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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Revised fact sheet describes the transpired solar collector that was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

2

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights System Size 300 ft 2 transpired solar collector Energy Production About 125 Btu/hr/ft 2 (400 W/m 2 ) of heat delivery under ideal conditions (full sun) Installation Date 1990 Motivation Provide solar-heated ventilation air to offset some of the heating with conventional electric resistance heaters Annual Savings 14,310 kWh (49 million Btu/yr) or about 26% of the energy required to heat the facility's ventilation air System Details Components Black, 300 ft 2 corrugated aluminum transpired solar collector with a porosity of 2%; bypass damper; two-speed 3000 CFM vane axial supply fan; electric duct heater; thermostat controller Storage None Loads 188 million Btu/year (55,038 kWh/year) winter average to heat 1,300 ft 2 Waste Handling Facility

3

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highlights Highlights System Size 300 ft 2 transpired solar collector Energy Production About 125 Btu/hr/ft 2 (400 W/m 2 ) of heat delivery under ideal conditions (full sun) Installation Date 1990 Motivation Provide solar-heated ventilation air to offset some of the heating with conventional electric resistance heaters Annual Savings 14,310 kWh (49 million Btu/yr) or about 26% of the energy required to heat the facility's ventilation air System Details Components Black, 300 ft 2 corrugated aluminum transpired solar collector with a porosity of 2%; bypass damper; two-speed 3000 CFM vane axial supply fan; electric duct heater; thermostat controller Storage None Loads 188 million Btu/year (55,038 kWh/year) winter average to heat 1,300 ft 2 Waste Handling Facility

4

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:49pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options for HVAC Renovations Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHP) Solar Water Heating (SWH) Biomass Passive Solar Heating Biomass Heating Solar Ventilation Air Preheating Federal building renovations that encompass the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in a facility provide a range of renewable energy opportunities. The primary technology option for HVAC renovations is geothermal heat pumps (GHP). Other options include leveraging a solar water heating (SWH) system to offset heating load or using passive solar heating or a biomass-capable furnace or boiler. Some facilities may also take

5

Business reasons for utilizing renewable energy applications in facilities to assist in extending the life of the heating ventilation and air conditioning systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research is intended to discover business reasons for utilizing renewable energy applications in buildings to help extend the life of the heating, ventilation and (more)

Thompson, Glendon Raymond

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ventilation and Solar Heat Storage System Offers Big Energy Savings  

Ventilation and Solar Heat Storage System Offers Big Energy Savings ... Heat is either reflected away from the building with radiant barriers, or heat is absorbed

7

Evaluation of design ventilation requirements for enclosed parking facilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a new design approach to determine the ventilation requirements for enclosed parking garages. The design approach accounts for various factors that affect the indoor air quality within a parking facility, including the average CO emission rate, the average travel time, the number of cars, and the acceptable CO level within the parking garage. This paper first describes the results of a parametric analysis based on the design method that was developed. Then the design method is presented to explain how the ventilation flow rate can be determined for any enclosed parking facility. Finally, some suggestions are proposed to save fan energy for ventilating parking garages using demand ventilation control strategies.

Ayari, A.; Krarti, M.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE CEM, CEA, CLEP, CDSM, CPE Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system is to provide and maintain a comfortable environment within a building for the occupants or for the process being conducted Many HVAC systems were not designed with energy efficiency as one of the design factors 3 Air Air is the major conductor of heat. Lack of heat = air conditioning OR 4 Btu - Amount of heat required to raise one pound of water 1 F = 0.252 KgCal 1 Pound of Water = About 1 Pint of Water ~ 1 Large Glass 1 Kitchen Match Basics of Air Conditioning = 1 Btu 5 = 6 Low Cost Cooling Unit 7 8 Typical Design Conditions 75 degrees F temperature 50% relative humidity 30 - 50 FPM air movement

9

New and Underutilized Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2013 - 2:56pm Addthis The following heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) technologies are underutilized within the Federal sector. These technologies have been...

10

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study is made of several outstanding issues concerning the commercial development of environmental control systems for electric vehicles (EVs). Engineering design constraints such as federal regulations and consumer requirements are first identified. Next, heating and cooling loads in a sample automobile are calculated using a computer model available from the literature. The heating and cooling loads are then used as a basis for estimating the electrical consumption that is to be expected for heat pumps installed in EVs. The heat pump performance is evaluated using an automobile heat pump computer model which has been developed recently at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The heat pump design used as input to the model consists of typical finned-tube heat exchangers and a hermetic compressor driven by a variable-speed brushless dc motor. The simulations suggest that to attain reasonable system efficiencies, the interior heat exchangers that are currently installed as automobile air conditioning will need to be enlarged. Regarding the thermal envelope of the automobile itself, calculations are made which show that considerable energy savings will result if steps are taken to reduce {open_quote}hot soak{close_quote} temperatures and if the outdoor air ventilation rate is well controlled. When these changes are made, heating and cooling should consume less than 10% of the total stored electrical energy for steady driving in most U.S. climates. However, this result depends strongly upon the type of driving: The fraction of total power for heating and cooling ({open_quote}range penalty{close_quote}) increases sharply for driving scenarios having low average propulsion power, such as stop-and-go driving.

Kyle, D.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sullivan, R.A. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

702AZ aging waste ventilation facility year 2000 test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This test procedure was developed to determine if the 702AZ Tank Ventilation Facility system is Year 2000 Compliant. The procedure provides detailed instructions for performing the operations necessary and documenting the results. This verification procedure will document that the 702AZ Facility Systems are year 2000 compliant and will correctly meet the criteria established in this procedure.

Winkelman, W.D.

1998-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

Intelligent Control of Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposed a simulation-optimization energy saving strategy for heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems' condenser water loop through intelligent control of single speed cooling towers' components. An analysis of system components ...

Patrick Low Kie; Lau Bee Theng

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Facility HVAC System Conversion to Ground Source Heat Pump Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ventilators will utilize the hot water to "temper" outdoor air ventilation. Although the heat pump modules can provide both heating and cooling, the space requires heating only....

14

Dry Transfer Facility #1 - Ventilation Confinement Zoning Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to establish the preliminary Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) for the Dry Transfer Facility (DTF). The results of this document is used to determine the air quantities for each VCZ that will eventually be reflected in the development of the Ventilation Flow Diagrams. The calculations contained in this document were developed by D and E/Mechanical-HVAC and are intended solely for the use of the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department in its work regarding the HVAC system for the Dry Transfer Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department should be consulted before use of the calculation for purposes other than those stated herein or used by individuals other than authorized personnel in D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department.

K.D. Draper

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

15

Development of a Dedicated 100 Percent Ventilation Air Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of using dedicated 100 percent ventilation makeup air conditioning units to meet indoor air quality standards is attractive because of the inherent advantages. However, it is challenging to design and build direct expansion unitary equipment for this purpose. EPRI teamed with ClimateMaster to develop and test a prototype of a vapor compression heat pump to advance the state of the art in such equipment. The prototype unit provides deep dehumidification and cooling of ventilation air in the su...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

16

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent). The original ventilation design for the project was provided by a local engineer and consisted of a single large heat recovery ventilator (HRV) located in a mechanical room in the basement with a centralized duct system providing supply air to the main living space and exhausting stale air from the single bathroom in each apartment. This design was deemed to be far too costly to install and operate for several reasons: the large central HRV was oversized and the specified flows to each apartment were much higher than the ASHRAE 62.2 rate; an extensive system of ductwork, smoke and fire dampers, and duct chases were specified; ductwork required a significant area of dropped ceilings; and the system lacked individual ventilation control in the apartments

Metzger, C.; Ueno, K.; Kerrigan, P.; Wytrykowska, H.; Van Straaten, R.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Section 4.1.3 Natural Ventilation: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in and through build- ings. These airflows may be used both for ventilation air and for passive cooling strategies. Natural ventila- tion is often strongly preferred by building...

18

Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

19

Operating experience review - Ventilation systems at Department of Energy Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Office of Special Projects (DP-35), formerly Office of Self-Assessment (DP-9), analyzed occurrences caused by problems with equipment and material and recommended the following systems for an in-depth study: (1) Selective Alpha Air Monitor (SAAM), (2) Emergency Diesel Generator, (3) Ventilation System, (4) Fire Alarm System. Further, DP-35 conducted an in-depth review of the problems associated with SAAM and with diesel generators, and made several recommendations. This study focusses on ventilation system. The intent was to determine the causes for the events related to these system that were reported in the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), to identify components that failed, and to provide technical information from the commercial and nuclear industries on the design, operation, maintenance, and surveillance related to the system and its components. From these data, sites can develop a comprehensive program of maintenance management, including surveillance, to avoid similar occurrences, and to be in compliance with the following DOE orders.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Radiative Heating Errors in Naturally Ventilated Air Temperature Measurements Made from Buoys*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiative heating errors in buoy-mounted, naturally ventilated air temperature sensors are examined. Data from sensors with multiplate radiation shields and collocated, fan-aspirated air temperature sensors from three buoy deployments ...

Steven P. Anderson; Mark F. Baumgartner

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

HVAC Technology Report: A Review of Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Technology and Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many of us, roughly 95 percent of our time is spent indoors. To enable humans to spend this much time inside, mechanical equipment is necessary to provide space conditioning to control the temperature (heating and cooling), ventilation, humidity, and indoor air quality. This report introduces the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry to EPRI member utility employees. The document describes the most common technologies and applications and provides an overview of industry statisti...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

Elko District Heat District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Heat District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Elko District Heat District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Elko District Heat Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Elko, Nevada Coordinates 40.8324211°, -115.7631232° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

23

Outdoor Air, Heat Wheels and JCPenney: A New Approach to Retail Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JCPenney Construction Services department is responsible for the construction of new stores, takeover of existing facilities to create a new store, repairs to existing JCPenney facilities and the expansion and modernization of stores across the nation and the world. Each year, JCPenney Construction Services handles approximately 50 projects along these lines. After the implementation of ASHRAE 62- 1989 by JCPenney and many major building codes, including BOCA, mechanical engineers at JCPenney noticed a sharp increase in the percentage of cooling capacity required to cool the outdoor ventilation air. In an effort to limit this impact, both in first cost and in operational costs, JCPenney is beginning to make an effort to use enthalpy heat wheels in the hot and humid climate areas where it is economically feasible. This paper discusses the efforts of JCPenney to implement this option to the treatment of outdoor air in a store in Baton Rouge, LA while maintaining indoor air quality requirements as stated in ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 and maintaining energy efficiency. This paper also discusses the projected energy savings and operations of this alternative to the standard treatment of outdoor air.

Smith, C. S.; Bartlett, T. A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning Specialist Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The people responsible for heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) in the nuclear power industry are known by various titles--HVAC specialist, HVAC component engineer, HVAC system manager, and HVAC system engineer, to name a few. Although HVAC duties and responsibilities are often spread across several departments, such as maintenance, operations, engineering, and procurement, it is up to the HVAC specialist to ensure that HVAC system and component health and reliability are maintained. This re...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

25

Proposed Design for a Coupled Ground-Source Heat Pump/Energy Recovery Ventilator System to Reduce Building Energy Demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work presented in this thesis focuses on reducing the energy demand of a residential building by using a coupled ground-source heat pump/energy recovery ventilation (more)

McDaniel, Matthew Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A genetic rule weighting and selection process for fuzzy control of heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose the use of weighted linguistic fuzzy rules in combination with a rule selection process to develop accurate fuzzy logic controllers dedicated to the intelligent control of heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems concerning ... Keywords: BEMS, building energy management system, FLC, fuzzy logic controller, Fuzzy logic controllers, GA, genetic algorithm, Genetic algorithms, HVAC systems, HVAC, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning, KB, knowledge base, PMV, predicted mean vote index for thermal comfort, Rule selection, Weighted fuzzy rules

Rafael Alcal; Jorge Casillas; Oscar Cordn; Antonio Gonzlez; Francisco Herrera

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

designs of personalized ventilation, International Journal of heating, Ventilation and Refrigeration

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

VENTILATION MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses.

V. Chipman

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

How refrigeration, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning service technicians learn from troubleshooting (Dissertation ABstract)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to understand how refrigeration, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (RHVAC) service technicians (techs) learned from troubleshooting. This understanding resulted in instructional and curricular strategies designed to help community colleges prepare vocational students to learn more effectively from informal workplace learning. RHVAC techs were studied because they increasingly learn their trade skills through a combination of formal schooling and informal workplace learning, though many still learn their trade almost exclusively in the workplace. Even those with formal training require considerable workplace experience to become fully competent. Troubleshooting is a major job function for RHVAC service techs, and troubleshooting

Denis F. H. Green

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Numerical Simulation of a Displacement Ventilation System with Multi-heat Sources and Analysis of Influential Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Displacement ventilation (DV) is a promising ventilation concept due to its high ventilation efficiency. In this paper, the application of the CFD method, the velocity and temperature fields of three-dimensional displacement ventilation systems with double heat sources are numerically simulated. The model is verified by experimental data. The results of the study show that thermal stratification characteristics exist in indoor temperature fields. The paper also analyzes the influence of different influential factors, e.g., the distance between heat sources, temperature of heat source, heat characteristics of the wall and outdoor temperature. It was found that the human requirement for comfort is satisfied easily when the distance between heat sources is long. Under the conditions simulated in this paper, when the distance was more than 0.8m, the temperature distribution tended to be average and steady, and it did not change as the distance changed. Second, the temperature change of the thermal current has a large influence on the indoor temperature. The rise in thermal current temperature makes the vertical temperature gradient in the room increase. The upper temperature of the room becomes higher, as does the height of the high temperature air level that lies in the upper part of the room. Finally, both the heat loss of the surrounding structure and the change in outdoor temperature have a large influence on indoor temperature. However, it does not influence the thermal stratification characteristics of DV. The only thing that has changed is the thermal stratification height.

Wu, X.; Gao, J.; Wu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A multi-objective evolutionary algorithm for an effective tuning of fuzzy logic controllers in heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the use of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms to develop smartly tuned fuzzy logic controllers dedicated to the control of heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems, energy performance, stability and indoor comfort ... Keywords: Fuzzy logic controllers, Genetic tuning, HVAC systems, Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems, Linguistic 2-tuples representation, Multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, Rule selection

Mara Jos Gacto; Rafael Alcal; Francisco Herrera

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

SciTech Connect

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

36

Genetic lateral and amplitude tuning with rule selection for fuzzy control of heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we propose the use of a new post-processing method for the lateral and amplitude tuning of membership functions combined with a rule selection to develop accurate fuzzy logic controllers dedicated to the control of heating, ventilating ...

R. Alcal; J. Alcal-Fdez; F. J. Berlanga; M. J. Gacto; F. Herrera

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

Eric Loros

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

NONE

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

39

Waste Heat Recovery in Industrial Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-temperature waste heat streams account for the majority of the industrial waste heat inventory. With a reference temperature of 60F (16C), 65% of the waste heat is below 450F (232C) and 99% is below 1,200F (649C). With a reference temperature of 300F (149C), 14% of the waste heat is below 450F, and 96% is below 1,200F. Waste heat is concentrated in a few industrial manufacturing sectors. Based on a review of 21 manufacturing sectors, the top two sectors that produce waste heat are petroleu...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

Heating National Ignition Facility, Realistic Financial Planning...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Essential Lessons Learned Report Apr 2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes Late...Lessons Learned Report, NNSA,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Burgdorf Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Burgdorf Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Burgdorf, Idaho Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

42

Modelica Library for Building Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a freely available Modelica library for building heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The library is based on the Modelica.Fluid library. It has been developed to support research and development of integrated building energy and control systems. The primary applications are controls design, energy analysis and model-based operation. The library contains dynamic and steady-state component models that are applicable for analyzing fast transients when designing control algorithms and for conducting annual simulations when assessing energy performance. For most models, dimensional analysis is used to compute the performance for operating points that differ from nominal conditions. This allows parameterizing models in the absence of detailed geometrical information which is often impractical to obtain during the conceptual design phase of building systems. In the first part of this paper, the library architecture and the main classes are described. In the second part, an example is presented in which we implemented a model of a hydronic heating system with thermostatic radiator valves and thermal energy storage.

Wetter, Michael

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

Section 5.3.1 Heat-Recovery Water Heating: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat pumps, chillers, steam condensate lines, hot air associated with kitchen and laundry facilities, power-generation equipment (such as microturbines or fuel cells), and...

44

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ft Bidwell Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ft. Bidwell, California Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

45

Medical Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Medical Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Medical Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Union County, Oregon Coordinates 45.2334122°, -118.0410627° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

46

Vichy Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vichy Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Vichy Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Vichy Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Vichy Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ukiah, California Coordinates 39.1501709°, -123.2077831° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

47

Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jump Steady Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Buena Vista, Colorado Coordinates 38.8422178°, -106.1311288° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

48

Summer Lake Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summer Lake Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Summer Lake Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Summer Lake Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Summer Lake Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Summer Lake, Oregon Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

49

Stroppel Hotel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stroppel Hotel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Stroppel Hotel Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Midland, South Dakota Coordinates 44.0716539°, -101.1554178° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

50

Van Norman Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Norman Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Norman Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Van Norman Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Van Norman Residences Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Thermopolis, Wyoming Coordinates 43.6460672°, -108.2120432° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

51

Desert Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Desert Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Desert Hot Springs, California Coordinates 33.961124°, -116.5016784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

52

Ouray Municipal Pool Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ouray Municipal Pool Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ouray Municipal Pool Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ouray Municipal Pool Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ouray Municipal Pool Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ouray, Colorado Coordinates 38.0227716°, -107.6714487° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

53

Canon City Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canon City Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Canon City Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Canon City Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Canon City Area Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Canon City, Colorado Coordinates 38.439949°, -105.226097° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

54

Chena Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chena Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Chena Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Fairbanks, Alaska Coordinates 64.8377778°, -147.7163889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

55

Modesto Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Modesto Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Modesto Memorial Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Modesto, California Coordinates 37.6390972°, -120.9968782° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

56

Peppermill Hotel Casino Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peppermill Hotel Casino Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Peppermill Hotel Casino Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Peppermill Hotel Casino Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Peppermill Hotel Casino Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Reno, Nevada Coordinates 39.5296329°, -119.8138027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

57

St. Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name St. Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility St. Mary's Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Pierre, South Dakota Coordinates 44.3683156°, -100.3509665° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

58

YMCA Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

YMCA Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility YMCA Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name YMCA Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility YMCA Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

59

Vale Slaughter House Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vale Slaughter House Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Vale Slaughter House Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Vale Slaughter House Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Vale Slaughter House Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Vale, Oregon Coordinates 43.9821055°, -117.2382311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

60

Avila Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Avila Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Avila Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location San Luis Obispo, California Coordinates 35.2827524°, -120.6596156° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hunters Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hunters Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hunters Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hunters Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hunters Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Lakeview, Oregon Coordinates 42.1887721°, -120.345792° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

62

Bozeman Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bozeman Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Bozeman Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bozeman Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bozeman Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Bozeman, Montana Coordinates 45.68346°, -111.050499° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

63

Radium Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radium Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Radium Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Radium Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Radium Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Union County, Oregon Coordinates 45.2334122°, -118.0410627° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

64

Miracle Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miracle Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Miracle Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Miracle Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Miracle Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Bakersfield, California Coordinates 35.3732921°, -119.0187125° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

65

Hot Springs National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Springs National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Springs National Park Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Hot Springs, Arkansas Coordinates 34.5037004°, -93.0551795° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

66

Lolo Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lolo Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Lolo Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lolo Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Lolo Hot Springs Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Missoula County, Montana Coordinates 47.0240503°, -113.6869923° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

67

Klamath Schools (7) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schools (7) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Schools (7) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Schools (7) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Klamath Schools (7) Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

68

Olene Gap Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olene Gap Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Olene Gap Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olene Gap Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Olene Gap Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath County, Oregon Coordinates 42.6952767°, -121.6142133° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

69

Surprise Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Surprise Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Surprise Valley Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Cedarville, California Coordinates 41.5290606°, -120.1732781° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

70

Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Marlin Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Marlin, Texas Coordinates 31.3062874°, -96.8980439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

71

White Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name White Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility White Sulphur Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location White Sulphur Springs, Montana Coordinates 46.548277°, -110.9021561° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

72

Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hillbrook Nursing Home Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Clancy, Montana Coordinates 46.4652096°, -111.9863826° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

73

Idaho Capitol Mall District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capitol Mall District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Capitol Mall District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Idaho Capitol Mall District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Idaho Capitol Mall Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Boise, Idaho Coordinates 43.6135002°, -116.2034505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

74

Miracle Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Miracle Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Miracle Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Buhl, Idaho Coordinates 42.5990714°, -114.7594946° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

75

LDS Wardhouse Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LDS Wardhouse Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility LDS Wardhouse Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name LDS Wardhouse Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility LDS Wardhouse Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Newcastle, Utah Coordinates 37.6666413°, -113.549406° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

76

LDS Church Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LDS Church Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility LDS Church Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name LDS Church Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility LDS Church Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Almo, Idaho Coordinates 42.1001924°, -113.6336192° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

77

The Wilderness Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Wilderness Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility The Wilderness Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name The Wilderness Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility The Wilderness Lodge Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Gila Hot Springs, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

78

Warren Estates District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warren Estates District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Warren Estates District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warren Estates District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Warren Estates Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Reno, Nevada Coordinates 39.5296329°, -119.8138027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

79

Senior Citizens' Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Senior Citizens' Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Senior Citizens' Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Senior Citizens' Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Senior Citizens' Center Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Truth or Consequences, New Mexico Coordinates 33.1284047°, -107.2528069° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

80

Schutz's Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schutz's Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Schutz's Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Schutz's Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Schutz's Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Crouch, Idaho Coordinates 44.1151717°, -115.970954° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mount Princeton Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mount Princeton Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Mount Princeton Area Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Mount Princeton, Colorado Coordinates 38.749167°, -106.2425° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

82

Baranof Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Baranof Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Baranof Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Sitka, Alaska Coordinates 57.0530556°, -135.33° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

83

Vale Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Vale Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Vale Residences Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Vale, Oregon Coordinates 43.9821055°, -117.2382311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

84

Cotulla High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cotulla High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Cotulla High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cotulla High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cotulla High School Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Cotulla, Texas Coordinates 28.436934°, -99.2350322° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

85

Melozi Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Melozi Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Melozi Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Yukon, Alaska Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

86

Indian Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Indian Valley Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Greenville, California Coordinates 40.1396126°, -120.9510675° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

87

Lakeview Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakeview Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Lakeview Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lakeview Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Lakeview Residences Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Lakeview, Oregon Coordinates 42.1887721°, -120.345792° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

88

Boulder Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Boulder Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Boulder Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Boulder, Montana Coordinates 46.2365947°, -112.1208336° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

89

Langel Valley Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Langel Valley Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Langel Valley Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Langel Valley Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Langel Valley Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Bonanza, Oregon Coordinates 42.1987607°, -121.4061076° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

90

Henley High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Henley High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Henley High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Henley High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Henley High School Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

91

Manzanita Estates District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manzanita Estates District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Manzanita Estates District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Manzanita Estates District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Manzanita Estates Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Reno, Nevada Coordinates 39.5296329°, -119.8138027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

92

Homestead Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Homestead Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Homestead Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Hot Springs, Virginia Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

93

Cottonwood Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cottonwood Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cottonwood Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Buena Vista, Colorado Coordinates 38.8422178°, -106.1311288° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

94

Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Jackson, Montana Coordinates 45.3679793°, -113.4089438° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

95

Box Canyon Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Box Canyon Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Box Canyon Motel Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ouray, Colorado Coordinates 38.0227716°, -107.6714487° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

96

Ophir Creek Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ophir Creek Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ophir Creek Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ophir Creek Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ophir Creek Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location SW, Alaska Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

97

Modoc High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modoc High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Modoc High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Modoc High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Modoc High School Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Alturas, California Coordinates 41.4871146°, -120.5424555° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

98

Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Convection Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility Scaling Basis Full Scale Half Scale NSTF Argonne National Laboratory's Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) - one of the world's largest facilities for ex-vessel passive decay heat removal testing-confirms the performance of reactor cavity cooling systems (RCCS) and similar passive confinement or containment decay heat removal systems in modern Small Modular Reactors. Originally built to aid in the development of General Electric's Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS), the NSTF has a long history of providing confirmatory data for the airside of the RVACS. Argonne National Laboratory's NSTF is a state-of-the-art, large-scale facility for evaluating performance

99

Indian Springs School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Springs School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Indian Springs School Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Big Bend, California Coordinates 39.6982182°, -121.4608015° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

100

Manley Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Manley Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Manley Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Manley Hot Springs, Alaska Coordinates 65.0011111°, -150.6338889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Klamath Residence (500) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residence (500) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Residence (500) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Residence (500) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Klamath Residence (500) Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

102

Klamath Churches (5) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Churches (5) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Churches (5) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Churches (5) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Klamath Churches (5) Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

103

Klamath County Jail Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Jail Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility County Jail Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath County Jail Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Klamath County Jail Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

104

Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Merle West Medical Center Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

105

Lava Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lava Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Lava Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Lava Hot Springs, Idaho Coordinates 42.6193625°, -112.0110712° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

106

Del Rio Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rio Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Rio Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Del Rio Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Del Rio Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Preston, Idaho Coordinates 42.0963133°, -111.8766173° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

107

Utah State Prison Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prison Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Prison Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Utah State Prison Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Utah State Prison Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Salt Lake City, Utah Coordinates 40.7607793°, -111.8910474° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

108

Twin Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Twin Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Twin Springs Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Boise, Idaho Coordinates 43.6135002°, -116.2034505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

109

Twin Peaks Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peaks Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Peaks Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Twin Peaks Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Twin Peaks Motel Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ouray, Colorado Coordinates 38.0227716°, -107.6714487° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

110

Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Springs Health Spa Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

111

Geronimo Springs Museum Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geronimo Springs Museum Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Geronimo Springs Museum Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geronimo Springs Museum Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Geronimo Springs Museum Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Truth or Consequences, New Mexico Coordinates 33.1284047°, -107.2528069° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

112

Gila Hot Springs District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gila Hot Springs District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Gila Hot Springs District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gila Hot Springs District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Gila Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Gila Hot Springs, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

113

Arrowhead Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Arrowhead Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Arrowhead Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location San Bernardino, California Coordinates 34.1083449°, -117.2897652° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

114

Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Medical Center Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Caliente, Nevada Coordinates 37.6149648°, -114.5119378° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

115

Hot Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Sulphur Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Hot Sulphur Springs, Colorado Coordinates 40.0730411°, -106.1027991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

116

Tecopa Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tecopa Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Tecopa Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tecopa Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Tecopa Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Inyo County, California Coordinates 36.3091865°, -117.5495846° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

117

Saratoga Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Saratoga Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Saratoga Springs Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Lehi, Utah Coordinates 40.3916172°, -111.8507662° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

118

Bell Island Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bell Island Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bell Island Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ketchikan, Alaska Coordinates 55.3422222°, -131.6461111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

119

Jackson Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jackson Well Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ashland, Oregon Coordinates 42.1853257°, -122.6980457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

120

Banbury Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Banbury Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Banbury Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Buhl, Idaho Coordinates 42.5990714°, -114.7594946° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Design and construction of the NMSU Geothermally Heated Greenhouse Research Facility: Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design, construction, and performance of the New Mexico State University (NMSU) Geothermal Greenhouse Research Facility. Two 6000-square-foot greenhouses were built on the NMSU campus and supplied with geothermal energy for heating. The geothermal water is pumped from one of three wells producing water at temperatures from 141/degree/F to 148/degree/F. Heat is delivered to the greenhouse space by means of overhead fan-coil unit heaters. The two greenhouses are double-glazed on roof and wall surfaces employing a total of four different film materials: Tedlar/Reg Sign/, Melinex/Reg Sign/, Softglass/Reg Sign/, and Agrifilm/Reg Sign/. One greenhouse is cooled using a traditional fan and pad cooling system. The second greenhouse is cooled with a high-pressure fog system and natural ventilation through roof and side vents. A 2400-square-foot metal building next to the greenhouses provides office, work, and storage space for the facility. The greenhouse facility was leased to two commerical tenants who produced a variety of crops. The performance of the greenhouses was monitored and reported both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results from the tenant's pilot-scale studies in the NMSU greenhouse facility were transferred and applied to two commercial greenhouse ranges that were built in southern New Mexico during 1986/87. 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Schoenmackers, R.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Design and construction of the NMSU Geothermally Heated Greenhouse Research Facility: Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design, construction, and performance of the New Mexico State University (NMSU) Geothermal Greenhouse Research Facility. Two 6000-square-foot greenhouses were built on the NMSU campus and supplied with geothermal energy for heating. The geothermal water is pumped from one of three wells producing water at temperatures from 141/degree/F to 148/degree/F. Heat is delivered to the greenhouse space by means of overhead fan-coil unit heaters. The two greenhouses are double-glazed on roof and wall surfaces employing a total of four different film materials: Tedlar/Reg Sign/, Melinex/Reg Sign/, Softglass/Reg Sign/, and Agrifilm/Reg Sign/. One greenhouse is cooled using a traditional fan and pad cooling system. The second greenhouse is cooled with a high-pressure fog system and natural ventilation through roof and side vents. A 2400-square-foot metal building next to the greenhouses provides office, work, and storage space for the facility. The greenhouse facility was leased to two commerical tenants who produced a variety of crops. The performance of the greenhouses was monitored and reported both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results from the tenant's pilot-scale studies in the NMSU greenhouse facility were transferred and applied to two commercial greenhouse ranges that were built in southern New Mexico during 1986/87. 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Schoenmackers, R.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Circle Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Circle Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Fairbanks, Alaska Coordinates 64.8377778°, -147.7163889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

124

Buckhorn Mineral Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Buckhorn Mineral Wells Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Mesa, Arizona Coordinates 33.4222685°, -111.8226402° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

125

Chico Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Chico Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Pray, Montana Coordinates 45.3802143°, -110.6815999° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

126

Jemez Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jemez Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Jemez Springs, New Mexico Coordinates 35.7686356°, -106.692258° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

127

Breitenbush Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Breitenbush Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Marion County, Oregon Coordinates 44.8446393°, -122.5927411° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

128

Heating facilities: Klamath Lutheran Church, Klamath Falls, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Klamath Lutheran Church is a masonry structure with cathedral ceiling containing approximately 5800 sq ft of floor area. This building is currently heated by two duct furnaces and a unit heater all of which are gas fired. An Educational Wing of approximately 6300 sq ft was added in 1958. This building, containing 2 assembly rooms and a number of classrooms is of uninsulated frame construction, with extensive glass area. A gas-fired boiler supplying finned tube radiators currently heats this wing. Four specific options for displacing all or part of the heating duty with geothermal were examined. These options are: case 1 - drilling a production and injection well on the property and using the resultant hot water (180/sup 0/F) to heat the entire facility; case 3 - using effluent from the Klamath Union High School to heat the entire facility; no well drilling required; case 2 - using effluent from the Klamath Union High School to heat only the church building; the present gas boiler would heat the Educational Wing; and case 4 - drilling a production and injection well on the property and using the resulting water (70/sup 0/F) to supply a water-to-water heat pump. Of the four cases examined, case 3 (heating of both the church building and educational wing with effluent from the Klamath Union High School) seems to offer the greatest potential and earliest simple payback period. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Low Temperature Direct Use District Heating Geothermal Facilities | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heating Geothermal Facilities Heating Geothermal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":800,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":"Geothermal

130

Low Temperature Direct Use Space Heating Geothermal Facilities | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Temperature Direct Use Space Heating Geothermal Facilities Low Temperature Direct Use Space Heating Geothermal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":800,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":"Geothermal

131

Heat Transfer Modeling of Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geological codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geological repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

Lee, S.Y.

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

132

Project title: Natural ventilation, solar heating and integrated low-energy building design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrated low-energy building design. In Cambridge, research was conducted at the BP Institute - which was set up in 1999 with an endowment from BP to research some of the fundamental scientific challenges that the oil industry encounters. In the CMI... in building design. Summary of Intended Outcomes: The objectives of the project will be to develop designs and technologies to: reduce energy costs of maintaining a comfortable environment with buildings through use of solar power, natural ventilation...

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

133

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration in a Meat Processing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A case study is reviewed on a heat recovery system installed in a meat processing facility to preheat water for the plant hot water supply. The system utilizes waste superheat from the facility's 1,350-ton ammonia refrigeration system. The heat recovery system consists of a shell and tube heat exchanger (16"? x 14'0") installed in the compressor hot gas discharge line. Water is recirculated from a 23,000-gallon tempered water storage tank to the heat exchanger by a circulating pump at the rate of 100 gallons per minute. All make-up water to the plant hot water system is supplied from this tempered water storage tank, which is maintained at a constant filled level. Tests to determine the actual rate of heat recovery were conducted from October 3, 1979 to October 12, 1979, disclosing an average usage of 147,000 gallons of hot water daily. These tests illustrated a varied heat recovery of from 0.5 to 1.0 million BTU per hour. The deviations were the result of both changing refrigeration demands and compressor operating modes. An average of 16 million BTU per day was realized, resulting in reduced boiler fuel costs of $30,000 annually, based on the present $.80 per gallon #2 fuel oil price. At the total installed cost of $79,000, including test instrumentation, the project was found to be economically viable. The study has demonstrated the technical and economic feasibility of refrigeration waste heat recovery as a positive energy conservation strategy which has broad applications in industry and commerce.

Murphy, W. T.; Woods, B. E.; Gerdes, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Main Commercial Primary Energy Use of Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995 Heating Equipment | Cooling Equipment Packaged Heating Units 25% | Packaged Air Conditioning Units 54% Boilers 21% | Room Air Conditioning 5% Individual Space Heaters 2% | PTAC (2) 3% Furnaces 20% | Centrifugal Chillers 14% Heat Pumps 5% | Reciprocating Chillers 12% District Heat 7% | Rotary Screw Chillers 3% Unit Heater 18% | Absorption Chillers 2% PTHP & WLHP (1) 2% | Heat Pumps 7% 100% | 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) PTHP = Packaged Terminal Heat Pump, WLHP = Water Loop Heat Pump. 2) PTAC = Packaged Terminal Air Conditioner BTS/A.D. Little, Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume 1: Chillers, Refrigerant Compressors, and Heating Systems, Apr. 2001, Figure 5-5, p. 5-14 for cooling and Figure 5-10, p. 5-18 for heating

135

Optimization of the Fin Heat Pipe for Ventilating and Air Conditioning with a Genetic Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper illustrates that use of a heat pipe as a heat-reclaiming device can significantly influence the air-conditioning system. It analyzes the heat transfer model of the uniform annular fin heat pipe under the condition of air conditioning. It establishes functions of the fin structure parameters such as height,spacing and thickness of the fin when the volume of fin is the smallest under unit temperature difference and unit quantity of heat. It uses a genetic algorithm to optimize the model of the uniform annular fin heat pipe. The calculation result shows that the method of genetic algorithm is effective.

Qian, J.; Sun, D.; Li, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Acoustical prediction methods for heating, ventilating, and air?conditioning (HVAC) systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to compare and contrast various aspects of acoustical prediction methods for heating

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Main Commercial Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995, 1999, and 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Heating Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Cooling Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Packaged Heating Units 29% 38% 28% Packaged Air Conditioning Units 45% 54% 46% Boilers 29% 29% 32% Individual Air Conditioners 21% 21% 19% Individual Space Heaters 29% 26% 19% Central Chillers 19% 19% 18% Furnaces 25% 21% 30% Residential Central Air Conditioners 16% 12% 17% Heat Pumps 10% 13% 14% Heat Pumps 12% 14% 14% District Heat 10% 8% 8% District Chilled Water 4% 4% 4% Other 11% 6% 5% Swamp Coolers 4% 3% 2% Other 2% 2% 2% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Heating and cooling equipment percentages of floorspace total more than 100% since equipment shares floorspace. 2) Malls are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs.

138

Advanced control strategies for heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration systemsAn overview: Part I: Hard control  

SciTech Connect

A chronological overview of the advanced control strategies for heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) is presented in this article. The overview focuses on hard-computing or control techniques, such as proportional-integral-derivative, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive, and robust; soft-computing or control techniques, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms; and on the fusion or hybrid of hard- and soft-control techniques. Thus, it is to be noted that the terminology hard and soft computing/control has nothing to do with the hardware and software that is being generally used. Part I of a two-part series focuses on hard-control strategies, and Part II focuses on softand fusion-control in addition to some future directions in HVAC&R research. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic, and any omission of other works is purely unintentional.

D. Subbaram Naidu; Craig G. Rieger

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Operational test report integrated system test (ventilation upgrade)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operational Final Test Report for Integrated Systems, Project W-030 (Phase 2 test, RECIRC and HIGH-HEAT Modes). Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks, including upgraded vapor space cooling and filtered venting of tanks AY101, Ay102, AZ101, AZ102.

HARTY, W.M.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

140

Improving energy efficiency in a pharmaceutical manufacturing environment -- production facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing plant of a pharmaceutical company in Singapore had low energy efficiency in both its office buildings and production facilities. Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system was identified to ...

Zhang, Endong, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Residential Boiler Efficiencies (1) Gas-Fired Boilers Oil-Fired Boilers Average shipped in 1985 (2): 74% AFUE Average shipped in 1985 (2): 79% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 81% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 86% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 96% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 89% AFUE Note(s): Source(s): 1) Federal appliance standards effective Jan. 1, 1992, require a minimum of 80% AFUE (except gas-fired steam boiler, which must have a 75% AFUE or higher). 2) Includes furnaces. GAMA, Consumer's Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Residential Heating and Water Heating Equipment, Aug. 2005, p. 88 and 106 for best- available AFUE; and GAMA for 1985 average AFUEs; GAMA Tax Credit Eligible Equipment: Gas- and Oil-Fired Boilers 95% AFUE or Greater, May 2007; and GAMA Consumer's Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Heating and Water Heating Equipment, May 2007

142

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Standard (Trane) 14% York 12% Nordyne 12% Rheem 9% Lennox 9% Others 3% Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 5,833,354 1) Does not include water-source or ground-source heat pumps....

143

Heat barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility is disclosed herein. Generally, the thermal barrier comprises a flexible, heat-resistant web mounted over the annular space between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel in order to prevent convection currents generated in the nitrogen atmosphere in this space from entering the relatively cooler atmosphere of the reactor cavity which surrounds these vessels. Preferably, the flexible web includes a blanket of heat-insulating material formed from fibers of a refractory material, such as alumina and silica, sandwiched between a heat-resistant, metallic cloth made from stainless steel wire. In use, the web is mounted between the upper edges of the guard vessel and the flange of a sealing ring which surrounds the reactor vessel with a sufficient enough slack to avoid being pulled taut as a result of thermal differential expansion between the two vessels. The flexible web replaces the rigid and relatively complicated structures employed in the prior art for insulating the reactor cavity from the convection currents generated between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel.

Keegan, Charles P. (South Huntingdon Twp., Westmoreland County, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Individual Heating Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems Lawrence, Massachusetts PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Retrofit Type: Multifamily, affordable Builder: Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) www.merrimackvalleyhabitat.org Size: 840 to 1,170 ft 2 units Price Range: $125,000-$130,000 Date completed: Slated for 2014 Climate Zone: Cold (5A) PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index Range: 48 to 63 Projected annual energy cost savings: $1,797 Incremental cost of energy efficiency measures: $3,747 Incremental annual mortgage: $346 Annual cash flow: $1,451 Billing data: Not available The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley

145

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

U.S. Heating and Air-Conditioning System Manufacturer Shipments, by Type (Including Exports) 2005 Value of 2000 2005 2007 2009 2010 Shipments Equipment Type (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) ($million) (7) Air-Conditioners (1) 5,346 6,472 4,508 3,516 3419 5,837 Heat Pumps 1,539 2,336 1,899 1,642 1,748 2,226 Air-to-Air Heat Pumps 1,339 2,114 1,899 1,642 1748 1,869 Water-Source Heat Pumps (2) 200 222 N.A. N.A. N.A. 357 Chillers 38 37 37 25 29 1,093 Reciprocating 25 24 30 20 24 462 Centrifugal/Screw 8 6 7 5 5 566 Absorption (3) 5 7 N.A. N.A. N.A. 64 Furnaces 3,681 3,624 2,866 2,231 2,509 2,144 Gas-Fired (4) 3,104 3,512 2,782 2,175 2453 2,081 Electric 455 N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. Oil-Fired (5) 121 111 84 56 56 63 Boilers (6) 368 370 N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes exports and gas air conditioners (gas units <10,000 units/yr) and rooftop equipment. Excludes heat pumps, packaged terminal air

146

Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation contains provisions for facilities and service related to electricity, natural gas, water, heating, refrigeration, and street railways. The chapter addresses the construction and...

147

Ventilative cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

Graa, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Ventilation Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings....

149

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Commercial Equipment Efficiencies Equipment Type Chiller Screw COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.02 / 4.45 Scroll COP 2.80 / 3.06 2.96 / 4.40 N.A. Reciprocating COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.52 / 4.40 Centrifugal COP(full-load / IPLV) 5.0 / 5.2 6.1 / 6.4 7.3 / 9.0 Gas-Fired Absorption COP 1.0 1.1 N.A. Gas-Fired Engine Driven COP 1.5 1.8 N.A. Rooftop A/C EER 10.1 11.2 13.9 Rooftop Heat Pump EER (cooling) 9.8 11.0 12.0 COP (heating) 3.2 3.3 3.4 Boilers Gas-Fired Combustion Efficiency 77 80 98 Oil-Fired Thermal Efficiency 80 84 98 Electric Thermal Efficiency 98 98 98 Furnace AFUE 77 80 82 Water Heater Gas-Fired Thermal Efficiency 78 80 96 Oil-Fired Thermal Efficiency 79 80 85 Electric Resistance Thermal Efficiency 98 98 98 Gas-Fired Instantaneous Thermal Efficiency 77 84 89 Source(s): Parameter Efficiency

150

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Main Residential Heating Equipment as of 1987, 1993, 1997, 2001, and 2005 (Percent of Total Households) Equipment Type 1987 1993 1997 2001 2005 Natural Gas 55% 53% 53% 55% 52% Central Warm-Air Furnace 35% 36% 38% 42% 40% Steam or Hot-Water System 10% 9% 7% 7% 7% Floor/Wall/Pipeless Furnace 6% 4% 4% 3% 2% Room Heater/Other 4% 3% 4% 3% 3% Electricity 20% 26% 29% 29% 30% Central Warm-Air Furnace 8% 10% 11% 12% 14% Heat Pump 5% 8% 10% 10% 8% Built-In Electric Units 6% 7% 7% 6% 5% Other 1% 1% 2% 2% 1% Fuel Oil 12% 11% 9% 7% 7% Steam or Hot-Water System 7% 6% 5% 4% 4% Central Warm-Air Furnace 4% 5% 4% 3% 3% Other 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% Other 13% 11% 9% 8% 10% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Other equipment includes wood, LPG, kerosene, other fuels, and none. EIA, A Look at Residential Consumption in 2005, June 2008, Table HC2-4; EIA, A Look at Residential Energy Consumption in 2001, Apr. 2004, 'Table HC3-

151

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Demonstration of Demand Control Ventilation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Control Ventilation (DCV) is one of the control strategies that can be used modulate the amount of ventilation air for space conditioning in commercial buildings. DCV modulates the amount of ventilation air introduced into the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system based on carbon dioxide levels sensed in the areas served. The carbon dioxide level is a proxy for the number of people within the space, from which the required quantity of ventilation air is determined. By using this ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Major Residential HVAC Equipment Lifetimes, Ages, and Replacement Picture Equipment Type Central Air Conditioners 8 - 14 11 8 5,354 Heat Pumps 9 - 15 12 8 1,260 Furnaces Electric 10 - 20 15 11 N.A. Gas-Fired 12 - 17 15 11 2,601 Oil-Fired 15 - 19 17 N.A. 149 Gas-Fired Boilers (1) 17 - 24 20 17 204 Note(s): Source(s): Lifetimes based on use by the first owner of the product, and do not necessarily indicate that the product stops working after this period. A replaced unit may be discarded or used elsewhere. 1) 2005 average stock age is for gas- and oil-fired steam and hot water boilers. Appliance Magazine, U.S. Appliance Industry: Market Share, Life Expectancy & Replacement Market, and Saturation Levels, January 2010, p. 10 for service and average lifetimes, and units to be replaced; ASHRAE, 1999 ASHRAE Handbook: HVAC Applications, Table 3, p. 35.3 for boilers service lifetimes; and

156

International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST); Volume 1: Cases E100-E200  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Building Energy Simulation Test for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST) project conducted by the Tool Evaluation and Improvement International Energy Agency (IEA) Experts Group. The group was composed of experts from the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) Programme, Task 22, Subtask A. The current test cases, E100-E200, represent the beginning of work on mechanical equipment test cases; additional cases that would expand the current test suite have been proposed for future development.

Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Geothermal Heat Pumps Deliver Big Savings for Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and the authoring national laboratory. Geothermal heat pump surface water loops. Geothermal Heat Pumps Deliver Big Savings for Federal...

158

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

159

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

160

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

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161

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

162

Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Knox County Detention Facility Goes Solar for Heating Water | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Knox County Detention Facility Goes Solar for Heating Water Knox County Detention Facility Goes Solar for Heating Water Knox County Detention Facility Goes Solar for Heating Water August 16, 2010 - 12:30pm Addthis An array of solar collectors | Photo courtesy of Trane An array of solar collectors | Photo courtesy of Trane Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? Recovery Act grant funds solar farm to heat 14,000 gallons of water a day Estimated to save $60,000 a year 174 tons of CO2 emissions avoided annually Hot water demand soars at the six-building Knox County Detention Facility in Tennessee. It's open 24/7 with 1,036 inmate beds and 4,500 meals served daily-and don't forget the laundry. Naturally, county officials sought an alternative to costly water heating. Their solution: a $1.88 million solar thermal system, among

164

Renewable energy technologies for federal facilities: Geothermal heat pump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This sheet summarizes information on geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), which extracts heat from the ground in the winter and transfers heat to the ground in the summer. More than 200,000 GHPs are operating in US; they can reduce energy consumption and related emissions by 23 to 44% compared to air-source heat pumps. Opportunities for use of GHPs, requirements, and cost are described. Important terms are defined.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Transpired Air Collectors - Ventilation Preheating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many commercial and industrial buildings have high ventilation rates. Although all that fresh air is great for indoor air quality, heating it can be very expensive. This short (2-page) fact sheet describes a technology available to use solar energy to preheat ventilation air and dramatically reduce utility bills.

Christensen, C.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

166

High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections.

Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

US Department of Energys Regulatory Negotiations Convening on Commercial Certification for Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Equipment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US Department of Energy's Regulatory Negotiations Convening on US Department of Energy's Regulatory Negotiations Convening on Commercial Certification for Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Equipment Public Information for Convening Interviews I. What are the substantive issues DOE seeks to address? Strategies for grouping various basic models for purposes of certification; Identification of non-efficiency attributes, which do not impact the measured consumption of the equipment as tested by DOE's test procedure; The information that is certified to the Department; The timing of when the certification should be made relative to distribution in commerce; and Alterations to a basic model that would impact the certification.

168

Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hi-Tech Fisheries Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Bluffdale, Utah Coordinates 40.4896711°, -111.9388244° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

169

City of Twenty-Nine Palms Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Twenty-Nine Palms Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility City of Twenty-Nine Palms Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Twenty-Nine Palms, California Coordinates 34.1355582°, -116.0541689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

170

Hot Lake RV Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Lake RV Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Lake RV Park Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Union County, Oregon Coordinates 45.2334122°, -118.0410627° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

171

Reno-Moana Area (300) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reno-Moana Area (300) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Reno-Moana Area (300) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Reno-Moana Area (300) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Reno-Moana Area (300) Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Reno, Nevada Coordinates 39.5296329°, -119.8138027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

172

Education and Collection Facility (ECF) Ground Source Heat Pump...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Collection Facility (ECF) addition. In 2007, Denver voters passed a 30 million dollar bond initiative that will cover approximately 57% of the cost of the ECF. A fraction...

173

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

develop integrated models to evaluate the impacts of advanced window glazings; cooling heat-pipe systems; parked car ventilation; heated, cooled, and ventilated seats; and...

174

COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FOR A COLLEGE CAMPUS THE HARRISONBURG, VIRGINIA WASTE-TO-ENERGY FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of installing the super-heaters, cooling towers, condensers and auxiliary equipment needed to make and cooling needs of the campus. This facility also has a small turbine that can be brought on line to produce Madison University central heating & cooling system. This facility uses a mass-burn style waste combustion

Columbia University

175

Renewable energy technologies for federal facilities: Solar water heating  

SciTech Connect

This sheet presents information on solar water heaters (passive and active), solar collectors (flat plate, evacuated tube, parabolic trough), lists opportunities for use of solar water heating, and describes what is required and the costs. Important terms are defined.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cogeneration Waste Heat Recovery at a Coke Calcining Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PSE Inc. recently completed the design, construction and start-up of a cogeneration plant in which waste heat in the high temperature flue gases of three existing coke calcining kilns is recovered to produce process steam and electrical energy. The heat previously exhausted to the atmosphere is now converted to steam by waste heat recovery boilers. Eighty percent of the steam produced is metered for sale to a major oil refinery, while the remainder passes through a steam turbine generator and is used for deaeration and feedwater heating. The electricity produced is used for the plant auxiliaries and sold to the local utility. Many design concepts were incorporated into the plant which provided for high plant availability, reliability and energy efficiency. This paper will show how these concepts were implemented and incorporated into the detailed design of the plant while making cogeneration a cost effective way to save conventional fuels. Operating data since plant start-up will also be presented.

Coles, R. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Heating facilities for the city schools, Ephrata, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Ephrata, Washington has an existing well that has the capability of pumping 2200 gallons per minute of 86/sup 0/F water into the City drinking water system. To determine the economic practicality of using the City water to heat the schools, one school (Middle School) was selected for evaluation. Two cases were considered. Case 1 uses a two stage water-to-water heat pump to produce a 190/sup 0/F circulating hot water steam. This would be compatible with the existing system and essentially no retrofit costs for the room convective heating system would be incurred. Case 2 uses a single stage water-to-water heat pump to produce a 140/sup 0/F circulating hot water stream. Retrofit costs would incur for additional room convection equipment. In both cases the heat pump is sized to furnish the total heating and hot water requirements of the school. However, one of the existing boilers is left in place to serve as standby. The Middle School evaluation shows the single stage heat pump to be most cost effective, having a return on invested capital of about 19%. Projecting the single stage evaluation to include all the schools, the total conversion cost would be about $800,000. This includes a retrofit allowance of $100,000. The return on investment would be about 19%. Total annual savings in fuel oil consumption would be nearly 150,000 gallons, amounting to a first year savings of about $134,000. Peak water usage would be 1000 gallons per minute, about 45% of that available. Annual water usage would be about 90 million gallons, about 14% of the water used during 1978. This water would be returned to the drinking water system after extraction of heat. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Heating Facilities, Stepping Stones Rehabilitation Center, Klamath Falls, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stepping Stones Rehabilitation Center is leased from Klamath County and operated by the Klamath Council on Alcohol and Drugs. Buildings consist of interconnected and adjoining buildings laid out in a U configuration, with a total floor plan area of about 13,000 square feet. Construction is conventional single story, with tile roofs, masonry facing on the walls, and single glazed windows. Heating is by room wall convectors using low pressure steam. Steam is generated in an oil fired boiler. It is economically feasible to heat Stepping Stones using a water to water heat pump. Low temperature geothermal water from a relatively shallow well would be boosted from 80/sup 0/F to a 150/sup 0/F in the heat pump. This hot water would supply space heating requirements and potable hot water. The existing boiler, steam and condensate piping, and room convectors would be removed. The water to water heat pump, new piping, and room convectors would be installed. Estimated capital cost is $140,000. Annual energy savings in fuel oil purchases is about 26,000 gallons with a first year value of about $19,000. This savings, less operating costs, when applied with escalation considerations over a period of twenty years, results in a present worth of $91,778 when discounted at 10%. This is the amount of surplus generated after the payment of all obligations, when the project is financed with 10% bonds.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Heating Facilities, Virginia Lake Townhouses and Apartments, Reno, Nevada.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Virginia Lake Townhouses and Apartments are located in a 12 acre parcel in the geographic center of Reno, Nevada. There are 148 apartments, consisting of 70 single story garden apartments in 10 buildings, 40 two story townhouses in six buildings, and 38 two story apartments in five buildings. All apartments are presently heated with individual natural gas fired forced air furnaces. Hot water is provided by gas fired water heaters, except for the 40 older townhouses which are using water directly from a geothermal source. This water has now been found to be unsuitable for potable use. Located on the property are two geothermal wells, complete with pumps. The larger well can deliver 500 gallons per min., and the smaller well 65 gallons per min., of the 135/sup 0/F geothermal water. The Geo-Heat Utilization Center has been asked to determine a scheme for using the geothermal water from these wells to provide the needed space and hot water heating for the 148 apartments. An outdoor swimming pool also requires heating. Space heating in all three types of apartments will be accomplished through the installation of finned water coils in existing ductwork or furnaces. Geothermal water will be pumped from Well No. 2 through a main distribution system and used directly in the coils. Piping system specifics are available in the Appendix.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Geothermal Heat Pumps Deliver Big Savings for Federal Facilities - Technology Focus  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EE-0291 EE-0291 Internet: www.eere.energy.gov/femp/ No portion of this publication may be altered in any form without prior written consent from the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and the authoring national laboratory. Geothermal heat pump surface water loops. Geothermal Heat Pumps Deliver Big Savings for Federal Facilities An update on geothermal heat pump technologies and the Super ESPC Energy-efficiency improvements at federal facilities must enhance support for the agency's critical missions while also saving energy and money. Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs, also known as ground-source heat pumps or GeoExchange systems) can do both, and can help meet energy-conservation, emissions-reduction, and renewable-energy goals. GHP technology is now well known as a proven, reliable, efficient, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ventilation Model and Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This model and analysis report develops, validates, and implements a conceptual model for heat transfer in and around a ventilated emplacement drift. This conceptual model includes thermal radiation between the waste package and the drift wall, convection from the waste package and drift wall surfaces into the flowing air, and conduction in the surrounding host rock. These heat transfer processes are coupled and vary both temporally and spatially, so numerical and analytical methods are used to implement the mathematical equations which describe the conceptual model. These numerical and analytical methods predict the transient response of the system, at the drift scale, in terms of spatially varying temperatures and ventilation efficiencies. The ventilation efficiency describes the effectiveness of the ventilation process in removing radionuclide decay heat from the drift environment. An alternative conceptual model is also developed which evaluates the influence of water and water vapor mass transport on the ventilation efficiency. These effects are described using analytical methods which bound the contribution of latent heat to the system, quantify the effects of varying degrees of host rock saturation (and hence host rock thermal conductivity) on the ventilation efficiency, and evaluate the effects of vapor and enhanced vapor diffusion on the host rock thermal conductivity.

V. Chipman

2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation Speaker(s): Hwataik Han Date: July 10, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone Heat recovery ventilators are frequently used to save heating/cooling loads of buildings for ventilation. There are several types of HRV's, including a parallel plate type, a rotary type, a capillary type, and a heat pipe type. The breathing HRV is a heat recovery ventilator of a new kind using the concept of alternating-current ventilation. The AC ventilation is the ventilation with the airflow directions reversed periodically. It has an advantage of using a single duct system, for both supply and exhaust purposes. In order to develop a breathing HRV system, the thermal recovery performance should be investigated depending on many parameters, such as

183

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Operational Excellence Facilities Facilities...

184

Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities, Second Edition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and exterior to the facility, are typically less and exterior to the facility, are typically less than those for conventional systems. Potential Application The technology has been shown to be techni- cally valid and economically attractive in many applications. It is efficient and effective. This Federal Technology Alert reports on the collec- tive experience of heat pump users and evalua- tors and provides application guidance. An estimated 400,000 ground-source heat pumps are operating in the private and public sector, although most of these systems operate in resi- dential applications. A ground-source heat pump system can be applied in virtually any category of climate or building. The large num- ber of installations testifies to the stability of this technology. The reported problems can usually be attributed to faulty design or

185

Commissioning Ventilated Containment Systems in the Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This Best Practices Guide focuses on the specialized approaches required for ventilated containment systems, understood to be all components that drive and control ventilated enclosures and local exhaust systems within the laboratory. Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

Not Available

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system  

SciTech Connect

This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Title Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-57730 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Russell, Marion L., Max H. Sherman, and Armin F. Rudd Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 13 Start Page Chapter Pagination 325-348 Abstract This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings in North America and a few in Europe. The major technologies reviewed include a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. Key parameters that are related to each system include operating costs, installation costs, ventilation rates, heat recovery potential. It also examines related issues such as infiltration, duct systems, filtration options, noise, and construction issues. This report describes a wide variety of systems currently on the market that can be used to meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2. While these systems generally fall into the categories of supply, exhaust or balanced, the specifics of each system are driven by concerns that extend beyond those in the standard and are discussed. Some of these systems go beyond the current standard by providing additional features (such as air distribution or pressurization control). The market will decide the immediate value of such features, but ASHRAE may wish to consider modifications to the standard in the future.

188

NREL: Learning - Solar Process Heat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Heat Process Heat Photo of part of one side of a warehouse wall, where a perforated metal exterior skin is spaced about a foot out from the main building wall to form part of the transpired solar collector system. A transpired collector is installed at a FedEx facility in Denver, Colorado. Commercial and industrial buildings may use the same solar technologies-photovoltaics, passive heating, daylighting, and water heating-that are used for residential buildings. These nonresidential buildings can also use solar energy technologies that would be impractical for a home. These technologies include ventilation air preheating, solar process heating, and solar cooling. Space Heating Many large buildings need ventilated air to maintain indoor air quality. In cold climates, heating this air can use large amounts of energy. But a

189

Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controlling summer attic heat gain is important to reducing air conditioning energy use in homes in hot-humid climates. Both heat transfer through ceilings and t attic duct systems can make up a large part of peak cooling demand, Attic ventilation has long been identified as a method to abate such heat gains. We present test results from using the photovoltaic (PV) attic ventilator fans in a test home to assess impact on attic and cooling energy performance.

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Heating Season Energy and Moisture Levels  

SciTech Connect

Two identical laboratory homes designed to model existing Florida building stock were sealed and tested to 2.5 ACH50. Then, one was made leaky with 70% leakage through the attic and 30% through windows, to a tested value of 9 ACH50. Reduced energy use was measured in the tighter home (2.5 ACH50) in the range of 15% to 16.5% relative to the leaky (9 ACH50) home. Internal moisture loads resulted in higher dew points inside the tight home than the leaky home. Window condensation and mold growth occurred inside the tight home. Even cutting internal moisture gains in half to 6.05 lbs/day, the dew point of the tight home was more than 15 degrees F higher than the outside dry bulb temperature. The homes have single pane glass representative of older Central Florida homes.

Vieira, R.; Parker, D.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Title Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed Year of Publication 2012 Authors Bennett, Deborah H., William J. Fisk, Michael G. Apte, X. Wu, Amber L. Trout, David Faulkner, and Douglas P. Sullivan Journal Indoor Air Volume 22 Issue 4 Pagination 309-20 Abstract This field study of 37 small and medium commercial buildings throughout California obtained information on ventilation rate, temperature, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system characteristics. The study included seven retail establishments; five restaurants; eight offices; two each of gas stations, hair salons, healthcare facilities, grocery stores, dental offices, and fitness centers; and five other buildings. Fourteen (38%) of the buildings either could not or did not provide outdoor air through the HVAC system. The air exchange rate averaged 1.6 (s.d. = 1.7) exchanges per hour and was similar between buildings with and without outdoor air supplied through the HVAC system, indicating that some buildings have significant leakage or ventilation through open windows and doors. Not all buildings had sufficient air exchange to meet ASHRAE 62.1 Standards, including buildings used for fitness centers, hair salons, offices, and retail establishments. The majority of the time, buildings were within the ASHRAE temperature comfort range. Offices were frequently overcooled in the summer. All of the buildings had filters, but over half the buildings had a filter with a minimum efficiency reporting value rating of 4 or lower, which are not very effective for removing fine particles. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Most U.S. commercial buildings (96%) are small- to medium-sized, using nearly 18% of the country's energy, and sheltering a large population daily. Little is known about the ventilation systems in these buildings. This study found a wide variety of ventilation conditions, with many buildings failing to meet relevant ventilation standards. Regulators may want to consider implementing more complete building inspections at commissioning and point of sale.

192

Nuclear heating in thick iron slabs at the ORR Pool Side Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to determine experimentally and computationally the nuclear heating rates in iron in the Pool Side Facility (PSF) of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR). This work was performed in support of the NRC-Pressure Vessel Surveillance Program, the objective of which is to verify and upgrade dosimetry and damage correlations for pressure vessels of Light Water Reactors (LWR).

Siman-Tov, I.I.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation Controlled ventilation keeps energy-efficient homes healthy and comfortable. Learn more about ventilation. Controlled ventilation keeps energy-efficient homes healthy and comfortable. Learn more about ventilation. When creating an energy-efficient, airtight home through air sealing, it's very important to consider ventilation. Unless properly ventilated, an airtight home can seal in indoor air pollutants. Ventilation also helps control moisture-another important consideration for a healthy, energy-efficient home. Featured Whole-House Ventilation A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. Tight, energy-efficient homes require mechanical -- usually whole-house --

194

Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities, Second Edition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E E N E R G Y M A N A G E M E N T P R O G R A M and exterior to the facility, are typically less than those for conventional systems. Potential Application The technology has been shown to be techni- cally valid and economically attractive in many applications. It is efficient and effective. This Federal Technology Alert reports on the collec- tive experience of heat pump users and evalua- tors and provides application guidance. An estimated 400,000 ground-source heat pumps are operating in the private and public sector, although most of these systems operate in resi- dential applications. A ground-source heat pump system can be applied in virtually any category of climate or building. The large num- ber of installations testifies to the stability of this technology. The reported problems can

195

Geothermal greenhouse-heating facilities for the Klamath County Nursing Home, Klamath Falls, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Klamath County Nursing Home, located in Klamath Falls, Oregon, was constructed in 1976. The building of 55,654 square feet currently houses care facilities for approximately 120 persons. During the initial planning for the Nursing Home, the present site was selected primarily on the basis of its geothermal resource. This resource (approx. 190/sup 0/F) currently provides space and domestic hot water heating for the Nursing Home, Merle West Medical Center and the Oregon Institute of Technology. The feasibility of installing a geothermal heating system in a planned greenhouse for the Nursing Home is explored. The greenhouse system would be tied directly to the existing hot water heating system for the Nursing Home.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Liquid ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For 350 million years, fish have breathed liquid through gills. Mammals evolved lungs to breathe air. Rarely, circumstances can occur when a mammal needs to `turn back the clock' to breathe through a special liquid medium. This is particularly true if surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung is increased, as in acute lung injury. In this condition, surface tension increases because the pulmonary surfactant system is damaged, causing alveolar collapse, atelectasis, increased right-to-left shunt and hypoxaemia. 69 The aims of treatment are: (i) to offset increased forces causing lung collapse by applying mechanical ventilation with PEEP; (ii) to decrease alveolar surface tension with exogenous surfactant; (iii) to eliminate the air-liquid interface by filling the lung with a fluid in

U. Kaisers; K. P. Kelly; T. Busch

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Mechanical Equipment - June 26, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Facility Construction - Mechanical Equipment - June Nuclear Facility Construction - Mechanical Equipment - June 26, 2012 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Mechanical Equipment - June 26, 2012 June 26, 2012 Nuclear Facility Construction - Mechanical Equipment Installation, (HSS CRAD 45-53, Rev. 0) The purpose of this criteria review and approach, this CRAD includes mechanical equipment installation, including connections of the equipment to installed piping systems, and attachments of the equipment to structures (concrete, structural steel, or embed plates). Mechanical equipment includes items such as pumps and motors, valves, tanks, glove boxes, heat exchangers, ion exchangers, service air system, fire pumps and tanks, and heating, ventilation, and air condition (HVAC) equipment such as fans, scrubbers and filters.

198

Floor-supply displacement ventilation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research on indoor environments has received more attention recently because reports of symptoms and other health complaints related to indoor environments have been increasing. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning ...

Kobayashi, Nobukazu, 1967-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems Title Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation...

200

Definition and means of maintaining the ventilation system confinement portion of the PFP safety envelope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Plutonium Finishing Plant Heating Ventilation and Cooling system provides for the confinement of radioactive releases to the environment and provides for the confinement of radioactive contamination within designated zones inside the facility. This document identifies the components and procedures necessary to ensure the HVAC system provides these functions. Appendices E through J provide a snapshot of non-safety class HVAC equipment and need not be updated when the remainder of the document and Appendices A through D are updated.

Dick, J.D.; Grover, G.A.; O`Brien, P.M., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGERS: TEST METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presenting Test Results Heat Exchanger Descriptions and Testof Residential Heat Exchangers Conclusions . . . . . . . .ventilation testing heat exchangers. system, a heat

Fisk, William J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Authors Fisk, William J., Mark J. Mendell, Molly Davies, Ekaterina Eliseeva, David Faulkner, Tienzen Hong, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords absence, building s, carbon dioxide, demand - controlled ventilation, energy, indoor air quality, schools, ventilation Abstract This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included:  The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).  Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.

203

VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

C.R. Gorrell

1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

Hysteresis effects in hybrid building ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation, external wind forcing and internal heat gains e.g. due to electrical equipment or building chloride, etc. Developing world: By-products of cooking or heating fires Ghiaus & Allard (2005) · Exposure-breeze, displacement ventilation dissipate internal heat gains e.g. from kitchen stove · Wintertime: Spaces filled

Flynn, Morris R.

205

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

206

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ventilation Systems Operating Experience Review for Fusion Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for air ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. These experiences are applicable for magnetic and inertial fusion facilities since air ventilation systems are support systems that can be considered generic to nuclear facilities. The report contains descriptions of ventilation system components, operating experiences with these systems, component failure rates, and component repair times. Since ventilation systems have a role in mitigating accident releases in nuclear facilities, these data are useful in safety analysis and risk assessment of public safety. An effort has also been given to identifying any safety issues with personnel operating or maintaining ventilation systems. Finally, the recommended failure data were compared to an independent data set to determine the accuracy of individual values. This comparison is useful for the International Energy Agency task on fusion component failure rate data collection.

L. C. Cadwallader

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

210

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

211

The Ventilated Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adiabatic theories of ocean circulation and density structure have a long tradition, from the concept of the ventilated thermocline to the notion that deep ocean ventilation is controlled by westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. This study ...

Patrick Haertel; Alexey Fedorov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Combined Heat and Power (CHP): Is It Right For Your Facility?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership with the US DOE Partnership with the US DOE Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Is It Right For Your Facility U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program Webcast Series May 14 th , 2009 John J. Cuttica Cliff Haefke 312/996-4382 312/355-3476 cuttica@uic.edu chaefk1@uic.edu In Partnership with the US DOE Mid Atlantic www.chpcenterma.org Midwest www.chpcentermw.org Pacific www.chpcenterpr.org Northwest Region www.chpcenternw.org Northeast www.northeastchp.org Intermountain www.IntermountainCHP.org Gulf Coast www.GulfCoastCHP.org Southeastern www.chpcenterse.org In Partnership with the US DOE CHP Decision Making Process Presented by Ted Bronson & Joe Orlando Webcast Series January 8, 2009 CHP Regional Application Centers Walkthrough STOP Average Costs Typical Performance Yes No Energy Rates Profiles

213

Solar heating and hot water system for the central administrative office facility. Technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress on the solar heating and hot water system for the central administrative office facility of the Lincoln Housing Authority, Lincoln, NE is covered. An acceptance test plan is presented and the results of the test are tabulated. A complete blueprint of the system as built is provided. The monitoring system is drawn and settings and installation are described. An operation and maintenance manual discusses procedures for start up, shut down and seasonal changeover and include a valve list and pictures and specifications of components and materials used. Photographs of the final installation are included, and technical data and performance data are given. Finally, there is a brief description of system design and operation and a discussion of major maintenance problems encountered and their solutions. (LEW)

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper sets up a mathematical model of three-dimensional steady turbulence heat transfer in an air-conditioned room of multi-polluting heat sources. Numerical simulation helps identify key factors in displacement ventilation systems that affect air-quality in rooms of multi-polluting heat sources. Results show that it is very important to determine the suitable air-intemperature , air-inflow, and heat source quantity and dispersion, to obtain better displacement ventilation results.

Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

DOE/EA-1605: Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

605 605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1605 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR BIOMASS COGENERATION AND HEATING FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AUGUST 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE This page intentionally left blank - i - TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................1 1.1 Background and Proposed Action ...............................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need ........................................................................................4

216

Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Heating,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Technologies to Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: New and

217

Absolute Glovebox Ventilation Filtration System with Unique Filter Replacement Feature  

SciTech Connect

A glovebox ventilation system was designed for a new plutonium-238 processing facility that provided 1) downdraft ventilation, 2) a leak tight seal around the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, and 3) a method for changing the filters internally without risk of contaminating the laboratory.

Freeman, S. S.; Slusher, W. A.

1975-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

ELF/VLF emissions generated in the ionosphere by heating facilities - a new tool for ionospheric and magnetospheric research  

SciTech Connect

A brief summary of ELF/VLF generation experiments using the SURA heating facility is presented. The possibilities of applications of the measured ionospherically generated low frequency signal parameters for diagnosing the physical phenomena in the ionosphere and the magnetosphere are discussed.

Kotik, D.S. [Radiophysical Research Institute, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Building Science - Ventilation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Ventilation Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com Build Tight - Ventilate Right Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Build Tight - Ventilate Right How Tight? What's Right? Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Air Barrier Metrics Material 0.02 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa Assembly 0.20 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa Enclosure 2.00 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa 0.35 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa 0.25 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa 0.15 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Getting rid of big holes 3 ach@50 Getting rid of smaller holes 1.5 ach@50 Getting German 0.6 ach@50 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Best As Tight as Possible - with - Balanced Ventilation Energy Recovery Distribution Source Control - Spot exhaust ventilation Filtration

220

ASHRAE and residential ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conditioning Engineers. 2001. ASHRAE, Indoor Air QualityABOUT/IAQ_papr01.htm ASHRAE. Standard 62.2-2003:Ventilation Requirements. ASHRAE Journal, pp. 51- 55, June

Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measured. The local exhaust flows can be measured or can meet prescriptive ducting and fan labeling requirements that use ratings provided by the Home Ventilating Institute (HVI,...

222

Carbon-dioxide-controlled ventilation study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In-House Energy Management (IHEM) Program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide funds to federal laboratories to conduct research on energy-efficient technology. The Energy Sciences Department of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by IHEM to research the energy savings potential associated with reducing outdoor-air ventilation of buildings. By monitoring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels in a building, outdoor air provided by the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system can be reduced to the percentage required to maintain satisfactory CO{sub 2} levels rather than ventilating with a higher outdoor-air percentage based on an arbitrary minimum outdoor-air setting. During summer months, warm outdoor air brought into a building for ventilation must be cooled to meet the appropriate cooling supply-air temperature, and during winter months, cold outdoor air must be heated. By minimizing the amount of hot or cold outdoor air brought into the HVAC system, the supply air requires less cooling or heating, saving energy and money. Additionally, the CO{sub 2} levels in a building can be monitored to ensure that adequate outdoor air is supplied to a building to maintain air quality levels. The two main considerations prior to implementing CO{sub 2}-based ventilation control are its impact on energy consumption and the adequacy of indoor air quality (IAQ) and occupant comfort. To address these considerations, six portable CO{sub 2} monitors were placed in several Hanford Site buildings to estimate the adequacy of office/workspace ventilation. The monitors assessed the potential for reducing the flow of outdoor-air to the buildings. A candidate building was also identified to monitor various ventilation control strategies for use in developing a plan for implementing and assessing energy savings.

McMordie, K.L.; Carroll, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

LBNL REPORT NUMBER 53776; OCTOBER 2003 ASHRAE &Residential Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL REPORT NUMBER 53776; OCTOBER 2003 ASHRAE &Residential Ventilation Max Sherman Energy Performance of Buildings Group IED/EETD Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory1 MHSherman@lbl.gov ASHRAE, the American of heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R). ASHRAE has recently released a new

224

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rudd. 2007. Review of residential ventilation technologies.2009. EISG Final Report: Residential Integrated VentilationDesign and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems. Proc.

Sherman, Max H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Why We Ventilate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why We Ventilate Why We Ventilate Title Why We Ventilate Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-5093E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Phillip N. Price, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Conference Name Proceedings of the 2011 32nd AIVC Conference and 1st Tightvent Conference Date Published October 2011 Conference Location Brussels, Belgium Keywords indoor environment department, resave, ventilation and air cleaning Abstract It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of "good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

226

Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies  

SciTech Connect

In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.; Bergey, D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Geothermal heating retrofit at the Utah State Prison Minimum Security Facility. Final report, March 1979-January 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of progress and results of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project. Initiated in 1978 by the Utah State Energy Office and developed with assistance from DOE's Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies PON program, final construction was completed in 1984. The completed system provides space and water heating for the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. It consists of an artesian flowing geothermal well, plate heat exchangers, and underground distribution pipeline that connects to the existing hydronic heating system in the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. Geothermal water disposal consists of a gravity drain line carrying spent geothermal water to a cooling pond which discharges into the Jordan River, approximately one mile from the well site. The system has been in operation for two years with mixed results. Continuing operation and maintenance problems have reduced the expected seasonal operation from 9 months per year to 3 months. Problems with the Minimum Security heating system have reduced the expected energy contribution by approximately 60%. To date the system has saved the prison approximately $18,060. The total expenditure including resource assessment and development, design, construction, performance verification, and reporting is approximately $827,558.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Dianne Griffiths April 29, 2013 Presentation Outline * Basic Objectives * Exhaust Systems * Make-up Air Systems Two Primary Ventilation Objectives 1) Providing Fresh Air - Whole-House 2) Removing Pollutants - Local Exhaust Our goal is to find the simplest solution that satisfies both objectives while minimizing cost and energy impacts. Common Solution: Align local exhaust with fresh air requirements (Ex: 25 Bath + 25 Kitchen) Exhaust-Driven Fresh Air Design * Exhaust slightly depressurizes the units * Outside air enters through leaks, cracks, or planned inlets * Widely used in the North Multifamily Ventilation Best Practice * Step 1: Understand ventilation requirements * Step 2: Select the simplest design that can

229

Whole Building Ventilation Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Whole-Building Whole-Building Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Home Performance / Weatherization  Addressing ventilation is the exception  Max tightness, e.g. BPI's "Building Airflow Standard" (BAS)  References ASHRAE 62-89  BAS = Max [0.35 ACH, 15 CFM/person], CFM50 eq.  If BD tests show natural infiltration below BAS...  Ventilation must be recommended or installed.  SO DON'T AIR SEAL TO MUCH! © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Ventilation Requirements Ventilation systems for existing homes that are:

230

Topical report: Natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) evaluation for generating additional reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) data.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept. One of the key passive safety features of the VHTR is the potential for decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-cooled RCCS concept is notably similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that was developed for the General Electric PRISM sodium-cooled fast reactor. As part of the DOE R&D program that supported the development of this fast reactor concept, the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) was developed at ANL to provide proof-of-concept data for the RVACS under prototypic natural convection flow, temperature, and heat flux conditions. Due to the similarity between RVACS and the RCCS, current VHTR R&D plans call for the utilization of the NSTF to provide RCCS model development and validation data, in addition to supporting design validation and optimization activities. Both air-cooled and water-cooled RCCS designs are to be included. In support of this effort, ANL has been tasked with the development of an engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF to ensure that sufficiently detailed temperature, heat flux, velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained to adequately qualify the codes under the expected range of air-cooled RCCS flow conditions. Next year, similar work will be carried out for the alternative option of a water-cooled RCCS design. Analysis activities carried out in support of this experiment planning task have shown that: (a) in the RCCS, strong 3-D effects result in large heat flux, temperature, and heat transfer variations around the tube wall; (b) there is a large difference in the heat transfer coefficient predicted by turbulence models and heat transfer correlations, and this underscores the need of experimental work to validate the thermal performance of the RCCS; and (c) tests at the NSTF would embody all important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena in the RCCS, in addition to covering the entire parameter ranges that characterize these phenomena. Additional supporting scaling study results are available in Reference 2. The purpose of this work is to develop a high-level engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF in order to meet the following two technical objectives: (1) provide CFD and system-level code development and validation data for the RCCS under prototypic (full-scale) natural convection flow conditions, and (2) support RCCS design validation and optimization. As background for this work, the report begins by providing a summary of the original NSTF design and operational capabilities. Since the facility has not been actively utilized since the early 1990's, the next step is to assess the current facility status. With this background material in place, the data needs and requirements for the facility are then defined on the basis of supporting analysis activities. With the requirements for the facility established, appropriate mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF are then developed in order to meet the overall project objectives. A cost and schedule for modifying the facility to satisfy the RCCS data needs is then provided.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Pointer, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Facilities Services and Environmental Health and Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facilities Services and Environmental Health and Safety Laboratory Ventilation Management Program Guidance Document Facilities Services and Environmental Health and Safety This group is comprised of support staff from Facilities Services and Environmental Health and Safety who make observations

Pawlowski, Wojtek

232

Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation  

SciTech Connect

In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

De Almeida, A.T. [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dep. Eng. Electrotecnica; Fisk, W.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Solar ventilation preheating: FEMP fact sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Installing a ''solar wall'' to heat air before it enters a building, called solar ventilation preheating, is one of the most efficient ways of reducing energy costs using clean and renewable energy. A solar wall can be designed as an integral part of a new building or it can be added in a retrofit project.

Clyne, R.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modeling and analysis of a heat transport transient test facility for space nuclear systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis is to design a robust test facility for a small space nuclear power system and model its physical behavior under (more)

[No author

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

236

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

Sippola, Mark R.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Natural Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Ventilation Natural Ventilation Natural Ventilation May 30, 2012 - 7:56pm Addthis Opening a window is a simple natural ventilation strategy. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/Simotion Opening a window is a simple natural ventilation strategy. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/Simotion What does this mean for me? If you live in a part of the country with cool nights and breezes, you may be able to cool your house with natural ventilation. If you're building a new home, design it to take advantage of natural ventilation. Natural ventilation relies on the wind and the "chimney effect" to keep a home cool. Natural ventilation works best in climates with cool nights and regular breezes. The wind will naturally ventilate your home by entering or leaving windows, depending on their orientation to the wind. When wind blows against your

238

Residential Ventilation & Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Residential Ventilation & Energy Figure 1: Annual Average Ventilation Costs of the Current U.S. Single-Family Housing Stock ($/year/house). Infiltration and ventilation in dwellings is conventionally believed to account for one-third to one-half of space conditioning energy. Unfortunately, there is not a great deal of measurement data or analysis to substantiate this assumption. As energy conservation improvements to the thermal envelope continue, the fraction of energy consumed by the conditioning of air may increase. Air-tightening programs, while decreasing energy requirements, have the tendency to decrease ventilation and its associated energy penalty at the possible expense of adequate indoor air quality. Therefore, more energy may be spent on conditioning air.

239

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(often required by building codes) will help to reduce your use of air conditioning, and attic fans may also help keep cooling costs down. Learn More Whole-House Ventilation...

240

Why We Ventilate  

SciTech Connect

It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of"good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Price, Phil N.; Singer, Brett C.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

WASTE TREATMENT BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System provides heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for the contaminated, potentially contaminated, and uncontaminated areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository's (MGR) Waste Treatment Building (WTB). In the uncontaminated areas, the non-confinement area ventilation system maintains the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort. In the contaminated and potentially contaminated areas, in addition to maintaining the proper environmental conditions for personnel comfort and equipment operation, the contamination confinement area ventilation system directs potentially contaminated air away from personnel in the WTB and confines the contamination within high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units. The contamination confinement area ventilation system creates airflow paths and pressure zones to minimize the potential for spreading contamination with the building. The contamination confinement ventilation system also protects the environment and the public by limiting airborne releases of radioactive or other hazardous contaminants from the WTB. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System confines the radioactive and hazardous material within the building such that the release rates comply with regulatory limits, The system design, operations, and maintenance activities incorporate ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principles to maintain personnel radiation doses to all occupational workers below regulatory limits and as low as is reasonably achievable. The system provides status of important system parameters and equipment operation, and provides audible and/or visual indication of off-normal conditions and equipment failures. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Waste Treatment Building System by being located in the WTB, and by maintaining specific pressure, temperature, and humidity environments within the building. The system also depends on the WTB for normal electric power supply and the required supply of water for heating, cooling, and humidification. Interface with the Waste Treatment Building System includes the WTB fire protection subsystem for detection of fire and smoke. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Site Radiological Monitoring System for continuous monitoring of the exhaust air and key areas within the WTB, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control of system operations, and the Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System and Site Generated Hazardous, Non-Hazardous & Sanitary Waste Disposal System for routing of pretreated toxic, corrosive, and radiologically contaminated effluent from process equipment to the HEPA filter exhaust ductwork and air-cleaning unit.

P.A. Kumar

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

242

Solar water-heating system refurbishments: Ingham County Geriatric Medical Care Facility. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The step-by-step procedure for the refurbishment project for the medical care facility is detailed. The Wyle Laboratories' solar collector test report is included in the apendix.

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air  

SciTech Connect

The importance of controlling humidity in buildings is cause for concern, in part, because of indoor air quality problems associated with excess moisture in air-conditioning systems. But more universally, the need for ventilation air has forced HVAC equipment (originally optimized for high efficiency in removing sensible heat loads) to remove high moisture loads. To assist cooling equipment and meet the challenge of larger ventilation loads, several technologies have succeeded in commercial buildings. Newer technologies such as subcool/reheat and heat pipe reheat show promise. These increase latent capacity of cooling-based systems by reducing their sensible capacity. Also, desiccant wheels have traditionally provided deeper-drying capacity by using thermal energy in place of electrical power to remove the latent load. Regardless of what mix of technologies is best for a particular application, there is a need for a more effective way of thinking about the cooling loads created by ventilation air. It is clear from the literature that all-too-frequently, HVAC systems do not perform well unless the ventilation air loads have been effectively addressed at the original design stage. This article proposes an engineering shorthand, an annual load index for ventilation air. This index will aid in the complex process of improving the ability of HVAC systems to deal efficiently with the amount of fresh air the industry has deemed useful for maintaining comfort in buildings. Examination of typical behavior of weather shows that latent loads usually exceed sensible loads in ventilation air by at least 3:1 and often as much as 8:1. A designer can use the engineering shorthand indexes presented to quickly assess the importance of this fact for a given system design. To size those components after they are selected, the designer can refer to Chapter 24 of the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals, which includes separate values for peak moisture and peak temperature.

Harriman, L.G. III [Mason-Grant, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Plager, D. [Quantitative Decision Support, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Kosar, D. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

245

Federal Technology Alert: Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities--Second Edition  

SciTech Connect

This Federal Technology Alert, which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs, provides the detailed information and procedures that a Federal energy manager needs to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. This report updates an earlier report on ground-source heat pumps that was published in September 1995. In the current report, general benefits of this technology to the Federal sector are described, as are ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits. In addition, information on current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are provided.

Hadley, Donald L.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

FEMP-FS--Solar Ventilation Preheating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Installing a "solar wall" to heat air before it enters a Installing a "solar wall" to heat air before it enters a building, called solar ventilation preheating, is one of the most efficient ways of reducing energy costs using clean and renewable energy. The system works by heating outside air with a south-facing solar collector-a dark-colored wall made of sheet metal and perforated with tiny holes. Outdoor air is drawn through the holes and heated as it absorbs the wall's warmth. The warm air rises in the space between the solar wall and the building wall and is moved into the air-duct system, usually by means of a fan, to heat the building. Any additional heating needed at night or on cloudy days is supplied by the build- ing's conventional heating system. During summer months, intake air bypasses the solar collector,

247

Summary of human responses to ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

low ventilation rates and increase in health problems:rate. As ventilation rates increase, benefits gained fordetermined that increases in ventilation rates above 10 Ls -

Seppanen, Olli A.; Fisk, William J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements. Rudd, A. 2005. Review of Residential Ventilationand Matson N.E. , Residential Ventilation and Energy

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Design methods for displacement ventilation: Critical review.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Displacement Ventilation. ASHRAE Research project-RP-949.displacement ventilation. ASHRAE Transaction, 96 (1). Ar ???due to displacement ventilation. ASHRAE Transaction, 96 (1).

Schiavon, Stefano

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Energy Crossroads: Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Suggest a Listing Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre (AIVC) The AIVC fulfills its objectives by providing a range of services and facilities which include: Information, Technical Analysis, Technical Interchange, and Coordination. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) The ACGIH offers high quality technical publications and learning opportunities. Americlean Services Corp. (ASC) ASC is a certified SBA 8(a) engineering/consulting firm specializing in HVAC contamination detection, abatement, and monitoring. In addition to highly professional ductwork cleaning and HVAC cleaning services, ASC offers a wide range of other engineering/ consulting/ management services

251

Solar water-heating system for the Ingham County geriatric medical care facility, Okemos, Michigan. Operational and maintenance instruction manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Ingham County Solar Project include: the demonstration of a major operational supplement to fossil fuels, thereby reducing the demand for non-renewable energy sources, demonstration of the economic and technical feasibility of solar systems as an important energy supplement over the expected life of the building, and to encourage Michigan industry to produce and incorporate solar systems in their own facility. The Ingham County solar system consists of approximately 10,000 square feet of solar collectors connected in a closed configuration loop. The primary loop solution is a mixture of water and propylene glycol which flows through the tube side of a heat exchanger connected to the primary storage tank. The heat energy which is supplied to the primary storage tank is subsequently utilized to increase the temperature of the laundry water, kitchen water, and domestic potable water.

Not Available

1983-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

252

Section 5.8.8 Combined Heat and Power: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Combined Heat and Power Technical Information Thermal-energy losses from power plants in the U.S. currently total approximately 23 quads (one quad is 10 15 Btu)-more than...

253

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System provides heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for the contaminated, potentially contaminated, and uncontaminated areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository's (MGR) Waste Handling Building (WHB). In the uncontaminated areas, the non-confinement area ventilation system maintains the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort. In the contaminated and potentially contaminated areas, in addition to maintaining the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort, the contamination confinement area ventilation system directs potentially contaminated air away from personnel in the WHB and confines the contamination within high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units. The contamination confinement areas ventilation system creates airflow paths and pressure zones to minimize the potential for spreading contamination within the building. The contamination confinement ventilation system also protects the environment and the public by limiting airborne releases of radioactive or other hazardous contaminants from the WHB. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System is designed to perform its safety functions under accident conditions and other Design Basis Events (DBEs) (such as earthquakes, tornadoes, fires, and loss of the primary electric power). Additional system design features (such as compartmentalization with independent subsystems) limit the potential for cross-contamination within the WHB. The system provides status of important system parameters and equipment operation, and provides audible and/or visual indication of off-normal conditions and equipment failures. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System confines the radioactive and hazardous material within the building such that the release rates comply with regulatory limits. The system design, operations, and maintenance activities incorporate ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principles to maintain personnel radiation doses to all occupational workers below regulatory limits and as low as is reasonably achievable. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System by being located within the WHB and by maintaining specific pressures, temperatures, and humidity within the building. The system also depends on the WHB for water supply. The system interfaces with the Site Radiological Monitoring System for continuous monitoring of the exhaust air; the Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System for detection of fire and smoke; the Waste Handling Building Electrical System for normal, emergency, and standby power; and the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control of the system.

P.A. Kumar

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification J. Chris Stratton, Iain S. Walker, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5982E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

255

Energy Basics: Ventilation Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

building through the roof, walls, and windows. Heat-reflecting roofs, insulation, and energy efficient windows will help to reduce that heat conduction. Radiation is heat...

256

Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Highlighting High Performance: The Solar Energy Research Facility, Golden, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Energy Research Facility in Golden, Colorado, uses a stair-step configuration to allow daylight and heat into the office areas, while the laboratories in the back of the building are in a more controlled environment where tight levels of ventilation, humidity, temperature, and light are critical. A unique mechanical system makes the most of the natural environment and the building's design to efficiently heat and cool the building at an annual utility bill savings of almost $200,000 per year.

Torcellini, P.; Epstein, K.

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

258

International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST): Volume 2: Cases E300-E545.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents an additional set of mechanical system test cases that are planned for inclusion in ANSI/ASHRAE STANDARD 140. The cases test a program's modeling capabilities on the working-fluid side of the coil, but in an hourly dynamic context over an expanded range of performance conditions. These cases help to scale the significance of disagreements that are less obvious in the steady-state cases. The report is Vol. 2 of HVAC BESTEST Volume 1. Volume 1 was limited to steady-state test cases that could be solved with analytical solutions. Volume 2 includes hourly dynamic effects, and other cases that cannot be solved analytically. NREL conducted this work in collaboration with the Tool Evaluation and Improvement Experts Group under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 22.

Neymark J.; Judkoff, R.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Geothermal-heating facilities for Carson Elementary School and Wind River Middle School  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carson Elementary School and Wind River Middle School are located in Carson, Washington, adjacent to the Wind River. Both schools are operated by the Stevenson-Carson School District. Carson Elementary, comprised of 49,000 square feet, was constructed in several phases beginning in 1951. The construction is variable, but is characterized by large expanses of single glass and uninsulated masonry areas. An oil fired steam boiler supplies a variety of terminal equipment. Wind River Middle School was built in 1972 and, as a result, exhibits much greater insulation levels. The 38,000 square foot structure is heated entirely by an electric resistance terminal reheat system. Carson Hot Springs Resort, located approximately one half mile from the schools, exhibits temperatures of 124/sup 0/F. In addition, geological work is in progress to better define the local geothermal resource. The feasibility of geothermal use at the school for space heating purposes is examined.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Transport modeling of ECH and neutral-beam-heated plasmas in the advanced toroidal facility  

SciTech Connect

Results of time-dependent transport modeling of the ATF plasmas are compared with a typical ungettered, neutral-beam-heated discharge. A summary of ATF machine parameters is given by Murakami. The model is adjusted to give agreement between measured diagnostics signals and the corresponding values inferred from the model plasma. With this agreement, the main features of the discharge are reproduced including the radiation-induced temperature collapse. 7 refs., 6 figs.

Howe, H.C.; Horton, L.D.; Crume, E.C.; Harris, J.H.; Isler, R.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Wing, W.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ingham County Geriatric Medical Care Facility solar water-heating system refurbishments. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tasks of the refurbishment of a damaged solar water heating system are outlined. The system is a closed loop, 50% glycol antifreeze system consisting of 14 rows of 6 series manifolds each containing 6 solar collectors connected in parallel for a total of 504 modules. The Wyle Laboratories' test report for the Revere Model 132 flat plate collector is appended. A collector test plan and photographs are also appended. Reference CAPE-2834. (LS)

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A database of PFT ventilation measurements  

SciTech Connect

About five years ago, a method for measuring the ventilation flows of a building was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This method is based on the use of a family of compounds known as perfluorocarbon tracers or PFTs. Since 1982, BNL has measured ventilation in more than 4000 homes, comprising about 100 separate research projects throughout the world. This measurement set is unique in that it is the only set of ventilation measurements that acknowledge and measure the multizone characteristics of residences. Other large measurement sets assume that a home can be treated as a single well-mixed zone. This report describes the creation of a database of approximately half of the PFT ventilation measurements made by BNL over the last five years. The PFT database is currently available for use on any IBM PC or Apple Macintosh based personal computer system. In addition to its utility in modeling indoor pollutant dispersion, this database may also be useful to those people studying energy conservation, thermal comfort and heating system design in residential buildings. 2 refs.

D' Ottavio, T.W.; Goodrich, R.W.; Spandau, D.J.; Dietz, R.N.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

ASHRAE and residential ventilation  

SciTech Connect

In the last quarter of a century, the western world has become increasingly aware of environmental threats to health and safety. During this period, people psychologically retreated away from outdoors hazards such as pesticides, smog, lead, oil spills, and dioxin to the seeming security of their homes. However, the indoor environment may not be healthier than the outdoor environment, as has become more apparent over the past few years with issues such as mold, formaldehyde, and sick-building syndrome. While the built human environment has changed substantially over the past 10,000 years, human biology has not; poor indoor air quality creates health risks and can be uncomfortable. The human race has found, over time, that it is essential to manage the indoor environments of their homes. ASHRAE has long been in the business of ventilation, but most of the focus of that effort has been in the area of commercial and institutional buildings. Residential ventilation was traditionally not a major concern because it was felt that, between operable windows and envelope leakage, people were getting enough outside air in their homes. In the quarter of a century since the first oil shock, houses have gotten much more energy efficient. At the same time, the kinds of materials and functions in houses changed in character in response to people's needs. People became more environmentally conscious and aware not only about the resources they were consuming but about the environment in which they lived. All of these factors contributed to an increasing level of public concern about residential indoor air quality and ventilation. Where once there was an easy feeling about the residential indoor environment, there is now a desire to define levels of acceptability and performance. Many institutions--both public and private--have interests in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), but ASHRAE, as the professional society that has had ventilation as part of its mission for over 100 years, is the logical place to provide leadership. This leadership has been demonstrated most recently by the publication of the first nationally recognized standard on ventilation in homes, ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2003, which builds on work that has been part of ASHRAE for many years and will presumably continue. Homeowners and occupants, which includes virtually all of us, will benefit from the application of Standard 62.2 and use of the top ten list. This activity is exactly the kind of benefit to society that the founders of ASHRAE envisioned and is consistent with ASHRAE's mission and vision. ASHRAE members should be proud of their Society for taking leadership in residential ventilation.

Sherman, Max H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Investigation of the polar electrojet-current system using radio-wave heating from a ground-based facility  

SciTech Connect

The High Power Auroral Stimulation (HIPAS) heating facility has been used to modulate D region ionospheric currents at high latitudes, producing very low frequency (VLF) radio wave emissions. The behavior of these ionospheric currents can be deduced from a comprehensive study of the VLF signals received at a local field site. This Paper examines the relationship between the VLF magnetic field strength measured on the ground and the intensity of an overhead electrojet current for the purpose of enhancing communications. The mapping of the polar electrojet current from the E region down through the D region, where it can then be modulated by the heater beam, is investigated. A finite difference solution to the electrojet mapping .problem is presented in which arbitrary conductivity profiles can be specified. Results have been obtained using a simple Cowling model of the electrojet. These results indicate that for electrojets flowing between 100 and 110 km with scale sizes in excess of 100 km, the mapping of the horizontal current density can be completely characterized in terms of the Pedersen and Hall conductivities. This indicates that the mapping becomes independent of scale sizes which exceed 100 km. A promising new diagnostic technique, for studying ionospheric D region currents, has been implemented using the HIPAS facility. This technique involves high frequency (HF) beam steering for localized VLF generation in the mapped region below electrojets. Beam steering has been used to estimate the strength and current distribution of the polar electrojet, and for charting the movements of overhead currents.

Werner, D.H.; Ferraro, A.J.; Brandt, R.G.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Summary of Information and Resources Related to Energy Use in Healthcare Facilities - Version 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design, and operations related to ventilation, cooling, heating, domestic hot water, other services (e.g. , refrigeration),

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increased cost per unit of energy at times of peak demandminimizing energy costs and operation during peak timesenergy and cost impacts of ventilation vary with weather and time

Sherman, Max H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Heat Transfer Simulation of Reactor Cavity Cooling System Experimental Facility using RELAP5-3D and Generation of View Factors using MCNP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As one of the most attractive reactor types, The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is designed to be passively safe with the incorporation of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). In this paper, a RELAP5-3D simulation model is set up based on the 1/16 scale experimental facility established by Texas A&M University. Also, RELAP5-3D input decks are modified to replicate the experiment procedures and the experimental results are compared with the simulation results. The results show there is a perfect match between experimental and simulation results. Radiation heat transfer dominates in the heat transfer process of high temperature gas-cooled reactor due to its high operation temperature. According to experimental research done with the RCCS facility in Texas A&M University, radiation heat transfer takes up 80% of the total heat transferred to standing pipes. In radiation heat transfer, the important parameters are view factors between surfaces. However, because of the geometrical complexity in the experimental facility, it is hard to use the numerical method or analytical view factor formula to calculate view factors. In this project, MCNP based on the Monte Carlo method is used to generate view factors for RELAP5-3D input. MCNP is powerful in setting up complicated geometry, source definition and tally application. In the end, RCCS geometry is set up using MCNP and view factors are calculated.

Wu, Huali

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ventilation and Work Performance in Office Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A). When ventilation rate increases from V to V\\, the ratiowork when ventilation rates increase. Field studies withper 10 L/s person increase in ventilation rate and relative

Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.; Lei, Q.H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

VENTILATION (HVAC) FAILURE (BUILDING WIDE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VENTILATION (HVAC) FAILURE (BUILDING WIDE) A failure or shutdown of the ventilation system will be signaled by cessation of the audible background "rumbling" sound of the building's HVAC system. As building durations. NOTE: Due to unpredictable pressure differentials in and around the labs during an HVAC failure

Strynadka, Natalie

270

RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

while still providing ventilation for adequate indoor air quality. Various ASHRAE Standards (e.g., 62 to the ASHRAE Standard 119 levels while still providing adequate ventilation through infiltration or mechanical alternatives. Various ASHRAE Standards are used to assist us. ASHRAE Standard 119-19885 classifies the envelope

271

Innovative Energy Efficient Industrial Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper was written to describe an innovative on-demand industrial ventilation system for woodworking, metalworking, food processing, pharmaceutical, chemical, and other industries. Having analyzed existing industrial ventilation in 130 factories, we found striking dichotomy between the classical static design of ventilation systems and constantly changing workflow and business demands. Using data from real factories, we are able to prove that classical industrial ventilation design consumes 70 % more energy than necessary. Total potential electricity saving achieved by using on-demand systems instead of classically designed industrial ventilation in the U.S. could be 26 billion kWh. At the average electricity cost of 7 cents per kWh, this would represent $1.875 billion. Eighty such systems are already installed in the USA and European Union.

Litomisky, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Why We Ventilate - Recent Advances  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WHY WE VENTILATE: WHY WE VENTILATE: Recent Advances Max Sherman BA Stakeholders meeting ASHRAE BIO  Distinguished Lecturer  Exceptional Service Award  Board of Directors; TechC  Chair of committees:  62.2; Standards Committee  TC 4.3; TC 2.5  Holladay Distinguished Fellow OVERVIEW QUESTIONS  What is Ventilation? What is IAQ?  What functions does it provide?  How much do we need? Why?  How should ventilations standards be made? LBL has working on these problems Who Are You?  Engineers (ASHRAE Members & not);  architects,  contractors,  reps,  builders,  vendors,  code officials WHAT IS VENTILATION  Medicine: To Exchange Air In the Lungs  Latin: Ventilare, "to expose to the wind"  Today: To Bring In Outdoor Air And Replace

273

Infiltration as ventilation: Weather-induced dilution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infiltration as ventilation: Weather-induced dilution Title Infiltration as ventilation: Weather-induced dilution Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5795E Year of...

274

Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing...

275

Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 11:50am Addthis Photo of a dark brown perforated metal...

276

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom Field Study Interim Report Title Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom Field Study Interim...

277

Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

air quality. There are four basic mechanical whole-house ventilation systems -- exhaust, supply, balanced, and energy recovery. Comparison of Whole-House Ventilation Systems...

278

RESIDENTIAL INTEGRATED VENTILATION ENERGY CONTROLLER - Energy ...  

A residential controller is described which is used to manage the mechanical ventilation systems of a home, installed to meet whole-house ventilation requirements, at ...

279

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses. Passive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses."

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

282

Boise City Geothermal District Heating District Heating Low Temperatur...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boise City Geothermal District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Boise City Geothermal District Heating District Heating...

283

San Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name San Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

284

Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

285

Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

286

City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperatur...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

287

Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2011 , 2011 Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-324-9601; Pass code: 5551971 Download the presentation at: www.buildingamerica.gov/meetings.html Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Building America: Introduction November 1, 2011 Cheryn Engebrecht Cheryn.engebrecht@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved * Accelerate adoption of high performance technologies

288

Positive Pressure Ventilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to the fire and can increase the rate of heat and energy being released. ... of vents open were altered to examine capability and optimization of each. ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

Airflow Simulation and Energy Analysis in Ventilated Room with a New Type of Air Conditioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airflow simulation in one ventilated room with radiant heating and natural ventilation has been carried out. Three cases are compared: the closed room, the room with full openings, and the room with small openings. The radiator heating room with small openings is recommended. The airflow and thermal comfort are discussed for the last case. It is suitable for two kinds of civil buildings, housing buildings and office buildings, which take up the largest part of all functional buildings.

Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

DOE/EA-1605: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Action: Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1605) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of new biomass cogeneration and heating facilities located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The draft EA was made available to the States of South Carolina and Georgia, and to the public, for a 30-day comment period. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the

291

Site handbook: data acquisition system information, passive solar retrofit Automobile Maintenance Facility, City of Philadelphia  

SciTech Connect

Data were collected at the City of Philadelphia's Auto Maintenance Facility using an Aeoloan Kinetics PDL-24 data acquisition system. Instantaneous data readings were recorded each 15 seconds by the microprocessor. These channel readings were then averaged to produce hourly values which were then stored on an audio cassette. The energy saving strategies include: styrofoam and concrete roof coverings; weatherstripping; replacement of north windows with combination insulation and view glazing; PVC strips between heated and unheated areas; gas fired radiant heaters at individual work stations; reduction of the number of light fixtures; and the installation of retrofit window units for radiant solar heating, daylighting, ventilation, glare control and vandalism protection.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, Ventilation andleakage. The ASHRAE Handbook of fundamentals (ASHRAE 2009),

Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Pump Shelter Kicks Off Upgrades to Aerosol Observing System New Pump Shelter Kicks Off Upgrades to Aerosol Observing System Bookmark and Share Representing the first of several planned improvements to the Aerosol Observing System (AOS) at the SGP site, the ARM Climate Research Facility operations staff completed installing a new pump shelter for the system in late September, followed by relocation of the pumps and connection of the electrical hookups in October. Though the enclosure was designed primarily to move the nine vacuum pumps out of the existing AOS trailer-thereby reducing the potential for damage to the AOS instruments from heat generated by the pumps-noise reduction in the AOS trailer was another desired outcome. Anticipated instrument additions were also considered in designing the new enclosure. The new pump shelter sits on a concrete pad near the south end of the AOS. Four adjustable, open-wire shelves run the width of the shelter, and can accommodate sixteen large pumps and associated ventilation equipment.

294

Ventilating Beta Plane Leases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of warm water lenses on beta planes is extended to include heat exchange between the lenses and their environment. The motivation for this study comes from recent observations of Gulf Stream warm core rings, which clearly show that ...

William K. Dewar

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Guide to Energy-Efficient Ventilation Methods for Acceptable Levels of Indoor Air Quality Levels in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor air quality is important in commercial buildings to maintain employee health, well-being, and productivity and avoid employer liability. The most common method to improve indoor air quality in commercial buildings is to use outside ventilation air for dilution of the inside air. Unfortunately, the conditioning of outdoor ventilation air may result in increased energy use for cooling, dehumidification, and heating; and humid outdoor ventilation air also can degrade indoor air quality. Some commerci...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

296

Modeling study of ventilation, IAQ and energy impacts of residential mechanical ventilation  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a simulation study of indoor air quality, ventilation and energy impacts of several mechanical ventilation approaches in a single-family residential building. The study focused on a fictitious two-story house in Spokane, Washington and employed the multizone airflow and contaminant dispersal model CONTAM. The model of the house included a number of factors related to airflow including exhaust fan and forced-air system operation, duct leakage and weather effects, as well as factors related to contaminant dispersal including adsorption/desorption of water vapor and volatile organic compounds, surface losses of particles and nitrogen dioxide, outdoor contaminant concentrations, and occupant activities. The contaminants studied include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor, fine and coarse particles, and volatile organic compounds. One-year simulations were performed for four different ventilation approaches: a base case of envelope infiltration only, passive inlet vents in combination with exhaust fan operation, an outdoor intake duct connected to the forced-air system return balanced by exhaust fan operation, and a continuously-operated exhaust fan. Results discussed include whole building air change rates, air distribution within the house, heating and cooling loads, contaminants concentrations, and occupant exposure to contaminants.

Persily, A.K.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Classroom HVAC: Improving ventilation and saving energy -- field study plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this study. Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation andV8doc.sas.com/sashtml. Classroom HVAC: Improving VentilationBerkeley, CA 94720. Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation

Apte, Michael G.; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

On The Valuation of Infiltration towards Meeting Residential Ventilation Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Literature Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements.A. 2005. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies,M.H. and Matson N.E. , Residential Ventilation and Energy

Sherman, Max H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Definition of a facility for experimental studies of two-phase flows and heat transfer in porous materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A facility-development effort is currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in order to create an experimental capability for the study of two-phase, steam/water flows through a variety of porous media. The facility definition phase of this project is described. Equations are derived for the steady, adiabatic, macroscopically-linear two-phase flow of a single-component fluid through a porous medium, including energy transfer both by convection and conduction. These equations are then solved to give relative permeabilities for the steam and water phases as functions of known and/or measurable quantities. A viable experimental approach was thereby formulated, leading to the definition of facility components and instrumentation requirements, including the application of gamma-beam densitometry for the measurement of liquid-saturation distributions in porous media. Finally, a state-of-the-art computer code was utilized to numerically simulate the proposed experiments, providing an estimate of the facility operating envelope.

Reda, D.C.; Eaton, R.R.

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB Jump to: navigation, search Name Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne (VIB) Place Ploudalmezeau, France Zip 29839 Sector Geothermal energy, Solar Product Ploudalmezeau-based company producing and marketing energy efficient and ventilation products including air source heat pumps, geothermal water source heat pumps, efficient air filtration systems and solar products. Coordinates 48.540325°, -4.657904° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.540325,"lon":-4.657904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

CFD analysis for the applicability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for the simulation of the VHTR RCCS. Topical report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) is one of the GEN IV reactor concepts that have been proposed for thermochemical hydrogen production and other process-heat applications like coal gasification. The USDOE has selected the VHTR for further research and development, aiming to demonstrate emissions-free electricity and hydrogen production at a future time. One of the major safety advantages of the VHTR is the potential for passive decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-side of the RCCS is very similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that has been proposed for the PRISM reactor design. The design and safety analysis of the RVACS have been based on extensive analytical and experimental work performed at ANL. The Natural Convective Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at ANL that simulates at full scale the air-side of the RVACS was built to provide experimental support for the design and analysis of the PRISM RVACS system. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that the NSTF facility can be used to generate RCCS experimental data: to validate CFD and systems codes for the analysis of the RCCS; and to support the design and safety analysis of the RCCS.

Tzanos, C. P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

302

Residential ventilation standards scoping study  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

OPTIMIZED CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR A TYPICAL WATER LOOP HEAT PUMP SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water Loop Heat Pump (WLHP) System has been widely utilized in the Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) industry for several decades. There is no (more)

Lian, Xu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effect of attic ventilation on the performance of radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the experiments was to quantify how attic ventilation would affect the performance of a radiant barrier. Ceiling heat flux and space cooling load were both measured. Results of side-by-side radiant barrier experiments using two identical 13.38 m[sup 2] (nominal) test houses are presented in this paper. The test houses responded similarly to weather variations. Indoor temperatures of the test houses were controlled to within 0.2 [degrees] C. Ceiling heat fluxes and space cooling load were within a 2.5 percent difference between both test houses. The results showed that a critical attic ventilation flow rate of 1.3 (1/sec)/m[sup 2] of the attic floor existed after which the percentage reduction in ceiling heat fluxes produced by the radiant barriers did not change with increasing attic airflow rates. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barriers were between 25 and 35 percent, with 28 percent being the percent reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. The space-cooling load reductions observed were between two to four percent. All results compiled in this paper were for attics with unfaced fiberglass insulation with a resistance level of 3.35 m[sup 2]K/W (nominal) and for a perforated radiant barrier with low emissivities (less than 0.05) on both sides.

Medina, M.A.; O'Neal, D.L. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Turner, W.D. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Coll. of Engineering)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Numerical Analysis of the Channel Wheel Fresh Air Ventilator Under Frosting Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As new equipment, the channel wheel fresh air ventilator has become increasingly popular in recent years. However, when such equipment is operated under low ambient temperature in the freezing area in winter, the formation of frost on the outdoor waste air surface becomes problematic, leading to the degradation of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator's performance or even the shutdown of equipment. Therefore, it is necessary to have a detailed investigation on the operational characteristics of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator under frosting in order to guide its application. This paper first reports on the development of a detailed model for the channel wheel heat exchanger, which is the core part of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator under frosting conditions. The model developed, first seen in open literature, consists of a frosting sub-model and a channel wheel heat exchanger sub-model. This is followed by reporting an evaluation of the operational characteristics of a frosted channel wheel heat exchanger under different ambient conditions using the model developed. These include frost formation on the surface of the channel wheel heat exchanger, and impacts on the operational performance of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator. Furthermore, the interval of defrosting is obtained, which provides the basis for the adoption of effective defrosting measures, and thus increasing the channel wheel fresh air ventilator's energy efficiency and operating reliability.

Gao, B.; Dong, Z.; Cheng, Z.; Luo, E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Title Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2005 Authors Apte, Michael G., Ian S. Buchanan, David Faulkner, William J. Fisk, Chi-Ming Lai, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms

307

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches  

SciTech Connect

The prevailing residential ventilation standard in North America, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specifies volumetric airflow requirements as a function of the overall size of the home and the number of bedrooms, assumes a fixed, minimal amount of infiltration, and requires mechanical ventilation to achieve the remainder. The standard allows for infiltration credits and intermittent ventilation patterns that can be shown to provide comparable performance. Whole-house ventilation methods have a substantial effect on time-varying indoor pollutant concentrations. If alternatives specified by Standard 62.2, such as intermittent ventilation, are used, short-term pollutant concentrations could exceed acute health standards even if chronic health standards are met.The authors present a methodology for comparing ASHRAE- and non-ASHRAE-specified ventilation scenarios on relative indoor pollutant concentrations. We use numerical modeling to compare the maximum time-averaged concentrations for acute exposure relevant (1-hour, 8-hour, 24-hour ) and chronic exposure relevant (1-year) time periods for four different ventilation scenarios in six climates with a range of normalized leakage values. The results suggest that long-term concentrations are the most important metric for assessing the effectiveness of whole-house ventilation systems in meeting exposure standards and that, if chronic health exposure standards are met, acute standards will also be met.

Sherman, Max; Logue, Jennifer; Singer, Brett

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Commissioning of the Korean High Heat Flux Test Facility by Using Electron Beam System for Plasma Facing Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Divertor and High-Heat-Flux Components / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Suk-Kwon Kim; Eo Hwak Lee; Jae-Sung Yoon; Dong Won Lee; Duck-Hoi Kim; Seungyon Cho

309

Midlevel Ventilations Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a tropical cyclones intensity. An idealized framework based ...

Brian Tang; Kerry Emanuel

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation May 30, 2012 - 2:37pm Addthis A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. What does this mean for me? Whole-house ventilation is critical in an energy-efficient home to maintain adequate indoor air quality and comfort. The whole-house ventilation system you choose will depend upon your climate, budget, and the availability of experienced contractors in your area. Energy-efficient homes -- both new and existing -- require mechanical ventilation to maintain indoor air quality. There are four basic mechanical

311

Ventilation Controller for Improved Indoor Air Quality  

Iain Walker and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have developed a dynamic control system for whole-house ventilation fans that provides maximal air quality while reducing by 18-44% the energy spent on ventilation. The system, the Residential Integrated ...

312

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. References ASHRAE.2009. ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, Ventilation andChapter. Atlanta GA: ASHRAE. ASHRAE. 2007. Ventilation and

Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

May 1999 LBNL -42975 ASHRAE'S RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 1999 LBNL - 42975 ASHRAE'S RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION STANDARD: EXEGESIS OF PROPOSED STANDARD 62 Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 April 1999 In January 1999 ASHRAE's Standard Project, approved ASHRAE's first complete standard on residential ventilation for public review

314

Heat recovery in building envelopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating Research Facility (AHHRF) located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The house is of standard wood

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, in exit ventilation ducts, from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Initially, methods were developed to cool fire-heated air by fine water spray upstream of the filters. It was recognized that smoke aerosol exposure to HEPA filters could also cause disruption of the containment system. Through testing and analysis, several methods to partially mitigate the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified. A continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. The technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total time duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modification of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, rolling filter media were laminated with the desired properties. The approach was Edisonian, but truncation in short order to a combination of prefilters was effective. The application of this technique was qualified, since it is of use only to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols. It is not believed that this technique is cost effective in the total spectrum of containment systems, especially if standard fire protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high-fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

Alvares, N.; Beason, D.; Bergman, V.; Creighton, J.; Ford, H.; Lipska, A.

1980-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ventilation Based on ASHRAE 62.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor Ventilation Based on ASHRAE 62.2 Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor California Energy Commission Ventilation (ASHRAE 62.2) Minimum Best Practices Guide - Exhaust-Only Ventilation Introduction: The California Energy Commission has created the following guide to provide assistance in complying with ANSI/ASHRAE

317

Ventilation problems in heritage buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The control of indoor conditions in heritage buildings, such as castles or museums, is of paramount importance for the proper preservation of the artworks kept in. As heritage buildings are often not equipped with HVAC systems, it is necessary to provide ... Keywords: CO2 concentration, IAQ, heritage buildings, ventilation

S. Costanzo; A. Cusumano; C. Giaconia; S. Mazzacane

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Title Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5554E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20%, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

319

Oregon Institute of Technology District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Oregon Institute of Technology District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

320

Topical report : CFD analysis for the applicability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for the simulation of the VHTR RCCS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) is one of the GEN IV reactor concepts that have been proposed for thermochemical hydrogen production and other process-heat applications like coal gasification. The United States Department of Energy has selected the VHTR for further research and development, aiming to demonstrate emissions-free electricity and hydrogen production at a future time. One of the major safety advantages of the VHTR is the potential for passive decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-side of the RCCS is very similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that has been proposed for the PRISM reactor design. The design and safety analysis of the RVACS have been based on extensive analytical and experimental work performed at ANL. The Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at ANL that simulates at full scale the air-side of the RVACS was built to provide experimental support for the design and analysis of the PRISM RVACS system. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that the NSTF facility can be used to generate RCCS experimental data: to validate CFD and systems codes for the analysis of the RCCS; and to support the design and safety analysis of the RCCS. At this time no reference design is available for the NGNP. The General Atomics (GA) gas turbine - modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) has been used in many analyses as a starting reference design. In the GT-MHR the reactor outlet temperature is 850 C, while the target outlet reactor temperature in VHTR is 1000 C. VHTR scoping studies with a reactor outlet temperature of 1000 C have been performed at GA and INEL. Although the reactor outlet temperature in the VHTR is significantly higher than in the GT-MHR, the peak temperature in the reactor vessel (which is the heat source for the RCCS) is not drastically different. In this work, analyses have been performed using reactor vessel temperatures from the GT-MHR design, and the VHTR scoping studies. To demonstrate the applicability of the NSTF facility for full scale simulation of the RCCS the following approach was used. CFD analyses were performed of the RCCS and of its simulation at NSTF to demonstrate that: all significant fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena in the RCCS can be simulated at NSTF; and RCCS simulations at NSTF can cover the whole range of variation of the parameters describing these important phenomena in the RCCS. In CFD analyses, the simulation of turbulence is one of the most significant challenges. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulence in large scale systems require excessive computational resources. The use of the Low-Re number k-{var_epsilon} model, which resolves the boundary layer, is computationally expensive in studies where many simulations have to be performed. In Ref. 2 it was shown that in the RCCS, heat transfer coefficient predictions of the high-Re number k-{var_epsilon} model are closer to those of the low-Re number model than those of heat transfer correlations. In this work, the standard high-Re number k-{var_epsilon} was used to simulate turbulence, and all analyses were performed with the CFD code STARCD.

Tzanos, C. P. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fresh Way to Cut Combustion, Crop and Air Heating Costs Avoids Million BTU Purchases: Inventions and Innovation Combustion Success Story  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Success story written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new space heating method that uses solar energy to heat incoming combustion, crop, and ventilation air.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

322

Preliminary conceptual design for geothermal space heating conversion of school district 50 joint facilities at Pagosa Springs, Colorado. GTA Report No. 6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This feasibility study and preliminary conceptual design effort assesses the conversion of Colorado School District 50 facilities - a high school and gym, and a middle school building - at Pagosa Springs, Colorado to geothermal space heating. A preliminary cost-benefit assessment made on the basis of estimated costs for conversion, system maintenance, debt service, resource development, electricity to power pumps, and savings from reduced natural gas consumption concluded that an economic conversion depended on development of an adequate geothermal resource (approximately 150/sup 0/F, 400 gpm). Material selection assumed that the geothermal water to the main supply system was isolated to minimize effects of corrosion and deposition, and that system-compatible components would be used for the building modifications. Asbestos-cement distribution pipe, a stainless steel heat exchanger, and stainless steel lined valves were recommended for the supply, heat transfer, and disposal mechanisms, respectively. A comparison of the calculated average gas consumption cost, escalated at 10% per year, with conversion project cost, both in 1977 dollars, showed that the project could be amortized over less than 20 years at current interest rates. In view of the favorable economics and the uncertain future availability and escalating cost of natural gas, the conversion appears economicaly feasible and desirable.

Engen, I.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Lower-Temperature Subsurface Layout and Ventilation Concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis combines work scope identified as subsurface facility (SSF) low temperature (LT) Facilities System and SSF LT Ventilation System in the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001b, pp. 6 and 7, and pp. 13 and 14). In accordance with this technical work plan (TWP), this analysis is performed using AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI.1Q, Software Management. The purpose of this analysis is to develop an overall subsurface layout system and the overall ventilation system concepts that address a lower-temperature operating mode for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The objective of this analysis is to provide a technical design product that supports the lower-temperature operating mode concept for the revision of the system description documents and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. The overall subsurface layout analysis develops and describes the overall subsurface layout, including performance confirmation facilities (also referred to as Test and Evaluation Facilities) for the Site Recommendation design. This analysis also incorporates current program directives for thermal management.

Christine L. Linden; Edward G. Thomas

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

Operational and maintenance instruction manual for the Ingham County Geriatric Medical Care Facility solar water-heating system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ingham County solar system consists of approximately 10,000 square feet of solar collectors connected in a closed configuration loop. The primary loop solution is a 1:12 mixture of water and propylene glycol which flows through the tube side of a heat exchanger connected to the primary storage tank. The heat energy which is supplied to the primary storage tank is subsequently used to preheat the temperature of the laundry water, kitchen water, and domestic potable water. Included in this report are: detailed drawings and flow chart; operational methodology; preventive maintenance instructions; general instructions and safety precautions; and a corrective maintenance and tabulation of failure modes. Appendices include: manufacturers technical manual and component specifications; IBM data sensors and responsibilities; digital county monitor operations manual; and on site monitor operations manual. Reference CAPE-2834. (LS)

Not Available

1983-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the UnitedStates  

SciTech Connect

The first and only national norm for residential ventilation in the United States is Standard 62.2-2004 published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This standard does not by itself have the force of regulation, but is being considered for adoption by various jurisdictions within the U.S. as well as by various voluntary programs. The adoption of 62.2 would require mechanical ventilation systems to be installed in virtually all new homes, but allows for a wide variety of design solutions. These solutions, however, may have a different energy costs and non-energy benefits. This report uses a detailed simulation model to evaluate the energy impacts of currently popular and proposed mechanical ventilation approaches that are 62.2 compliant for a variety of climates. These results separate the energy needed to ventilate from the energy needed to condition the ventilation air, from the energy needed to distribute and/or temper the ventilation air. The results show that exhaust systems are generally the most energy efficient method of meeting the proposed requirements. Balanced and supply systems have more ventilation resulting in greater energy and their associated distribution energy use can be significant.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ventilation Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is important in understanding cooling strategies for homes and buildings. Principles of Heat Transfer Heat is transferred to and from objects via three processes: conduction,...

327

Passive ventilation for residential air quality control  

SciTech Connect

Infiltration has long served the residential ventilation needs in North America. In Northern Europe it has been augmented by purpose-provided natural ventilation systems--so-called passive ventilation systems--to better control moisture problems in dwellings smaller than their North American counterparts and in a generally wetter climate. The growing concern for energy consumption, and the environmental impacts associated with it, has however led to tighter residential construction standards on both continents and as a result problems associated with insufficient background ventilation have surfaced. Can European passive ventilation systems be adapted for use in North American dwellings to provide general background ventilation for air quality control? This paper attempts to answer this question. The configuration, specifications and performance of the preferred European passive ventilation system--the passive stack ventilation (PSV) system--will be reviewed; innovative components and system design strategies recently developed to improve the traditional PSV system performance will be outlined; and alternative system configurations will be presented that may better serve the climatic extremes and more urban contexts of North America. While these innovative and alternative passive ventilation systems hold great promise for the future, a rational method to size the components of these systems to achieve the control and precision needed to meet the conflicting constraints of new ventilation and air tightness standards has not been forthcoming. Such a method will be introduced in this paper and an application of this method will be presented.

Axley, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Enclosed firing facility NTS Holmes and Narver report - HN 104-1021C  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the design and budget requirements for an enclosed firing facility. The use of a steel sphere installed in a tunnel facility is recommended. The system would incorporate handling equipment, ventilation, refrigeration and ice handling.

Crowley, W.B.

1958-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

330

Energy Efficient Ventilation for Maintaining Indoor Air Quality in Large Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper was presented at the 3rd International Conference on Cold Climate Heating, Ventilating and Air-conditioning, Sapporo, Japan, November 2000 C. Y. Shaw Rsum Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council Canada Achieving good indoor air quality in large residential and commercial buildings continues to be a top priority for owners, designers, building managers and occupants alike. Large buildings present a greater challenge in this regard than do smaller buildings and houses. The challenge is greater today because there are many new materials, furnishings, products and processes used in these buildings that are potential sources of air contaminants. There are three strategies for achieving acceptable indoor air quality: ventilation (dilution), source control and air cleaning/filtration. Of the three, the most frequently used strategy, and in most cases the only one available to building operators, is ventilation. Ventilation is the process of supplying outdoor air to an enclosed space and removing stale air from this space. It can control the indoor air quality by both diluting the indoor air with less contaminated outdoor air and removing the indoor contaminants with the exhaust air. Ventilation costs money because the outdoor air needs to be heated in winter and cooled in summer. To conserve energy, care must be taken to maximize the efficiency of the ventilation system. In this regard, a number of factors come into play

C. Y. Shaw; C. Y. Shaw Rsum

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Experiments to investigate the effect of flight path on direct containment heating (DCH) in the Surtsey test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Limited Flight Path (LFP) test series was to investigate the effect of reactor subcompartment flight path length on direct containment heating (DCH). The test series consisted of eight experiments with nominal flight paths of 1, 2, or 8 m. A thermitically generated mixture of iron, chromium, and alumina simulated the corium melt of a severe reactor accident. After thermite ignition, superheated steam forcibly ejected the molten debris into a 1:10 linear scale the model of a dry reactor cavity. The blowdown steam entrained the molten debris and dispersed it into the Surtsey vessel. The vessel pressure, gas temperature, debris temperature, hydrogen produced by steam/metal reactions, debris velocity, mass dispersed into the Surtsey vessel, and debris particle size were measured for each experiment. The measured peak pressure for each experiment was normalized by the total amount of energy introduced into the Surtsey vessel; the normalized pressures increased with lengthened flight path. The debris temperature at the cavity exit was about 2320 K. Gas grab samples indicated that steam in the cavity reacted rapidly to form hydrogen, so the driving gas was a mixture of steam and hydrogen. These experiments indicate that debris may be trapped in reactor subcompartments and thus will not efficiently transfer heat to gas in the upper dome of a containment building. The effect of deentrainment by reactor subcompartments may significantly reduce the peak containment load in a severe reactor accident. 8 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Griffith, R.O. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Nichols, R.T. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Available Technologies: Ventilation Controller for Improved Indoor ...  

Iain Walker and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have developed a dynamic control system for whole-house ventilation fans that provides maximal air quality while reducing ...

333

Case Study 1 - Ventilation in Manufactured Houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ventilation in Manufactured Houses. ... fan operation, an outdoor air intake duct installed on the forced-air return, and whole house exhaust with and ...

334

Summary of human responses to ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coils of commercial air-conditioning systems. Proceedings ofrefrigerating and air-conditioning engineers, inc. pp 601-for ventilation and air-conditioning systems - offices and

Seppanen, Olli A.; Fisk, William J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Mixed-Mode Ventilation and Building Retrofits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 1994, ENTPE, Lyon. [CIBSE] Chartered Institution ofMixed-mode ventilation. CIBSE Applications Manual AM13.incorporated by the design. CIBSE, 2000 Mixed-mode

Brager, Gail; Ackerly, Katie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Indoor Air Quality & Ventilation Group Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation Group Staff. Staff Listing. Dr. Andrew K. Persily, Leader, Supervisory Mechanical Engineer, 301-975-6418. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

Ventilation measurements in large office buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ventilation rates were measured in nine office buildings using an automated tracer gas measuring system. The buildings range in size from a two-story federal building with a floor area of about 20,000 ft/sup 2/ (1900 m/sup 2/) to a 26-story office building with a floor area of 700,000 ft/sup 2/ (65,000 m/sup 2/). The ventilation rates were measured for about 100 hours in each building over a range of weather conditions. The results are presented and examined for variation with time and weather. In most cases, the ventilation rate of a building is similar for hot and cold weather. In mild weather, outdoor air is used to cool the building and the ventilation rate increases. In the buildings where infiltration is a significant portion of the total ventilation rate, this total rate exhibits a dependence on weather conditions. The measured ventilation rates are discussed in relation to the outdoor air intake strategy in each building. The ventilation rates are also compared to the design rates in the buildings and ventilation rates based on the ASHRAE Standard 62-81. Some of the buildings are at times operated at lower ventilation rates than recommended in Standard 62-81.

Persily, A.K.; Grot, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective? Maxmanufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitutethe University of California. Does Mixing Make Residential

Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Analysis of Demand Controlled Ventilation Technology and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The actual health, comfort, and productivity impacts of mechanical ventilation ... p strat i csp o ... in California and elsewhere is the impact of ambient air ...

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Histoty of Ventilation and Air Conditioning is CERN Up to Date with the latest Technological Developments?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The invention of ventilation cannot be ascribed to a certain date. It started with simple aeration when man brought fire into his abode and continued through different stages including air cooling using ice to finally arrive at the time when ventilation and air conditioning has become an essential part of our life and plays an important role in human evolution. This paper presents the history of ventilation and air conditioning, explains the key constraints over the centuries, and shows its influence on everyday life. Some examples of previous air-conditioning plants are described and different approaches to the way of calculation of ventilation systems discussed. It gives an overview of the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) installations at CERN and points out their particularities. It also compares them with the latest technological developments in the field as well as showing the new trends that are being applied at CERN.

Khnl-Kinel, J

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1168-2013 October 2013 DOE STANDARD CONFINEMENT VENTILATION AND PROCESS GAS TREATMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1168-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/department-energy-technical-standards-program ii DOE-STD-1168-2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK iv DOE-STD-1168-2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT...................................................................................................................vii

342

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) As the DOE complex sites prepare for closure, a large number of buildings and facilities must be deactivated and decommissioned. These facilities contain many complex systems (e.g. ventilation), miles of contaminated pipelines, glove boxes, and unique processing equipment that require labor intensive deactivation and decommissioning methods. Although

343

Quantitative relationship of sick building syndrome symptoms with ventilation rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

32%), and as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-0.85) as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-29% as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-person.

Fisk, William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Review of Literature Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

typical existing house. Designed passive ventilation systemsPassive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses."House Ventilation Rates Local Exhaust Rates Air Distribution and Duct Leakage Infiltration Windows and Passive

McWilliams, Jennifer; Sherman, Max

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant could be exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. ASHRAE Standards including standards 62, 119, and 136 have all considered the contribution of infiltration in various ways, using methods and data from 20 years ago. The vast majority of homes in the United States and indeed the world are ventilated through natural means such as infiltration caused by air leakage. Newer homes in the western world are tight and require mechanical ventilation. As we seek to provide acceptable indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate norunder-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to correctly evaluate the contribution infiltration makes to both energy consumption and equivalent ventilation. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 specifies how much mechanical ventilation is considered necessary to provide acceptable indoor air quality, but that standard is weak on how infiltration can contribute towards meeting the total requirement. In the past ASHRAE Standard 136 was used to do this, but new theoretical approaches and expanded weather data have made that standard out of date. This article will describe how to properly treat infiltration as an equivalent ventilation approach and then use new data and these new approaches to demonstrate how these calculations might be done both in general and to update Standard 136.

Sherman, Max

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Ventilation Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products

348

CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial Buildings Title CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year...

349

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Title Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and...

350

Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools Title Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A...

351

Why We Ventilate Our Houses - An Historical Look  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The knowledge of how to ventilate buildings, and how much ventilation is necessary for human health and comfort, has evolved over centuries of trial and error. Humans and...

352

Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification Title Measuring Residential Ventilation System...

353

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Title Improving Ventilation and Saving...

354

Demand-Controlled Ventilation Using CO2 Sensors - Federal Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fresh air in a building can be a problem. Over ventilation results in higher energy usage and costs than are necessary with appropriate ventilation while potentially increasing...

355

Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates vary Title Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates vary Publication Type Conference Paper...

356

Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation Standards in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but also because passive, whole-house ventilation systemsPassive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses",

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliam, Jennifer A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the loss of residual heat removal during midloop operation experiment conducted at the ROSA-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modeling of the complex thermal hydraulics Of reactor systems involves the use Of experimental test systems as well as numerical codes. A simulation of the loss of residual heat removal (RHR) during midloop operations was performed using the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. The experiment was conducted at the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA)-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The experiment involved a 5% cold leg break along with the loss of the RHR system-The transient was simulated for 3040 seconds. The ROSA-1-V/]LsTF is one of the largest test facilities in the world and is located in Japan. It is a volumetrically scaled (1/48) full height, two loop model of a Westinghouse four loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). The facility consists of pressure vessel, two symmetric loops, a pressurizer and a full emergency core cooling system (ECCS) system. The transient was run on the CRAY-YMP supercomputer at Texas A&M university. Core boiling and primary pressurization followed the initiation of the transient. The time to core boiling was overpredicted. Almost all Primary parameters were predicted well until the occurrence of the loop seal clearing (LSC) at 2400 seconds. The secondary side temperatures were in good agreement with the experimental data until the LSC. Following the LSC, the steam condensation in the tubes was not calculated. This resulted in the overprediction of primary pressures after the LSC. Also, the temperatures in the hot and the cold legs were overpredicted. Because there was no significant condensation in the U-tubes, the core remained uncovered. Moreover, the LSC did not recover. Consequently, secondary side temperatures were underpredicted after the LSC. This indicated the deficiency of the condensation model. The core temperature excursion at the time of the LSC was not predicted, though there was good agreement between the experimental and calculated data for the rest of the transient. Severe oscillations were calculated throughout the course of the transient. Overall, there was reasonable qualitative agreement between the measured and the calculated data.

Banerjee, Sibashis Sanatkumar

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Controllability and invariance of monotone systems for robust ventilation automation in buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[2] and control [3] of Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems leads to an improved on these matters [4]. Various paths have already been explored for the control of HVAC systems in intelligent and energy saving [7], a model-predictive strategy [8], or a fuzzy logic controller [9]. The notion of Robust

359

Readiness plan, Hanford 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility: Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) is designed for the collection, treatment, and eventual disposal of liquid waste from the 300 Area Process Sewer (PS) system. The PS currently discharges water to the 300 Area Process Trenches. Facilities supported total 54 buildings, including site laboratories, inactive buildings, and support facilities. Effluent discharges to the process sewer from within these facilities include heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, heat exchangers, floor drains, sinks, and process equipment. The wastewaters go through treatment processes that include iron coprecipitation, ion exchange and ultraviolet oxidation. The iron coprecipitation process is designed to remove general heavy metals. A series of gravity filters then complete the clarification process by removing suspended solids. Following the iron coprecipitation process is the ion exchange process, where a specific resin is utilized for the removal of mercury. The final main unit operation is the ultraviolet destruction process, which uses high power ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide to destroy organic molecules. The objective of this readiness plan is to provide the method by which line management will prepare for a Readiness Assessment (RA) of the TEDF. The self-assessment and RA will assess safety, health, environmental compliance and management readiness of the TEDF. This assessment will provide assurances to both WHC and DOE that the facility is ready to start-up and begin operation.

Storm, S.J.

1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

360

Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in the Surtsey Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Surtsey Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to perform scaled experiments that simulate hypothetical high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effect of specific phenomena associated with direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load, such as the effect of physical scale, prototypic subcompartment structures, water in the cavity, and hydrogen generation and combustion. In the Integral Effects Test (IET) series, 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion NPP structures were constructed in the Surtsey vessel. The RPV was modeled with a steel pressure vessel that had a hemispherical bottom head, which had a 4-cm hole in the bottom head that simulated the final ablated hole that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe NPP accident. Iron/alumina/chromium thermite was used to simulate molten corium that would accumulate on the bottom head of an actual RPV. The chemically reactive melt simulant was ejected by high-pressure steam from the RPV model into the scaled reactor cavity. Debris was then entrained through the instrument tunnel into the subcompartment structures and the upper dome of the simulated reactor containment building. The results of the IET experiments are given in this report.

Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Blanchat, T.K.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

GAS MIXING ANALYSIS IN A LARGE-SCALED SALTSTONE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns mainly driven by temperature gradients inside vapor space in a large-scaled Saltstone vault facility at Savannah River site (SRS). The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations by taking a three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the potential operating conditions. The baseline model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference nominal case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

Lee, S

2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Ventilation | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation Ventilation The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on ventilation air; exhaust air; control strategies; carbon dioxide sensors; economizers. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_ventilation.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Contractor Engineer State: All States Contacts Web Site Policies

363

Scale model studies of displacement ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Displacement ventilation is an air conditioning method that provides conditioned air to indoor environments with the goal to improve air quality while reducing energy consumption. This study investigates the performance ...

Okutan, Galip Mehmet

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a tropical cyclones intensity. An ...

Tang, Brian Hong-An

365

A Ventilation Index for Tropical Cyclones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An important environmental control of both tropical cyclone intensity and genesis is vertical wind shear. One hypothesized pathway by which vertical shear affects tropical cyclones is midlevel ventilationor the flux of ...

Tang, Brian

366

Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

into the house to be filtered to remove pollen and dust or dehumidified to provide humidity control Supply ventilation systems work best in hot or mixed climates. Because they...

367

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.of Ventilation and Air Conditioning: Is CERN up to Date With

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Cooling airflow design tool for displacement ventilation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

withEquation 7.4oftheASHRAEDesignGuidelinesforefficiency air diffusers. The ASHRAE method does not takeVentilation Atlanta: ASHRAE. Jiang, Z. , Chen, Q. , and

Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Ventilation of the Subtropical North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ventilation of the subtropical North Pacific is studied using a simple analytical model. The model is forced by winter mixed layer density and depth calculated from the Levitus climatology and wind stress curl from the Hellerman and ...

Rui Xin Huang; Sarah Russell

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Midlevel ventilation's constraint on tropical cyclone intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a TC's intensity. An idealized ...

Tang, Brian Hong-An

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Chlorofluorocarbon Constraints on North Atlantic Ventilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North Atlantic Ocean vigorously ventilates the ocean interior. Thermocline and deep water masses are exposed to atmospheric contact there and are sequestered in two principal classes: Subtropical Mode Water (STMW: 26.5 ? ?? ? 26.8) and ...

Thomas W. N. Haine; Kelvin J. Richards; Yanli Jia

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Cooling airflow design tool for displacement ventilation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone. HeatloadfromheatconductionthroughtheroomTotalheatloadfromheatconductionthroughtheroomthe heat gain from heat conduction through the room envelope

Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 6. Thermal-hydraulic test facility experimental data report for test 3. 05. 5B - double-ended cold-leg break simulation  

SciTech Connect

Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) Test 3.05.5B was conducted by members of the ORNL PWR Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program on July 3, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small and large break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test 3.05.5B was designed to provide transient thermal-hydraulics data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. Reduced instrument responses are presented. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.; Schwinkendorf, K.N.

1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2006 [Facility News] 31, 2006 [Facility News] Infrared Loss Study Underway at North Slope of Alaska Bookmark and Share At ARM's North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow, collocated sky radiometers are being evaluated to refine the methodology that accounts for infrared loss in polar conditions. At ARM's North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow, collocated sky radiometers are being evaluated to refine the methodology that accounts for infrared loss in polar conditions. In the far northern reaches of Alaska, extended periods of both darkness and daylight occur throughout the year. Additionally, extremely cold weather conditions contribute to a harsh operating environment for research equipment. Therefore, broadband radiometers at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site are equipped with electric heaters inside the ventilators

375

Shut-off mechanism for ventilation hose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shut-off mechanism to provide automatic closure of a ventilation hose when the operation of drawing air through the hose is terminated. The mechanism includes a tube of light gauge metal inside of which are mounted a plurality of louver doors positioned in the closed position due to gravity when the ventilation unit is not operational. When the unit is operational, air flowing into the unit maintains the doors in the open position. 5 figs.

Huyett, J.D.; Meskanick, G.R.

1989-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Tracer dating and ocean ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interpretation of transient tracer observations depends on difcult to obtain information on the evolution in time of the tracer boundary conditions and interior distributions. Recent studies have attempted to circumvent this problem by making use of a derived quantity, age, based on the simultaneous distribution of two complementary tracers, such as tritium and its daughter, helium 3. The age is defined with reference to the surface such that the boundary condition takes on a constant value of zero. We use a two-dimensional model to explore the circumstances under which such a combination of conservation equations for two complementary tracers can lead to a cancellation of the time derivative terms. An interesting aspect of this approach is that mixing can serve as a source or sink of tracer based age. We define an idealized "ventilation age tracer " that is conservative with respect to mixing, and we explore how its behavior compares with that of the tracer-based ages over a range of advective and diffusive parameters. 1.

G. Thiele; J. L. Sarmiento

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M&O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M&O 2000a).

Yiming Sun

2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

CFD Simulation of Airflow in Ventilated Wall System Report #9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to examine air movements in vinyl and brick ventilation cavities in detail, using a state of the art CFD commercial modeling tool. The CFD activity was planned to proceed the other activities in order to develop insight on the important magnitudes of scales occurring during ventilation air flow. This information generated by the CFD model was to be used to modify (if necessary) and to validate the air flow dynamics already imbedded in the hygrothermal model for the computer-based air flow simulation procedures. A comprehensive program of advanced, state-of-the-art hygrothermal modeling was then envisaged mainly to extend the knowledge to other wall systems and at least six representative climatic areas. These data were then to be used to provide the basis for the development of design guidelines. CFD results provided timely and much needed answers to many of the concerns and questions related to ventilation flows due to thermal buoyancy and wind-driven flow scenarios. The relative strength between these two mechanisms. Simple correlations were developed and are presented in the report providing the overall pressure drop, and flow through various cavities under different exterior solar and temperature scenarios. Brick Rainscreen Wall: It was initially expected that a 50 mm cavity would offer reduced pressure drops and increased air flow compared to a 19 mm cavity. However, these models showed that the size of the ventilation slots through the wall are the limiting factor rather than the cavity depth. Of course, once the slots are enlarged beyond a certain point, this could change. The effects of natural convection within the air cavities, driven by the temperature difference across the cavity, were shown to be less important than the external wind speed (for a wind direction normal to the wall surface), when wind action is present. Vinyl Rainscreen Wall: The CFD model of the vinyl rainscreen wall was simpler than that for the brick wall. Constant wall temperatures were used rather than conjugate heat transfer. Although this is appropriate for a thin surface with little heat capacity, it does mean that an empirical correlation between solar radiation (and perhaps wind speed) and vinyl temperature is required to use these results appropriately. The results developed from this CFD model were correlated to weather parameters and construction details so that they can be incorporated into ORNL s advanced hygrothermal models MOISTURE- EXPERT.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Karagiozis, Achilles N [ORNL

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Nuclear Facilities Production Facilities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sand 2011-4582P. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) The GIF provides test cells for...

380

The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two-phase zone, is the heat-pipe (i.e. , a zone of constant4a), when there is a heat pipe just above the emplacementduring ventilation, the heat-pipe signature is absent in

Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Title Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5968E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., and Iain S. Walker Date Published 12/2012 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, passive ventilation, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health, and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. At the same time we wish to reduce the energy use in homes and therefore minimize the energy used to provide ventilation. This study examined several approaches to reducing the energy requirements of providing acceptable IAQ in residential buildings. Two approaches were taken. The first used RIVEC - the Residential Integrated VEntilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. The second used passive and hybrid ventilation systems, rather than mechanical systems, to provide whole-house ventilation.

382

TNKVNT: A model of the Tank 48 purge/ventilation exhaust system. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The waste tank purge ventilation system for Tank 48 is designed to prevent dangerous concentrations of hydrogen or benzene from accumulating in the gas space of the tank. Fans pull the gas/water vapor mixture from the tank gas space and pass it sequentially through a demister, a condenser, a reheater, and HEPA filters before discharging to the environment. Proper operation of the HEPA filters requires that the gas mixture passing through them has a low relative humidity. The ventilation system has been modified by increasing the capacity of the fans and changing the condenser from a two-pass heat exchanger to a single-pass heat exchanger. It is important to understand the impact of these modifications on the operation of the system. A hydraulic model of the ventilation exhaust system has been developed. This model predicts the properties of the air throughout the system and the flowrate through the system, as functions of the tank gas space and environmental conditions. This document serves as a Software Design Report, a Software Coding report, and a User`s Manual. All of the information required for understanding and using this code is herein contained: the governing equations are fully developed, the numerical algorithms are described in detail, and an extensively commented code listing is included. This updated version of the code models the entire purge ventilation system, and is therefore more general in its potential applications.

Shadday, M.A. Jr.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Optimization Measures for Sporting and Special Event Facilities: Design and Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reducing unnecessary building energy costs is becoming more of a priority. Rising fuel prices and a global emphasis on energy efficiency are key contributing factors. This push towards energy efficiency certainly applies to today's athletic and special event facilities. High customer expectations and corresponding large operating expenses have helped to make energy conservation measures more of a priority in the facilities design. The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in sporting and special event facility present a unique challenge to Continuous Commissioning (CC) engineers. In such facilities, high occupancy and equipment loads occur at the design load condition, but only a small fraction of the designed capacity is necessary for routine operations. On the other hand, during games and other events, system performance is critical. Therefore, significant savings potential exists, but care must be taken to avoid compromising the peak load operations. Maintenance uncertainties, equipment wear, and lack of operator knowledge all combine to affect the building operating costs. Continuous Commissioning, a process developed by the Texas A&M Energy Systems Laboratory, addresses issues such as these and proves very worthwhile. An overview of multi-purpose arenas and their usage will be given, and potential optimization measures and Continuous Commissioning of these facilities will be presented, along with some illustrative examples.

Giebler, T.; Wei, G.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Residential Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning Research Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The residential HVAC load contributes $23 billion to electric utility energy sales and significantly to peak demands. Participants at this 1986 workshop identified fifteen areas of research needed to improve HVAC components, systems, and applications.

1987-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

385

Heat pipe dynamics. Final report, April 30, 1981. [Uses of heat pipe, especially in solar collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A heat-pipe flat plate solar collector is constructed like a typical flat plate collector with the exception that individual heat pipes are attached to the collector surface to transfer collected heat via a phase change from collector surface into an attached jacket containing a phase change material. The efficiency of such a collector was measured roughly. Also briefly described are: a heat-pipe heat exchanger, heat-pipe heat exchanger freeze proofing, heat-pipe attic ventilation, transfer of light bulb heat via a heat pipe to heat water, heat recovery via heat pipe, cooling of oil in engines and transmissions via heat pipe, a tracking reflector, automatic sun tracker, single-stroke vacuum pump for heat-pipe manufacture, and heat pipe heat transfer from rock bed. (LEW)

Norman, R.M. Sr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

MAX Fluid Dynamics facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAX Fluid Dynamics facility MAX Fluid Dynamics facility Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr MAX Fluid Dynamics facility Providing high resolution data for development of computational tools that model fluid flow and heat transfer within complex systems such as the core of a nuclear reactor. 1 2 3 4 5 Hot and cold air jets are mixed within a glass tank while laser-based anemometers and a high-speed infrared camera characterize fluid flow and heat transfer behavior. Click on image to view larger size image.

387

Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally Ventilated Building Speaker(s): Sezin Eren Ozcan Date: May 16, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Due to limited energy sources, countries are looking for alternative solutions to decrease energy needs. In that context, natural ventilation can be seen as a very attractive sustainable technique in building design. However, understanding of ventilation dynamics is needed to provide an efficient control. Ventilation rate has to be determined not only in terms of energy, but also for controlling indoor air quality and emissions. For these reasons, agricultural buildings (livestock houses, greenhouses, etc.), naturally ventilated industrial buildings, and residences require a reliable ventilation rate measuring technique. Measuring techniques suffer

388

Modeling buoyancy-driven airflow in ventilation shafts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naturally ventilated buildings can significantly reduce the required energy for cooling and ventilating buildings by drawing in outdoor air using non-mechanical forces. Buoyancy-driven systems are common in naturally ...

Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Natural ventilation : design for suburban houses in Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Ventilation is the most effective passive cooling design strategy for architecture in hot and humid climates. In Thailand, natural ventilation has been the most essential element in the vernacular architecture such ...

Tantasavasdi, Chalermwat, 1971-

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A scale model study of displacement ventilation with chilled ceilings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Displacement ventilation is a form of air-conditioning which provides good air quality and some energy savings. The air quality is better than for a conventional mixed ventilation system. The maximum amount of cooling that ...

Holden, Katherine J. A. (Katherine Joan Adrienne)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Quantitative relationship of sick building syndrome symptoms with ventilation rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at two outdoor air supply rates." Indoor Air 14 Suppl 8: 7-Miettinen (1995). "Ventilation rate in office buildings andAssociation of ventilation rates and CO 2 concentrations

Fisk, William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Effects of Radiant Barrier Systems on Ventilated Attics in a Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of side-by-side radiant barrier experiments using two identical 144 ft2 (nominal) test houses are presented. The test houses responded very similarly to weather variations prior to the retrofit. The temperatures of the test houses were controlled to within 0.3F. Ceiling heat fluxes were within 2 percent for each house. The results showed that a critical attic ventilation flow rate (0.25 CFM/ft2 ) existed after which the percentage reduction produced by the radiant barrier systems was not sensitive to increased airflows. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barrier systems were between 25 and 34 percent, with 28 percent being the reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. All results presented in this paper were for attics with R-19 unfaced fiberglass insulation and for a perforated radiant barrier with low emissivities on both sides.

Medina, M. A.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

394

Spot Ventilation: Source Control to Improve Indoor Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to employ spot ventilation in the home for comfort and safety.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Whole-House Ventilation Systems: Improved Control of Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to employ spot ventilation in the home for comfort and safety.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Project: Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Energy Buildings Project. Summary: NIST is developing tools and metrics to both ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

397

Coupled urban wind flow and indoor natural ventilation modelling on a high-resolution grid: A case study for the Amsterdam ArenA stadium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind flow in urban environments is an important factor governing the dispersion of heat and pollutants from streets, squares and buildings. This paper presents a coupled CFD modelling approach for urban wind flow and indoor natural ventilation. A specific ... Keywords: Air exchange rate, Air quality, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Cross-ventilation, Full-scale measurements, Grid generation technique, Integrated model, Model validation and solution verification, Numerical simulation, Outdoor and indoor air flow, Sports stadium

T. van Hooff; B. Blocken

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Ventilation planning at Energy West's Deer Creek mine  

SciTech Connect

In 2004 ventilation planning was initiated to exploit a remote area of Deer Creek mine's reserve (near Huntington, Utah), the Mill Fork Area, located under a mountain. A push-pull ventilation system was selected. This article details the design process of the ventilation system upgrade, the procurement process for the new fans, and the new fan startup testing. 5 figs., 1 photo.

Tonc, L.; Prosser, B.; Gamble, G. [Pacific Corp., Huntington, UT (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

HOW THE LEED VENTILATION CREDIT IMPACTS ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF GSHP SYSTEMS A CASE STUDY FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a study on the impacts of increased outdoor air (OA) ventilation on the performance of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems that heat and cool typical primary schools. Four locations Phoenix, Miami, Seattle, and Chicago are selected in this study to represent different climate zones in the United States. eQUEST, an integrated building and HVAC system energy analysis program, is used to simulate a typical primary school and the GSHP system at the four locations with minimum and 30% more than minimum OA ventilation. The simulation results show that, without an energy recovery ventilator, the 30% more OA ventilation results in an 8.0 13.3% increase in total GSHP system energy consumption at the four locations. The peak heating and cooling loads increase by 20.2 30% and 14.9 18.4%, respectively, at the four locations. The load imbalance of the ground heat exchanger is increased in hot climates but reduced in mild and cold climates.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Ventilation Index for Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important environmental control of both tropical cyclone intensity and genesis is vertical wind shear. One hypothesized pathway by which vertical shear affects tropical cyclones is midlevel ventilationor the flux of low-entropy air into the center of ...

Brian Tang; Kerry Emanuel

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

402

ANALYSIS OF THE HEAT GENERATION IN THE PRIMARY SODIUM PIPE TUNNELS, INTERMEDIATE HEAT EXCHANGER CELLS, AND THE PRIMARY SODIUM FILL TANK VAULT FOR THE HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY (HNPF)  

SciTech Connect

I. An adequate and conservative calculational method for evaluation of the heat generation distribution in the primary sodium system substructural areas was developed. The method was programed for the IBM 704 and the IBM 709. The results obtained from analysis of the gamma heat generation in the primary sodium pipe tunnels and in the intermediate heat exchanger cells are presented. Calculations are outlined, and gamma attenuation coefficients for concrete, sodium, and steel are given. II. Results obtained from analysis of the gamma heat generation in areas where the primary sodium system piping layout was changed from that of the previous analysis are presented. Major changes in magnitude of the hot spot heat generation due to the changes are pointed out. (auth)

Legendre, P.J.

1959-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

NSA Barrow Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barrow Facility Barrow Facility NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Barrow Facility Location: 71° 19' 23.73" N, 156° 36' 56.70" W Altitude: 8 meters The Barrow facility was dedicated in July 1997 and chosen because the Arctic is particularly sensitive to climate changes. Barrow is located at the northernmost point in the United States, 330 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Also known as the Top of the World, Barrow is Alaska's largest Eskimo village (home to 4,581 people). Tax revenue from the Slope's oil fields pay for services borough wide, and natural gas is used to heat homes and generate electricity in Barrow. Many residents, however, maintain

404

ARM - NSA Barrow Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barrow Facility Barrow Facility NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Barrow Facility Location: 71° 19' 23.73" N, 156° 36' 56.70" W Altitude: 8 meters The Barrow facility was dedicated in July 1997 and chosen because the Arctic is particularly sensitive to climate changes. Barrow is located at the northernmost point in the United States, 330 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Also known as the Top of the World, Barrow is Alaska's largest Eskimo village (home to 4,581 people). Tax revenue from the Slope's oil fields pay for services borough wide, and natural gas is used to heat homes and generate electricity in Barrow. Many residents, however, maintain

405

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Activity (1) Space Heating 389 47% 39.4 Cooling 79 10% 8.0 Ventilation 83 10% 8.4 Water Heating 57 7% 5.8 Lighting 113 14% 11.5 Cooking 8 1% 0.8 Refrigeration 16 2% 1.6...

406

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Science and Technology Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science and Technology Facility Science and Technology Facility Photo of the Science and Technology Facility (S&TF) at NREL. NREL's Science and Technology Facility (S&TF) has a sustainable and energy efficient design and will support solar cell, thin film, and nanostructure research. Solar cell, thin film, and nanostructure research are conducted in our Science and Technology Facility (S&TF) with the benefits of a forty percent reduction in energy use compared to standard laboratory buildings; energy recovery for ventilation in laboratories; and functional and flexible laboratory space. Designed specifically to reduce time delays associated with transferring technology to industry, the S&TF's 71,000 square feet is a multi-level facility of laboratory space, office space, and lobby connected by an

407

ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 3. Thermal-hydraulic test facility experimental data report for test 3. 06. 6B - transient film boiling in upflow. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

Reduced instrument responses are presented for Thermal-Hyraulic Test Facility (THTF) Test 3.06.6B. This test was conducted by members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized-Water-Reactor (PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) Separate-Effects Program on August 29, 1980. The objective of the program was to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWR's during accidents, including small and large break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test 3.06.6B was conducted to obtain transient film boiling data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. The primary purpose of this report is to make the reduced instrument responses for THTF Test 3.06.6B available. Included in the report are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Facility Microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Energy Performance and Economic Evaluations of the Geothermal Heat Pump System used in the KnowledgeWorks I and II Buildings, Blacksburg, Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems (HVAC) are not only one of the most energy consuming components in buildings but also contribute to green house (more)

Charoenvisal, Kongkun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Indoor Humidity Analysis of an Integrated Radiant Cooling and Desiccant Ventilation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiant cooling is credited with improving energy efficiency and enhancing the comfort level as an alternative method of space cooling in mild and dry climates, according to recent research. Since radiant cooling panels lack the capability to remove latent heat, they normally are used in conjunction with an independent ventilation system, which is capable of decoupling the space sensible and latent loads. Condensation concerns limit the application of radiant cooling. This paper studies the dehumidification processes of solid desiccant systems and investigates the factors that affect the humidity levels of a radiantly cooled space. Hourly indoor humidity is simulated at eight different operating conditions in a radiantly cooled test-bed office. The simulation results show that infiltration and ventilation flow rates are the main factors affecting indoor humidity level and energy consumption in a radiantly cooled space with relatively constant occupancy. It is found that condensation is hard to control in a leaky office operated with the required ventilation rate. Slightly pressurizing the space is recommended for radiant cooling. The energy consumption simulation shows that a passive desiccant wheel can recover about 50% of the ventilation load.

Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.10 Educational Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Educational Facilities Educational Facilities March 2012 3.9.4 Total Expenditures for K-12 School Plant Operations and Maintenance, by Function ($2010 Billion) Salaries and Benefits 18.4 53% 21.5 51% 24.2 49% 24.8 49% 25.4 51% Purchased Services 10.4 30% 12.0 28% 13.2 27% 13.6 27% 13.6 27% Supplies 5.7 16% 8.6 20% 11.2 23% 11.4 23% 12.0 24% Other 0.3 1% 0.3 1% 0.4 1% 0.4 1% 0.5 1% Total 34.9 100% 42.5 100% 49.0 100% 50.2 100% 51.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): NCES, Digest of Educational Statistics 2010, April 2011, Table 188; EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Aug. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators. 1995-96 2000-01 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 1) Operation and maintenance services include salaries, benefits, supplies, and contractual fees for supervision of operations and maintenance, operating buildings (heating, lighting, ventilating, repair and replacement), care and upkeep of grounds and equipment, vehicle

412

Laboratory Testing of the Heating Capacity of Air-Source Heat Pumps at Low Outdoor Temperature Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-source heat pump systems offer an alternative to the common heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) configuration of single split unitary air conditioners with gas heating. In simple terms, heat pumps are traditional air conditioning units with the added capability of running in reverse as required by the building load. Thus, where the traditional air conditioning unit has an indoor evaporator to remove heat from the space and an outdoor condenser to reject heat to the ambient environment, ...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

413

SY Tank Farm ventilation isolation option risk assessment report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The safety of the 241-SY Tank Farm ventilation system has been under extensive scrutiny due to safety concerns associated with tank 101-SY. Hydrogen and other gases are generated and trapped in the waste below the liquid surface. Periodically, these gases are released into the dome space and vented through the exhaust system. This attention to the ventilation system has resulted in the development of several alternative ventilation system designs. The ventilation system provides the primary means of mitigation of accidents associated with flammable gases. This report provides an assessment of various alternatives ventilation system designs.

Powers, T.B.; Morales, S.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

On The Valuation of Infiltration towards Meeting Residential Ventilation Needs  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. In most homes, especially existing homes, infiltration provides the dominant fraction of the ventilation. As we seek to provide acceptable indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate nor under-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to correctly evaluate the contribution infiltration makes to both energy consumption and equivalent ventilation. ASHRAE Standards including standards 62, 119, and 136 have all considered the contribution of infiltration in various ways, using methods and data from 20 years ago.

Sherman, Max H.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Solar process heat technology in action: The process hot water system at the California Correctional Institution at Tehachapi  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar process heat technology relates to solar thermal energy systems for industry, commerce, and government. Applications include water preheating and heating, steam generation, process hot air, ventilation air heating, and refrigeration. Solar process heat systems are available for commercial use. At the present time, however, they are economically viable only in niche markets. This paper describes a functioning system in one such market. The California Department of Corrections (CDOC), which operates correctional facilities for the state of California, uses a solar system for providing hot water and space heating at the California Correctional Institute at Tehachapi (CCI/Tehachapi). CCI/Tehachapi is a 5100-inmate facility. The CDOC does not own the solar system. Rather, it buys energy from private investors who own the solar system located on CCI/Tehachapi property; this arrangement is part of a long-term energy purchase agreement. United Solar Technologies (UST) of Olympia Washington is the system operator. The solar system, which began operating in the fall of 1990, utilizes 2677 m{sup 2} (28,800 ft{sup 2}) of parabolic through solar concentrators. Thermal energy collected by the system is used to generate hot water for showers, kitchen operations, and laundry functions. Thermal energy collected by the system is also used for space heating. At peak operating conditions, the system is designed to meet approximately 80 percent of the summer thermal load. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Hewett, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, R.; May, K. [Industrial Solar Technology, Arvada, CO (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Construction of a Solid State Research Facility, Building 3150. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct a new facility to house the Materials Synthesis Group (MSG) and the Semiconductor Physics Group (SPG) of the Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The location of the proposed action is Roane County, Tennessee. MSG is involved in the study of crystal growth and the preparation and characterization of advanced materials, such as high-temperature superconductors, while SPG is involved in semiconductor physics research. All MSG and a major pardon of SPG research activities are now conducted in Building 2000, a deteriorating structure constructed in the 1940. The physical deterioration of the roof; the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system; and the plumbing make this building inadequate for supporting research activities. The proposed project is needed to provide laboratory and office space for MSG and SPG and to ensure that research activities can continue without interruption due to deficiencies in the building and its associated utility systems.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

Cameron, C.P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Technology Deployment Centers Advanced Power Sources Laboratory Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Trisonic Wind Tunnel Hypersonic Wind Tunnel High Altitude Chamber Explosive Components Facility Ion Beam Laboratory Materials Science and Engineering Center Pulsed Power and Systems Validation Facility Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) Weapon and Force Protection Center Design, Evaluation and Test Technology Facility Research Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) The ESEF complex contains several independent laboratories for experiments and advanced diagnostics in the fields of thermodynamics, heat transfer,

419

Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a comfortable and energy-efficient air conditioning system, the application of floor radiant heating system is used increasingly greatly in the north of China. As a result, the feasibility of floor radiant cooling has gained more attention. To examine the thermodynamic performance of the floor radiant cooling system, we measured the operational conditions including the minimum floor surface temperature, the cooling capacity, and the indoor temperature field distribution under different outdoor temperatures in Beijing. Because the ground temperature changes with the mean temperature of the supplied and returned water and room temperature, the mean temperature of the supplied and retuned water was obtained. Finally, we analyzed the phenomenon of dewing and developed measures for preventing it. The dry air layer near the floor formed by a displacement ventilation system can effectively prevent dews on the surface of the floor in the wet and hot days in summer. In addition, for the sake of the displacement ventilation system, the heat transfer effect between floor and space is enhanced. Our analysis pointed out that floor radiant cooling system combined with displacement ventilation ensures good comfort and energy efficiency.

Ren, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Application: Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Option.. Papavergos, PG; 1991. Halon 1301 Use in Oil and Gas Production Facilities: Alaska's North Slope.. Ulmer, PE; 1991. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 28, 2006 [Facility News] February 28, 2006 [Facility News] Network of Infrared Thermometers Nearly Complete at SGP Bookmark and Share Red dots indicate extended facilities at SGP with the new IRTs installed; green dots indicate future installations. Red dots indicate extended facilities at SGP with the new IRTs installed; green dots indicate future installations. As reported in April 2005, a network of infrared thermometers (IRT) is being installed throughout the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site for the purpose of measuring cloud base temperature and inferring cloud base height across the domain. These measurements will enhance existing SGP surface and satellite cloud measurements to help scientists improve their calculations of heating rate profiles on the scale of global climate models. The first

422

New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents an interactive on-line package for calculation of energy and cost demands for residential infiltration and ventilation, with input and output data entry through a web browser. This is a unique tool. It represents a new kind of approach to developing software employing user (client) and server (package provider) computers. The main program, servicing {open_quotes}intelligent{close_quotes} CGI (Common Gateway Interface) calls, resides on the server and dynamically handles the whole package performance and the procedure of calculations. The {open_quotes}computing engine{close_quotes} consists of two parts: RESVENT - the previously existing program for ventilation calculations and ECONOMICS - for heating and cooling system energy and cost calculations. The user interface is designed in such a way, that it allows simultaneous access by many users from all over the world.

Forowicz, T.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A field demonstration of automatic restroom ventilation control to reduce energy consumption  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the motion sensor evaluation task for the Hanford Energy Management Committee (HEMC) performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to support the energy reduction mission. The study included installing automatic exhaust ventilation controls in the restrooms of the 1103 Building, 100N area. The goal of this task was to measure the benefit of automatically controlling exhaust ventilation in restrooms of an office building on the Hanford Site. The HEMC belief is that the value of controlling the fans is not limited to the power consumed by the fans, but also includes the value invested to condition (heat or cool) the makeup air. The air exhausted to the exterior of the building must ultimately be replaced by unconditioned air from the outside. This outside air must then by conditioned to maintain the comfort of building occupants. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Doggett, W.H.; Merrick, S.B.; Richman, E.E.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Typer Lab Houses  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Effectiveness Research Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Tyler Lab Houses Source Of Outside Air, Distribution, Filtration Armin Rudd Twin (almost) Lab Houses at UT-Tyler House 2: Unvented attic, House 1: Vented attic lower loads + PV Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 2 * 1475 ft 2 , 3-bedroom houses * House 2 was mirrored plan * 45 cfm 62.2 ventilation rate * Garage connected to house on only one wall * Access to attic via pull-down stairs in garage * Further access to House 2 unvented attic through gasket sealed door Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 3 Testing Approach  Building enclosure and building mechanical systems characterization by measurement of building enclosure air leakage, central air distribution system airflows, and ventilation system airflows.

425

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Moisture and combustion products  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, moisture and combustion pollutants, are examined. A companion paper examines volatile organic compounds and radon. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. Moisture control puts significant restrictions on a ventilation system. The system should function continuously (averaged over days) and distribute ventilation throughout the habitable space. Combustion sources require task ventilation that functions reliably.

Hadlich, D.E.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

427

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Energy Recovery in Laboratory Facilities (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This guide regarding energy recovery is one in a series on best practices for laboratories. It was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs 21'), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy. Laboratories typically require 100% outside air for ventilation at higher rates than other commercial buildings. Minimum ventilation is typically provided at air change per hour (ACH) rates in accordance with codes and adopted design standards including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standard 1910.1450 (4 to 12 ACH - non-mandatory) or the 2011 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Applications Handbook, Chapter 16 - Laboratories (6 to 12 ACH). While OSHA states this minimum ventilation rate 'should not be relied on for protection from toxic substances released into the laboratory' it specifically indicates that it is intended to 'provide a source of air for breathing and for input to local ventilation devices (e.g., chemical fume hoods or exhausted bio-safety cabinets), to ensure that laboratory air is continually replaced preventing the increase of air concentrations of toxic substances during the working day, direct air flow into the laboratory from non-laboratory areas and out to the exterior of the building.' The heating and cooling energy needed to condition and move this outside air can be 5 to 10 times greater than the amount of energy used in most office buildings. In addition, when the required ventilation rate exceeds the airflow needed to meet the cooling load in low-load laboratories, additional heating energy may be expended to reheat dehumidified supply air from the supply air condition to prevent over cooling. In addition to these low-load laboratories, reheat may also be required in adjacent spaces such as corridors that provide makeup air to replace air being pulled into negative-pressure laboratories. Various types of energy recovery devices and systems can substantially reduce heating and cooling energy required for conditioning spaces in laboratories. Heating and cooling systems can be downsized when energy recovery is used because these systems reduce peak heating and cooling requirements. Heating and cooling systems can also be downsized by capturing heat generated in high-load spaces and transferring it to spaces requiring reheat. There are many opportunities for energy recovery in laboratories. This guide includes descriptions of several air-to-air energy recovery devices and methods, such as using enthalpy wheels (Figure 1), heat pipes, or run-around loops in new construction. These devices generally recover energy from exhaust air. This recovered energy is used to precondition supply air during both cooling and heating modes of operation. In addition to air-to-air energy recovery options, this guide includes a description of a water-to-water heat recovery system that collects heat from high-load spaces and transfers it to spaces that require reheat. While air-to-air recovery devices provide significant energy reduction, in some laboratory facilities the amount of energy available in the exhaust air exceeds the pre-heat and pre-cooling needed to maintain supply air conditions. During these periods of time, controls typically reduce the energy recovery capacity to match the reduced load. If the energy recovered in the exhaust is not needed then it is rejected from the facility. By using a water-to-water recovery system, it is possible to significantly reduce overall building energy use by reusing heating or cooling energy generated in the building before it is rejected to the outdoors. Laboratory managers are encouraged to perform a life-cycle cost analysis of an energy-recovery technology to determine the feasibility of its application in their laboratory. Usually, the shortest payback periods occur when the heating and cooling load reduction provided by an energy recovery system allows the laboratory to install and use smaller heating (e.g., hot water or steam) and cooling (e.g., c

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Title Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5889E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., and Max H. Sherman Journal Building and Environment Volume 59 Start Page 456 Pagination 456-465 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, filtration, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, ozone, simulation Abstract Elevated outdoor ozone levels are associated with adverse health effects. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone of outdoor origin would lower population exposures and might also lead to a reduction in ozone---associated adverse health effects. In most buildings, indoor ozone levels are diminished with respect to outdoor levels to an extent that depends on surface reactions and on the degree to which ozone penetrates the building envelope. Ozone enters buildings from outdoors together with the airflows that are driven by natural and mechanical means, including deliberate ventilation used to reduce concentrations of indoor---generated pollutants. When assessing the effect of deliberate ventilation on occupant health one should consider not only the positive effects on removing pollutants of indoor origin but also the possibility that enhanced ventilation might increase indoor levels of pollutants originating outdoors. This study considers how changes in residential ventilation that are designed to comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.2 might influence indoor levels of ozone. Simulation results show that the building envelope can contribute significantly to filtration of ozone. Consequently, the use of exhaust ventilation systems is predicted to produce lower indoor ozone concentrations than would occur with balanced ventilation systems operating at the same air---exchange rate. We also investigated a strategy for reducing exposure to ozone that would deliberately reduce ventilation rates during times of high outdoor ozone concentration while still meeting daily average ventilation requirements.

429

Summer Infiltration/Ventilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory Building America Technical Review Meeting April 29-30, 2013 A Research Institute of the University of Central...

430

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5% of the total space conditioning) and the intermittentsupply lead to greater space conditioning energy use. AnnualkWh Distribution Ventilation Space Conditioning Leaky House

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bldg. 90 Due to limited energy sources, countries are looking for alternative solutions to decrease energy needs. In that context, natural ventilation can be seen as a very...

432

Energy Impacts of Envelope Tightening and Mechanical Ventilation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or absolute standards along with mechanical ventilation throughout the U.S. housing stock. We used a physics-based modeling framework to simulate the impact of envelope...

433

Review of Literature Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigerating, and Air -Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GRefrigerat ing, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, Gof Ventilation and Air Conditioning: Is C E R N up to Date

McWilliams, Jennifer; Sherman, Max

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Critical Question #2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Specific to Multifamily Buildings? What is the best practice to address ASHRAE 62.2 Addendum J (multifamily)? Why is exhaust only (with supply in hallway) the...

435

Characterization of air recirculation in multiple fan ventilation systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Booster fans, large underground fans, can increase the volumetric efficiency of ventilation systems by helping to balance the pressure and quantity distribution throughout a mine, (more)

Wempen, Jessica Michelle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Case Study 3 - Energy Impacts of Infiltration and Ventilation in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the energy use in commercial buildings due to infiltration and ventilation airflows and to investigate the potential for energy savings that could be ...

437

Energy Management and Conservation in State Facilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Management and Conservation in State Facilities Energy Management and Conservation in State Facilities Energy Management and Conservation in State Facilities < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Pennsylvania Department of General Services In December 2004, Governor Ed Rendell signed Executive Order 2004-12, which made a number of energy efficiency related requirements for state facilities. The Pennsylvania Department of General Services (DGS) is generally responsible for administering the state's energy management and

438

The role of the US Department of Energy in indoor air quality and building ventilation policy development  

SciTech Connect

Building ventilation consumes about 5.8 exajoules of energy each year in the US The annual cost of this energy, used for commercial building fans (1.6 exajoules) and the heating and cooling of outside air (4.2 exajoules), is about $US 33 billion per year. Energy conservation measures that reduce heating and cooling season ventilation rates 15 to 35% in commercial and residential buildings can result in a national savings of about 0.6 to 1.5 exajoules ($US 3-8 billion) per year assuming no reduction of commercial building fan energy use. The most significant adverse environmental impact of reduced ventilation and infiltration is the potential degradation of the buildings indoor air quality. Potential benefits to the US from the implementation of sound indoor air quality and building ventilation reduction policies include reduced building-sector energy consumption; reduced indoor, outdoor, and global air pollution; reduced product costs; reduced worker absenteeism; reduced health care costs; reduced litigation; increased worker well-being and productivity; and increased product quality and competitiveness.

Traynor, G.W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Talbott, J.M.; Moses, D.O. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Remote Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remote Facilities Remote Facilities Remote Facilities October 16, 2013 - 4:55pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options for Renovations in Remote Areas Photovoltaics (PV) Small Wind Daylighting Solar Water Heating Passive Solar Design Biomass Heating When a Federal building or facility is located away from existing power lines, many renewable energy technologies including photovoltaics and wind become cost-effective options when compared to extending utilities or transporting fuel for onsite generators. Photovoltaics Photovoltaics (PV) are often cost-effective in remote power applications. In these circumstances, the system is coupled with batteries and can provide complete facility power. Proper system design is critical and must account for the building electrical loads and be sized to meet that load

440

Ventilating system for reprocessing of nuclear fuel rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a nuclear facility such as a reprocessing plant for nuclear fuel rods, the central air cleaner discharging ventilating gas to the atmosphere must meet preselected standards not only as to the momentary concentration of radioactive components, but also as to total quantity per year. In order to comply more satisfactorily with such standards, reprocessing steps are conducted by remote control in a plurality of separate compartments. The air flow for each compartment is regulated so that the air inventory for each compartment has a slow turnover rate of more than a day but less than a year, which slow rate is conveniently designated as quasihermetic sealing. The air inventory in each such compartment is recirculated through a specialized processing unit adapted to cool and/or filter and/or otherwise process the gas. Stale air is withdrawn from such recirculating inventory and fresh air is injected (eg., By the less than perfect sealing of a compartment) into such recirculating inventory so that the air turnover rate is more than a day but less than a year. The amount of air directed through the manifold and duct system from the reprocessing units to the central air cleaner is less than in reprocessing plants of conventional design.

Szulinski, M.J.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility heating ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Guide to Closing and Conditioning Ventilated Crawlspaces  

SciTech Connect

This how-to guide explains the issues and concerns with conventional ventilated crawlspaces and provides prescriptive measures for improvements that will create healthier and more durable spaces. The methods described in this guide are not the only acceptable ways to treat a crawlspace but represent a proven strategy that works in many areas of the United States. The designs discussed in this guide may or may not meet the local building codes and as such will need to be researched before beginning the project.

Dickson, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

ELECTRIC POWER AND VENTILATION SYSTEM OF SILOE  

SciTech Connect

The 15-kv electric power of Siloe is supplied from a central substation, which serves all the laboratories in the Center. The substation transforms primary 3-phase power from 15 kv to 380 to 220 v. Control installations are supplied from sets of rectifiers and batteries with 127 and 48 v direct current. If the normal electric power supply fails, a 12000 kva diesel driven generator is automatically started and in a very short time supplies power. The ventilation system supplies the whole building with conditioned air, holds the shell in negative pressure, and exhausts radioactive effluents. (auth)

Mitault, G.; Faudou, J.-C.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

DESIGN FEATURES AND OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE NEW BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY RADIATION LAUNDRY AND RECLAMATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Facilities and procedures for the decontamination, reclamation, or disposal of radioactively contaminated tools, equipment, and clothing are described. For safety and economy these operations are grouped in a facility with specially designed ventilation and controls under the supervision of a health physicist. (auth)

Pearsall, S.f Gemmell, L.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Residential Attic Ventilation In A Hot And Humid Climate: Effects Of Increased Ventilation On Thermal Performance And Moisture Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The reality of the effect of natural ventilation in a residential attic cavity has been the topic of many debates and scholarly reports since (more)

Atherton, Stanley Arthur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's National User Facilities are available for cooperative research with institutions and the private sector worldwide. The Environmental...

446

Existing Facilities Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Existing Facilities Program Existing Facilities Program Existing Facilities Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Construction Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Pre-Qualified Measures (General): $30,000 (electric and gas) Electric Efficiency and Energy Storage: 50% of cost or $2 million Natural Gas Efficiency: 50% of cost or $200,000 Demand Response: 75% of cost or $2 million (limit also applies to combined performance based efficiency and demand response measures) Industrial Process Efficiency: 50% of cost or $5 million

447

A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Material: Four turbine- based ventilators and nine conventional servo-valve compressed-gas ventilators were1 A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators Arnaud W. Thille,1 MD; Aissam Lyazidi,1 Biomed Eng MS; Jean-Christophe M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

448

Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota) Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota) < Back...

449

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air heat transmission due to thermal conductance and the difference in indoor and outdoor temperatures) was taken from ACM

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation of cooler, drier air into the inner core is examined using an axisymmetric tropical cyclone model with parameterized ventilation. Sufficiently strong ventilation ...

Tang, Brian

451

Quantification of the association of ventilation rates with sick building syndrome symptoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

42%) as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-person.0.85) as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-29% as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-person.

Fisk, William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation of cooler, drier air into the inner core is examined using an axisymmetric tropical cyclone model with parameterized ventilation. Sufficiently strong ventilation induces cooling of the ...

Brian Tang; Kerry Emanuel

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Facility Energy Checklist | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Energy Checklist Facility Energy Checklist Facility Energy Checklist October 7, 2013 - 4:45pm Addthis This checklist outlines actions that conserve energy within facilities. For Your Buildings Checkbox Lower thermostat settings. Checkbox Match HVAC schedules to occupancy schedules. Checkbox Lower setback temperatures. Checkbox Optimize morning warmup and night setback controls. Checkbox Reduce/eliminate major sources of infiltration. Checkbox Install a desiccant dehumidification system. Checkbox Minimize use of outside air for process ventilation. Checkbox Educate employees on building systems and energy efficiency measures. Checkbox Check/adjust combustion efficiency of gas-fired equipment. Checkbox Minimize the use of gas-fired refrigeration equipment. Checkbox Check for ways to control solar gain to reduce the cooling load on buildings, including cool roofs or solar shading on windows

454

Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management (Fact Sheet), Thermal Test Facility (TTF), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management Scientists at this living laboratory develop optimal solutions for managing energy flows within buildings and transportation systems. The built environment is stressing the utility grid to a greater degree than ever before. Growing demand for electric vehicles, space conditioning, and plug loads presents a critical opportunity for more effective energy management and development of efficiency technologies. Researchers at the Thermal Test Facility (TTF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, are addressing this opportunity. Through analysis of efficient heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) strategies, automated home energy management (AHEM), and energy storage systems,

455

Boise City Geothermal District Heating District Heating Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boise City Geothermal District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Boise City Geothermal District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Boise City Geothermal District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Boise City Geothermal District Heating Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Boise, Idaho Coordinates 43.6135002°, -116.2034505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADM