that result in correct site screening or further action recommendations on a nationally consistent basis.

NONE

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October - December 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FOR DISTRIBUTION FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: ANDREW C. LAWRENCE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF NUCLEAR SAFETY, QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENVIRONMENT OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October-December (Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2010) This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below:

110

Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities -- Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication Publication Publication - Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities Percent of Buildings, Floorspace, and Consumption in Multibuilding Facilities, 1989 Figure on percent of buildings, floorspace, and consumption in multibuilding facilities, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities (file size .53 MB) pages: 105

111

Self-imposed self-assessment program at a DOE Nuclear Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials and Technology (NMT) Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has implemented a performance-based self-assessment program at the TA-55 plutonium facility. The program was conceptualized and developed by LANL`s internal assessment group, AA-2. The management walkaround program fosters continuous improvement in NMT products and performance of its activities. The program, based on experience from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, is endorsed at the site by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) personnel and by the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board. The self-assessment program focuses on how work is actually performed rather than on paperwork or process compliance. Managers critically and continually assess ES&H, conduct of operations, and other functional area requirements.

Geoffrion, R.R.; Loud, J.J.; Walter, E.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Performance Assessment Report Domain CHP System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Assessment Report for the Domain CHP System November 2005 By Burns & McDonnell Engineering #12;Domain CHP System Performance Assessment Report for the Packaged Cooling, Heating and Power

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

113

4Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2008 6, 2008 MEMORANDUM FROM: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATNE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October - December (4th Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%)

114

2Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0,2007 0,2007 M E M 0 R A N D ; p s ' X Z FROM: M RK B. WHI DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June (2nd Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 72%) 94% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 9 1 %)

116

Non-Facility Contractor Prior Performance, IG-0857  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Facility Contractor Prior Non-Facility Contractor Prior Performance DOE/IG-0857 October 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 28, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Non-Facility Contractor Prior Performance" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy obligated approximately $89 billion during Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010, through various contracts and financial assistance awards, including contracts funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Holding contractors accountable for past performance is an important tool for making sure that the Federal government and the taxpayers that it represents, receive good value from its contracts. To determine whether a prospective

117

Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ARPT-LSO-2011-001 ARPT-LSO-2011-001 Site: Livermore Site Office Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment Dates of Activity 01/24/2011 - 01/28/2011 Report Preparer Robert Freeman Activity Description/Purpose: This activity report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of and participation in the Livermore Site Office Self-Assessment of the Facility Representative (FR) Program. This self-assessment was led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Livermore Site Office (LSO) and conducted by LSO staff, HSS staff, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety (CDNS) staff, a peer from Los Alamos Site

118

International physical protection self-assessment tool for chemical facilities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the final report for Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project No.130746, International Physical Protection Self-Assessment Tool for Chemical Facilities. The goal of the project was to develop an exportable, low-cost, computer-based risk assessment tool for small to medium size chemical facilities. The tool would assist facilities in improving their physical protection posture, while protecting their proprietary information. In FY2009, the project team proposed a comprehensive evaluation of safety and security regulations in the target geographical area, Southeast Asia. This approach was later modified and the team worked instead on developing a methodology for identifying potential targets at chemical facilities. Milestones proposed for FY2010 included characterizing the international/regional regulatory framework, finalizing the target identification and consequence analysis methodology, and developing, reviewing, and piloting the software tool. The project team accomplished the initial goal of developing potential target categories for chemical facilities; however, the additional milestones proposed for FY2010 were not pursued and the LDRD funding therefore was redirected.

Tewell, Craig R.; Burdick, Brent A.; Stiles, Linda L.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report Kurt D. Gerdes Harry D. Harmon Herbert G. Sutter Major C. Thompson John R. Shultz Sahid C. Smith July 13, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 ii This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii Signatures SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iv This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility

120

Tech-X Corporation has accessed the high performance computing (HPC) facilities at the Science and Technology Facilities Council's (STFC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tech-X Corporation has accessed the high performance computing (HPC) facilities at the Science high performance computing (HPC) and simulation technology. A research collaboratory in association

Zharkova, Valentina V.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Consolidated Transportation Facility. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0822, addressing environmental impacts that could result from siting, construction, and operation of a consolidated transportation facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The DOE proposes to construct and operate a new transportation facility at the Central Facilities Area (CFA) at the INEL. The proposed facility would replace outdated facilities and consolidate in one location operations that are conducted at six different locations at the CFA. The proposed facility would be used for vehicle and equipment maintenance and repair, administrative support, bus parking, and bus driver accommodation. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October-December 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2012 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN DIRECTOR ~ OFFICE OF :-IDC~AR AFETY OFFICE OF HEAL 'l;H, AFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October- December 20 ll This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full

123

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for April - June 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 , 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June 20 1 I This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffin~/Qualification/Oversi~ht Data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

124

Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on April 13-14, 2010. The Performance Assessment Community of Practice has been chartered to advise the Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board regarding performance assessments and performance assessment-like analyses, promote consistency in the preparation of performance assessments across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, foster exchange of information among performance assessment practitioners, and develop appropriate guidance for performance assessments such that they are based on sound science and are defensible. The purpose of this technical exchange is to provide a venue for performance assessment and risk assessment practitioners, managers and regulators, and contributors to the Cementitious Barriers Partnership and Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management project to share plans and experiences and share ideas for future performance assessment and risk assessment modeling. The technical exchange will include a combination of plenary presentations and discussions with breakout sessions for specific topics. Discussions will emphasize areas for improved consistency and solicit suggestions for future developments related to modeling tools. A breakout discussion session is also planned to address: DOE Order 435.1 Update, regulatory challenges for performance and risk assessment modeling, and other topical areas. Arrangements have also been made for a GoldSim modeling roundtable at the conclusion of the workshop for participants who are interested in sharing experiences related to the use of GoldSim for their simulations.

125

Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance | ENERGY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial energy management Industrial energy management » Measure, track, and benchmark » Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Tools for benchmarking energy management practices

126

Assessing Plant Performance for Energy Savings | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessing Plant Performance for Energy Savings Assessing Plant Performance for Energy Savings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

127

ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF MODEL PREDICTIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL THROUGH VARIANCE/CONSTRAINT TUNING advanced process control (APC) strategies to deal with multivariable constrained control problems with an ultimate objective towards economic optimization. Any attempt to evaluate MPC performance should therefore

Huang, Biao

128

High Performance Computing at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Performance Computing at High Performance Computing at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility Go to Menu Page 2 Outline * Our Mission * Computer Systems: Present, Past, Future * Challenges Along the Way * Resources for Users Go to Menu Page 3 Our Mission Go to Menu Page 4 * World's most powerful computing facility * Nation's largest concentration of open source materials research * $1.3B budget * 4,250 employees * 3,900 research guests annually * $350 million invested in modernization * Nation's most diverse energy portfolio * The $1.4B Spallation Neutron Source in operation * Managing the billion-dollar U.S. ITER project ORNL is the U.S. Department of Energy's largest science and energy laboratory Go to Menu Page 5 Computing Complex @ ORNL World's most powerful computer for open science

129

RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL`s assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL's assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

High Performance Imaging Streak Camera for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An x-ray streak camera platform has been characterized and implemented for use at the National Ignition Facility. The camera has been modified to meet the experiment requirements of the National Ignition Campaign and to perform reliably in conditions that produce high EMI. A train of temporal UV timing markers has been added to the diagnostic in order to calibrate the temporal axis of the instrument and the detector efficiency of the streak camera was improved by using a CsI photocathode. The performance of the streak camera has been characterized and is summarized in this paper. The detector efficiency and cathode measurements are also presented.

Opachich, Y. P. [LLNL; Kalantar, D. [LLNL; MacPhee, A. [LLNL; Holder, J. [LLNL; Kimbrough, J. [LLNL; Bell, P. M. [LLNL; Bradley, D. [LLNL; Hatch, B. [LLNL; Brown, C. [LLNL; Landen, O. [LLNL; Perfect, B. H. [LLNL, HMC; Guidry, B. [LLNL; Mead, A. [NSTec; Charest, M. [NSTec; Palmer, N. [LLNL; Homoelle, D. [LLNL; Browning, D. [LLNL; Silbernagel, C. [NSTec; Brienza-Larsen, G. [NSTec; Griffin, M. [NSTec; Lee, J. J. [NSTec; Haugh, M. J. [NSTec

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This paper focuses on the business value of Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors.

133

NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 * November 2010 8 * November 2010 The NREL hydrogen safety sensor test facility (Robert Burgess/NREL) PIX 18240 NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance Team: Safety Codes & Standards Group, Hydrogen Technologies & Systems Center Accomplishment: The NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Facility was recently commissioned for the quantitative assessment of hydrogen safety sensors (first reported in April 2010). Testing of sensors has started and is ongoing. Test Apparatus: The Test Facility was designed to test hydrogen sensors under precisely controlled conditions. The apparatus can simultaneously test multiple sensors and can handle all common electronic interfaces, including voltage, current, resistance,

134

Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for US Army Garrison, Japan - Honshu Installations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an assessment was performed by a team of engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract to the Installation Management Command (IMCOM) Pacific Region Office (PARO). The effort used the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) model to determine how energy is consumed at five U.S. Army Garrison-Japan (USAG-J) installations in the Honshu area, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

Kora, Angela R.; Brown, Daryl R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

135

FACSIM/MRS-2: Storage and shipping performance assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a performance assessment of the designs for the storage and shipping operations of the MRS facility. These activities, referred to as back-end operations, including handling canistered spent fuel and secondary waste in the shielded canyon cell, in onsite yard storage, and in repository shipping cask loading areas. This analysis verified that the MRS facility back-end operations as designed are capable of handling 3600 metric tons of uranium (MTU) per year if the facility operates seven days per week (24-hour days). The cask cart utilization rate is highest, in use about 50% of the operating year. Cask cart utilization refers to the utilization of the shielded canyon cell repository shipping cask loadout port (also referred to as the exit port) and the cask cart that serves that port. The receiving and handling facility design specifies two loadout ports, one for each side of the facility. This analysis also determined that a throughput rate of 3000 MTU per year could be achieved with five-day week facility operation.

Hostick, C.J.; Otis, P.T.; Chockie, A.D.; Sovers, R.A; Huber, H.D.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the planned disposal of the vitrified low-level fraction of waste presently contained in Hanford Site tanks. The tank waste is the by-product of separating special nuclear materials from irradiated nuclear fuels over the past 50 years. This waste has been stored in underground single and double-shell tanks. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low and high-activity fractions, and then immobilized by private vendors. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will receive the vitrified waste from private vendors and plans to dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The high-level fraction will be stored at Hanford until a national repository is approved. This report provides the site-specific long-term environmental information needed by the DOE to issue a Disposal Authorization Statement that would allow the modification of the four existing concrete disposal vaults to provide better access for emplacement of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) containers; filling of the modified vaults with the approximately 5,000 ILAW containers and filler material with the intent to dispose of the containers; construction of the first set of next-generation disposal facilities. The performance assessment activity will continue beyond this assessment. The activity will collect additional data on the geotechnical features of the disposal sites, the disposal facility design and construction, and the long-term performance of the waste. Better estimates of long-term performance will be produced and reviewed on a regular basis. Performance assessments supporting closure of filled facilities will be issued seeking approval of those actions necessary to conclude active disposal facility operations. This report also analyzes the long-term performance of the currently planned disposal system as a basis to set requirements on the waste form and the facility design that will protect the long-term public health and safety and protect the environment.

Mann, F.M.

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

URS Consultants, Inc.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The purpose of this assessment is verify and validate the process for the development of operations procedures and that procedures are in place which provide direction to personnel to ensure that the facility is operated within its design bases. Criteria: Operations procedures should be written to provide specific direction for operating systems and equipment during normal and postulated abnormal and emergency conditions. (DOE O 5480.19 A) Operations procedures should provide appropriate direction to ensure that the facility is operated within its design bases and should be effectively used to support safe operations of the facility. (DOE O 5480.19 A)

139

WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) test phase plan: Performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing the disposition of transuranic (TRU) wastes resulting from nuclear weapons production activities of the United States. These wastes are currently stored nationwide at several of the DOE's waste generating/storage sites. The goal is to eliminate interim waste storage and achieve environmentally and institutionally acceptable permanent disposal of these TRU wastes. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico is being considered as a disposal facility for these TRU wastes. This document describes the first of the following two major programs planned for the Test Phase of WIPP: Performance Assessment -- determination of the long-term performance of the WIPP disposal system in accordance with the requirements of the EPA Standard; and Operations Demonstration -- evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of the DOE TRU waste management system's ability to emplace design throughput quantities of TRU waste in the WIPP underground facility. 120 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Consideration of liners and covers in performance assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management due to the radioactive waste. The USDOE-Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these CERCLA disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to CERCLA risk assessments and DOE Order 435.1 performance assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement, respectively. One of the issues considered by the working group, which is addressed in this report, was how to appropriately consider the performance of covers and liners/leachate collections systems in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 performance assessment (PA). This same information may be appropriate for consideration within CERCLA risk assessments for these facilities. These OSDCs are generally developed to meet hazardous waste (HW) disposal design standards under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as well as the DOE Order 435.1 performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. To meet the standards for HW, the facilities typically include engineered covers and liner/leachate collection systems. Thus, when considering such facilities in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 PA, there is a need to address the evolution of performance of covers and liner/leachate collection systems in the context of meeting a performance standard considering time frames of 1,000 years for compliance and potentially thousands of years based on the wastes to test the robustness of the system. Experience has shown that there are a range of expectations and perspectives from the different regulators involved at different sites when reviewing assumptions related to cover and liner/leachate collection system performance. However for HW disposal alone under RCRA the design standards are typically considered sufficient by the regulators without a requirement to assess long-term performance thus avoiding the need to consider the details addressed in this report. This report provides suggestions for a general approach to address covers and liners/leachate collection systems in a DOE Order 435.1 PA and how to integrate assessments with defense-in-depth considerations such as design, operations, and waste acceptance criteria to address uncertainties. The emphasis is on water balances and management in such assessments. Specific information and references are provided for details needed to address the evolution of individual components of cover and liner/leachate collection systems. This information was then synthesized into suggestions for best practices for cover and liner system design and examples of approaches to address the performance of covers and liners as part of a performance assessment of the disposal system. Numerous references are provided for sources of information to help describe the basis for performance of individual components of cover and liner systems.

Phifer, Mark A. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Seitz, Robert R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [USDOE Enviromental Management, Washington, DC (United States)

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Confined Spaces Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONFINED SPACES CONFINED SPACES Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the safety effectiveness of the contractor's confined or enclosed spaces procedure, and for establishing compliance with DOE and OSHA requirements. Specifically, this assessment is to verify the information and findings of the BN Management Self Assessment Report on "Confined Space", ES&H-MSA-03-13, dated December 31, 2003. Criteria: Practices and procedures are in place to protect employees in general industry from the hazards of entry into permit-required confined spaces. 29 CFR 1910.146 (a) Each employee is instructed in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to

142

DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site Performance Assessments (PA) are analyses conducted for low level radioactive waste disposal facilities (or appropriate CERCLA documentation for a low level radioactive waste disposal facility), and are critical in determining the nature and extent of the controls that need to be put in place at the facility being evaluated. There are specific requirements for the protection of the public, workers, and environment that are critical to maintaining safe and effective disposal of radioactive waste and the PA is a risk analysis of the potential hazards of disposing of low level radioactive waste. The review and approval of these evaluations is

143

Self-Assessment Program Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SELF-ASSESSMENT SELF-ASSESSMENT Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self- assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect people and

144

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

145

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

146

Operations Authorization Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operations Authorization Operations Authorization Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to verify there is documentation in place which accurately describes the safety envelope for a facility, program or project. Criteria: Conditions and requirements should be established to ensure programs addressing all applicable functional areas are adequately implemented to support safe performance of the work. The extent of documentation and level of authority for agreement shall be tailored to the complexity and hazards associated with the work. Personnel shall be responsible and accountable for performance of work in accordance with the controls established. Controls established for safety are a discernible part of the plan for

147

4Q CY2008, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (4QCY2008) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 3 1 100 1 100 100 70 86 ID (EM) 13 12 11 85 0 82 82 43 84 OR (EM) 19 18 18 95 0 72 72 44 66 ORP 15 15 14 93 0 79 64 43 72 PPPO 6 5 5 83 0 80 80 44 70 RL 19 18 18 95 1 84 84 45 70 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 30 80 SR 32 24 24 75 2 71 67 45 74 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 42 70 EM Totals 108 98 94 87 4 77 72 44 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of available work hours is the actual number of hours a Facility Representative works in a calendar quarter, including overtime hours. It does not include

148

3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (3QCY2007) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 2 2 200 0 100 50 66 86 ID (ICP) 13 12 11 85 1 100 100 40 65 OR (EM) 19 17 16 84 0 94 88 47 71 ORP 14 14 14 100 0 100 93 46 74 PPPO 4 4 4 100 0 100 100 42 75 RL 19 19 19 100 0 100 95 73 69 SR 31 31 25 81 2 88 80 40 79 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 43 65 EM Totals 103 101 93 90 3 96 89 50 73 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of

149

2Q CY2004, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Attachment Attachment Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report September 20, 2004 Distribution: Kyle McSlarrow, S-2 Bruce Carnes, S-2 Les Novitsky, S-2 David Garman, S-3 Linton Brooks, NA-1 Tyler Przybylek, NA-1 Everet Beckner, NA-10 James Mangeno, NA-3.6 Glenn Podonsky, SP-1 Mike Kilpatrick, OA-1 Patricia Worthington, OA-40 Paul Golan, EM-1 Inés Triay, EM-3 Patty Bubar, EM-3.2 Raymond Orbach, SC-1 Milt Johnson, SC-3 William Magwood, NE-1 Manager, Ames Site Office Manager, Argonne Site Office Manager, Brookhaven Site Office Manager, Carlsbad Field Office Manager, Fermi Site Office Manager, Idaho Operations Office Manager, Livermore Site Office Manager, Los Alamos Site Office Manager, Nevada Site Office Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office Manager, Office of River Protection

150

1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Http: Http: OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (1QCY2010) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 3 100 0 100 33 50 78 ID (EM) 13 13 12 92 0 100 100 50 91 OR (EM) 18 17 18 100 0 100 81 45 67 ORP 15 15 14 93 1 93 80 51 81 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 100 100 43 68 RL 19 19 19 100 0 95 95 43 69 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 50 75 SR 32 29 29 91 1 69 69 43 76 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 60 EM Totals 109 105 104 95 2 89 81 45 75 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key:

151

DOE Order 435.1 - Performance Assessments and Waste Incidental...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Performance Assessment DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessments Savannah River Site West Valley Demonstration Project DOE Manual 435.1-1 Waste Incidental to Reprocessing...

152

COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF MATERIAL PERFORMANCE IN DEMO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for sufficient time. Reliable estimates of component lifetimes are an important part of power plant design The basic DEMO design used in the present study is a 1.8 GW device (2.2 GW total thermal power ­ including simulation models and capabilities to assess material performance under the neutron irradiation conditions

153

Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

154

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Assessing marketing performance: history and challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While assessing the marketing performance of an organisation is increasingly important, it is also increasingly difficult due to the nature of the discipline and several challenges facing researchers and managers. This article reviews the long history of marketing performance assessment and the nature of those challenges. The earliest work in this area examined the productivity of marketing, traditionally defined as financial output per marketing input. Later writers have explored non-financial outputs, and looked at an expanded concept of marketing activities and assets as they lead to business outcomes. I briefly review four measures that have attracted substantial attention in the past ten years - market orientation, customer satisfaction, customer loyalty and brand equity - and conclude with a discussion of challenges for the better measurement and understanding of performance in marketing.

Bruce H. Clark

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Lines of authority are clearly defined with clear and open communications existing between all departments and all levels. Criteria: Dialogue exists between personnel involved in engineering/design, operations, maintenance, safety issues, and remedial actions. Personnel within the departments are promptly informed on issues as they occur on a need-to-know basis. Lessons Learned and feedback is encouraged inter-departmentally regarding safety, adequate resources, and processes to enable prompt and effective corrective actions and resolutions for mission accomplishment. Management has an effective and specified chain of communication in both directions between corporate and facility management. (DOE/EH-0135)

157

Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM In December 2007 the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM More Documents & Publications Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM

158

Radiological Assessment for the Vance Road Facility Source Vault, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratories had been used for a broad range of nuclear medicine research involving numerous radionuclides. These radionuclides were stored in the a source vault located on the first floor of the facility. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault after it had been remediated and in preparation for converting the area to office space.

J. R. Morton

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Welding Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been implemented. Verify that the requirements implemented are appropriate for preventing loss of life and property from fire, and personal injury from contact with or exposure to molten metals, vapors, radiant energy, injurious rays and sparks. Criteria: Establish designated area in which routine and repetitive welding, cutting, and other spark- or flame producing operations are conducted [1910.252(a)(2)(iv),1910.252(a)(2)(vi)(A), 1910.252(a)(2)(xv), General Requirements].

160

2Q CY2009, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (2QCY2009) Field or Ops Office * Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time ** % Oversight Time *** CBFO 3 3 2 67 0 50 50 46 76 ID 13 13 11 85 0 100 100 49 90 OR 19 18 17 89 1 71 71 42 57 ORP 15 15 15 100 0 73 73 53 77 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 67 67 42 70 RL 19 19 19 100 0 84 84 45 69 SR 32 28 28 88 0 64 64 47 73 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 70 EM Totals 109 104 100 92 1 74 74 46 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office; ID = Idaho Operations Office; OR = Oak Ridge Office; ORP = Office of River Protection; PPPO = Portsmouth/Paducah

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Performance Evaluation Of An Irradiation Facility Using An Electron Accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation parameters over a period of seven years have been evaluated for a radiation processing electron accelerator facility. The parameters monitored during this time were the electron beam energy, linearity of beam current, linearity of dose with the reciprocal value of the samples speed, and dose uniformity along the scanning area after a maintenance audit performed by the electron accelerator manufacturer. The electron energy was determined from the depth-dose curve by using a two piece aluminum wedge and measuring the practical range from the obtained curves. The linearity of dose with beam current, and reciprocal value of the speed and dose uniformity along the scanning area of the electron beam were determined by measuring the dose under different beam current and cart conveyor speed conditions using film dosimetry. The results of the experiments have shown that the energy in the range from 1 to 5 MeV has not changed by more than 15% from the High Voltage setting of the machine over the evaluation period, and dose linearity with beam current and cart conveyor speed has not changed. The dose uniformity along the scanning direction of the beam showed a dose uniformity of 90% or better for energies between 2 and 5 MeV, however for 1 MeV electrons this value was reduced to 80%. This parameter can be improved by changing the beam optics settings in the control console of the accelerator though.

Uribe, R. M.; Hullihen, K. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio (United States); Filppi, E. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

WIPP Remote Handled Waste Facility: Performance Dry Run Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote Handled (RH) TRU Waste Handling Facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recently upgraded and modified in preparation for handling and disposal of RH Transuranic (TRU) waste. This modification will allow processing of RH-TRU waste arriving at the WIPP site in two different types of shielded road casks, the RH-TRU 72B and the CNS 10-160B. Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the WIPP Management and Operation Contractor (MOC), conducted a performance dry run (PDR), beginning August 19, 2002 and successfully completed it on August 24, 2002. The PDR demonstrated that the RHTRU waste handling system works as designed and demonstrated the handling process for each cask, including underground disposal. The purpose of the PDR was to develop and implement a plan that would define in general terms how the WIPP RH-TRU waste handling process would be conducted and evaluated. The PDR demonstrated WIPP operations and support activities required to dispose of RH-TRU waste in the WIPP underground.

Burrington, T. P.; Britain, R. M.; Cassingham, S. T.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

163

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NS.1 Facility safety documentation that describes the "safety envelope" for the AR Project II activities is in place and has been implemented to meet the following criteria:...

164

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE?s contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEP-certified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

Therkelsen, Peter; McKane, Aimee; Sabouini, Ridah; Evans, Tracy

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the...

166

4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

167

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

168

4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

169

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July  through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

170

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

171

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were...

172

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September   2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

173

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were...

174

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from July  to September  2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

175

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from April  to June 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

176

1Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from January  to March  2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

177

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these...

178

Environmental Assessment for Linac Coherent Light Source Experimental Facility (12/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Stanford Stanford Linear A ccelerator Center DOE/EA-1426 Environmental Assessment for Linac Coherent Light Source Experimental Facility LCLS December 2002 LCLS Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1426 December 2002 Page - i - Environmental Assessment for LCLS Experimental Facility Table of Contents Preface ............................................................................................................................................ iii 1.0 Summary ................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Purpose and Need for LCLS ..................................................................................................... 6 3.0 Description of Proposed Action and Alternatives

179

Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Handling System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Visit Report Site Visit Report Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Handling System INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW This report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of a safety system oversight (SSO) assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) tritium gas handling system (TGHS). The assessment evaluated the TGHS's ability to perform as required by safety bases and other applicable requirements. The assessment was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) and was conducted October 25 - November 5, 2010. LASO was the overall lead organization for the evaluation, which included independent

180

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (904-113G)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment (RFI/RI/BRA) for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (FDTF) (904-113G).

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Auxiliary analyses in support of performance assessment of a hypothetical low-level waste facility: Two-phase flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils with application to low-level radioactive waste disposal. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical model of multiphase air-water flow and contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone is presented. The multiphase flow equations are solved using the two-pressure, mixed form of the equations with a modified Picard linearization of the equations and a finite element spatial approximation. A volatile contaminant is assumed to be transported in either phase, or in both phases simultaneously. The contaminant partitions between phases with an equilibrium distribution given by Henry`s Law or via kinetic mass transfer. The transport equations are solved using a Galerkin finite element method with reduced integration to lump the resultant matrices. The numerical model is applied to published experimental studies to examine the behavior of the air phase and associated contaminant movement under water infiltration. The model is also used to evaluate a hypothetical design for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. The model has been developed in both one and two dimensions; documentation and computer codes are available for the one-dimensional flow and transport model.

Binning, P. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia); Celia, M.A.; Johnson, J.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Operations Research

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Title Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5545E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Delp, William W., and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Science & Technology Volume 46 Issue 11 Pagination 6167-6173 Date Published 05/08/2012 Keywords Range Hood Test Facility Abstract This study assessed the performance of seven new residential cooking exhaust hoods representing common U.S. designs. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine fan curves relating airflow to duct static pressure, sound levels, and exhaust gas capture efficiency for front and back cooktop burners and the oven. Airflow rate sensitivity to duct flow resistance was higher for axial fan devices than for centrifugal fan devices. Pollutant capture efficiency (CE) ranged from 98%, varying across hoods and with airflow and burner position for each hood. CE was higher for back burners relative to front burners, presumably because most hoods covered only part of the front burners. Open hoods had higher CE than those with grease screen and metal-covered bottoms. The device with the highest CE-exceeding 80% for oven and front burners-had a large, open hood that covered most of the front burners. The airflow rate for this hood surpassed the industry-recommended level of 118 L·s-1 (250 cfm) and produced sound levels too high for normal conversation. For hoods meeting the sound and fan efficacy criteria for Energy Star, CE was <30% for front and oven burners.

183

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: Introduction and Summary of Results; Facility Background; Facility Emissions; Atmospheric Dispersion and Deposition Modeling of Emissions; Human Health Risk Assessment; Screening Ecological Risk Assessment; Accident Analysis; Additional Analysis in Response to Peer Review Recommendations; References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: Overview; Facility Background; Risk Assessment History at WTI; Peer Review Comments and Key Assumptions; and References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA 2 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550, USA 3 LaboratoryDiagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron.1088/0029-5515/53/4/043014 Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron spectrometry J

187

A Facile Approach Using MgCl2 to Formulate High Performance Mg2...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using MgCl2 to Formulate High Performance Mg2+ Electrolytes for Rechargeable Mg Batteries. A Facile Approach Using MgCl2 to Formulate High Performance Mg2+ Electrolytes for...

188

Performance assessment task team progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters EM-35, established a Performance Assessment Task Team (referred to as the Team) to integrate the activities of the sites that are preparing performance assessments (PAs) for disposal of new low-level waste, as required by Chapter III of DOE Order 5820.2A, {open_quotes}Low-Level Waste Management{close_quotes}. The intent of the Team is to achieve a degree of consistency among these PAs as the analyses proceed at the disposal sites. The Team`s purpose is to recommend policy and guidance to the DOE on issues that impact the PAs, including release scenarios and parameters, so that the approaches are as consistent as possible across the DOE complex. The Team has identified issues requiring attention and developed discussion papers for those issues. Some issues have been completed, and the recommendations are provided in this document. Other issues are still being discussed, and the status summaries are provided in this document. A major initiative was to establish a subteam to develop a set of test scenarios and parameters for benchmarking codes in use at the various sites. The activities of the Team are reported here through December 1993.

Wood, D.E.; Curl, R.U.; Armstrong, D.R.; Cook, J.R.; Dolenc, M.R.; Kocher, D.C.; Owens, K.W.; Regnier, E.P.; Roles, G.W.; Seitz, R.R. [and others

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities (1989 data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Use in Multibuildings > Overview Use in Multibuildings > Overview Overview Percent of Buildings, Floorspace, and Consumption in Multibuilding Facilities, 1989 Figure on percent of buildings, floorspace, and consumption in multibuilding facilities, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar Executive Summary The purpose of this report is to address a known problem in the Energy Information AdministrationÆs (EIA) data systems regarding energy consumption in buildings. The problem is in measuring the consumption of energy in a particular building that is located within a multibuilding facility that utilizes district heating and/or cooling. When such a building is surveyed by EIA, total energy use for that particular building is normally not measured and can only be estimated from related information that is provided for the multibuilding facility as a whole. Since a facility usually includes a wide variety of building types with differing heating and/or cooling requirements, the estimation procedures are subject to error. This then adversely affects the quality of the energy consumption estimates that are made for the surveyed building.

190

Floodplain Assessment for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Floodplain Assessment for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility at the University of California, Davis in Yolo County, California, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy website.

191

BG/Q DGEMM Performance | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BGQ DGEMM Performance BGQ DGEMM PERFORMANCE The table below represents the percentage of peak performance for a matrix-matrix multiply BLAS3 dgemm routine as it is implemented in...

192

Using vulnerability assessments to design facility safeguards and security systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (WCR) Program is meant to prepare the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex to meet the needs of the next century through construction of now facilities or upgrades-in-place at existing facilities. This paper describes how a vulnerability (VA) was used to identify potential S&S features for the conceptual design for a plutonium storage facility as part of the WCR Program. We distinguish those features of the design that need to be investigated at the conceptual stage from those that can be evaluated later. We also examined what protection features may allow reduced S&S operating costs, with the main focus on protective force costs. While some of these concepts hold the promise for significantly reducing life-cycle protective force costs, their use depends on resolving long-standing tradeoffs between S&S and safety, which are discussed in the study.

Snell, M.; Jaeger, C.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

BG/Q Performance Counters | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

supports a large set of hardware performance counters accessible through the native BGPM API. Detailed documentation on the performance counter hardware and BGPM API is available...

194

DOE/EA-1613: Environmental Assessment for the Proposed High Explosive Pressing Facility (June 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE/EA-1613 DOE/EA-1613 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PROPOSED HIGH EXPLOSIVE PRESSING FACILITY PANTEX PLANT * AMARILLO, TEXAS * JUNE 2008 Environmental Assessment for the Proposed High Explosive Pressing Facility Pantex Plant June 2008 Page i CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................................ 1 2.1 Alternatives ........................................................................................................................... 1 2.1.1 Preferred Alternative ..............................................................................................

195

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 80% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 87%) 89% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 86%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is > 40%) 76% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is >

196

Performing Probabilistic Risk Assessment Through RAVEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENviroment (RAVEN) code is a software tool that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing engine for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. RAVEN is now a multi-purpose Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) software framework that allows dispatching different functionalities: Derive and actuate the control logic required to simulate the plant control system and operator actions (guided procedures), allowing on-line monitoring/controlling in the Phase Space Perform both Monte-Carlo sampling of random distributed events and Dynamic Event Tree based analysis Facilitate the input/output handling through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a post-processing data mining module

A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Kinoshita

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

CRAD, Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Plan More Documents & Publications OPS 9.16 Procedure Content and Use 82498 CRAD, Conduct of Operations Assessment Plan CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National...

198

DOE/EA-1510; Final Environmental Assessment for the Alternate Financed Facility Modernization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Environmental Assessment for the Final Environmental Assessment for the Alternate Financed Facility Modernization Alternate Financed Facility Modernization January 2005 January 2005 U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Y-12 Site Office Oak Ridge Y-12 Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration DOE/EA-1510 DOE/EA-1510 Alternate Financed Facility Modernization EA Final i January 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Acronyms and Abbreviations............................................................................................. vi Chemicals and Units of Measure ................................................................................................... ix Conversion Chart ...........................................................................................................................

199

NASA Benchmarks Lessons Learned Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LESSONS LEARNED LESSONS LEARNED Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established Lessons Learned Program with an effective system to continuously distribute information of improvement in safe operations to all affected personnel. Criteria: Timely and effective action is taken to track and correct identified deficiencies and to prevent their recurrence by addressing their basic causes and related generic problems. (DOE/EH-0135) Management installs an effective corrective action program (caWeb) for safety-related issues, wherein records are updated and actions are tracked through completion. (DOE/EH-0135) Management uses the corrective action program (caWeb) as the database to analyze safety issues, implement corrective actions, and define

200

NASA Benchmarks Safety Functions Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SAFETY FUNCTIONS SAFETY FUNCTIONS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should be proactive in addressing safety-related issues. Management should have an established system to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. Criteria: A system is in place to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. (DOE/EH-0135) Procedures clearly define management's responsibility for safety- related decisions and provide for the escalation of matters in an appropriate time frame. (DOE/EH-0135) Management promotes safety programs and the organization's safety culture through sponsoring and attending safety meetings. (DOE/EH- 0135) Management encourages and supports effective programs for reporting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Gas Test Loop Facilities Alternatives Assessment Report Rev 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important task in the Gas Test Loop (GTL) conceptual design was to determine the best facility to serve as host for this apparatus, which will allow fast-flux neutron testing in an existing nuclear facility. A survey was undertaken of domestic and foreign nuclear reactors and accelerator facilities to arrive at that determination. Two major research reactors in the U.S. were considered in detail, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), each with sufficient power to attain the required neutron fluxes. HFIR routinely operates near its design power limit of 100 MW. ATR has traditionally operated at less than half its design power limit of 250 MW. Both of these reactors should be available for at least the next 30 years. The other major U.S. research reactor, the Missouri University Research Reactor, does not have sufficient power to reach the required neutron flux nor do the smaller research reactors. Of the foreign reactors investigated, BOR-60 is perhaps the most attractive. Monju and BN 600 are power reactors for their respective electrical grids. Although the Joyo reactor is vigorously campaigning for customers, local laws regarding transport of radioactive material mean it would be very difficult to retrieve test articles from either Japanese reactor for post irradiation examination. PHENIX is scheduled to close in 2008 and is fully booked until then. FBTR is limited to domestic (Indian) users only. Data quality is often suspect in Russia. The only accelerator seriously considered was the Fuel and Material Test Station (FMTS) currently proposed for operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron spectrum in FMTS is similar to that found in a fast reactor, but it has a pronounced high-energy tail that is atypical of fast fission reactor spectra. First irradiation in the FMTS is being contemplated for 2008. Detailed review of these facilities resulted in the recommendation that the ATR would be the best host for the GTL.

William J. Skerjanc; William F. Skerjanc

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

203

A retrospective tiered environmental assessment of the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility, West Virginia,USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bird and bat fatalities from wind energy projects are an environmental and public concern, with post-construction fatalities sometimes differing from predictions. Siting facilities in this context can be a challenge. In March 2012 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines to assess collision fatalities and other potential impacts to species of concern and their habitats to aid in siting and management. The Guidelines recommend a tiered approach for assessing risk to wildlife, including a preliminary site evaluation that may evaluate alternative sites, a site characterization, field studies to document wildlife and habitat and to predict project impacts, post construction studies to estimate impacts, and other post construction studies. We applied the tiered assessment framework to a case study site, the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility in Grant County, West Virginia, USA, to demonstrate the use of the USFWS assessment approach, to indicate how the use of a tiered assessment framework might have altered outputs of wildlife assessments previously undertaken for the case study site, and to assess benefits of a tiered ecological assessment framework for siting wind energy facilities. The conclusions of this tiered assessment for birds are similar to those of previous environmental assessments for Mount Storm. This assessment found risk to individual migratory tree-roosting bats that was not emphasized in previous preconstruction assessments. Differences compared to previous environmental assessments are more related to knowledge accrued in the past 10 years rather than to the tiered structure of the Guidelines. Benefits of the tiered assessment framework include good communication among stakeholders, clear decision points, a standard assessment trajectory, narrowing the list of species of concern, improving study protocols, promoting consideration of population-level effects, promoting adaptive management through post-construction assessment and mitigation, and sharing information that can be used in other assessments.

Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Day, Robin [No Affiliation; Strickland, M. Dale [Western EcoSystems Technology

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

DOE Office of Science Computing Facility Operational Assessment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics Lab NUG Meeting, 17 Sep 2007 Objective * The DOE Office of Science is required to conduct an Operational Assessment (OA) Review of the efficiencies in the steady-state...

205

DOE/EA-1837:Final Environmental Assessment for the Performance Verification Laboratory (January 2011)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment for the Performance Verification Laboratory January 2011 DOE/EA-1837 This page left intentionally blank. Performance Verification Laboratory DOE/EA-1837 U.S. Department of Energy Final Environmental Assessment National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2011 i National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is proposing to construct and operate a Performance Verification Laboratory (PVL) facility to be located on the Morgantown NETL site in West Virginia. NETL would design, construct, and make operational a DOE PVL facility for verifying the energy performance of selected appliances and equipment to facilitate improved enforcement of DOE energy conservation

206

Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

207

Save Energy Now Energy Assessments What Are the Benefits for Small and Medium Facilities?  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 19, 2009 February 19, 2009 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? 2 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? Webcast Agenda * Overview of Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program - Bill Prymak, US Department of Energy * Facility Assessment Process - Don Kasten, Rutgers University * Demonstration of IAC Website - Don Kasten/Michael B. Muller, Rutgers University * Q&A 3 DOE Industrial Technologies Goal: Drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. 4 EERE Goals include * Dramatically reduce, or even end, dependence on foreign oil (Goal 1) * Increase the efficiency/ reduce the energy intensity of industry (Goal 6) ITP Goal Drive a 25% reduction in U.S. industrial energy intensity by 2017 in support of the Energy

208

Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities?  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 6, 2008 November 6, 2008 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? 2 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? Webcast Agenda * Overview of Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program - Bill Prymak, US Department of Energy * Facility Assessment Process - Don Kasten, Rutgers University * Demonstration of IAC Website - Michael B. Muller, Rutgers University * Q&A 3 DOE Industrial Technologies Goal: Drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. 4 EERE Goals include * Dramatically reduce, or even end, dependence on foreign oil (Goal 1) * Increase the efficiency/ reduce the energy intensity of industry (Goal 6) ITP Goal Drive a 25% reduction in U.S. industrial energy intensity by 2017 in support of the Energy

209

Innovative Facility Kicks Off First Experiment to Transform Building Energy Performance  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Find out how the Energy Department is working to improve the energy efficiency, design, construction and operation of high-performance commercial buildings through research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's new FLEXLAB, Facility for Low Energy Experiments in Buildings.

210

2011 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE TECHNICAL EXCHANGE - SUMMARY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) was developed in 2008 to improve consistency and quality in the preparation of performance assessments (PAs) and risk assessments across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The term, PA, is used to represent all of these modeling applications in this report. The PA CoP goals are to foster the exchange of information among PA practitioners and to share lessons learned from PAs conducted for DOE, commercial disposal facilities, and international entities. Technical exchanges and workshops are a cornerstone of PA CoP activities. Previous technical exchanges have addressed Engineered Barriers (2009 - http://www.cresp.org/education/workshops/pacop/), the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management and the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (2010 - http://srnl.doe.gov/copexchange/links.htm). Each technical exchange also includes summary presentations regarding activities at DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other organizations (e.g., International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)) as well as a number of presentations from selected sites to provide insight and perspective from on-going modeling activities. Through the deployment of PA Assistance Teams, the PA CoP has also been engaged in the development of new PAs across the DOE Complex. As a way of improving consistency in the preparation of new PAs, the teams provide technical advice and share experiences, noteworthy practices, and lessons learned from previous Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) reviews. Teams have provided support for PAs at Hanford, Idaho, Paducah and Portsmouth. The third annual PA CoP Technical Exchange was held on May 25-26, 2011 in Atlanta, GA. The PA CoP Steering Committee Meeting held its first meeting on May 24 prior to the Technical Exchange. Decision making using models and software quality assurance were the topical emphasis for the exchange. A new feature at the 2011 technical exchange was the use of panel discussions to solicit feedback from regulators and practitioners. This report summarizes discussions and recommendations from the steering committee meeting and presentations and feedback obtained at the technical exchange. Appendix I includes the steering committee meeting agenda and Appendix II includes the agenda for the technical exchange and a screenshot of the presentations and video files that are available online.

Seitz, R.

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

CARD No. 33 Consideration of Drilling Events in Performance Assessments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Table 1 of 40 CFR Part 191. Assessment of the likelihood that the WIPP will meet the Appendix A release limits is conducted through the use of a process known as "performance assessment" (PA). The WIPP PA). For information on the natural and man-made events that were considered in the scope of the performance assessment

212

Evolution of US DOE Performance Assessments Over 20 Years - 13597  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessments (PAs) have been used for many years for the analysis of post-closure hazards associated with a radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide a reasonable expectation of the ability of the site and facility design to meet objectives for the protection of members of the public and the environment. The use of PA to support decision-making for LLW disposal facilities has been mandated in United States Department of Energy (US DOE) directives governing radioactive waste management since 1988 (currently DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management). Prior to that time, PAs were also used in a less formal role. Over the past 20+ years, the US DOE approach to conduct, review and apply PAs has evolved into an efficient, rigorous and mature process that includes specific requirements for continuous improvement and independent reviews. The PA process has evolved through refinement of a graded and iterative approach designed to help focus efforts on those aspects of the problem expected to have the greatest influence on the decision being made. Many of the evolutionary changes to the PA process are linked to the refinement of the PA maintenance concept that has proven to be an important element of US DOE PA requirements in the context of supporting decision-making for safe disposal of LLW. The PA maintenance concept is central to the evolution of the graded and iterative philosophy and has helped to drive the evolution of PAs from a deterministic compliance calculation into a systematic approach that helps to focus on critical aspects of the disposal system in a manner designed to provide a more informed basis for decision-making throughout the life of a disposal facility (e.g., monitoring, research and testing, waste acceptance criteria, design improvements, data collection, model refinements). A significant evolution in PA modeling has been associated with improved use of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques to support efficient implementation of the graded and iterative approach. Rather than attempt to exactly predict the migration of radionuclides in a disposal unit, the best PAs have evolved into tools that provide a range of results to guide decision-makers in planning the most efficient, cost effective, and safe disposal of radionuclides. (authors)

Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, 19901 Germantown Rd, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, 19901 Germantown Rd, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States); Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Integrated Facilities Disposition Non-Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Technical Assistance Page 1 of 2 Complex-Wide Multi-State Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM Challenge In December 2007 the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Transfers of facilities, materials, and waste to EM will generate liabilities that are currently unfunded. For purposes of overall planning, it is important to understand the impacts of proposed transfers with regard to technical

214

Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

King, J.W.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Technical Assistance Page 1 of 2 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Y-12 National Security Complex Tennessee Tennessee Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at ORNL & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Challenge In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). In parallel with the EM-1 initiative, the Oak Ridge Reservation was conducting a Critical

216

Evaluation of replacement tritium facility (RTF) compliance with DOE safety goals using probabilistic consequence assessment methodology. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), is a major center for the processing of nuclear materials for national defense, deep-space exploration, and medical treatment applications in the United States. As an integral part of the DOE`s effort to modernize facilities, implement improved handling and processing technology, and reduce operational risk to the general public and onsite workers, transition of tritium processing at SRS from the Consolidated Tritium Facility to the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) began in 1993. To ensure that operation of new DOE facilities such as RTF present minimum involuntary and voluntary risks to the neighboring public and workers, indices of risk have been established to serve as target levels or safety goals of performance for assessing nuclear safety. These goals are discussed from a historical perspective in the initial part of this paper. Secondly, methodologies to quantify risk indices are briefly described. Lastly, accident, abnormal event, and normal operation source terms from RTF are evaluated for consequence assessment purposes relative to the safety targets.

O`Kula, K.R.; East, J.M.; Moore, M.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Microsoft PowerPoint - 12_gary_Tuesday 5-21 Facility Performance.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Facility Reporting Analysis and Facility Reporting Analysis and Performance Gary L. Hirsch Project Lead  NMMSS is currently accepting data * Electronically o 80 Column o XML 1 o XML 2 * Paper / PDF 2  Reporting Statistics for 2012 * 179 facilities reporting in XML 2 (56%) * 5 facilities reporting in XML 1 (2%) * 22 facilities reporting in 80 col (7%) * 114 facilities reporting hardcopy input (35%) 3 ~ 65 % of reporting facilities are reporting electronically - This accounts for 97% of the transaction data 4 Reporting Performance - DOE September 2012 Reconciliations * Closed 11/26/2012, 10 day ahead of average * 49 facilities required to be reconciled * 40 facilities reported by 10/15/2012 * 31 facilities either submitted reconciled or reconciled within 2 days of receipt 5 Reporting Performance - NRC 2012 Reconciliations

218

Pollution prevention opportunity assessments of US Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project summary describes three Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments conducted at US Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works facilities under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. The purposes of the WREAFS Program are to identify new technologies and techniques for reducing wastes from industrial processes at Federal sites, and to enhance the implementation of pollution prevention through technology transfer. New techniques and technologies for reducing waste generation are identified through pollution prevention opportunity assessments (PPOA) and may be further evaluated through joint research, development, and demonstration projects. The assessments were conducted using the procedures outlined in EPA`s Facility Pollution Prevention Guide. The assessments had two major phases. The first phase quantified waste generation and management practices. The second phase identified and evaluated the feasibility of opportunities and techniques to eliminate, reduce, or recycle wastes. The facilities studied in the PPOAs were: a navigation lock and dam; a warehouse and a maintenance and repair facility; a hydroelectric power plant; and a flood control dam and reservoir with associated public recreation areas. Other Federal agencies, such as the Bureau of Reclamation and the Tennessee Valley Authority have similar functions and facilities, as do states and the private sector. Thus, the results of the PPOAs described in the three full reports have applicability to a broad audience.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

220

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website: www.emt-india.netBook4Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentenergy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment...

222

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with the Baseline Risk Assessment for the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment of the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin.

Palmer, E.

1997-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Title Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-6349E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Therkelsen, Peter, Aimee T. McKane, Ridah Sabouni, and Tracy Evans Conference Name American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 07/2013 Keywords ACEEE Conference Paper, energy efficiency, Energy Performance Program Abstract Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE's contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEPcertified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

224

Historical Background on the Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the U.S. Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a Research and development facility for the safe management storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and after site selection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance. assessment conducted in 1996, which is summarized in this special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This paper provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.

1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

225

HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division : To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001

226

Environmental Assessment for the new Whole Body Counter facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy proposes to construct and operate a new in-vivo counting facility at the Savannah River Site for the monitoring of employees for internal radionuclides. The proposed facility, titled the new Whole Body Counter (WBC) facility, would house both the existing and additional new invivo counting equipment and facility support operations. The proposed facility would be sited and located in an area of the SRS in which background radiation levels are sufficiently low to assure accurate in-vivo counts and a location that would assure ease of access for occupational workers. This Environmental Assessment has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, and the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CPR Parts 1500-1508). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. The proposed action has independent utility to the Savannah River operations and will be necessary to support plant activities regardless of the makeup of the future mission at the site. As such, the proposed new WBC facility is treated as part of the preliminary Reconfiguration Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ``No Action`` alternative.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Historical Relationship Between Performance Assessment for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Other Types of Risk Assessment in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of the process for assessing the hazards of a geologic disposal system for radioactive waste and, similarly, nuclear power reactors, and the relationship of this process with other assessments of risk, particularly assessments of hazards from manufactured carcinogenic chemicals during use and disposal. This perspective reviews the common history of scientific concepts for risk assessment developed to the 1950s. Computational tools and techniques developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to analyze the reliability of nuclear weapon delivery systems were adopted in the early 1970s for probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power reactors, a technology for which behavior was unknown. In turn, these analyses became an important foundation for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the late 1970s. The evaluation of risk to human health and the environment from chemical hazards is built upon methods for assessing the dose response of radionuclides in the 1950s. Despite a shared background, however, societal events, often in the form of legislation, have affected the development path for risk assessment for human health, producing dissimilarities between these risk assessments and those for nuclear facilities. An important difference is the regulator's interest in accounting for uncertainty and the tools used to evaluate it.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

228

Regulatory basis for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the first operational repository designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste from the defense programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for certifications and regulation of the WIPP facility for the radioactive components of the waste. The EPA has promulgated general radioactive waste disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 191. and WIPP-specific criteria to implement and interpret the generic disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 194. In October 1996. the DOE submitted its Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the EPA to demonstrate compliance with the disposal standards at Subparts B and C of 40 CFR Part 191. This paper summarizes the development of the overall legal framework for radioactive waste disposal at the WIPP, the parallel development of the WIPP performance assessment (PA), and how the EPA disposal standards and implementing criteria formed the basis for the CCA WIPP PA. The CCA resulted in a certification in May 1998 by the EPA of the WIPP'S compliance with the EPA's disposal standard, thus enabling the WIPP to begin radioactive waste disposal.

HOWARD,BRYAN A.; CRAWFORD,M.B.; GALSON,D.A.; MARIETTA,MELVIN G.

2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

229

Environmental Assessment Proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Newport News, Virginia  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

84 84 Environmental Assessment Proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Newport News, Virginia June 2002 U. S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Oak Ridge, Tennessee DOE/EA-1384 i TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.....................................................................................................................1 1. INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................................... 6 1.1 PREVIOUS ACTIONS ............................................................................................................................................. 6 1.2 SCOPE OF THIS PROPOSED ACTION..............................................................................................................

230

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) The CPAR assesses a contractor's performance, both positive and negative, and provides a record on a given contract during a specified period of time. Each assessment must be based on objective data (or measurable, subjective data when objective data is not available) supportable by program and contract management data. The CPARS process is designed with a series of checks-and-balances to facilitate the objective and consistent evaluation of contractor performance. Both Government and contractor perspectives are captured on the CPAR form. The opportunity to review/comment on the CPAR by the designated Government and contractor personnel together makes a complete CPAR.

231

A Dynamic Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment Tool - 12490  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Performance Assessment (PA) methodology comprises a toolbox used to demonstrate regulatory compliance of the repository after facility closure. The PA framework rests upon an extensive suite of computational codes. In some cases, significant alteration of code inputs is a tedious and difficult task. Due to the nature of the application for which they are used, PA codes used in support of WIPP regulatory compliance demonstration must satisfy stringent quality assurance requirements. Consequently, many of the coding practices used during original code development are still implemented today. A more efficient workflow configuration has the potential to alleviate difficulties associated with extensive code input modifications. Here, this potential is assessed via an implementation of a more flexible scientific workflow system for a subset of the codes used in WIPP PA. The scientific workflow approach taken here for a dynamic PA system enables users from disparate backgrounds to dramatically shorten the time between hypothesis and analysis by decreasing the amount of a priori knowledge, from a range of disciplines, needed to execute the code. Having smaller iteration times allows for more ideas to be tested and explored, which leads to safer and more optimized systems. Note that these high-level, dynamic tools are intended only for initial scoping studies on the personal computer of a researcher. Full, regulatory compliance calculations may occur only within a qualified computing environment. However, the WIPP PA tools here may guide future research and indicate regions of the analysis space that are worth further study. This next generation of PA software provides the ability to perform scoping investigations of repository performance quickly and easily, and has an accessible and useful interface to a variety of users, such as fuel cycle systems designers, domain experts such as repository modelers, and policy makers. The purview of this project allows for many opportunities for future work. Foremost among these is the desire to implement the full BRAGFLO suite within the workflow. This will entail porting or wrapping Genmesh, Matset, LHS, and ICSet within Python. Moreover, unifying the two GUIs into a single driver application would be a natural next step. Once the BRAGFLO suite is completed, other portions of WIPP PA could be implemented with corresponding and inter-operable work-flows. Likely first candidates for this are those codes that are similarly computationally intensive, such as the one used to generate complementary cumulative distribution functions used to demonstrate regulatory compliance (code CCDFGF). (authors)

Scopatz, Anthony M.; March, Jonathan; Weckesser, Warren; Jones, Eric [Enthought Inc, Austin, Texas, 78701 (United States); Lee, Moo; Camphouse, Chris [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM, 88220 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Performance and improvements of the tritium handling facility at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major problem facing todays nuclear energy industry is the release of radioactive waste products to the atmosphere. The DP-East Tritium Handling Facility at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), activated December 5, 1974 has processed 3.8 x 10/sup 6/ curies of tritium with a total stack release of 704.5 curies as of December 12, 1979. This averages only 11.7 Ci/month which to our knowledge is the lowest stack release any major tritium facility has achieved. The facility includes an 11.5 m/sup 3/ dry box with associated gas purification system (GPS) and an effluent treatment system (FTS). The system performance, problems, and improvements are discussed with special emphasis given to the ETS, the new dry box waste disposal system, and the new automated logic control system, all of which contribute significantly to the low level tritium release at this facility.

Nasise, J.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Assessment of radioactive wastes from a DCLL fusion reactor: Disposal in El Cabril facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Under the Spanish Breeding Blanket Technology Programme TECNO_FUS a conceptual design of a DCLL (Dual-Coolant Lithium–Lead) blanket-based reactor is being revised. The dually cooled breeding zone is composed of He/LiPb and SiC as material of the liquid metal flow channel inserts. Structural materials are ferritic-martensitic steel (Eurofer) for the blanket and austenitic steel (SS316LN) for the vacuum vessel (VV) and the cryostat. In this work, radioactive wastes are assessed in order to determine if they can be disposed as low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) in the Spanish near surface disposal facility of El Cabril. Also, unconditional clearance and recycling waste management options are studied. The neutron transport calculations have been performed with MCNPX code, while the ACAB code is used for calculations of the inventory of activation products and for activation analysis, in terms of waste management ratings for the options considered. Results show that the total amount of the cryostat can be disposed in El Cabril joined to the outer layer of both VV and channel inserts, whereas only concrete-made biological shield can be managed through clearance and none of the steels can be recycled. Those results are compared with those corresponding to French regulation, showing similar conclusions.

Raquel García; Juan Pablo Catalán; Javier Sanz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project, September 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Centered Assessment of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Results .................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Conclusions ............................................................................................................................ 7

235

Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project, September 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility Centered Assessment of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Results .................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Conclusions ............................................................................................................................ 7

236

Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Level Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee John E. Marra, Ph.D. Associate Laboratory Director November 6, 2008 Richland, WA DOE-EM HLW Corporate Board Meeting Background - Performance Assessment Process Performance assessments are the fundamental risk assessment tool used by the DOE to evaluate and communicate the effectiveness and long-term impact of waste management and cleanup decisions. This includes demonstrations of compliance, NEPA analyses, and decisions about technologies and 2 analyses, and decisions about technologies and waste forms. Background - Process Perception EM-2 'Precepts' for Improved High-Level Waste Management (HLW Corporate Board Meeting - April 2008) Improved Performance Assessments (PA) The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the 3 The PA process is not consistently applied amongst the major HLW sites PA

238

Fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model for critical facilities in combating the terrorism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Critical facility vulnerability assessment is a highly complex strategic activity in combating the terrorism and necessitates a structured quantified methodology to support the decision-making process in defense planning. In the system perspective, the critical facility, such as airport, dam, governmental facility, harbor, nuclear power plant, oil plant etc., can be defined as a system that relies on a group of different interdependent logical and physical entities as system functions and system components. The aim of this paper is to present a realistic approach to determine the vulnerability of such a system defended against the terrorist attack under multiple criteria which can be both qualitative and quantitative by considering these interdependencies. The proposed approach, called fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model (FIVAM), is based on fuzzy set theory, Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART) and Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCM) methodology in a group decision-making environment. The FIVAM approach is presented step-by-step and applied to a simple case study on airport vulnerability assessment. The results of the application are compared to those observed through a classical vulnerability assessment model to illustrate the effectiveness of the FIVAM. Furthermore, FIVAM provides a framework to identify the hidden vulnerabilities caused by the functional interdependencies within the system. The results also show that FIVAM quantifies the vulnerability of the system, system functions and system components, and determines the most critical functions and components by simulating the system behavior.

Ilker Akgun; Ahmet Kandakoglu; Ahmet Fahri Ozok

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

PERFORMANCE STATUS OF THE RF-GUN BASED INJECTOR OF THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERFORMANCE STATUS OF THE RF-GUN BASED INJECTOR OF THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC S. Schreiber. For this, an rf-gun based photoinjec- tor was installed late 1998 and is in operation since then gun [4] to match the beam charcteristics as close as pos- sible to the TESLA proposal. It is able

240

US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, Germantown, MD (United States); Phifer, Mark [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Environmental Assessment for decommissioning the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Weeks Island Facility, Iberia Parish, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Weeks Island site is one of five underground salt dome crude oils storage facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). It is located in Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The purpose of the proposed action is to decommission the Weeks Island crude oil storage after the oil inventory has been transferred to other SPR facilities. Water intrusion into the salt dome storage chambers and the development of two sinkholes located near the aboveground facilities has created uncertain geophysical conditions. This Environmental Assessment describes the proposed decommissioning operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. Based on this analyses, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and has issued the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Thorium fuel performance assessment in \\{HTRs\\}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thorium as a nuclear fuel is receiving renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium. After 1980, most HTR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium. After completing fuel development for AVR and THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded efforts on a new program utilizing thorium and high-enriched uranium TRISO coated particles for advanced HTR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of LTI inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with HTI-BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th,U)O2 TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300 °C in normal operations and 1600 °C in accidents, with burnups up to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8 × 1025 m?2 (E > 16 fJ), the results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR Modul concept, which were: <6.5 × 10?5 for manufacturing; <2 × 10?4 for normal operating conditions; and <5 × 10?4 for accident conditions. These performance statistics for the HEU (Th,U)O2 TRISO fuel system are in good agreement with similar results for the LEU UO2 TRISO fuel system.

H.-J. Allelein; M.J. Kania; H. Nabielek; K. Verfondern

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Performance assessment implementation plan for the geologic repository program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations of repository-system performance to access compliance with regulations and to support the development of the geologic repository. To define the strategy for these evaluations, the DOE has developed this performance assessment strategy plan. This document discusses the need for such a strategy, the objectives and scope of the strategy plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans. Additionally, it defines performance assessment and describes the roles of performance assessment in this program, discusses concepts and general strategies needed for performance assessment, outlines the content of the Safety Analysis Report, summarizes the requirements for the repository Environmental Impact Statement, discusses the requirements that apply to the site-suitability analyses and describes the site characterization. 10 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

An Integrated Assessment of Location-Dependent Scaling for Microalgae Biofuel Production Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful development of a large-scale microalgae-based biofuels industry requires comprehensive analysis and understanding of the feedstock supply chain—from facility siting/design through processing/upgrading of the feedstock to a fuel product. The evolution from pilot-scale production facilities to energy-scale operations presents many multi-disciplinary challenges, including a sustainable supply of water and nutrients, operational and infrastructure logistics, and economic competitiveness with petroleum-based fuels. These challenges are addressed in part by applying the Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF)—an integrated multi-scale modeling, analysis, and data management suite—to address key issues in developing and operating an open-pond facility by analyzing how variability and uncertainty in space and time affect algal feedstock production rates, and determining the site-specific “optimum” facility scale to minimize capital and operational expenses. This approach explicitly and systematically assesses the interdependence of biofuel production potential, associated resource requirements, and production system design trade-offs. The IAF was applied to a set of sites previously identified as having the potential to cumulatively produce 5 billion-gallons/year in the southeastern U.S. and results indicate costs can be reduced by selecting the most effective processing technology pathway and scaling downstream processing capabilities to fit site-specific growing conditions, available resources, and algal strains.

Coleman, Andre M.; Abodeely, Jared; Skaggs, Richard; Moeglein, William AM; Newby, Deborah T.; Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

246

Assessing the performance of recent density functionals for bulk solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assess the performance of recent density functionals for the exchange-correlation energy of a nonmolecular solid, by applying accurate calculations with the GAUSSIAN, BAND, and VASP codes to a test set of 24 solid metals ...

Csonka, Gabor I.

247

Synchronous and Cogged Fan Belt Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GSA Regional GPG Team commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to perform monitoring of cogged V-belts and synchronous belts on both a constant volume and a variable air volume fan at the Byron G. Rodgers Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Denver, Colorado. These motor/fan combinations were tested with their original, standard V-belts (appropriately tensioned by an operation and maintenance professional) to obtain a baseline for standard operation. They were then switched to the cogged V-belts, and finally to synchronous belts. The power consumption by the motor was normalized for both fan speed and air density changes. This was necessary to ensure that the power readings were not influenced by a change in rotational fan speed or by the power required to push denser air. Finally, energy savings and operation and maintenance savings were compiled into an economic life-cycle cost analysis of the different belt options.

Cutler, D.; Dean, J.; Acosta, J.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High Performance Computer Facility Designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-performance computing facilities in the United States consume an enormous amount of electricity, cutting into research budgets and challenging public- and private-sector efforts to reduce energy consumption and meet environmental goals. However, these facilities can greatly reduce their energy demand through energy-efficient design of the facility itself. Using a case study of a facility under design, this article discusses strategies and technologies that can be used to help achieve energy reductions.

Drewmark Communications; Sartor, Dale; Wilson, Mark

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single- and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and its performance as early as possible in the project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

Mann, F.M.

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

Mann, F.M.

1997-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 2003 December 2003 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and implemented. The M&O contractor and other NTS Users management actively participate in the ES program. An implemented Work Control process is in place that ensures

252

EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM recently completed its tenth Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) since piloting the TRA process in 2006. A TRA is an intensive peer review process through which the maturity of a technology is evaluated. A TRA utilizes the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale pioneered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

253

EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Employees with Savannah River Remediation, the SRS liquid waste contractor, review mock-ups of the SCIX technology at the Savannah River National Laboratory. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM recently completed its tenth Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) since piloting the TRA process in 2006. A TRA is an intensive peer review process through which the maturity of a technology is evaluated. A TRA utilizes the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale pioneered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

254

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

Hansen, René Rydhof

255

Facility Representative Performance Indicator Report for for Jan-Mar 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Staffing, Qualification, and Utilization Data OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Location Analysis FTE Approved FTE Actual Staff % Staff * Gains / Losses % Core Qualified * % Fully Qualified * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 4 100 0 100 100 63 ID (EM) 1 7 7 6 86 0 71 71 90 OR (EM) 14 14 13 93 0 86 86 75 ORP 13 13 13 100 0 100 100 90 PPPO 2 6 6 6 100 ±1 100 100 74 RL 17 15 15 88 0 88 82 70 SPRU 3 2 2 2 100 0 100 0 90 SR 4 31 31 27 87 -1 87 87 86 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 75 EM Totals 95 93 88 93 +1, -2 89 86 79 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >65 Location Key: CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office ORP = Office of River Protection SPRU = Separations Process Research Unit

256

W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility experiment centerline fuel thermocouple performance. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) experiment is the fifth in a series of experiments sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the National Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) Safety Assurance Program. The experiments are being conducted under the direction of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). The irradiation phase of the W-1 SLSF experiment was conducted between May 27 and July 20, 1979, and terminated with incipient fuel pin cladding failure during the final boiling transient. Experimental hardware and facility performed as designed, allowing completion of all planned tests and test objectives. This paper focuses on high temperature in-fuel thermocouples and discusses their development, fabrication, and performance in the W-1 experiment.

Meyers, S.C.; Henderson, J.M.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review (HPCOR): Enabling Data-Driven Scientific Discovery at HPC Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are on the verge of a paradigm shift in the way they deliver systems and services to science and engineering teams. Research projects are producing a wide variety of data at unprecedented scale and level of complexity, with community-specific services that are part of the data collection and analysis workflow. On June 18-19, 2014 representatives from six DOE HPC centers met in Oakland, CA at the DOE High Performance Operational Review (HPCOR) to discuss how they can best provide facilities and services to enable large-scale data-driven scientific discovery at the DOE national laboratories. The report contains findings from that review.

Gerber, Richard; Allcock, William; Beggio, Chris; Campbell, Stuart; Cherry, Andrew; Cholia, Shreyas; Dart, Eli; England, Clay; Fahey, Tim; Foertter, Fernanda; Goldstone, Robin; Hick, Jason; Karelitz, David; Kelly, Kaki; Monroe, Laura; Prabhat,; Skinner, David; White, Julia

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

258

Gamma Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Final environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed construction and operation of a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to: enhance capabilities to assure technical excellence in nuclear weapon radiation environments testing, component development, and certification; comply with all applicable ES and H safeguards, standards, policies, and regulations; reduce personnel radiological exposure to comply with ALARA limits in accordance with DOE orders and standards; consolidate major gamma ray sources into a central, secured area; and reduce operational risks associated with operation of the GIF and LICA in their present locations. This proposed action provides for the design, construction, and operation of a new GIF located within TA V and the removal of the existing GIF and Low Intensity Cobalt Array (LICA). The proposed action includes potential demolition of the gamma shield walls and removal of equipment in the existing GIF and LICA. The shielding pool used by the existing GIF will remain as part of the ACRR facility. Transportation of the existing {sup 60}Co sources from the existing LICA and GIF to the new facility is also included in the proposed action. Relocation of the gamma sources to the new GIF will be accomplished by similar techniques to those used to install the sources originally.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Environmental Assessment for the LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, is being constructed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). In this Environmental Assessment, environmental consequences of spilling hazardous materials in the Frenchman Flat basin are evaluated and mitigations and recommendations are stated in order to protect natural resources and reduce land-use impacts. Guidelines and restrictions concerning spill-test procedures will be determined by the LGF Test Facility Operations Manager and DOE based on toxicity documentation for the test material, provided by the user, and mitigations imposed by the Environmental Assessment. In addition to Spill Test Facility operational procedures, certain assumptions have been made in preparation of this document: no materials will be considered for testing that have cumulative, long-term persistence in the environment; spill tests will consist of releases of 15 min or less; and sufficient time will be allowed between tests for recovery of natural resources. Geographic limits to downwind concentrations of spill materials were primarily determined from meteorological data, human occupational exposure standards to hazardous materials and previous spill tests. These limits were established using maximum spill scenarios and environmental impacts are discussed as worst case scenarios; however, spill-test series will begin with smaller spills, gradually increasing in size after the impacts of the initial tests have been evaluated.

Patton, S.E.; Novo, M.G.; Shinn, J.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Federal Facility Reporting | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Facility Reporting Federal Facility Reporting Federal Facility Reporting October 8, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Various legal authorities require agencies to report data on energy and water consumption and resource management efforts within Federal facilities. The Federal Energy Management Program collects this data to assess agency performance toward mandated goals on agency Energy/Sustainability Scorecards and presents it in annual reports to Congress. Find Federal facility reporting information related to: Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, Section 432, Federal Facility Management and Benchmarking Requirements: View information about requirements and data collected to track Federal facility compliance with requirements for performing facility evaluations, implementing and

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Assessment of External Hazards at Radioactive Waste and Used Fuel Management Facilities - 13505  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key lessons from the Fukushima accident is the importance of having a comprehensive identification and evaluation of risks posed by external events to nuclear facilities. While the primary focus has been on nuclear power plants, the Canadian nuclear industry has also been updating hazard assessments for radioactive waste and used fuel management facilities to ensure that lessons learnt from Fukushima are addressed. External events are events that originate either physically outside the nuclear site or outside its control. They include natural events, such as high winds, lightning, earthquakes or flood due to extreme rainfall. The approaches that have been applied to the identification and assessment of external hazards in Canada are presented and analyzed. Specific aspects and considerations concerning hazards posed to radioactive waste and used fuel management operations are identified. Relevant hazard identification techniques are described, which draw upon available regulatory guidance and standard assessment techniques such as Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPs) and 'What-if' analysis. Consideration is given to ensuring that hazard combinations (for example: high winds and flooding due to rainfall) are properly taken into account. Approaches that can be used to screen out external hazards, through a combination of frequency and impact assessments, are summarized. For those hazards that cannot be screened out, a brief overview of methods that can be used to conduct more detailed hazard assessments is also provided. The lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident have had a significant impact on specific aspects of the approaches used to hazard assessment for waste management. Practical examples of the effect of these impacts are provided. (authors)

Gerchikov, Mark; Schneider, Glenn; Khan, Badi; Alderson, Elizabeth [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)] [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Environmental Assessment for the Leasing of Facilities and Equipment to USEC Inc. (DOE/EA-1451) (10/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Environmental Assessment for the Leasing of Facilities and Equipment to USEC Inc. United States Department of Energy October 2002 Environmental Assessment for the Leasing of Facilities and Equipment to USEC Inc. i TABLE OF CONTENTS Cover Sheet Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i List of Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Acronyms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii Chemicals and Units of Measure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x Conversion Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Metric Prefixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

263

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Simulated Performance Speaker(s): Emanuele Naboni Date: May 29, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Opaque ventilated façade systems are increasingly used in buildings, even though their effects on the overall thermal performance of buildings have not yet been fully understood. The research reported in this presentation focuses on the modeling of such systems with EnergyPlus. Ventilated façade systems are modeled in EnergyPlus with module "Exterior Naturally Vented Cavity." Not all façade systems can be modeled with this module; this research defined the types of systems that can be modeled, and the limitations of such simulation. The performance of a ventilated façade

264

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Geochemical data package for the Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment (ILAW PA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as low-activity waste is to vitrify the liquid/slurry and place the solid product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the porewater of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the disposal facility, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and the thermodynamic solubility product (K{sub sp}), respectively. In this data package, the authors approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. In future geochemical data packages, they will determine whether a more rigorous measure of solubility is necessary or warranted based on the dose predictions emanating from the ILAW 2001 PA and reviewers' comments. The K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the ILAW system. In addition to the best-estimate K{sub d}s, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. They assume that K{sub d} values are log normally distributed over the cited ranges. Currently, they do not give estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, they supply different values for both the K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the ILAW system and supply time-varying K{sub d}s for the concrete zone, should the final repository design include concrete vaults or cement amendments to buffer the system pH.

DI Kaplan; RJ Serne

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

266

A formal expert judgment procedure for performance assessments of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an experimental facility located in southeastern New Mexico. It has been designed to determine the feasibility of the geologic disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in a deep bedded-salt formation. The WIPP was also designed for disposal and will operate in that capacity if approved. The WIPP Performance Assessment Department at Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting analyses to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. These analyses sometimes require the use of expert judgment. This Department has convened several expert-judgment panels and from that experience has developed an internal quality-assurance procedure to guide the formal elicitation of expert judgment. This protocol is based on the principles found in the decision-analysis literature.

Trauth, K.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guzowski, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States). Business Administration & Economics Div.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

White paper updating conclusions of 1998 ILAW performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a comparison of the estimated immobilized low-activity waste (LAW) disposal system performance against established performance objectives using the beat estimates for parameters and models to describe the system. The principal advances in knowledge since the last performance assessment (known as the 1998 ILAW PA [Mann 1998a]) have been in site specific information and data on the waste form performance for BNFL, Inc. relevant glass formulations. The white paper also estimates the maximum release rates for technetium and other key radionuclides and chemicals from the waste form. Finally, this white paper provides limited information on the impact of changes in waste form loading.

MANN, F.M.

2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

268

Thermodynamic data management system for nuclear waste disposal performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermodynamic property values for use in assessing the performance of a nuclear waste repository are described. More emphasis is on a computerized data base management system which facilitates use of the thermodynamic data in sensitivity analysis and other studies which critically assess the performance of disposal sites. Examples are given of critical evaluation procedures; comparison of apparent equilibrium constants calculated from the data base, with other work; and of correlations useful in estimating missing values of both free energy and enthalpy of formation for aqueous species. 49 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

Phillips, S.L.; Hale, F.V.; Siegel, M.D.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Data Quality Assessment and Control for the ARM Climate Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is to provide observations of the earth climate system to the climate research community for the purpose of improving the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their coupling with the Earth's surface. In order for ARM measurements to be useful toward this goal, it is important that the measurements are of a known and reasonable quality. The ARM data quality program includes several components designed to identify quality issues in near-real-time, track problems to solutions, assess more subtle long-term issues, and communicate problems to the user community.

Peppler, R

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

270

DOE/EA-1310: Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Couples Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 March 2000 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory DOE/EA-1310 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Published March 2000 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS ............................................................................................................................... v HELPFUL INFORMATION ........................................................................................................

271

RELAP5/MOD3.2 Assessment Using CHF Data from the KS-1 and V-200 Experiment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using rod bundle critical heat flux data from the KS-1 and V-200 facilities. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem 7, these tests addressed one of the important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well, core heat transfer. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data, consistently overpredicting the measured critical heat flux. It is recommended that a model development effort be undertaken to develop a critical heat flux model for RELAP5 that better represents the behavior in VVER rod bundles.

Bayless, Paul David

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Use of the UNCLE Facility to Assess Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversions at Uranium Conversion Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, the approach to safeguarding nuclear material in the front end of the fuel cycle was implemented only at the stage when UF6 was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. Recent International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) circulars and policy papers have sought to implement safeguards when any purified aqueous uranium solution or uranium oxides suitable for isotopic enrichment or fuel fabrication exist. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) operating at 6000 MTU/year. Monitoring instruments, including the 3He passive neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter, have been tested at UNCLE and field tested at Springfields. The field trials demonstrated the need to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of operations and safeguards monitoring at additional plants. Currently, UNCLE is testing neutron-based monitoring for detection of noncompliant activities; however, gamma-ray source term monitoring is currently being explored complementary to the neutron detector in order to detect undeclared activities in a more timely manner. The preliminary results of gamma-ray source term modeling and monitoring at UNCLE are being analyzed as part of a comprehensive source term and detector benchmarking effort. Based on neutron source term detection capabilities, alternative gamma-based detection and monitoring methods will be proposed to more effectively monitor NUCP operations in verifying or detecting deviations from declared conversion activities.

Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Rauch, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Environmental assessment for the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility: Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0466) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 for the proposed completion of construction and subsequent operation of a central Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF), in the southeastern portion of Technical Area III at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque (SNLA). The RMWMF is designed to receive, store, characterize, conduct limited bench-scale treatment of, repackage, and certify low-level waste (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) (as necessary) for shipment to an offsite disposal or treatment facility. The RMWMF was partially constructed in 1989. Due to changing regulatory requirements, planned facility upgrades would be undertaken as part of the proposed action. These upgrades would include paving of road surfaces and work areas, installation of pumping equipment and lines for surface impoundment, and design and construction of air locks and truck decontamination and water treatment systems. The proposed action also includes an adjacent corrosive and reactive metals storage area, and associated roads and paving. LLW and MW generated at SNLA would be transported from the technical areas to the RMWMF in containers approved by the Department of Transportation. The RMWMF would not handle nonradioactive hazardous waste. Based on the analysis in the EA, the proposed completion of construction and operation of the RMWMF does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement for the proposed action is not required.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Environmental Assessment for the Leasing of Facilities and Equipment to USEC Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the lease of facilities and equipment to USEC Inc. (USEC), which would be used in its Gas Centrifuge Research and Development (R&D) Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) [hereinafter referred to as the USEC EA]. The USEC EA analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE leasing facility K-101 and portions of K-1600, K-1220 and K-1037 at the ETTP to USEC for a minimum 3-year period, with additional option periods consistent with the Oak Ridge Accelerated Clean-up Plan (ACP) Agreement. In July 2002, USEC notified DOE that it intends to use certain leased equipment at an off-site facility at the Centrifuge Technology Center (CTC) on the Boeing Property. The purpose of the USEC Gas Centrifuge R&D Project is to develop an economically attractive gas centrifuge machine and process using DOE's centrifuge technology.

N /A

2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

275

Radionuclide release rates from spent fuel for performance assessment modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a scenario of aqueous transport from a high-level radioactive waste repository, the concentration of radionuclides in water in contact with the waste constitutes the source term for transport models, and as such represents a fundamental component of all performance assessment models. Many laboratory experiments have been done to characterize release rates and understand processes influencing radionuclide release rates from irradiated nuclear fuel. Natural analogues of these waste forms have been studied to obtain information regarding the long-term stability of potential waste forms in complex natural systems. This information from diverse sources must be brought together to develop and defend methods used to define source terms for performance assessment models. In this manuscript examples of measures of radionuclide release rates from spent nuclear fuel or analogues of nuclear fuel are presented. Each example represents a very different approach to obtaining a numerical measure and each has its limitations. There is no way to obtain an unambiguous measure of this or any parameter used in performance assessment codes for evaluating the effects of processes operative over many millennia. The examples are intended to suggest by example that in the absence of the ability to evaluate accuracy and precision, consistency of a broadly based set of data can be used as circumstantial evidence to defend the choice of parameters used in performance assessments.

Curtis, D.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.emt-india.net/Book4/Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: "Energy Standards,Upgrade Requirements" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

277

Historical Background on Assessment the Performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the US Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a research and development facility for the safe management, storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and 25 years after site selection, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance assessment conducted in 1996. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This report provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project. For example, the federal requirement to provide environmental impact statements and negotiated agreements with the State of New Mexico influenced the type of scientific areas that were investigated and the engineering analysis prior to 1989 for the WIPP.

Rechard, R.P.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Methodology for assessing performance of waste management systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the methodology provided in this report is to select the optimal way to manage particular sets of waste streams from generation to disposal in a safe and cost-effective manner. The methodology described is designed to review the entire waste management system, assess its performance, ensure that the performance objectives are met, compare different LLW management alternatives, and select the optimal alternative. The methodology is based on decision analysis approach, in which costs and risk are considered for various LLW management alternatives, a comparison of costs, risks, and benefits is made, and an optimal system is selected which minimizes costs and risks and maximizes benefits. A ''zoom-lens'' approach is suggested, i.e., one begins by looking at gross features and gradually proceeds to more and more detail. Performance assessment requires certain information about the characteristics of the waste streams and about the various components of the waste management system. Waste acceptance criteria must be known for each component of the waste management system. Performance assessment for each component requires data about properties of the waste streams and operational and design characteristics of the processing or disposal components. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Meshkov, N.K.; Herzenberg, C.L.; Camasta, S.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

DOE/EA-1445: Environmental Assessment for the Construction of a Child-Care Facility (September 2002)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of a Child-Care Facility United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 DOE/EA-1445 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of a Child-Care Facility United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct a child-care facility at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL's) Pittsburgh site in South Park Township, Allegheny County, PA. The proposed facility would be constructed on previously disturbed parcels of Federal property that were previously developed during the mid-1970's for installation of coal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft{sup 2} mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

283

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

284

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

285

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Certified Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Industrial Leaders: The industrial facilities shown below are among the first to earn certification for Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™).

287

Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term.

Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States); Peterson, P.K. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States)

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

DOE/EA-0820 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

20 20 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669 u.s. Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee April 1994 ER t>ISTRf8UT!Q~~ Or-~I-:r8 DOCUMENT IS UNLlMIT~ DISCLAIMER This report was .prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial

289

Management Challenges in Developing Performance Assessments and Effectively Communicating Their Results - 13612  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War has left a legacy of approximately 37 million gallons of radioactive waste in the aging waste tanks at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). A robust program is in place to remove waste from these tanks, treat the waste to separate into a relatively small volume of high level waste and a large volume of low-level waste, and to actively dispose of the low-level waste on-site and close the cleaned waste tanks and associated ancillary structures. To support performance-based, risk-informed decision making, performance assessments have been developed for the low-level waste disposal facility and for the SRS Tank Farms. Although these performance assessments share many similar features, the nature of the hazards and associated containments differ. As a management team, we are challenged to effectively communicate both the similarities and differences of these performance assessments, how they should be used to support sound decision making for treatment, disposal and waste tank cleaning decisions, and in defending their respective assumptions to the regulatory community and the public but, equally important, to our own corporate decision makers and operations personnel. Effective development and defense of these performance assessments, and effective interpretation and communication of the results are key to making cost-effective, pragmatic decisions for the safe disposal of the low-level waste and stabilization and operational closure of the cleaned tanks and associated structures. This paper will focus on the importance and challenges in communicating key attributes, conclusions and operational implications within a company. (authors)

Thomas, Steve; Mahoney, Mark [Savannah River Remediations LLC, Building 705-1C, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediations LLC, Building 705-1C, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

DOE/EA-1605: Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

605 605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE This page intentionally left blank - i - TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................1 1.1 Background and Proposed Action ...............................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need ........................................................................................4

291

Performance assessment methodology and preliminary results for low-level radioactive waste disposal in Taiwan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Taiwan's Institute for Nuclear Energy Research (INER) have teamed together to evaluate several candidate sites for Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Taiwan currently has three nuclear power plants, with another under construction. Taiwan also has a research reactor, as well as medical and industrial wastes to contend with. Eventually the reactors will be decomissioned. Operational and decommissioning wastes will need to be disposed in a licensed disposal facility starting in 2014. Taiwan has adopted regulations similar to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) low-level radioactive waste rules (10 CFR 61) to govern the disposal of LLW. Taiwan has proposed several potential sites for the final disposal of LLW that is now in temporary storage on Lanyu Island and on-site at operating nuclear power plants, and for waste generated in the future through 2045. The planned final disposal facility will have a capacity of approximately 966,000 55-gallon drums. Taiwan is in the process of evaluating the best candidate site to pursue for licensing. Among these proposed sites there are basically two disposal concepts: shallow land burial and cavern disposal. A representative potential site for shallow land burial is located on a small island in the Taiwan Strait with basalt bedrock and interbedded sedimentary rocks. An engineered cover system would be constructed to limit infiltration for shallow land burial. A representative potential site for cavern disposal is located along the southeastern coast of Taiwan in a tunnel system that would be about 500 to 800 m below the surface. Bedrock at this site consists of argillite and meta-sedimentary rocks. Performance assessment analyses will be performed to evaluate future performance of the facility and the potential dose/risk to exposed populations. Preliminary performance assessment analyses will be used in the site-selection process and to aid in design of the disposal system. Final performance assessment analyses will be used in the regulatory process of licensing a site. The SNL/INER team has developed a performance assessment methodology that is used to simulate processes associated with the potential release of radionuclides to evaluate these sites. The following software codes are utilized in the performance assessment methodology: GoldSim (to implement a probabilistic analysis that will explicitly address uncertainties); the NRC's Breach, Leach, and Transport - Multiple Species (BLT-MS) code (to simulate waste-container degradation, waste-form leaching, and transport through the host rock); the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer code (FEHM) (to simulate groundwater flow and estimate flow velocities); the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill performance Model (HELP) code (to evaluate infiltration through the disposal cover); the AMBER code (to evaluate human health exposures); and the NRC's Disposal Unit Source Term -- Multiple Species (DUST-MS) code (to screen applicable radionuclides). Preliminary results of the evaluations of the two disposal concept sites are presented.

Arnold, Bill Walter; Chang, Fu-lin (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Mattie, Patrick D.; Knowlton, Robert G.; Chuang, W-S (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Chi, L-M (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Jow, Hong-Nian; Tien, Norman C. (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses...

293

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume provides a description of the facility, and its location and setting in the three-state area of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia; an overview of previous risk assessments conducted by U.S. EPA for this site, including the preliminary assessment of inhalation exposure and the screening-level risk analyses of indirect exposure; and a summary of comments provided by the Peer Review Panel on the Project Plan.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

An assessment of the quality and educational adequacy of educational facilities and their perceived impact on the learning environment as reported by middle school administrators and teachers in Humble Independent School District, Humble, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an assessment of the impact that these facilities have on the learning environment. This study also assesses the quality and adequacy of these middle school facilities through a purely quantitative evaluation conducted by an unbiased assessment team. Humble ISD...

Monk, Douglas Matthew

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

DOE/EA-1149; Environmental Assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility, Idaho Nation Engineering Laboratory (and FONSI)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 July 1996 Environmental Assessment Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE CLOSURE OF THE WASTE CALCINING FACILITY AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce the risks to human

296

Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Environmental assessment for the construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Waste Segregation Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction, operation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Waste Segregation Facility (WSF) for the sorting, shredding, and compaction of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The LLW to be processed consists of two waste streams: legacy waste which is currently stored in E-Area Vaults of SRS and new waste generated from continuing operations. The proposed action is to construct, operate, and D&D a facility to process low-activity job-control and equipment waste for volume reduction. The LLW would be processed to make more efficient use of low-level waste disposal capacity (E-Area Vaults) or to meet the waste acceptance criteria for treatment at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at SRS.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Â… 5-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRITICALITY SAFETY CRITICALITY SAFETY OBJECTIVE CS.1 Facility safety documentation that describes the "safety envelope" for the AR Project II activities is in place and has been implemented and administrative and engineering controls to prevent and mitigate hazards associated with commencing the AR Project II activities are tailored to the work being performed and the associated hazards to meet the following criteria: CRITERIA: CS. 1.1 Criticality safety requirements are current, approved, and properly controlled. CS. 1.2 Facility safety and criticality requirements have been incorporated into applicable procedures and documents. REVIEW APPROACH: Document Reviews: * Review applicable CSEs for identification of facility hazards and development

299

Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

Schneider, K.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

PORFLOW Modeling Supporting The H-Tank Farm Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vadose and saturated zones have been conducted using the PORFLOW code in support of an overall Performance Assessment (PA) of the H-Tank Farm. This report provides technical detail on selected aspects of PORFLOW model development and describes the structure of the associated electronic files. The PORFLOW models for the H-Tank Farm PA, Rev. 1 were updated with grout, solubility, and inventory changes. The aquifer model was refined. In addition, a set of flow sensitivity runs were performed to allow flow to be varied in the related probabilistic GoldSim models. The final PORFLOW concentration values are used as input into a GoldSim dose calculator.

Jordan, J. M.; Flach, G. P.; Westbrook, M. L.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Strategy for experimental validation of waste package performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A strategy for the experimental validation of waste package performance assessment has been developed as part of a program supported by the Repository Technology Program. The strategy was developed by reviewing the results of laboratory analog experiments, in-situ tests, repository simulation tests, and material interaction tests. As a result of the review, a listing of dependent and independent variables that influence the ingress of water into the near-field environment, the reaction between water and the waste form, and the transport of radionuclides from the near-field environment was developed. The variables necessary to incorporate into an experimental validation strategy were chosen by identifying those which had the greatest effect of each of the three major events, i.e., groundwater ingress, waste package reactions, and radionuclide transport. The methodology to perform validation experiments was examined by utilizing an existing laboratory analog approach developed for unsaturated testing of glass waste forms. 185 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Gerding, T.J.; Seils, C.A.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following analogous characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site: (1) Analogous source--UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geology--(i.e. fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs); (3) Analogous climate--Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous setting--Volcanic tuffs overlie carbonate rocks; and (5) Analogous geochemistry--Oxidizing conditions Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table.

G. Saulnier and W. Statham

2006-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

303

Measuring and Testing Equipment Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Measuring and Test Equipment Measuring and Test Equipment Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to determine whether a program is in place which assures that Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used in activities affecting quality and safety are properly controlled, calibrated, and adjusted at specified times to maintain accuracy within necessary limits. Criteria: All M&TE is uniquely identified, calibrated, controlled, and provides accuracy traceability. A recall program maintains the total inventory and status of all M&TE. Out-of-tolerance M&TE is removed from service. Plant equipment calibrated with out-of-tolerance M&TE is evaluated in a timely manner for impact on previous output, current operability and is re-

304

Measuring and Testing Equipment Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Measuring and Test Equipment Measuring and Test Equipment Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to determine whether a program is in place which assures that Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used in activities affecting quality and safety are properly controlled, calibrated, and adjusted at specified times to maintain accuracy within necessary limits. Criteria: All M&TE is uniquely identified, calibrated, controlled, and provides accuracy traceability. A recall program maintains the total inventory and status of all M&TE. Out-of-tolerance M&TE is removed from service. Plant equipment calibrated with out-of-tolerance M&TE is evaluated in a timely manner for impact on previous output, current operability and is re-

305

Machine Shop Safe Operations Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 2003 - Machine Shop Safe Operations July 2003 - Machine Shop Safe Operations Utilize 29 CFR 1910 Utilize applicable LLNL, LANL, DTRA, BN procedures VALUE ADDED FOR: AMTS Contractor Assurance Focus Area AMTS ISM Improvements Focus Area AMTS Safety Precursors/Hazards Analysis Focus Area AMTS Environment, Safety, & Health Division MACHINE SHOP SAFE OPERATIONS Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The purpose of this assessment is to verify that machine shop operators are provided a safe and healthful workplace which will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses. Criteria: A worker protection program shall be implemented that provides a place of employment free from recognized hazards that are causing or likely to cause

306

Assessing current vehicle performance and simulating the performance of hydrogen and hybrid cars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A measure of the efficiency in transforming energy input into transport work is defined and applied to road vehicles as well as to sea, air and rail vehicles for passenger or freight transportation. The insight obtained with this measure is compared with the results of applying the conventional measure of kilometres per unit of energy for current fleets of vehicles. Then, simulation methods are used to assess the performance of fuel cell vehicles, electric vehicles and hybrids between the two. The latter are found to provide an optimum performance for a small, efficient passenger car.

Bent Sørensen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Performance Improvements to the Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team headed by LANL and including many members from LLNL and NSTec LO and NSTec LAO fielded a neutron imaging system (NIS) at the National Ignition Facility at the start of 2011. The NIS consists of a pinhole array that is located 32.5 cm from the source and that creates an image of the source in a segmented scintillator 28 m from the source. The scintillator is viewed by two gated, optical imaging systems: one that is fiber coupled, and one that is lens coupled. While there are a number of other pieces to the system related to pinhole alignment, collimation, shielding and data acquisition, those pieces are discussed elsewhere and are not relevant here. The system is operational and has successfully obtained data on more that ten imaging shots. This remainder of this whitepaper is divided in five main sections. In Section II, we identify three critical areas of improvement that we believe should be pursued to improve the performance of the system for future experiments: spatial resolution, temporal response and signal-to-noise ratio. In Section III, we discuss technologies that could be used to improve these critical performance areas. In Section IV, we describe a path to evolve the current system to achieve improved performance with minimal impact on the ability of the system to operate on shots. In Section V, we discuss the abilities, scope and timescales of the current teams and the Commissariat energie atomique (CEA). In Section VI, we summarize and make specific recommendations for collaboration on improvements to the NIS.

Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Hatarik, R; Merrill, F E; Grim, G P; Wilde, C H; Wilson, D C; Landoas, O; Caillaud, T; Bourgade, J; Buckles, R A; Lee, J; Weiss, P B

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

PORFLOW MODELING FOR A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE PERFORMANCE OF NEW SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT DESIGNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of Savannah River Remediation (SRR), SRNL has analyzed the expected performance obtained from using seven 32 million gallon Saltstone Disposal Units (SDUs) in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) to store future saltstone grout. The analysis was based on preliminary SDU final design specifications. The analysis used PORFLOW modeling to calculate the release of 20 radionuclides from an SDU and transport of the radionuclides and daughters through the vadose zone. Results from this vadose zone analysis were combined with previously calculated releases from existing saltstone vaults and FDCs and a second PORFLOW model run to calculate aquifer transport to assessment points located along a boundary 100 m from the nearest edge of the SDF sources. Peak concentrations within 12 sectors spaced along the 100 m boundary were determined over a period of evaluation extending 20,000 years after SDF closure cap placement. These peak concentrations were provided to SRR to use as input for dose calculations.

Smith, F.

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

309

MHD seawater thruster performance: A comparison of predictions with experimental results from a two Tesla test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate a design oriented MHD thruster performance computer code. The thruster performance code consists of a one-dimensional MHD hydrodynamic model coupled to a two-dimensional electrical model. The code includes major loss mechanisms affecting the performance of the thruster. Among these losses are the joule dissipation losses, frictional losses, electrical end losses, and single electrode potential losses. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

Picologlou, B.F.; Doss, E.D.; Geyer, H.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sikes, W.C.; Ranellone, R.F. (Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

CRAD, Criteria and Guidelines For the Assessment of Safety System Software and Firmware at Defense Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose and scope of this CRAD is to provide a set of consistent assessment criteria and guidelines for the assessment of safety system software and firmware that performs an SC or SS function, as described in the Background section. The scope of the assessment, henceforth, is called "I&C software."

311

Hygienic surveillance in swimming pools: Assessment of the water quality in Bologna facilities in the period 2010–2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the three-year period 2010–2012, 80 public swimming facilities in the metropolitan area of Bologna (Emilia Romagna Region, Italy), including 144 pools (69 indoor, 75 outdoor), were monitored to assess the microbiological and chemical water quality, after about ten years of implementing the new Italian guidance which introduced the principles of internal safety plans in the surveillance of swimming pools. According to the Italian guidance, water samples were collected from supply water (370 samples), pool water (645), and recirculating water entering the pool (307). The samples of supply water always conformed to the microbiological limits for drinking water. The pool water did not conform to the Italian legal requirements in around 16% of indoor pools and 25% of outdoor pools. In 65% of non-compliant samples, only one parameter exceeded the required standards. The microorganisms of faecal origin were isolated very rarely (Enterococci in less than 2% of samples) and pH and residual chlorine showed good compliance in pool water, implying an efficient management of the internal control. The inlet water exceeded the required standards in about 36% and 50% of samples, respectively in indoor and outdoor pools. However, 83.6% of the corresponding samples of pool water met the required limits. The microbiological incongruities were prevalently due to high levels of total heterotrophic counts (THCs) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and were indicative of bacterial colonization of the filters. The sampling of inlet water can thus be indicated as a critical control point for checking the correct functioning of the filters. The non-conformity of samples led to pool closure only in 1.5% of cases. In the other cases, the operators were officially invited to perform the corrective measures previously established in the plan of risk assessment. On the whole, the approach based on internal safety plans produced satisfactory results in terms of pool water quality, demonstrating the effective working of the internal system of analysis and management of risks.

L. Dallolio; M. Belletti; A. Agostini; M. Teggi; M. Bertelli; C. Bergamini; L. Chetti; E. Leoni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Performance Assessment for e-Government Services: An Experience Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transformation and integration of government services, enabled by the use of new technologies such as application servers and Web services, is fundamental to reduce the cost of government and improving service outcomes to citizens. Many core Government information systems comprise applications running on legacy mainframes, databases and transaction processing monitors. As Governments worldwide provide direct access over the Internet to these legacy applications from the general public, they may be exposed to workloads well above the origin design parameters of these back-end systems. This creates a significant risk of high profile failures for Government agencies whose newly integrated systems become overloaded. In this paper we describe how we conducted a performance assessment of a business-critical, Internet-facing Web services that integrated new and legacy systems from two Australian Government agencies. We leveraged prototype tools from our own research along with known techniques in performance modeling. We were able to clearly demonstrate that the existing hardware and software would be adequate to handle the predicted workload for the next financial year. We were also able to do ‘what-if’ analysis and predict how the system can perform with alternative strategies to scale the system. We conclude by summarizing the lessons learnt, including the importance of architecture visibility, benchmarking data quality, and measurement feasibility due to issues of outsourcing, privacy legislation and cross-agency involvement.

Liu, Yan; Zhu, Liming; Gorton, Ian

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

313

Environmental Assessment for the Decontamination, Demolition, and Removal of Certain Facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

52 52 Environmental Assessment for the Decontamination, Demolition, and Removal of Certain Facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project Final U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley, New York September 14, 2006 Final EA - Decontamination, Demolition, and Removal of Certain Facilities at WVDP i Table of Contents CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION................ 1 1.1 Overview....................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 West Valley Demonstration Project.............................................................................. 2 1.3 Purpose and Need for Agency Action ..........................................................................

314

Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has prepared an environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site. This (new) facility would meet requirements of the site radiological protection program and would ensure site compliance with regulations. It was determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and no environmental impact statement is needed.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

Proposal of an environmental performance index to assess solid waste treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proposal of a new concept in waste management: Cleaner Treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of an index to assess quantitatively waste treatment technologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delphi Method was carried out so as to define environmental indicators. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental performance evaluation of waste-to-energy plants. - Abstract: Although the concern with sustainable development and environment protection has considerably grown in the last years it is noted that the majority of decision making models and tools are still either excessively tied to economic aspects or geared to the production process. Moreover, existing models focus on the priority steps of solid waste management, beyond waste energy recovery and disposal. So, in order to help the lack of models and tools aiming at the waste treatment and final disposal, a new concept is proposed: the Cleaner Treatment, which is based on the Cleaner Production principles. This paper focuses on the development and validation of the Cleaner Treatment Index (CTI), to assess environmental performance of waste treatment technologies based on the Cleaner Treatment concept. The index is formed by aggregation (summation or product) of several indicators that consists in operational parameters. The weights of the indicator were established by Delphi Method and Brazilian Environmental Laws. In addition, sensitivity analyses were carried out comparing both aggregation methods. Finally, index validation was carried out by applying the CTI to 10 waste-to-energy plants data. From sensitivity analysis and validation results it is possible to infer that summation model is the most suitable aggregation method. For summation method, CTI results were superior to 0.5 (in a scale from 0 to 1) for most facilities evaluated. So, this study demonstrates that CTI is a simple and robust tool to assess and compare the environmental performance of different treatment plants being an excellent quantitative tool to support Cleaner Treatment implementation.

Goulart Coelho, Hosmanny Mauro, E-mail: hosmanny@hotmail.com [Federal University of Minas Gerais, School of Engineering, Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Bloco 2, Sala 4628, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, CEP 30.270-901 (Brazil); Lange, Lisete Celina [Federal University of Minas Gerais, School of Engineering, Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Bloco 2, Sala 4628, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, CEP 30.270-901 (Brazil); Coelho, Lineker Max Goulart [Ecole des Ponts ParisTech 6 et 8 avenue Blaise-Pascal, Cite Descartes Champs-sur-Marne, 77455, Marne-la-Vallee (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Comparative assessment of sub-critical versus advanced super-critical oxyfuel fired PF boilers with CO2 sequestration facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work focuses on the techno-economic assessment of bituminous coal fired sub- and super-critical pulverised fuel boilers from an oxyfuel based CO2 capture point of view. At the initial stage, two conventional power plants with a nominal power output of above 600 MWe based on the above steam cycles are designed, simulated and optimised. Built upon these technologies, CO2 capture facilities are incorporated within the base plants resulting in a nominal power output of 500 MWe. In this manner, some sensible heat generated in the air separation unit and the CO2 capture train can be redirected to the steam cycle resulting in a higher plant efficiency. The simulation results of conventional sub- and super-critical plants are compared with their CO2 capture counterparts to disclose the effect of sequestration on the overall system performance attributes. This systematic approach allows the investigation of the effects of the CO2 capture on both cycles. In the literature, super-critical plants are often considered for a CO2 capture option. These, however, are not based on a systematic evaluation of these technologies and concentrate mainly on one or two key features. In this work several techno-economic plant attributes such as the fuel consumptions, the utility usages, the plant performance parameters as well as the specific CO2 generation and capture rates are calculated and weighed against each other. Finally, an economic evaluation of the system is conducted along with sensitivity analyses in connection with some key features such as discounted cash flow rates, capital investments and plant efficiencies as well as fuel and operating costs.

Sina Rezvani; Ye Huang; David McIlveen-Wright; Neil Hewitt; Yaodong Wang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

324 Facility special-case waste assessment in support of 324 closure (TPA milestone M-89-05)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-89-05, requires US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office to complete a 324 Facility Special-Case Waste Assessment in Support of 324 Closure. This document, HNF-1270, has been prepared with the intent of meeting this regulatory commitment. Alternatives for the special-case wastes located in the 324 Building were defined and analyzed. Based on the criteria of safety, environmental, complexity of interfaces, risk, cost, schedule, and long-term operability and maintainability, the best alternative was chosen. Waste packaging and transportation options are also included in the recommendations. The waste disposition recommendations for the B-Cell dispersibles/tank heels and High-Level Vault packaged residuals are to direct them to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX) Number 2 storage tunnel.

Hobart, R.L.

1998-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, August 1993--January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project, ``Use of International Data Sets to Evaluate and Validate Pathway Assessment Models Applicable to Exposure and Dose Reconstruction at DOE Facilities,`` grew out of several activities being conducted by the Principal Investigator Dr. F Owen Hoffman. One activity was originally part of the Chernobyl Studies Project and began as Task 7.1D, ``Internal Dose From Direct Contamination of Terrestrial Food Sources.`` The objective of Task 7.1D was to (1) establish a collaborative US USSR effort to improve and validate our methods of forecasting doses and dose commitments from the direct contamination of food sources, and (2) perform experiments and validation studies to improve our ability to predict rapidly and accurately the long-term internal dose from the contamination of agricultural soil. The latter was to include the consideration of remedial measures to block contamination of food grown on contaminated soil. The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates the activity of Task 7.1D into a multinational effort to evaluate data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (VAlidation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains.

Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [ed.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis] [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

October 24, 2003, Criteria and Guidelines For the Assessment of Safety System Software and Firmware at Defense Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3.1 3.1 Revision 3 October 24, 2003 U. S. Department of Energy Criteria and Guidelines For the Assessment of Safety System Software and Firmware at Defense Nuclear Facilities October 24, 2003 CRAD - 4.2.3.1 Revision 3 October 24, 2003 i TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS...................................................................................................................................ii GLOSSARY ...................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 INTRODUCTION .....................................................................................................................1 2.0 BACKGROUND .......................................................................................................................2

324

Review of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections), Novvember 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections) May 2011 November 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1

325

High Performance Lipoprotein Profiling for Cardiovascular Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the severity of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the related mortality rate to this disease, new methods are necessary for risk assessment and treatment prior to the onset of the disease. The current paradigm in CVD risk assessment has shifted...

Larner, Craig

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

Performance Assessment Modeling for Savannah River Glass HLW Disposal in a Potential Repository at Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance assessment (PA) simulates the long-term performance of a conceptual geological repository for nuclear waste or the performance of a subsystem such as the engineered barrier system (drifts, waste pa...

W. J. O’Connell; W. L. Bourcier; J. Gansemer…

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Tsunami Assessment for Risk Management at Nuclear Power Facilities in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study focuses on evaluation of the maximum and minimum water levels caused by tsunamis as risk factors for operation and management at nuclear power facilities along the coastal area of Japan. Tsunami...

Ken Yanagisawa; Fumihiko Imamura…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Tsunami Assessment for Risk Management at Nuclear Power Facilities in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study focuses on evaluation of the maximum and minimum water levels caused by tsunamis as risk factors for operation and management at nuclear power facilities along the coastal area of Japan. Tsunami...

Ken Yanagisawa; Fumihiko Imamura; Tsutomu Sakakiyama…

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has monitored groundwater on the Hanford Site since the 1940s to help determine what chemical and radiological contaminants have made their way into the groundwater. As regulatory requirements for monitoring increased in the 1980s, there began to be some overlap between various programs. DOE established the Groundwater Performance Assessment Project (groundwater project) in 1996 to ensure protection of the public and the environment while improving the efficiency of monitoring activities. The groundwater project is designed to support all groundwater monitoring needs at the site, eliminate redundant sampling and analysis, and establish a cost-effective hierarchy for groundwater monitoring activities. This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the groundwater project. This QA Plan is based on the QA requirements of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830, Subpart A--General Provisions/Quality Assurance Requirements as delineated in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Standards-Based Management System. In addition, the groundwater project is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA/240/B-01/003, QA/R-5). The groundwater project has determined that the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68) apply to portions of this project and to the subcontractors. HASQARD requirements are discussed within applicable sections of this plan.

Luttrell, Stuart P.

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

330

Performance Assessment Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site Low-Level Burial Grounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, requires a disposal authorization statement authorizing operation (or continued operation) for low-level waste disposal facilities. In fulfillment of these requirements, a disposal authorization statement was issued on October 25, 1999, authorizing the Hanford Site to transfer, receive, possess, and dispose of low-level radioactive waste at the 200 East Area burial grounds and the 200 West Area burial grounds. One of the conditions is that monitoring plans for the 200 East Area and 200 West Area low-level burial grounds be written and approved by the Richland Operations Office. As a result of a record of decision for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Program and acceptance of the Hanford Site Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement, the use of the low-level burial ground (LLBG) as a disposal facility for low-level and mixed low-level wastes has been restricted to lined trenches and the Navy reactor-compartment trench only. Hence, as of July 2004, only the two lined trenches in burial ground 218-W-5 (trenches 31 and 34, see Appendix A) and the Navy reactor-compartment trench in burial ground 218 E 12B (trench 94) are allowed to receive waste. When the two lined trenches are filled, the LLBG will cease to operate except for reactor compartment disposal at trench 94. Remaining operational lifetime of the LLBG is dependent on waste volume disposal rates. Existing programs for air sampling and analyses and subsidence monitoring are currently adequate for performance assessment at the LLBG. The waste disposal authorization for the Hanford Site is based (in part) on the post-closure performance assessments for the LLBG. In order to maintain a useful link between operational monitoring (e.g., Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA], Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, and State Waste Discharge Permits), constituents, monitoring frequencies, and boundaries require regular review and comparison. The annual reports discussed here are the primary sources for these reviews. The pathways of interest are air and groundwater for both operational and post-closure conditions at the LLBG, with groundwater considered to be the most significant long-term exposure pathway. Constituents that contributed at least 0.1% of the total relative hazard were selected as target analytes for monitoring. These are technetium-99, uranium, and iodine-129. Because of its environmental unavailability, carbon 14 was removed from the list of constituents. Given the potential uncertainties in inventories at the 200 Area LLBG and the usefulness of tritium as a contaminant indicator, tritium will be monitored as a constituent of concern at all burial grounds. Preexisting contamination plumes in groundwater beneath low-level waste management areas are attributed to other past-practice liquid waste disposal sites. Groundwater and air will be sampled and analyzed for radiogenic components. Subsidence monitoring will also be performed on a regular basis. The existing near-facility and surveillance air monitoring programs are sufficient to satisfy the performance assessment monitoring. Groundwater monitoring will utilize the existing network of wells at the LLBG, and co-sampling with RCRA groundwater monitoring, to be sampled semiannually. Installation of additional wells is currently underway to replace wells that have gone dry.

None

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Molecular Environmental Science: An Assessment of Research Accomplishments, Available Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, and Needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron-based techniques are fundamental to research in ''Molecular Environmental Science'' (MES), an emerging field that involves molecular-level studies of chemical and biological processes affecting the speciation, properties, and behavior of contaminants, pollutants, and nutrients in the ecosphere. These techniques enable the study of aqueous solute complexes, poorly crystalline materials, solid-liquid interfaces, mineral-aqueous solution interactions, microbial biofilm-heavy metal interactions, heavy metal-plant interactions, complex material microstructures, and nanomaterials, all of which are important components or processes in the environment. Basic understanding of environmental materials and processes at the molecular scale is essential for risk assessment and management, and reduction of environmental pollutants at field, landscape, and global scales. One of the main purposes of this report is to illustrate the role of synchrotron radiation (SR)-based studies in environmental science and related fields and their impact on environmental problems of importance to society. A major driving force for MES research is the need to characterize, treat, and/or dispose of vast quantities of contaminated materials, including groundwater, sediments, and soils, and to process wastes, at an estimated cost exceeding 150 billion dollars through 2070. A major component of this problem derives from high-level nuclear waste. Other significant components come from mining and industrial wastes, atmospheric pollutants derived from fossil fuel consumption, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and the pollution problems associated with animal waste run-off, all of which have major impacts on human health and welfare. Addressing these problems requires the development of new characterization and processing technologies--efforts that require information on the chemical speciation of heavy metals, radionuclides, and xenobiotic organic compounds and their reactions with environmental materials. To achieve this goal, both fundamental and targeted studies of complex environmental systems at a molecular level are needed, and examples of both types of studies are presented herein. These examples illustrate the fact that MES SR studies have led to a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental physical and chemical aspects of natural systems. The MES SR user community has continued to experience strong growth at U.S. SR laboratories, with MES researchers comprising up to 15% of the total user base. Further growth and development of the MES community is being hindered by insufficient resources, including support personnel, materials preparation facilities, and available beam time at U.S. SR laboratories. ''EnviroSync'' recommends the following actions, in cooperation with U.S. SR laboratory directors, to meet the MES community's needs.

Brown, G

2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Molecular environmental science : an assessment of research accomplishments, available synchrotron radiation facilities, and needs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron-based techniques are fundamental to research in ''Molecular Environmental Science'' (MES), an emerging field that involves molecular-level studies of chemical and biological processes affecting the speciation, properties, and behavior of contaminants, pollutants, and nutrients in the ecosphere. These techniques enable the study of aqueous solute complexes, poorly crystalline materials, solid-liquid interfaces, mineral-aqueous solution interactions, microbial biofilm-heavy metal interactions, heavy metal-plant interactions, complex material microstructures, and nanomaterials, all of which are important components or processes in the environment. Basic understanding of environmental materials and processes at the molecular scale is essential for risk assessment and management, and reduction of environmental pollutants at field, landscape, and global scales. One of the main purposes of this report is to illustrate the role of synchrotron radiation (SR)-based studies in environmental science and related fields and their impact on environmental problems of importance to society. A major driving force for MES research is the need to characterize, treat, and/or dispose of vast quantities of contaminated materials, including groundwater, sediments, and soils, and to process wastes, at an estimated cost exceeding 150 billion dollars through 2070. A major component of this problem derives from high-level nuclear waste. Other significant components come from mining and industrial wastes, atmospheric pollutants derived from fossil fuel consumption, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and the pollution problems associated with animal waste run-off, all of which have major impacts on human health and welfare. Addressing these problems requires the development of new characterization and processing technologies--efforts that require information on the chemical speciation of heavy metals, radionuclides, and xenobiotic organic compounds and their reactions with environmental materials. To achieve this goal, both fundamental and targeted studies of complex environmental systems at a molecular level are needed, and examples of both types of studies are presented herein. These examples illustrate the fact that MES SR studies have led to a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental physical and chemical aspects of natural systems. The MES SR user community has continued to experience strong growth at U.S. SR laboratories, with MES researchers comprising up to 15% of the total user base. Further growth and development of the MES community is being hindered by insufficient resources, including support personnel, materials preparation facilities, and available beam time at U.S. SR laboratories. EnviroSync* recommends the following actions, in cooperation with U.S. SR laboratory directors, to meet the MES community's needs.

Brown, G. E., Jr.; Sutton, S. R.; Bargar, J. R.; Shuh, D. K.; Fenter, P. A.; Kemner, K. M.

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

333

A residence-time-based transport approach for the groundwater pathway in performance assessment models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the theoretical development and numerical implementation of a new modeling approach for representing the groundwater pathway in risk assessment or performance assessment model of a contaminant transport system. The model developed ... Keywords: Groundwater pathway, Mixing model, Performance assessment, Residence time distribution

Bruce A. Robinson; Shaoping Chu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Case Study- The Challenge: Improving the Performance of a Waste-To-Energy Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study examines how the City of Long Beach, California, was able to improve the operational efficiency of its Southeast Resource Recovery Facility (SERRF), a recycling and solid waste-to-energy plant. To replace inlet damper control and reduce energy consumption, variable frequency drives (VFDs) were installed on the induced draft fans of three boiler systems. As a result of the retrofit, facility energy consumption was reduced by more than 34 percent (3,661,200 kWh per year), and the facility saved more than $329,500 annually. Taking into consideration a $400,000 California Energy Commission grant, the simple net payback for this project was just under 10 months.

336

Conceptual structure of performance assessments conducted for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico is being developed by the US Department of Energy as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. In support of this project, Sandia National Laboratories is conducting an ongoing performance assessment (PA) for the WIPP. The ordered triple representation for risk proposed by Kaplan and Garrick is used to provide a clear conceptual structure for this PA. This presentation describes how the preceding representation provides a basis in the WIPP PA for (1) the definition of scenarios and the calculation of scenario probabilities and consequences, (2) the separation of subjective and stochastic uncertainties, (3) the construction of the complementary cumulative distribution functions required in comparisons with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (i.e., 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B), and (4) the performance of uncertainty and sensitivity studies. Results obtained in a preliminary PA for the WIPP completed in December of 1991 are used for illustration.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Marietta, M.G.; Rechard, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

DOE/EA-1638: Environmental Assessment for the Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Solyndra, Inc. for Construction of A Photovoltaic Manufacturing Facility and Leasing of an Existing Commercial Facility in Fremont, California (March 2009)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

38 38 Environmental Assessment FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE TO SOLYNDRA, INC. FOR CONSTRUCTION OF A PHOTOVOLTAIC MANUFACTURING FACILITY AND LEASING OF AN EXISTING COMMERCIAL FACILITY IN FREMONT, CALIFORNIA U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 March 2009 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT March 2009 Environmental Assessment i Proposed Guarantee of Loan to Solyndra, Inc. TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1. PURPOSE AND NEED..................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Purpose of and Need for Action ...................................................................... 1-1 1.2 Background .....................................................................................................

338

Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility 2, Installation 25075, Westover Air Force Base, Chicopee, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Army Aviation Support Facility 2 (AASF 2) near Chicopee, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF 2 is a 10-acre site located in the western portion of Massachusetts, in the town of Chicopee, in the county of Hampden. The facilities included in this PA are Building 7400, adjacent paved areas, grassy areas, and the hazardous waste drum storage buildings. The environmentally significant operations (ESOS) associated with the property are (1) the waste drum storage area, (2) abandoned underground storage tanks (USTs), and (3) refueling activities.

Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Assessment and analysis of indirect lightning performance of overhead lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an efficient method for the assessment of the indirect lightning performance of overhead power lines and analyses the influence of some relevant parameters on the flashover rate. The method is based on a formula to calculate the peak value of lightning-induced voltages in overhead lines over a lossy ground, which considers the front-time of the channel-base current. The results of the method are validated by comparison with results available in the literature. The method is then used to investigate the effect of subsequent strokes on the line flashover rate, leading to the conclusion that their contribution is negligible, as long as no correlation is assumed between front-time and peak value of the strokes (first and subsequent). In the following, the method is used to analyze the influence of some parameters on the lightning performance of overhead lines. The results show that the stroke current front-time influence decreases as the soil resistivity increases, and that a higher front-time leads to a lower flashover rate. It is shown that the use of a fixed front-time T = 5.63 ?s for the first strokes leads to results that match well the results obtained from Cigré’s front-time probabilistic distribution. Regarding the return stroke velocity, the results show that, for soils with resistivity higher than 100 ? m, the flashover rate increases as the return stroke velocity increases. The results also show that a relative velocity vr = 0.4 leads to flashover rates that match well the results obtained considering some correlations between return stroke velocity and peak current proposed in the literature. The influence of the correlation between current peak value and front-time for first strokes is also analyzed and it is shown that the correlation reduces the flashover rate. It is also shown that considering this correlation for first strokes and not for subsequent strokes increases the contribution of the latter to the flashover rate, especially for good conducting soils.

J.O.S. Paulino; C.F. Barbosa; I.J.S. Lopes; W.C. Boaventura

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cost Estimation Methodology for NETL Assessments of Power Plant Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Q Q Q U U A A L L I I T T Y Y G G U U I I D D E E L L I I N N E E S S F F O O R R E E N N E E R R G G Y Y S S Y Y S S T T E E M M S S T T U U D D I I E E S S C C o o s s t t E E s s t t i i m m a a t t i i o o n n M M e e t t h h o o d d o o l l o o g g y y f f o o r r N N E E T T L L A A s s s s e e s s s s m m e e n n t t s s o o f f P P o o w w e e r r P P l l a a n n t t P P e e r r f f o o r r m m a a n n c c e e March 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/???? April 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1455 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Program Planning and Analysis 2 Power Plant Cost Estimation Methodology Quality Guidelines for Energy Systems Studies April 2011 Quality Guidelines for Energy Systems Studies Cost Estimation Methodology for NETL Assessments of Power Plant Performance Introduction This paper summarizes the costing methodology employed by NETL in its costing models and baseline reports. Further, it defines the specific levels of capital cost as well as outlines the costing metrics by which

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341

Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,* , Kisup Leeb building, but cannot provide detailed flow information in a room. The zonal model can be useful when a user ventilation systems for buildings requires a suitable model to assess system performance. The performance can

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

343

A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems proposes a framework for reliability and dynamic performance assessment of wind energy conversion systems--Reliability, Dynamic Performance, Wind Power, Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS), Doubly-Fed Induction Generator

Liberzon, Daniel

344

Performance test of personal RF monitor for area monitoring at magnetic confinement fusion facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......fusion test facilities. INTRODUCTION For the realisation of a nuclear fusion reactor, high-temperature, high-density plasma must...range Up to 1 GHz Impedance 50 omega10 % Maximum allowable input power 200 W Uniformity of electric field distribution 4 dB......

Masahiro Tanaka; Tatsuhiko Uda; Jianqing Wang; Osamu Fujiwara

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Assessment and Mitigation of Diagnostic-Generated Electromagnetic Interference at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is an ever-present challenge at laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The major source of EMI at such facilities is laser-target interaction that can generate intense electromagnetic fields within, and outside of, the laser target chamber. In addition, the diagnostics themselves can be a source of EMI, even interfering with themselves. In this paper we describe EMI generated by ARIANE and DIXI, present measurements, and discuss effects of the diagnostic-generated EMI on ARIANE's CCD and on a PMT nearby DIXI. Finally we present some of the efforts we have made to mitigate the effects of diagnostic-generated EMI on NIF diagnostics.

Brown, C G; Ayers, M J; Felker, B; Ferguson, W; Holder, J P; Nagel, S R; Piston, K W; Simanovskaia, N; Throop, A L; Chung, M; Hilsabeck, T

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment performance assessment Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF ENGINEERING CYBERNETICS AND ROBOTICS, 60 Summary: , 60 2009 Sofia Service Oriented Architecture of Assessment Model1 Adelina Aleksieva... Assessment Model. To achieve...

347

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site The PAs are used to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment and provide the Department Of Energy with reasonable assurance that the removal from service of the Savannah River Site tank farm underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment will meet defined performance objectives for the protection of human health and the environment into the future. First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 1 First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 2

348

Utah Department of Health Bureau of Health Facility Licensing, Certification and Resident Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utah Department of Health Bureau of Health Facility Licensing, Certification and Resident of Utah Rule R432-31 (http://health.utah.gov/hflcra/forms.php) This is a physician order sheet based be effectively managed at current setting. ___ Limited additional interventions: Includes care above. May also

Tipple, Brett

349

Energy Efficiency - Assessment and Analysis of Energy Consumption at TAMK Kuntokatu 3 Campus.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The energy efficiency assessment, implemented at Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Kuntokatu 3 campus, investigated the efficiency performance of the campus buildings. Facility Assessment is… (more)

Emuraishe, Irikefe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments...

351

Performance assessment of low-energy buildings in central Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results obtained from the energy and thermal performance assessment of residential and non-residential low-energy buildings that were designed to minimize fossil energy use. They are located in the province of La Pampa, central Argentina, in a temperate continental climate that shows extreme hot and cold records during the summer and winter seasons, respectively. The common applied technologies for saving energy were passive solar heating, natural ventilation for cooling and daylighting. The glazing area in the principal functional spaces facing to the North oscillates between 11 and 17% of the building useful areas. All the studied buildings are massive, with the exception of an auditorium that was designed with a lightweight insulated technology. The mean thermal transmittance of the envelope is 0.45 W/(m2 K). Double glazing and hermetic carpentry were used to reduce thermal losses (U-value = 2.8 W/(m2 K)). The volumetric heat loss coefficient (G-value) oscillates between 0.90 and 1.00 W/(m3 K). During the design and thermal simulation convective-radiative heat transfer coefficients were estimated through a dimensional equation (h = 5.7 + 3.8 ws, wind speed). On internal surfaces, convective-radiative heat transfer coefficients of 8 and 6 W/(m2 °C) (for surfaces with and without solar gain, respectively) were applied. The monitoring process provided information on the energy and thermal behaviour under use and non-use conditions. The measured value of energy consumption was similar to the expected value that was used during the pre-design stage. Building technologies work well during the winter season, allowing 50–80% of energy savings. However, overheating is still an unresolved problem during the summer. Interviews with occupants revealed that they need both, information about functional details, and good-practice guidance to manage thermal issues of the building. In most cases, the annual consumption of energy was lower than those established by the Low Energy Housing German Standards and the Minirgie Switzerland Certificate. Despite their relative cost increase during the last years, the use of insulation technology and the application of passive solar devices involved an extra cost of only 3% in our works. Provided the expected depletion of natural gas production in the coming decade, the importance of applying energy-efficiency guidelines will increase very soon in Argentina in order to match the requirements of a new national energy matrix.

C. Filippín; A. Beascochea

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory analysis of the saturated zone water chemistry. The results of the field investigations and laboratory analyses of rock and water samples collected at Nopal I are used to calibrate the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model.

G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

353

DOE/EA-1444: Environmental Assessment for the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond (September 2002)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 DOE/EA-1444 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade facilities and infrastructure at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV, through acquisition of a 5-acre

354

Advancing Performance Assessment for Disposal of Depleted Uranium at Clive Utah - 12493  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Performance Assessment (PA) for disposal of depleted uranium (DU) waste has recently been completed for a potential disposal facility at Clive in northwestern Utah. For the purposes of this PA, 'DU waste' includes uranium oxides of all naturally-occurring isotopes, though depleted in U-235, varying quantities of other radionuclides introduced to the uranium enrichment process in the form of used nuclear reactor fuel (reactor returns), and decay products of all of these radionuclides. The PA will be used by the State of Utah to inform an approval decision for disposal of DU waste at the facility, and will be available to federal regulators as they revisit rulemaking for the disposal of DU. The specific performance objectives of the Clive DU PA relate to annual individual radiation dose within a 10,000-year performance period, groundwater concentrations of specific radionuclides within a 500-year compliance period, and site stability in the longer term. Fate and transport processes that underlie the PA model include radioactive decay and ingrowth, diffusion in gaseous and water phases, water advection in unsaturated and saturated zones, transport caused by plant and animal activity, cover naturalization, natural and anthropogenic erosion, and air dispersion. Fate and transport models were used to support the dose assessment and the evaluation of groundwater concentrations. Exposure assessment was based on site-specific scenarios, since the traditional human exposure scenarios suggested by DOE and NRC guidance are unrealistic for this site. Because the U-238 in DU waste reaches peak radioactivity (secular equilibrium) after 2 million years (My) following its separation, the PA must also evaluate the impact of climate change cycles, including the return of pluvial lakes such as Lake Bonneville. The first draft of the PA has been submitted to the State of Utah for review. The results of this preliminary analysis indicate that doses are very low for the site-specific receptors for the 10,000-year compliance period. This is primarily because DU waste is not highly radioactive within this time frame, the DU waste is assumed to be buried beneath zones exposed by erosion, groundwater concentrations of DU waste constituents do not exceed groundwater protection limits with in the 500-year compliance period, and the first deep lake occurrence will disperse DU waste across a large area, and will ultimately be covered by lake-derived sediment. A probabilistic PA model was constructed that considered DU waste and decay product doses to site-specific receptors for a 10,000-yr performance period, as well as deep-time effects. The quantitative results are summarized in Table VII. Doses (as TEDE) are always less than 5 mSv in a year, and doses to the offsite receptors are always much less than 0.25 mSv in a year. Groundwater concentrations of Tc-99 are always less than its GWPL except when the Tc-99 contaminated waste is disposed below grade. Even in this case, the median groundwater concentration is only 4.18 Bq/L (113 pCi/L), which is more than one order of magnitude less than the GWPL for Tc-99. The results overall suggest that there are disposal configurations that can be used to dispose of the proposed quantities of DU waste that are adequately protective of human health. (authors)

Black, Paul; Tauxe, John; Perona, Ralph; Lee, Robert; Catlett, Kate; Balshi, Mike; Fitzgerald, Mark; McDermott, Greg [Neptune and Company, Inc., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Shrum, Dan; McCandless, Sean; Sobocinski, Robert; Rogers, Vern [EnergySolutions, LLC, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

356

Tritium Facilities Modernization and Consolidation Project Process Waste Assessment (Project S-7726)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Tritium Facility Modernization {ampersand} Consolidation (TFM{ampersand}C) Project (S-7726) at the Savannah River Site (SS), all tritium processing operations in Building 232-H, with the exception of extraction and obsolete/abandoned systems, will be reestablished in Building 233-H. These operations include hydrogen isotopic separation, loading and unloading of tritium shipping and storage containers, tritium recovery from zeolite beds, and stripping of nitrogen flush gas to remove tritium prior to stack discharge. The scope of the TFM{ampersand}C Project also provides for a new replacement R&D tritium test manifold in 233-H, upgrading of the 233- H Purge Stripper and 233-H/234-H building HVAC, a new 234-H motor control center equipment building and relocating 232-H Materials Test Facility metallurgical laboratories (met labs), flow tester and life storage program environment chambers to 234-H.

Hsu, R.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Oji, L.N.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

357

Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

Kaplan, D

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

358

Assessment of humidity management effects on PEM fuel cell performance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The electrical energy output and the performance of a PEM fuel cell is dependent on the ion transfer in the fuel cell. The ion… (more)

Osamudiamen Ose Micah, Ose Micah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION IN FRACTURED ROCK FOR THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORIES F. Cadini1 , J. De Sanctis1 , I. Bertoli1 , E. Zio1,2 1 Dipartimento di Energia is a fundamental task in any performance assessment aimed at verifying the protection offered by radioactive waste for chemical or low-level radioactive wastes, or the Performance Assessment (PA) of geological repositories

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E. (comps.)

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 15, 2005 Facility News More Server Power Improves Performance at the ARM Data Management Facility Bookmark and Share Recently, several new Sun servers joined the...

362

Final Environmental Assessment for the Construction and Operation of a Physical Sciences Facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

562 562 Environmental Assessment Construction and Operation of a Physical Sciences Facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Pacific Northwest Site Office Richland, Washington 99352 Final January 2007 U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA-1562 Environmental Assessment S-1 January 2007 Summary Introduction. This Environmental Assessment (EA) provides information and analyses of proposed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with constructing and operating a new Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) complex on DOE property located in Benton County, north of Richland, Washington. The proposed PSF would replace a number of existing research laboratories in the Hanford

363

Microsoft PowerPoint - 12_gary_Tuesday 5-21 Facility Performance...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Analysis and Performance Gary L. Hirsch Project Lead NMMSS is currently accepting data * Electronically o 80 Column o XML 1 o XML 2 * Paper PDF 2 Reporting Statistics...

364

Hydro Review: Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This review covers the BioPA method used to analyze the biological performance of proposed designs to help ensure the safety of fish passing through the turbines at the Priest Rapids Dam in Grant County, Washington.

365

The power balance method For aerodynamic performance assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the use of the power balance method for performance estimation of aircraft configurations. In this method, mechanical power production and mechanical power consumption of the aircraft are balanced, ...

Sato, Sho, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Environmentally based siting assessment for synthetic-liquid-fuels facilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed assessment of the major environmental constraints to siting a synthetic fuels industry and the results of that assessment are used to determine on a regional basis the potential for development of such an industry with minimal environmental conflicts. Secondly, the ability to mitigate some of the constraining impacts through alternative institutional arrangements, especially in areas that are judged to have a low development potential is also assessed. Limitations of the study are delineated, but specifically, the study is limited geographically to well-defined boundaries that include the prime coal and oil shale resource areas. The critical factors used in developing the framework are air quality, water availability, socioeconomic capacity, ecological sensitivity, environmental health, and the management of Federally owned lands. (MCW)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Upgrading secret military facilities—What is more important, acoustic design standards or acoustical performance?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Defense has developed acoustical performance standards that are to be achieved in the design and construction of meeting and conference rooms where sensitive and secret information will be discussed. These performance standards rely on published acoustical industry design data which are readily available. The intention of these standards is to prevent sensitive and secret information from being heard understood or otherwise obtained by persons or devices that are not authorized to have access to such information. This paper presents design and field performance test results for new and renovated secret rooms that initially passed the acoustical design criteria and acoustical standard field tests but failed to provide the desired secret level acoustical performance. Further investigations and research into partition component and building composite performance indicated that floors walls ceilings doors windows and perimeter penetrations by conduit and HVAC ducting which individually met the design standards and when installed meet the design standards but as a composite did not provide the intended acoustical performance that would prevent unauthorized access to sensitive and secret information by persons or devices outside the designated perimeter. Reasons for certain performance failures are discussed and specific successful remedies are presented.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deposited on a flat metal- carbide surface. The tube startsduring SWCNT synthesis on metal carbide surface substrates.

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tape System Reliability High Owner: Jason Hick, Systems Storage Group Lead Med X Low Low Med High Impact Trigger: Tape errors exceed observed

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Models Used to Assess the Performance of Photovoltaic Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization.

371

Environmental Assessment for the Ammunition Storage Facility at the Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

t30. t30. U.S. DEPARTHEHT OF EMERCT , FXNIDIIG OF It0 SIONI~ICAMT. IMPACT -1TIOH STORAGE E'ACXLITX AT THE SAVAxmAa RI-R iIT@ " Afl[EN, 6OtfTE CAROLXNA AGEYCT: U.S. Department of Energy ACTIOR: Finding of No Significant Impact s-r: The Department of Energy (DOE1 hqe prepared an Environmental ~Asscssx~ent (EA), DOE/EA-0820, for the proposed construction and operation of ~rl Ammunition Storage Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the &A, DOE ha8 determined that the propoeed action ie aot a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the Natioaal Eavironmcatal Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparatioa of an environruents~,impaCt Statement iS not required

372

Preliminary Assessment of Potential Avian Interactions at Four Proposed Wind Energy Facilities on Vandenberg Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Air Force (USAF) is investigating whether to install wind turbines to provide a supplemental source of electricity at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) near Lompoc, California. As part of that investigation, VAFB sought assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide a preliminary characterization of the potential risk to wildlife resources (mainly birds and bats) from wind turbine installations. With wind power development expanding throughout North America and Europe, concerns have surfaced over the number of bird fatalities associated with wind turbines. Guidelines developed for the wind industry by the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC) recommend assessing potential impacts to birds, bats, and other potentially sensitive resources before construction. The primary purpose of an assessment is to identify potential conflicts with sensitive resources, to assist developers with identifying their permitting needs, and to develop strategies to avoid impacts or to mitigate their effects. This report provides a preliminary (Phase I) biological assessment of potential impacts to birds and bats that might result from construction and operation of the proposed wind energy facilities on VAFB.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor employing the coupled NJOY/AMPX-II/TORT systems was successfully accomplished. All the analysis was performed employing ENDF/B-VII.0. The theoretical approach follows all the steps of the subcritical model of Gandini and Salvatores. The theory/experiment comparison reveals that the calculated subcritical reactivity is in a very good agreement to the experimental values. The subcritical index ({xi}) shows some discrepancies although in this particular case some work still have to be made to model in a better way the neutron source present in the experiments. (authors)

Lee, S. M.; Dos Santos, A. [Inst. de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitaria, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo - SP (Brazil)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Models used to assess the performance of photovoltaic systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization. Energy storage plays an important role in reducing PV intermittency and battery storage models are used to understand the best configurations and technologies to store PV generated electricity. Other researcher's models used by SNL are discussed including some widely known models that incorporate algorithms developed at SNL. There are other models included in the discussion that are not used by or were not adopted from SNL research but may provide some benefit to researchers working on PV array performance, hybrid system models and energy storage. The paper is organized into three sections to describe the different software models as applied to photovoltaic performance, hybrid systems, and battery storage. For each model, there is a description which includes where to find the model, whether it is currently maintained and any references that may be available. Modeling improvements underway at SNL include quantifying the uncertainty of individual system components, the overall uncertainty in modeled vs. measured results and modeling large PV systems. SNL is also conducting research into the overall reliability of PV systems.

Stein, Joshua S.; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Probabilistic risk assessment for salt repository conceptual design of subsurface facilities: A techical basis for Q-list determination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subpart G ''Quality Assurance'' of 10 CFR Part 60 requires that the US Department of Energy (DOE) apply a quality assurance program to ''all systems, structures, and components important to safety'' and to ''design and characterization of barriers important to waste isolation.'' In April 1986, DOE's Office of Geologic Repositories (OGR) issued general guidance for formulating a list of such systems, structures, and components---the Q-list. This guidance called for the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques to identify Q-list items. In this report, PRA techniques are applied to the underground facilities and systems described in the conceptual design report for the Salt Repository Project (SRP) in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Based on probability and dose consequence calculations, no specific items were identified for the Q-list. However, evaluation of the analyses indicated that two functions are important in precluding off-site releases of radioactivity: disposal container integrity; and isolation of the underground facility by the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Items related to these functions are recommended for further evaluation as the repository design progresses. 13 refs., 20 figs.

Chen, C.P.; Mayberry, J.J.; Shepherd, J.; Koza, H.; Rahmani, H.; Sinsky, J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) includes an evaluation of available biotic information from the site vicinity to provide a preliminary description of potential ecological receptors (e.g., rare, threatened and endangered species; migratory birds; and important game species), and important ecological habitats (e.g., wetland areas). A conceptual site model is developed that describe show stressors associated with the WTI facility might affect the ecological components in the surrounding environment through the development and evaluation of specific ecological endpoints. Finally, an estimate of the potential for current and/or future adverse impacts to the biotic component of the environment is provided, based on the integration of potential exposures of ecological receptors to WTI emissions and toxicological threshold values.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

NONE

1995-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

378

Performance Confirmation Strategies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - A Historical Perspective from an Operating Disposal Facility - 12248  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance confirmation is an important element of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program. Performance confirmation was first used during the early WIPP site characterization phase to focus experimental activities that address the development of probabilistic repository performance models and to address stakeholder assurance needs. The program is currently used to analyze the conditions of the repository and its surroundings to ensure that the basis for the repository's long-term radioactive waste containment predictions is valid. This basis is related to the parameters, assumptions, conceptual and numerical models that are used to predict or validate the potential radioactive waste containment performance of the system. The concept of performance confirmation for the WIPP is one that has evolved since the first repository work was initiated decades ago and plays an important role in assuring adequate repository performance both now and in the long-term. The WIPP mission has progressed from a pilot project to an operational disposal facility and will progress to eventual site closure when disposal operations are completed. Performance confirmation is an important part of each of these progressions. The concept of disposing radioactive waste in a geologic repository today involves a complete understanding of many technical, political, regulatory, societal and economic elements. Many of these elements overlap and solving all relevant issues necessary to site, operate and decommission a disposal facility should be done with knowledge of each element's requirements and impacts. Performance confirmation is one tool that can help to coordinate many of these elements into a program that actively investigates what is thought to be adequately understood about the system and what information is lacking. A performance confirmation program is used to determine ways to challenge and verify those areas that are thought to be understood and to find ways to understand those areas that are not well understood. Performance confirmation programs have been used twice at WIPP, first during site characterization and PA development and later in a Compliance Monitoring program. At first, only certain technical aspects of the system were deemed important because it was a scientifically-based, government project. Early site characterization work was design to gather information about the geology and hydrology of the area and the mechanical properties of the natural barrier. The information would be used in a PA to determine the long-term containment performance of the disposal system. A performance confirmation element was used to identify the sensitive elements of the system that were certain, well understood or justified and those that were not. It identified experimental and analytical programs that could be used to reduce uncertainty, confirm sensitive assumptions and provide useful data. This performance confirmation program provided data to justify the adequacy of the information used in PA to demonstrate compliance with EPA's containment requirements. Performance confirmation will continue to be used in the post-closure period for at least 30 years and likely up to the end of the 100-year institutional controls period. As the technical basis for the repository matures throughout the operational period, the currently planned post-closure monitoring program will need to be reassessed prior to implementation. However, the intent of the program will be the same as it was for the previous programs, to ensure the ultimate goal of the repository. This goal is to safely isolate waste from the accessible environment and ensure public and environmental safety. (authors)

Wagner, Steve [John Hart and Associate for Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, New Mexico 88220 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Residential commissioning to assess envelope and HVAC system performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. For example, Walker et al. (1998a) found large variations in thermal distribution system efficiency, as much as a factor of two even between side-by-side houses with the same system design and installation crew. This and other studies (e.g., Jump et al. 1996) indicate that duct leakage testing and sealing can readily achieve a 25 to 30% reduction in installed cooling capacity and energy consumption. As another example, consider that the building industry has recognized for at least 20 years the substantial impact that envelope airtightness has on thermal loads, energy use, comfort, and indoor air quality. However, Walker et al. (1998a) found 50% variances in airtightness for houses with the same design and construction crews, within the same subdivision. A substantial reason for these problems is that few houses are now built or retrofitted using formal design procedures, most are field assembled from a large number of components, and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Solving the problems requires field performance evaluations of houses using appropriate and agreed upon procedures. Many procedural elements already exist in a fragmented environment; some are ready now to be integrated into a new process called residential commissioning (Wray et al. 2000). For example, California's Title 24 energy code already provides some commissioning elements for evaluating the energy performance of new houses. A house consists of components and systems that need to be commissioned, such as building envelopes, air distribution systems, cooling equipment, heat pumps, combustion appliances, controls, and other electrical appliances. For simplicity and practicality, these components and systems are usually evaluated individually, but we need to bear in mind that many of them interact. Therefore, commissioning must not only identify the energy and non-energy benefits associated with improving the performance of a component, it must also indicate how individual components interact in the complete building system. For this paper, we limit our discussion to diagnostics in areas of particular concern with significant interactions: envelope and HVAC systems. These areas include insulation quality, windows, airtightness, envelope moisture, fan and duct system airflows, duct leakage, cooling equipment charge, and combustion appliance backdrafting with spillage. The remainder of this paper first describes what residential commissioning is, its characteristic elements, and how one might structure its process. Subsequent sections describe a consolidated set of practical diagnostics that the building industry can use now. Where possible, we also discuss the accuracy and usability of these diagnostics, based on recent laboratory work and field studies. We conclude by describing areas in need of research and development, such as practical field diagnostics for envelope thermal conductance and combustion safety. There are several potential benefits for builders, consumers, code officials, utilities, and energy planners of commissioning houses using a consistent set of validated methods. Builders and/or commissioning agents will be able to optimize system performance and reduce consumer costs associated with building energy use. Consumers will be more likely to get what they paid for and builders can show they delivered what was expected. Code officials will be better able to enforce existing and future energy codes. As energy reduction measures are more effectively incorporated into the housing stock, utilities and energy planners will benefit through greater confidence in predicting demand and greater assurance that demand reductions will actually occur. Performance improvements will also reduce emissions from electricity generating plants and residential combustion equipment. Research to characterize these benefits is underway.

Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Assessment of operating parameter variation on electrostatic precipitator performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lignite coal were collected and resistivity analysis performed for varying conditions of temperature and humidity. As a result of the laboratory analysis, it was determined that moisture and temperature conditioning of Texas lignite coal fly ash...verized coal 1 25 50 Electric ~ower Fly ash from ~clc f f c 6 60 B5 0. 7 Cement Ki1n dust 1 20 40 10 Steel Blast furnace 5 30 60 Steel 9 N -h th f f. 90 98 99 Nonferrous Copper roaster smelters dust 10 Nonferrous Converter fur- smelters nace...

Gunn, Roam Anthony

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Evaluating the effects of the number of caverns on the performance of underground oil storage facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three dimensional finite element calculations were performed to investigate the effect field size, in terms of the number of caverns, on the performance of SPR oil storage caverns leached in domal salt (interms of surface subsidence, storage losses, and cavern integrity). The calculations were performed for cavern fields containing 1, 7, 19, and an infinite number of caverns. The magnitude and volume of subsidence was significantly affected by increasing the number of caverns (nearly an order of magnitude increase was predicted for each increase in field size), while the extent of subsidence (approximately 2000 m fromthe center of the field) and storage loss were not. Furthermore, the percentage of storage loss volume manifested as surface subsidence increased as the cavern field was enlarged. This was attributed to elasticvolumetric dilatation of overlying strata. The multiple cavern calculations demonstrate that storage losses are greater for caverns farther from the center of the caverns field. Based on an accumulated strain stability criteria, the larger cavern fields are predicted to have a shorter life. This criteria also indicates that caverns on the periphery of a field may show signs of instability before the inner caverns. The West Hackberry site (containing 22 caverns) subsidence data closely agrees with the 19 cavern model subsidence predictions, providing confidence in the calculations. Even a 19 cavern field, substantially large by SPR standards, does not approach the behavior predicted by infinite cavern models (which are frequently used because they are economical). This demonstrates that 3D modeling is required to accurately investigate the performance of a multi-cavern array. Although based on a typical SPR cavern design, the results of this study describe mechanics common to all multi-cavern fields and should, in general, be useful tocavern engineers and architects.

Hoffman, E.L.; Ehgartner, B.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Performance optimization of biological waste treatment by flotation clarification at a chemical manufacturing facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., utilizes a deep-tank activated sludge wastewater treatment system with a dissolved air flotation clarifier (DAF) to effectively treat amine wastes containing residual organics, ammonia-nitrogen and organic nitrogen. The bio-system, a deep tank aeration system, produces a high quality final effluent low in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), ammonia and organic nitrogen, turbidity and total suspended solids. Prior to installing the DAF, treatment performance was at risk with a gravity clarifier. Waste treatment performance was jeopardized by poor settling bio-flocs and uncontrollable solids-liquid separation problems within the gravity clarifier. The solids settleability problems resulted primarily from mixed liquor nitrogen supersaturation degassing in the clarifier. As a result of the degassing, biomass floated on the gravity clarifier or overflowed the effluent weir. As a result of biomass loss periodically organic carbon and total Kjeldahl nitrogen loadings had to be reduced in order to maintain optimal food-to-mass ratios. As biomass levels dropped within the aeration basin, waste treatment performance was at risk and waste loads had to be decreased causing waste inventories to increase in storage tanks.

Kerecz, B.J. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States); Miller, D.R. [Komline-Sanderson, Peapack, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Pressurized Items and Cryogens Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pressurized Systems and Cryogens Pressurized Systems and Cryogens Performance Objective: Assure personnel health and safety through regularly scheduled inspections and maintenance on pressure vessels and equipment, compressed gases and gas cylinders, vacuum equipment and systems, hydraulics, and cryogenic materials and systems. Performance Criteria: BN inspects, operates and safely stores unmodified compressed-gas or liquid cylinders approved by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the appropriate regulators. BN inspects, operates and maintains refrigeration systems that comply with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes, and applicable Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) standards. BN inspects, operates and maintains pressure systems that operate at an

385

Maintenance Plan for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plan for maintaining the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (PA) is described. The plan includes expected work on PA reviews and revisions, waste reports, monitoring, other operational activities, etc.

MANN, F.M.

2000-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

386

Assessment of durability performance of "Early-Opening-to-Traffic" Portland Cement Concrete pavement and patches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-thaw, shrinkage, chemical attack, abrasion resistance, fatigue life, volumetric expansion, practicality, and concrete costs. The assessment discusses material combinations, mixture designs, and construction practices on performance. A computer program using...

Shrestha, Pradhumna Babu

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Assessment of performing an MST strike in Tank 21H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tank mixing studies performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project have shown that 3 Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) installed in Tank 41 are sufficient to support actinide removal by MST sorption as well as subsequent resuspension and removal of settled solids. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is pursuing MST addition into Tank 21 as part of the Large Tank Strike (LTS) project. The preliminary scope for LTS involves the use of three standard slurry pumps (installed in N, SE, and SW risers) in a Type IV tank. Due to the differences in tank size, internal interferences, and pump design, a separate mixing evaluation is required to determine if the proposed configuration will allow for MST suspension and strontium and actinide sorption. The author performed the analysis by reviewing drawings for Tank 21 [W231023] and determining the required cleaning radius or zone of influence for the pumps. This requirement was compared with previous pilot-scale MST suspension data collected for SCIX that determined the cleaning radius, or zone of influence, as a function of pump operating parameters. The author also reviewed a previous Tank 50 mixing analysis that examined the ability of standard slurry pumps to suspend sludge particles. Based on a review of the pilot-scale SCIX mixing tests and Tank 50 pump operating experience, three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend sludge and MST to effectively sorb strontium and actinides onto the MST. Using the SCIX data requires an assumption about the impact of cooling coils on slurry pump mixing. The basis for this assumption is described in this report. Using the Tank 50 operating experience shows three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend solids if the shear strength of the settled solids is less than 160 Pa. Because Tank 21 does not contain cooling coils, the shear strength could be larger.

Poirier, Michael R.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

Assessment of radiation exposure for materials in the LANSCE Spallation Irradiation Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials samples were irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the changes in mechanical and physical properties of materials in a spallation target environment. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including high-energy protons, mixed protons and neutrons, and predominantly neutrons. The irradiation was driven by an 800 MeV 1 mA proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2{sigma} = 3.5 cm. Two irradiation campaigns were conducted in which samples were exposed for approximately six months and two months, respectively. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples were used to quantify the fluences in various locations. The STAYSL2 code was used to estimate the fluences by combining the activation foil data with calculated data from the LAHET Code System (LCS) and MCNPX. The exposure for each sample was determined from the estimated fluences using interpolation based on a mathematical fitting to the fluence results. The final results included displacement damage (dpa) and gas (H, He) production for each sample from the irradiation. Based on the activation foil analysis, samples from several locations in both irradiation campaigns were characterized. The radiation damage to each sample was highly dependent upon location and varied from 0.023 to 13 dpa and was accompanied by high levels of H and He production.

James, M. R. (Michael R.); Maloy, S. A. (Stuart A.); Sommer, W. F. (Walter F.), Jr.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Dry, D. E. (Donald E.); Ferguson, P. D. (Phillip D.); Corzine, R. K. (R. Karen); Mueller, G. E. (Gary E.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

66 of 864 66 of 864 3.0 DISPOSAL FACILITY CHARACTERISTICS Section 3.1 provides information regarding site characteristics including detailed information furnished for those characteristics that influence the contaminant transport modeling assumptions provided in Chapter 4. ï‚· Section 3.1.1 provides a general description and layout of the site and the HTF to orient the reader and includes the current (as of 2009) estimated population distribution of the surrounding area as well as future land use planning for information purposes. ï‚· Section 3.1.2 describes meteorological and climatological data collection at SRS. This data collection determines appropriate modeling assumptions related to rainfall and temperature to assess the performance of the HTF closure cap presented in SRNL-ESB-

390

Data used in preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (1990)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the data available as of August 1990 and used by the Performance Assessment Division of Sandia National Laboratories in its December 1990 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Parameter values are presented in table form for the geologic subsystem, engineered barriers, borehole flow properties, climate variability, and intrusion characteristics. Sources for the data and a brief discussion of each parameter are provided. 101 refs., 72 figs., 21 tabs.

Rechard, R.P (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Luzzolino, H. (Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Sandha, J.S. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

An appraisal of the 1992 preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The WIPP Project, located in southeastern New Mexico, is being constructed as a repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes generated by the national defense programs. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has reviewed the WIPP 1992 Performance Assessment (Sandia WIPP Performance Assessment Department, 1992). Although this performance assessment was released after the October 1992 passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (PL 102-579), the work preceded the Act. For individual and ground-water protection, calculations have been done for 1000 years post closure, whereas the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Standards (40 CFR 191) issued in 1993 require calculations for 10,000 years. The 1992 Performance Assessment continues to assimilate improved understanding of the geology and hydrogeology of the site, and evolving conceptual models of natural barriers. Progress has been made towards assessing WIPP`s compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Standards (40 CFR 191). The 1992 Performance Assessment has addressed several items of major concern to EEG, outlined in the July 1992 review of the 1991 performance assessment (Neill et al., 1992). In particular, the authors are pleased that some key results in this performance assessment deal with sensitivity of the calculated complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDF) to alterative conceptual models proposed by EEG -- that flow in the Culebra be treated as single-porosity fracture-flow; with no sorption retardation unless substantiated by experimental data.

Lee, W.W.L.; Chaturvedi, L.; Silva, M.K.; Weiner, R.; Neill, R.H. [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Environmental Evaluation Group, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT TO SUPPORT CLOSURE OF SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTE MANAGEMENT AREA C AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current proposed regulatory agreements (Consent Decree) at the Hanford Site call for closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C in the year 2019. WMA C is part of the SST system in 200 East area ofthe Hanford Site and is one of the first tank farm areas built in mid-1940s. In order to close WMA C, both tank and facility closure activities and corrective actions associated with existing soil and groundwater contamination must be performed. Remedial activities for WMA C and corrective actions for soils and groundwater within that system will be supported by various types of risk assessments and interim performance assessments (PA). The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the State ofWashington Department of Ecology (Ecology) are sponsoring a series of working sessions with regulators and stakeholders to solicit input and to obtain a common understanding concerning the scope, methods, and data to be used in the planned risk assessments and PAs to support closure of WMA C. In addition to DOE-ORP and Ecology staff and contractors, working session members include representatives from the U.S. Enviromnental Protection Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), interested tribal nations, other stakeholders groups, and members of the interested public. NRC staff involvement in the working sessions is as a technical resource to assess whether required waste determinations by DOE for waste incidental to reprocessing are based on sound technical assumptions, analyses, and conclusions relative to applicable incidental waste criteria.

BERGERON MP

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Discussion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Discussion

395

Models for source term, flow, transport and dose assessment in NRC`s Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The core consequence modules for the recently completed Phase 2 Iterative Performance Assessment (IPA) of the Yucca Mountain repository for high-level nuclear waste depend on models for releases from the engineered barrier system (source term), flow of liquid and gas, transport of radionuclides in the geosphere and assessment of dose to target populations. The source term model includes temperature and moisture phenomena in the near-field environment, general, pitting and crevice corrosion, contact of the waste form by water, dissolution and oxidation of the waste form, and transport of dissolved and gaseous radionuclides from the waste package by advection and diffusion. The liquid flow and transport models describe water flow through fractures and matrix in both the unsaturated and saturated zones. Models for flow of gas and transport of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} released from the engineered barrier system to the atmosphere take into account repository heat and the geothermal gradient. The dose assessment model calculates doses to a regional population and a farm family for an assumed reference biosphere in the vicinity of the repository. The Phase 2 IPA led to a number of suggestions for model improvement: (1) improve the ability of the models to include spatial and temporal variability in the parameters; (2) improve the coupling among processes, especially the effects of changing environments in the waste packages; (3) develop more mechanistic models, but abstracted for use in total system performance assessment; and (4) use more site specific parameters, especially for the dose assessments.

McCartin, T.; Codell, R.; Neel, R.; Ford, W.; Wescott, R.; Bradbury, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Sagar, B.; Walton, J. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Facilities | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JLab Buildings Facilities Management & Logistics is responsible for performing or specifying performance of all Jefferson Lab facility maintenance. A D D I T I O N A L L I N K S:...

397

Assessment of radiological releases from the NuMI facility during MINOS and NOvA operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report makes projections of the radiological releases from the NuMI facility during operations for the MINOS and NO ?A experiments. It includes an estimate of the radionuclide levels released into the atmosphere and the estimated tritium and sodium-22 concentrations in the NuMI sump water and Fermilab pond system. The analysis was performed for NuMI operations with a beam power on target increased from the present 400 kW design up to a possible 1500 kW with future upgrades. The total number of protons on target was assumed to be 18 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of MINOS and 78 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of NO ?A.

Martens, Mike; /Fermilab

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

April 27, 2010, Department letter transmitting revised Implementation Plan for Recommendation 2009-1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 27, 20 10 April 27, 20 10 The Honorable Peter S. Winokur Chairman Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana Avenue, NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20004-294 1 Dear Mr. Chairman: In a letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board dated February 1, 20 10, I reaffirmed our acceptance of Recommendation 2009- 1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities, and committed to several changes to the Department's Plan for implementing the recommendations therein. Enclosed please find the revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safity Board Recommendation 2009-1 that incorporates those changes. I want to express my thanks for your staffs input on this revision and look forward to similar contributions as we revise the Department's Nuclear Safety Policy and implement

399

Durability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High Performance Computing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the viscoelastic parameters; 3D FEM analysis using High Performance Computing (parallel and vector features) to run Performance Computing. E. M. R. Fairbairn, E. Goulart, A. L. G. A. Coutinho, N. F. F. Ebecken COPPEDurability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High

Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

400

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility performance assessments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

Recent ORNL experience in site performance prediction: the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The suitability of the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Landfill and the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Central Waste Disposal Facility for disposal of low-level radioactive waste was evaluated using pathways analyses. For these evaluations, a conservative approach was selected; that is, conservatism was built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events had to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics existed. Data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations were used in developing the conceptual and numerical models that served as the basis for the numerical simulations of the long-term transport of contamination to man. However, the analyses relied on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Maximum potential doses to man were calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. Even under this conservative framework, the sites were found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations and conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability were drawn. Our experience through these studies has shown that in reaching conclusions in such studies, some consideration must be given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and to quantitatively determine the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed.

Pin, F.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Facility Representative Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

403

DOE/EA-1676: Final Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for U.S. Geothermal's Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Facility in Vale, Oregon (December 2009)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

76 76 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Environmental Assessment for DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR U.S. GEOTHERMAL'S NEAL HOT SPRINGS GEOTHERMAL FACILITY IN VALE, OREGON U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 December 2009 DOE/EA-1676 Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for U.S Geothermal's Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Facility in Vale, Oregon DOE/EA-1676 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ACRONYMS iii Executive Summary 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 2 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2 2.1 Description of Proposed Action 4 2.2 Alternatives Considered but Eliminated 9 2.3 No Action Alternative 9 3.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS 10

404

DOE/EA-1631: Final Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Beacon Power Corporation Frequency Regulation Facility in Stephentown, NY (February 2009)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 31 Environmental Assessment for DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR BEACON POWER CORPORATION FREQUENCY REGULATION FACILITY IN STEPHENTOWN, N.Y. U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 February 2009 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Beacon Power Corporation Frequency Regulation Facility in Stephentown, N.Y. DOE/EA-1631 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ACRONYMS iii 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED 1 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Agency Action 1 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION AND NO ACTION ALTERNATIVE 3 2.1 Location 3 2.2 Proposed Action 3 2.2.1 Flywheel 3 2.2.2 Project Elements 4 2.2.3 Project Systems 5 2.2.4 Construction

405

ORNL results for Test Case 1 of the International Atomic Energy Agency`s research program on the safety assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started the Coordinated Research Program entitled ```The Safety Assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities.`` The program is aimed at improving the confidence in the modeling results for safety assessments of waste disposal facilities. The program has been given the acronym NSARS (Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Safety Assessment Reliability Study) for ease of reference. The purpose of this report is to present the ORNL modeling results for the first test case (i.e., Test Case 1) of the IAEA NSARS program. Test Case 1 is based on near-surface disposal of radionuclides that are subsequently leached to a saturated-sand aquifer. Exposure to radionuclides results from use of a well screened in the aquifer and from intrusion into the repository. Two repository concepts were defined in Test Case 1: a simple earth trench and an engineered vault.

Thorne, D.J.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Kocher, D.C.; Little, C.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Roemer, E.K. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

COMPLETION OF THE TRANSURANIC GREATER CONFINEMENT DISPOSAL BOREHOLE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Classified transuranic material that cannot be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico is stored in Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. A performance assessment was completed for the transuranic inventory in the boreholes and submitted to the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group. The performance assessment was prepared by Sandia National Laboratories on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office using an iterative methodology that assessed radiological releases from the intermediate depth disposal configuration against the regulatory requirements of the 1985 version of 40 CFR 191 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The transuranic materials are stored at 21 to 37 m depth (70 to 120 ft) in large diameter boreholes constructed in the unsaturated alluvial deposits of Frenchman Flat. Hydrologic processes that affect long- term isolation of the radionuclides are dominated by extremely slow upward rates of liquid/vapor advection and diffusion; there is no downward pathway under current climatic conditions and there is no recharge to groundwater under future ''glacial'' climatic conditions. A Federal Review Team appointed by the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group reviewed the Greater Confinement Disposal performance assessment and found that the site met the majority of the regulatory criteria of the 1985 and portions of the 1993 versions of 40 CFR 191. A number of technical and procedural issues required development of supplemental information that was incorporated into a final revision of the performance assessment. These issues include inclusion of radiological releases into the complementary cumulative distribution function for the containment requirements associated with drill cuttings from inadvertent human intrusion, verification of mathematical models used in the performance assessment, inclusion of dose calculations from collocated low-level waste in the boreholes for the individual protection requirements, further assessments of engineered barriers and conditions associated with the assurance requirements, and expansion of documentation provided for assessing the groundwater protection requirements. The Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group approved the performance assessment for Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in 2001 and did not approve the Application of the Assurance Requirements. Remaining issues concerned with engineered barriers and the multiple aspects of the Assurance Requirements will be resolved at the time of closure of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. This is the first completion and acceptance of a performance assessment for transuranic materials under the U.S. Department of Energy self-regulation. The Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes are only the second waste disposal configuration to meet the safety regulatory requirements of 40 CFR 191.

Colarusso, Angela; Crowe, Bruce; Cochran, John R.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

Transmittal of the Calculation Package that Supports the Analysis of Performance of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Based 5-Cell Design Issued 8/14/09)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of an assessment of the performance of a build-out of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The EMWMF configuration that was assessed includes the as-constructed Cells 1 through 4, with a groundwater underdrain that was installed beneath Cell 3 during the winter of 2003-2004, and Cell 5, whose proposed design is an Addendum to Remedial Design Report for the Disposal of Oak Ridge Reservation Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Waste, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DOE/OR/01-1873&D2/A5/R1. The total capacity of the EMWMF with 5 cells is about 1.7 million cubic yards. This assessment was conducted to determine the conditions under which the approved Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the EMWMF found in the Attainment Plan for Risk/Toxicity-Based Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee [U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2001a], as revised for constituents added up to October 2008, would remain protective of public health and safety for a five-cell disposal facility. For consistency, the methods of analyses and the exposure scenario used to predict the performance of a five-cell disposal facility were identical to those used in the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) and its addendum (DOE 1998a, DOE 1998b) to develop the approved WAC. To take advantage of new information and design changes departing from the conceptual design, the modeling domain and model calibration were upaded from those used in the RI/FS and its addendum. It should be noted that this analysis is not intended to justify or propose a change in the approved WAC.

Williams M.J.

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 Draft Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site. In accordance with NDAA Section 3116, certain waste from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is not high-level waste if the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, determines that the criteria in NDAA Section 3116(a) are met. This Draft FTF 3116 Basis Document shows that those criteria are satisfied, to support a potential determination by the Secretary pursuant Section 3116. This Draft FTF 3116 Basis Document concerns the stabilized residuals in waste tanks and ancillary structures, those waste tanks, and the ancillary structures (including integral equipment) at the SRS FTF at the time of closure.

409

F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 Draft Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site. In accordance with NDAA Section 3116, certain waste from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is not high-level waste if the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, determines that the criteria in NDAA Section 3116(a) are met. This Draft FTF 3116 Basis Document shows that those criteria are satisfied, to support a potential determination by the Secretary pursuant Section 3116. This Draft FTF 3116 Basis Document concerns the stabilized residuals in waste tanks and ancillary structures, those waste tanks, and the ancillary structures (including integral equipment) at the SRS FTF at the time of closure.

410

Final Revised Environmental Assessment for The Proposed Construction and Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

R R Final Revised Environmental Assessment for The Proposed Construction and Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California Issued: December 2002 Revised: January 2008 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Livermore Site Office This page intentionally left blank. FINAL Revised EA for the Proposed Construction and Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at LLNL ii FORWARD The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for national programs to reduce and counter threats from weapons of mass destruction including nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons (bioweapons). NNSA's bioscience work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of these

411

Environmental Assessment for The Proposed Construction and Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (DOE/EA-1442) (12/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Assessment for The Proposed Construction and Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California December 2002 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Oakland Operations Office EA for the Proposed Construction and Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at LLNL ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), has responsibility for national programs to reduce and counter threats from weapons of mass destruction including nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons (bioweapons). NNSA's bioscience work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of these missions requires work with infectious agents, including those historically used for bioweapons.

412

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Jeff Tappen; M.A. Wasiolek; D.W. Wu; J.F. Schmitt

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

413

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Tappen, J. J.; Wasiolek, M. A.; Wu, D. W.; Schmitt, J. F.; Smith, A. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

414

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Methodology for Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems, Revision 6, September 15, 2011 IAEA, (1972) The Structure and Content of...

415

Strategies for Assessment of the Biological Performance and Design of Hydroturbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biological response of fish to turbine passage has been of concern for several decades and emphasized recently by consideration of hydro as a 'green' power source. The current state-of-the-art of hydro-turbine biological performance assessment, while still inadequate, has advanced considerably the past 10 years. For example, the importance of assessment of exposure to pressure changes during turbine passage has been emphasized by findings of laboratory studies of rapid decompression. It is now very clear that hydroturbine biological assessment must consider the physiological state and behavior of fish at turbine entry and changes in physiological state that drive aspects of behavior during tailrace passage. Such considerations are in addition to concerns about exposure of fish to mechanical and pressure sources of injury during turbine passage. Experimental designs and assessment tools have evolved for acclimation of test fish, observation of test fish behavior at approach and upon exit from the turbine environment, and precise estimation of turbine passage mortality. Fish condition assessment continues to improve permitting better classification of observed injuries to injury mechanisms. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and other computer models permit detailed investigation of the turbine passage environment and development of hypotheses that can be tested in field studies using live fish. Risk assessment techniques permit synthesis of laboratory and in-field study findings and estimation of population level effects over a wide range of turbine operation scenarios. Risk assessment is also evolving to provide input to turbine runner design. These developments, and others, have resulted in more productive biological performance assessment studies and will continue to evolve and improve the quantity and quality of information obtained from costly live fish hydroturbine passage studies. This paper reviews the history of hydro-turbine biological assessment, presents the current state-of-the-art, and identify areas needing improvement.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

416

Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Water Intake Pipeline Replacement Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed action and three alternatives, including a No Build alternative, were evaluated along the existing RWIPL alignment to accommodate the placement of the proposed RWIPL. Construction feasibility, reasonableness and potential environmental impacts were considered during the evaluation of the four actions (and action alternatives) for the proposed RWIPL activities. Reasonable actions were identified as those actions which were considered to be supported by common sense and sound technical principles. Feasible actions were those actions which were considered to be capable of being accomplished, practicable and non-excessive in terms of cost. The evaluation process considered the following design specifications, which were determined to be important to the feasibility of the overall project. The proposed RWIPL replacement project must therefore: (1) Comply with the existing design basis and criteria, (2) Maintain continuity of operation of the facility during construction, (3)Provide the required service life, (4) Be cost effective, (5)Improve the operation and maintenance of the pipeline, and (6) Maintain minimal environmental impact while meeting the performance requirements. Sizing of the pipe, piping construction materials, construction method (e.g., open-cut trench, directional drilling, etc.) and the acquisition of new Right-of-Way (ROW) were additionally evaluated in the preliminary alternative identification, selection and screening process.

N /A

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Attack Injection for Performance and Dependability Assessment of Ad hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attack Injection for Performance and Dependability Assessment of Ad hoc Networks Jes´us Friginal, ddandres, pgil}@disca.upv.es Abstract Ad hoc networks are wireless, self-configuring and self- maintaining in this domain has been based on simulation, thus obviating aspects influencing the behav- ior of real ad hoc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

418

Maintenance policy performance assessment in presence of imprecision based on Dempster-Shafer Theory of Evidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to assess the performance of a maintenance policy when a stochastic model of the life of the component of interest is known, but relies on parameters that are imprecisely known, and only through information elicited from experts. ... Keywords: Dempster-Shafer Theory of Evidence (DSTE), Maintenance, Uncertainty

P. Baraldi; M. Compare; E. Zio

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Automated Performance Assessment for Service-Oriented Middleware: a Case Study on BPEL Engines  

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Automated Performance Assessment for Service-Oriented Middleware: a Case Study on BPEL Engines Middleware for Web service compositions, such as BPEL engines, provides the execution environment of service-oriented middleware components. From an engineer- ing point of view, one of the key activities

Binder, Walter

420

A Method for Impact Assessment of Faults on the Performance of Field-Oriented Control Drives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, reliability of a motor drive can be explored via the emerging field of thermo- electrical analysis [3A Method for Impact Assessment of Faults on the Performance of Field-Oriented Control Drives Grainger Center for Electric Machinery and Electromechanics Department of Electrical and Computer

Liberzon, Daniel

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