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1

File:07FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:07FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 35 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 14:34, 4 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 14:34, 4 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (35 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 13:39, 4 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:39, 4 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (35 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 13:35, 4 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:35, 4 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (35 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs)

2

GRR/Section 7-FD-c - PURPA Qualifying Facility Certification Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-FD-c - PURPA Qualifying Facility Certification Process 7-FD-c - PURPA Qualifying Facility Certification Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-FD-c - PURPA Qualifying Facility Certification Process 07FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations & Policies Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act 18 CFR 292 18 CFR 131.80 18 CFR 381 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07FDCPURPAQualifyingFacilityCertificationProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

3

Framework for Certification of Fish Propagation, Protection and Monitoring Facilities. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual framework for certification of fish production and monitoring facilities including software templates to expedite implementation of the framework are presented. The framework is based on well established and widely utilized project management techniques. The implementation templates are overlays for Microsoft Professional Office software products: Excel, Word, and Project. Use of the software templates requires Microsoft Professional Office. The certification framework integrates two classical project management processes with a third process for facility certification. These processes are: (1) organization and definition of the project, (2) acquisition and organization of project documentation, and (3) facility certification. The certification process consists of systematic review of the production processes and the characteristics of the produced product. The criteria for certification review are the plans and specifications for the products and production processes that guided development of the facility. The facility is certified when the production processes are operating as designed and the product produced meets specifications. Within this framework, certification is a performance based process, not dissimilar from that practiced in many professions and required for many process, or a product meets professional/industry standards of performance. In the case of fish production facilities, the certifying authority may be diffuse, consisting of many entities acting through a process such as NEPA. A cornerstone of certification is accountability, over the long term, for the operation and products of a facility. This is particularly important for fish production facilities where the overall goal of the facility may require decades to accomplish.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Costello, Ronald J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

6

NNSA and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board certifications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allocated funding NNSA and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board certifications free up 47 million in previously allocated funding The DNFSB and NNSA required the CMRR...

7

Newest Los Alamos facility receives LEED® Gold certification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newest facility receives LEED® Gold certification Newest facility receives LEED® Gold certification Newest Los Alamos facility receives LEED® Gold certification The Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building is first to achieve both the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design status and LEED Gold certification. June 13, 2012 Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building Contact Kim Powell Communications Office (505) 695-6159 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, June 13, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building (RLUOB), is also its first to achieve both the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) status and LEED Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

8

Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification | National Nuclear Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification Posted By Office of Public Affairs RULOB LANL's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility Office

9

Applications for Certificates for Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An applicant for a certificate to site an electric power generating facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a...

10

Certification plan transuranic waste: Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWBF; and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Liquid waste certification plan 340 waste handling facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document addresses the discharges from the 340 Facility to the 300 Area Process Sewer and Retention Process Sewer.

HALGREN, D.L.

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

12

Certification Plan, Radioactive Mixed Waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). RMW is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or transuranic (TRU) waste that is co-contaminated with dangerous waste as defined in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations, 173-303-040 (18). This waste is to be transferred to the Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington. This plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF (Section 4); and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Business process mapping techniques for ISO 9001 and 14001 certifications  

SciTech Connect

AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies/Kansas City (FM and T/KC) produces nonnuclear components for nuclear weapons. The company has operated the plant for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1949. Throughout the history of the plant, procedures have been written to reflect the nuclear weapons industry best practices, and the facility has built a reputation for producing high quality products. The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how Total Quality principles were used at FM and T/KC to document processes for ISO 9001 and 14001 certifications. The information presented to the reader will lead to a better understanding of business administration by aligning procedures to key business processes within a business model; converting functional-based procedures to process-based procedures for total integrated resource management; and assigning ownership, validation, and metrics to procedures/processes, adding value to a company`s profitability.

Klement, R.E.; Richardson, G.D.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Studsvik Processing Facility Update  

SciTech Connect

Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

15

Newest Los Alamos facility receives LEED Gold certification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is first to achieve both the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design status and LEED Gold certification. June 13, 2012 Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building...

16

Washington 401 Water Quality Certification JARPA Process | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington 401 Water Quality Certification JARPA Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Washington 401 Water Quality...

17

Uranium Processing Facility | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About / Transforming Y-12 / Uranium Processing Facility About / Transforming Y-12 / Uranium Processing Facility Uranium Processing Facility UPF will be a state-of-the-art, consolidated facility for enriched uranium operations including assembly, disassembly, dismantlement, quality evaluation, and product certification. An integral part of Y-12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium Processing Facility is one of two facilities at Y-12 whose joint mission will be to accomplish the storage and processing of all enriched uranium in one much smaller, centralized area. Safety, security and flexibility are key design attributes of the facility, which is in the preliminary design phase of work. UPF will be built to modern standards and engage new technologies through a responsive and agile

18

Advanced Polymer Processing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

19

Certification and Accreditation Process for Federal Information ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Process for Federal Information Systems Transformed. ... is focused on transforming the episodic ... the Joint Task Force Transformation Initiative, which ...

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

20

Certification process of safety analysis and risk management computer codes at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The commitment by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to bring safety analysis and risk management codes into compliance with national and sitewide quality assurance requirements necessitated a systematic, structured approach. As a part of this effort, WSRC, in cooperation with the Westinghouse Hanford Company, has developed and implemented a certification process for the development and control of computer software. Safety analysis and risk management computer codes pertinent to reactor analyses were selected for inclusion in the certification process. As a first step, documented plans were developed for implementing verification and validation of the codes, and establishing configuration control. User qualification guidelines were determined. The plans were followed with an extensive assessment of the codes with respect to certification status. Detailed schedules and work plans were thus determined for completing certification of the codes considered. Although the software certification process discussed is specific to the application described, it is sufficiently general to provide useful insights and guidance for certification of other software.

Ades, M.J. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Toffer, H.; Lewis, C.J.; Crowe, R.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Certification process of safety analysis and risk management computer codes at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The commitment by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to bring safety analysis and risk management codes into compliance with national and sitewide quality assurance requirements necessitated a systematic, structured approach. As a part of this effort, WSRC, in cooperation with the Westinghouse Hanford Company, has developed and implemented a certification process for the development and control of computer software. Safety analysis and risk management computer codes pertinent to reactor analyses were selected for inclusion in the certification process. As a first step, documented plans were developed for implementing verification and validation of the codes, and establishing configuration control. User qualification guidelines were determined. The plans were followed with an extensive assessment of the codes with respect to certification status. Detailed schedules and work plans were thus determined for completing certification of the codes considered. Although the software certification process discussed is specific to the application described, it is sufficiently general to provide useful insights and guidance for certification of other software.

Ades, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toffer, H.; Lewis, C.J.; Crowe, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Mixed waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of mixed waste handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. Mixed waste is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

TA-55: LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TA-55: LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities TA-55: LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities TA-55: LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities TA-55 supports a wide range of national security programs that involve stockpile stewardship, plutonium processing, nuclear materials stabilization, materials disposition, nuclear forensics, nuclear counter-terrorism, and nuclear energy. ...the only fully operational, full capability plutonium facility in the nation. National Security At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), virtually all plutonium operations occur within the Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55 (TA-55). TA-55 is the nation's most modern plutonium science and manufacturing facility, and it is the only fully operational, full capability plutonium facility in the nation. Thus, TA-55 supports a wide

24

Certification Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certified Reference Materials AOCS 1206-A and AOCS 1206-B Report of the certification process for Conventional and Roundup Ready

25

GRR/Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process 7-WA-a - Energy Facility Siting Process (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Regulations & Policies RCW 80.50.60(1) WAC 463-60 RCW 80.50.090(2) WAC 463-30-270 WAC 463-30-320 Triggers None specified Under RCW 80.50.60(1) a developer may not begin construction of a new energy facility site until they obtain Energy Facility Siting certification

26

PV Standards Work: Photovoltaic System and Component Certification, Test Facility Accreditation, and Solar Photovoltaic Energy Systems International Standards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses efforts led by two companies (PowerMark Corporation and Sunset Technologies Inc.) to support both U.S. domestic and international photovoltaic (PV) system and component certification and test facility accreditation programs and the operation of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC-82) Photovoltaic Energy Systems. International and national PV certification/accreditation programs are successfully facilitating entry of only the highest quality PV products into the marketplace. Standards also continue to be a cornerstone for assuring global PV product conformity assessment, reducing non-tariff trade barriers, and ultimately improving PV products while lowering cost.

Basso, T. S.; Chalmers, S.; Barikmo, H. O.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 426.2 Personnel Selection, Training, Qualification, and Certification Requirements for DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6.2 6.2 PERSONNEL SELECTION, TRAINING, QUALIFICATION, AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DOE NUCLEAR FACILITIES DOE O 426.2 Familiar Level June 2011 1 DOE O 426.2 PERSONNEL SELECTION, TRAINING, QUALIFICATION, AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DOE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FAMILIAR LEVEL ___________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources, you will be able answer the following questions: 1. What is the purpose of DOE O 426.2, Personnel Selection, Training, Qualification, and Certification Requirements for DOE Nuclear Facilities? 2. What are the DOE field elements requirements associated with DOE O 426.2? 3. What are the general contractor requirements specified in the contractor requirements

28

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

29

Certificate-Based Approach to Marketing Green Power and Constructing New Wind Energy Facilities: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The availability of wind energy certificates in Pennsylvania's retail electricity market has made a critical difference in the economic feasibility of developing 140 MW of new wind energy projects in the region. Certificates offer important benefits to both green power suppliers and buyers by reducing transaction barriers and thus lowering the cost of renewable energy. Buyers also benefit through the increased flexibility offered by certificate products. The experience described in this paper offers important insights for selling green power certificates and achieving new wind energy development in other areas of the country.

Blank, E.; Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fuel Conditioning Facility Electrorefiner Process Model  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory processes spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II using electro-metallurgical treatment. To process fuel without waiting for periodic sample analyses to assess process conditions, an electrorefiner process model predicts the composition of the electrorefiner inventory and effluent streams. For the chemical equilibrium portion of the model, the two common methods for solving chemical equilibrium problems, stoichiometric and non stoichiometric, were investigated. In conclusion, the stoichiometric method produced equilibrium compositions close to the measured results whereas the non stoichiometric method did not.

DeeEarl Vaden

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Implementing change in the facilities planning process  

SciTech Connect

In the post-Cold War climate of reduced budgets at the national laboratories, the Sites Planning Department at Sandia National Laboratories was faced with the problem of securing funding for capital construction projects in a very competitive environment. The Department of Energy (DOE), felt that requests for new facilities were not always well coordinated with its mission needs. The Sites Planning Department needed to revolutionize the way they were doing business. To be successful in obtaining approval and funding for future facilities, they recognized the need to concentrate their efforts on project proposals that tap strategic programs at DOE. The authors developed a series of new processes to identify, evaluate, prioritize, and develop line item project proposals to request approval and obtain funding. A matrixed group of sites and facilities directors was formed to establish criteria and make preliminary recommendations to upper management. Matrixed working groups were also established at the staff level to develop and prepare projects for the prioritization process. Ultimately, similar processes will be applied to all project types, and a prioritized plan generated for each. These plans will become the blueprint for an overarching strategic site plan. What started as a means of increasing success in obtaining approval and funding of capital projects has launched a whole new approach to project development that permits incorporation of facilities planning into overall corporate strategic planning.

Williams, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Sites Planning Dept.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Tag: uranium processing facility | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility project has received approval to begin field work. More... Category: News From aging infrastructure to the unaparalleled UPF The proposed Uranium Processing Facility...

33

Systematics of Reconstructed Process Facility Criticality Accidents  

SciTech Connect

The systematics of the characteristics of twenty-one criticality accidents occurring in nuclear processing facilities of the Russian Federation, the United States, and the United Kingdom are examined. By systematics the authors mean the degree of consistency or agreement between the factual parameters reported for the accidents and the experimentally known conditions for criticality. The twenty-one reported process criticality accidents are not sufficiently well described to justify attempting detailed neutronic modeling. However, results of classic hand calculations confirm the credibility of the reported accident conditions.

Pruvost, N.L.; McLaughlin, T.P.; Monahan, S.P.

1999-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

34

Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

NGNP Nuclear-Industrial Facility and Design Certification Boundaries White Paper  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project was initiated at Idaho National Laboratory by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act and based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is helium cooled and graphite moderated and can operate at reactor outlet temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. These varied industrial applications may involve a standard HTGR modular design using different Energy Conversion Systems. Additionally, some of these process heat applications will require process heat delivery systems to lie partially outside the HTGR operators facility.

Thomas E. Hicks

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Safeguards Approaches for Black Box Processes or Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to determine whether a safeguards approach can be developed for black box processes or facilities. These are facilities where a State or operator may limit IAEA access to specific processes or portions of a facility; in other cases, the IAEA may be prohibited access to the entire facility. The determination of whether a black box process or facility is safeguardable is dependent upon the details of the process type, design, and layout; the specific limitations on inspector access; and the restrictions placed upon the design information that can be provided to the IAEA. This analysis identified the necessary conditions for safeguardability of black box processes and facilities.

Diaz-Marcano, Helly; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Miller, Erin; Wylie, Joann

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

37

Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibratio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets Docket No. EO-05-01:...

38

New Facility Saves $20 Million, Accelerates Waste Processing | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Saves $20 Million, Accelerates Waste Processing Facility Saves $20 Million, Accelerates Waste Processing New Facility Saves $20 Million, Accelerates Waste Processing August 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The new Cask Processing Enclosure (CPE) facility is located at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center (TWPC). The Transuranic Waste Processing Center (TWPC) processes, repackages, and ships the site's legacy TRU waste offsite. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM program recently began operations at a newly constructed facility that will accelerate the completion of remote-handled transuranic (TRU) waste processing at the site by two years and save taxpayers more than $20 million. The new Cask Processing Enclosure (CPE) facility is located at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center (TWPC). TWPC processes, repackages, and

39

File:07CAAPlantCommissioningProcessApplicationForCertification.pdf | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7CAAPlantCommissioningProcessApplicationForCertification.pdf 7CAAPlantCommissioningProcessApplicationForCertification.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:07CAAPlantCommissioningProcessApplicationForCertification.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 95 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 11:37, 9 July 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 11:37, 9 July 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (95 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 11:27, 12 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:27, 12 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (96 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

40

Gas purification facilities at Purex: Process study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of the results of a process study, requested by the Atomic Energy Commission an the recovery of krypton and xenon from irradiated uranium at the Hanford Purex Plant. This request was prompted by original Commission forecasts of the expanded requirements for Krypton-85 for commercial phosphorescent signal lights and markers and for xenon isotopes of low neutron cross-section for use in liquid xenon scintillation counters, in connection with D.M.A., government and university-sponsored work. It was requested that both Hanford and Savannah River submit order of magnitude cost estimates for recovery facilities at the respective sites for three separate design cases. The cost information developed, along with market survey information obtained-through the A. D. Little Company and Department of Defense market surveys, would serve as the basis for scheduling of the Hanford and Savannah River participation in the Commission`s overall fission rare gas recovery program.

Michels, L.R.; Gerhart, J.M.

1958-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

Certification Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certified Reference Material AOCS 0806-A AOCS 0806-B AOCS 0806-C AOCS 0806-D Report of the certification process for Conventional and EH92-527-1 Potato Potato Certified Reference Materials G. Clapper a

42

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility: Briefing on the Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a presentation outlining the Salt Waste Processing Facility process, major risks, approach for conducting reviews, discussion of the findings, and conclusions.

43

Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Process and Systems Process and Components Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds

44

Summary - SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Co SRS Co DOE S Proces concen actinid in a se remov adjustm sorben sorben solutio passed separa stream extract sufficie separa (with S vitrifica (DWP Sr/acti federa assure and ha Critica The te (CTE) descrip Readin The Ele Site: S roject: S F Report Date: J ited States Why DOE omposite High Lev Savannah Rive ssing Facility (S ntrate targeted des) from High eries of unit ope ved by contactin ment) with a m nt in a batch m nt (containing S on by cross flow d to a solvent e ated to an aque m. The bulk so tion process, w ently low levels ated high activi Sr and actinide ation in the Def F). Provisions inides adsorpti al project direct e that the plann ave been matu al Decision-3 ap What th eam identified e of the SWPF w ption. All CTE ness Level of 6 To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin

45

Pinellas Plant facts. [Products, processes, laboratory facilities  

SciTech Connect

This plant was built in 1956 in response to a need for the manufacture of neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology: hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials: plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at the Pinellas Plant has led directly to the assignment of the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator draw on the materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life. A product development and production capability in alumina ceramics, cermet (electrical) feedthroughs, and glass ceramics has become a specialty of the plant; the laboratories monitor the materials and processes used by the plant's commercial suppliers of ferroelectric ceramics. In addition to the manufacturing facility, a production development capability is maintained at the Pinellas Plant.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

DOE O 426.2 Admin Chg 1, Personnel Selection, Training, Qualification, and Certification Requirements for DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes selection, training, qualification, and certification requirements for contractor personnel who can impact the safety basis through their ...

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

47

Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) Project. The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at the SWPF Project. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred during August - September 2012. Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -

48

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP) Drawing List  

SciTech Connect

This supporting document delineates the process of identification, categorization, and/or classification of the WRAP facility drawings used to support facility operations and maintenance. This document provides a listing of those essential or safety related drawings which have been identified to date. All other WRAP facility drawings have been classified as general.

WEIDERT, J.R.

1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Gas Processing Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In North Dakota, materials purchased for building or expending gas processing facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes. Building materials, equipment, and other tangible property are eligible...

50

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development May 2011 August 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement...

51

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition.

52

NERSC Grid Certificates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Grid Certificates Grid Certificates | Tags: Grid Grid certificates allow you to access NERSC (and other Grid enabled computing facilities) via grid interfaces. Grid certificates are credentials that must be initialized for use with grid tools. Once a certificate is initialized it is automatically used by the grid tools to authenticate the user to the grid resource. Getting a Short Lived NERSC CA Certificate The NERSC Online CA now offers a quick and painless way to obtain grid certificates. You can obtain a grid certificate with a single command using this method. If you are on a NERSC system, load the globus module to set up your environment: % module load globus or % module load osg On the client system (assuming you have the globus binaries in your path), simply run:

53

Construction Begins on New Waste Processing Facility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Begins on New Waste Processing Facility Construction Begins on New Waste Processing Facility Construction Begins on New Waste Processing Facility February 9, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers construct a new facility that will help Los Alamos National Laboratory accelerate the shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad for permanent disposal. Workers construct a new facility that will help Los Alamos National Laboratory accelerate the shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad for permanent disposal. Construction has begun on a new facility that will help Los Alamos National Laboratory accelerate the shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste stored in large boxes at Technical Area 54, Area G. Construction has begun on a new facility that will help Los Alamos National

54

Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets Docket No. EO-05-01: Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets from Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, Virginia Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of

55

November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983 The Department begins construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina. DWPF is designed to make high-level nuclear waste into a glass-like substance, which will then be shipped to a repository. DWPF will mix borosilicate glass with the waste, heat it to 2000 degrees F, and pour the mixture into stainless steel canisters. The mixture will cool into solid glass that can be permanently stored. DWPF will immobilize the more than 34 million gallons of liquid high-level waste that have accumulated from producing defense-related nuclear materials

56

Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Services » Waste Management » Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet Nuclear material production operations at SRS resulted in the generation of liquid radioactive waste that is being stored, on an interim basis, in 49 underground waste storage tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms. SWPF Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications EIS-0082-S2: Amended Record of Decision Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report EIS-0082-S2: Record of Decision Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste Disposition Packaging and Transportation Site & Facility Restoration Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D)

57

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tech Assistance Tech Assistance Savannah River National Laboratory- Assess Adequacy of Process Knowledge for D&D Guidance for Determining Adequacy of Process Knowledge Page 1 of 2 Savannah River National Laboratory South Carolina Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Challenge The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. When such excess facilities are scheduled for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), among the tasks the responsible project team is faced with include the evaluation and planning for the removal, characterization, and disposition of all legacy

58

Constructibility review process framework for transportation facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constructibility is the optimum use of construction knowledge and experience in planning, design, procurement, and field operations in order to achieve overall project objectives ("Constructibility: a primer" 1986). This Thesis presents a framework for implementing constructibility to the transportation industry. The challenge of applying such a process to the transportation industry is the contracting strategy predominantly used: the design/bid/build strategy. In such a contracting environment construction is performed as a completely separate phase. Changes in key players occur once the project is awarded to the contractor. Contractors have little or no opportunity to provide input to planners and designers. The framework developed in this research consists of performing a series of constructibility functions during specific project development phases. Constructibility functions such as forming project teams, storing and retrieving constructibility lessons learned, and providing construction feedback to designers make the project development process more efficient. The computer technique used to build the Constructibility Review Process Framework is the IDEFO modeling technique. The technique is used for modeling functions in a process (decisions, actions, and activities) and the relationship between the functions (Mayer). The model was developed after a thorough investigation of the critical issues facing the state transportation agencies, and an understanding of the current environment these agencies operate in.

Liman, Majed

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW November 22, 2006 Conducted by: Harry Harmon, Team Lead Civil/Structural Sub Team Facility Safety Sub Team Engineering Sub Team Peter Lowry, Lead James Langsted, Lead George Krauter, Lead Robert Kennedy Chuck Negin Art Etchells Les Youd Jerry Evatt Oliver Block Loring Wyllie Richard Stark Tim Adams Tom Anderson Todd LaPointe Stephen Gosselin Carl Costantino Norman Moreau Patrick Corcoran John Christian Ken Cooper Kari McDaniel _____________________________ Harry D. Harmon ITR Team Leader SPD-SWPF-217 SPD-SWPF-217: Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review 11/22/2006 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The ITR Team wishes to thank Shari Clifford of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for

60

VST processing facility: first astronomical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VST--Tube is a new software package designed to process optical astronomical images. It is an automated pipeline to go from the raw exposures to fully calibrated co-added images, and to extract catalogs with aperture and PSF photometry. A set of tools allow the data administration and the quality check of the intermediate and final products. VST-Tube comes with a Graphical User Interface to facilitate the interaction between data and user. We outline here the VST--Tube architecture and show some applications enlightening some of the characteristics of the pipeline.

Grado, A; Limatola, L; Getman, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notified or aware of an upcoming inspection, and the time the inspector actually enters the material balance area or facility. Termed by the authors as delayed access, this period of time between inspection notice and inspector entrance to a facility poses a concern. Delayed access also has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of measures applied as part of the Safeguards Approach for a facility (such as short-notice inspections). This report investigates the feasibility of using process monitoring to address safeguards challenges posed by delayed access at a subset of facility types.

Curtis, Michael M.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Johnson, Shirley J.; Schanfein, Mark; Toomey, Christopher

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

Defense Waste Processing Facility -- Radioactive operations -- Part 3 -- Remote operations  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, South Carolina is the nation`s first and world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction period and nearly three years of non-radioactive testing, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. Radioactive glass is poured from the joule heated melter into the stainless steel canisters. The canisters are then temporarily sealed, decontaminated, resistance welded for final closure, and transported to an interim storage facility. All of these operations are conducted remotely with equipment specially designed for these processes. This paper reviews canister processing during the first nine months of radioactive operations at DWPF. The fundamental design consideration for DWPF remote canister processing and handling equipment are discussed as well as interim canister storage.

Barnes, W.M.; Kerley, W.D.; Hughes, P.D.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Overview of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides the international community with credible assurance that a State is fulfilling its nonproliferation obligations. The IAEA draws such conclusions from the evaluation of all available information. Effective and cost-efficient IAEA safeguards at the facility level are, and will remain, an important element of this State-level approach. Efficiently used, the Safeguards by Design (SBD) methodologies , , , now being developed can contribute to effective and cost-efficient facility-level safeguards. The Facility Safeguardability Assessment (FSA) introduced here supports SBD in three areas. 1. It describes necessary interactions between the IAEA, the State regulator, and the owner / designer of a new or modified facility to determine where SBD efforts can be productively applied, 2. It presents a screening approach intended to identify potential safeguard issues for; a) design changes to existing facilities; b) new facilities similar to existing facilities with approved safeguards approaches, and c) new designs, 3. It identifies resources (the FSA toolkit), such as good practice guides, design guidance, and safeguardability evaluation methods that can be used by the owner/designer to develop solutions for potential safeguards issues during the interactions with the State regulator and IAEA. FSA presents a structured framework for the application of the SBD tools developed in other efforts. The more a design evolves, the greater the probability that new safeguards issues could be introduced. Likewise, for first-of-a-kind facilities or research facilities that involve previously unused processes or technologies, it is reasonable to expect that a number of possible safeguards issues might exist. Accordingly, FSA is intended to help the designer and its safeguards experts identify early in the design process: Areas where elements of previous accepted safeguards approach(es) may be applied to facility modifications or new designs Modifications of the design that could mitigate a potential safeguards issue or facilitate a more efficient application of the safeguards approach Possible innovative ideas for more efficient application of safeguards The potential for changes in elements of the safeguard approach that may be required by IAEA as a result of facility design features and characteristics Other potential concerns These issues will then be presented to the IAEA and the state regulator to be resolved in a timely manner, ensuring that the planned safeguards approach is acceptable and compatible with the facility design. The proposed approach should be validated by application to suitable facilities to assess its utility, comprehensiveness, and cost-effectiveness. The approach and example application should also be reviewed by industry to confirm the conclusions reached in the DOE review.

Bari, Robert A.; Hockert, John; Wonder, Edward F.; Johnson, Shirley J.; Wigeland, Roald; Zentner, Michael D.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility: Briefing on the Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review Harry Harmon January 9, 2007 2 U.S. Department of Energy Outline * SWPF Process Overview * Major Risks * Approach for Conducting Review * Discussion of Findings * Conclusions 3 U.S. Department of Energy Salt Waste Processing Facility 4 U.S. Department of Energy SWPF Process Overview Alpha Finishing Process CSSX Alpha Strike Process MST/ Sludge Cs Strip Effluent DSS 5 U.S. Department of Energy BOTTOM LINE The SWPF Project is ready to move into final design. 6 U.S. Department of Energy Major Risks * Final geotechnical data potentially could result in redesign of the PC-3 CPA base mat and structure. * Cost and schedule impacts arising from the change from ISO-9001 to NQA-1 quality assurance requirements. * The "de-inventory, flush, and then hands-on

65

The Defense Waste Processing Facility: Two Years of Radioactive Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC is currently immobilizing high level radioactive sludge waste in borosilicate glass. The DWPF began vitrification of radioactive waste in May, 1996. Prior to that time, an extensive startup test program was completed with simulated waste. The DWPF is a first of its kind facility. The experience gained and data collected during the startup program and early years of operation can provide valuable information to other similar facilities. This experience involves many areas such as process enhancements, analytical improvements, glass pouring issues, and documentation/data collection and tracking. A summary of this experience and the results of the first two years of operation will be presented.

Marra, S.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Gee, J.T.; Sproull, J.F.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for Waste Receiving & Processing (WRAP) facility  

SciTech Connect

These Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) define the Administrative Controls required to ensure safe operation of the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). As will be shown in the report, Safety Limits, Limiting Control Settings, Limiting Conditions for Operation, and Surveillance Requirements are not required for safe operation of WRAP.

TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Uranium Processing Facility Finite Element Meshing Discussion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion ...Need picture of Building... October 25, 2011 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop 1 Loring Wyllie Arne Halterman Degenkolb Engineers, San Francisco Purpose of Presentation * Design vs. Analysis * Discuss the mesh criteria * Discuss the evolution of the mesh of the UPF main building model * Discuss how the mesh affects the analysis process October 25, 2011 2 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop FEM Modeling * GTStrudl typically used for DOE projects. * Mesh size is important * What is to be captured? * How complex is the system? * Current criteria set to capture in-plane and out-of-plane response. October 25, 2011 3

68

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report Kurt D. Gerdes Harry D. Harmon Herbert G. Sutter Major C. Thompson John R. Shultz Sahid C. Smith July 13, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 ii This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii Signatures SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iv This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility

69

Continuous Material Balance Reconciliation for a Modern Plutonium Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a safeguards approach that can be deployed at any modern plutonium processing facility to increase the level of safeguards assurance and significantly reduce the impact of safeguards on process operations. One of the most perplexing problems facing the designers of plutonium processing facilities is the constraint placed upon the limit of error of the inventory difference (LEID). The current DOE manual constrains the LEID for Category I and II material balance areas to 2 per cent of active inventory up to a Category II quantity of the material being processed. For 239Pu a Category II quantity is two kilograms. Due to the large material throughput anticipated for some of the modern plutonium facilities, the required LEID cannot be achieved reliably during a nominal two month inventory period, even by using state-of-the-science non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The most cost-effective and least disruptive solution appears to be increasing the frequency of material balance closure and thus reducing the throughput being measured during each inventory period. Current inventory accounting practices and systems can already provide the book inventory values at any point in time. However, closing the material balance with measured values has typically required the process to be cleaned out, and in-process materials packaged and measured. This process requires one to two weeks of facility down time every two months for each inventory, thus significantly reducing productivity. To provide a solution to this problem, a non-traditional approach is proposed that will include using in-line instruments to provide measurement of the process materials on a near real-time basis. A new software component will be developed that will operate with the standard LANMAS application to provide the running material balance reconciliation, including the calculation of the inventory difference and variance propagation. The combined measurement system and software implementation will make it possible for a facility to close material balances on a measured basis in a time period as short as one day.

CLARK, THOMAS G.

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

70

GRR/Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Section 401 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires a Water Quality Certification for any federal license or permit that is issued to construct or operate a facility, which may result in any fill or discharge into the navigable waters of the United States. The Utah Division of Water Quality oversees the 401 Water Quality Certification process in the state of Utah. The director of the Utah Division of Water Quality ("director") handles

71

Y-12s Building 9212 and the Uranium Processing Facility, part...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 The Uranium Processing Facility is planned to replace aged facilities at the Y-12 National Security Complex. Support for moving the construction of the facility ahead has caused...

72

Accident Fault Trees for Defense Waste Processing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document fault tree analyses which have been completed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) safety analysis. Logic models for equipment failures and human error combinations that could lead to flammable gas explosions in various process tanks, or failure of critical support systems were developed for internal initiating events and for earthquakes. These fault trees provide frequency estimates for support systems failures and accidents that could lead to radioactive and hazardous chemical releases both on-site and off-site. Top event frequency results from these fault trees will be used in further APET analyses to calculate accident risk associated with DWPF facility operations. This report lists and explains important underlying assumptions, provides references for failure data sources, and briefly describes the fault tree method used. Specific commitments from DWPF to provide new procedural/administrative controls or system design changes are listed in the ''Facility Commitments'' section. The purpose of the ''Assumptions'' section is to clarify the basis for fault tree modeling, and is not necessarily a list of items required to be protected by Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs).

Sarrack, A.G.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

Earn ENERGY STAR certification | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earn ENERGY STAR certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction...

74

Certification Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certification Report The certification of Conventional and Liberty Link (T25) Corn Leaf DNA Reference Materials Certified Reference Materials AOCS 0306-C and AOCS 0306-H G. Clapper and R. Ca

75

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation -- DWPF Late Wash Facility, Salt Process Cell and Chemical Process Cell  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Nuclear Waste will be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for long term storage and disposal. This is a nuclear criticality safety evaluation for the Late Wash Facility (LWF), the Salt Processing Cell (SPC) and the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). of the DWPF. Waste salt solution is processed in the Tank Farm In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process and is then further washed in the DWPF Late Wash Facility (LWF) before it is fed to the DWPF Salt Processing Cell. In the Salt Processing Cell the precipitate slurry is processed in the Precipitate Reactor (PR) and the resultant Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) produce is combined with the sludge feed and frit in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell to produce a melter feed. The waste is finally immobilized in the Melt Cell. Material in the Tank Farm and the ITP and Extended Sludge processes have been shown to be safe against a nuclear criticality by others. The precipitate slurry feed from ITP and the first six batches of sludge feed are safe against a nuclear criticality and this evaluation demonstrates that the processes in the LWF, the SPC and the CPC do not alter the characteristics of the materials to compromise safety.

Williamson, T.G.

1994-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

76

Tank 42 sludge-only process development for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)  

SciTech Connect

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the development of a sludge-only process for Tank 42 sludge since at the current processing rate, the Tank 51 sludge has been projected to be depleted as early as August 1998. Testing was completed using a non-radioactive Tank 42 sludge simulant. The testing was completed under a range of operating conditions, including worst case conditions, to develop the processing conditions for radioactive Tank 42 sludge. The existing Tank 51 sludge-only process is adequate with the exception that 10 percent additional acid is recommended during sludge receipt and adjustment tank (SRAT) processing to ensure adequate destruction of nitrite during the SRAT cycle.

Lambert, D.P.

2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

Equipment Certification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equipment Certification Equipment Certification Jump to: navigation, search Policies requiring renewable energy equipment to meet certain standards serve to protect consumers from buying inferior equipment. These requirements not only benefit consumers; they also protect the renewable energy industry by making it more difficult for substandard systems to reach the market. [1] Equipment Certification Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 19) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) Environmental Regulations Equipment Certification Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Generation Disclosure Industry Recruitment/Support Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Canada Commercial Construction Developer

78

Certification | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Certification Certification Certification THE CERTIFICATION PROCESS You Are Sponsored and Associated With the PMCDP Program. How Do You Proceed? Start by taking an inventory of your past project management training, developmental assignments, and experience. Organize the information by the applicable knowledge, skill, and ability as shown in the Certification and Equivalency Guide (CEG), as well as the training curriculum requirements set forth in the Requirements at a Glance Table, or the PMCDP Curriculum Map. Profile Data Entry Log onto ESS. Click on PMCDP at the top of the screen. A drop down menu will appear. Choose "Instructions" and read through the applicable Tutorial chapters before you begin entering data. Once you are comfortable with the data requirements, begin entering your profile information into

79

Strategic planning for LEED certification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intel Corporation has recently implemented a "green building" policy, which states that Intel will design all new facilities to achieve a minimum LEED-Silver certification. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental ...

Capuzzi, Angelo Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Operational Excellence Facilities Facilities...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Waste receiving and processing facility module 1, detailed design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WRAP 1 baseline documents which guided the technical development of the Title design included: (a) A/E Statement of Work (SOW) Revision 4C: This DOE-RL contractual document specified the workscope, deliverables, schedule, method of performance and reference criteria for the Title design preparation. (b) Functional Design Criteria (FDC) Revision 1: This DOE-RL technical criteria document specified the overall operational criteria for the facility. The document was a Revision 0 at the beginning of the design and advanced to Revision 1 during the tenure of the Title design. (c) Supplemental Design Requirements Document (SDRD) Revision 3: This baseline criteria document prepared by WHC for DOE-RL augments the FDC by providing further definition of the process, operational safety, and facility requirements to the A/E for guidance in preparing the design. The document was at a very preliminary stage at the onset of Title design and was revised in concert with the results of the engineering studies that were performed to resolve the numerous technical issues that the project faced when Title I was initiated, as well as, by requirements established during the course of the Title II design.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A survey of decontamination processes applicable to DOE nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this survey was to select an appropriate technology for in situ decontamination of equipment interiors as part of the decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This selection depends on knowledge of existing chemical decontamination methods. This report provides an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. According to available information, aqueous systems are probably the most universally used method for decontaminating and cleaning metal surfaces. We have subdivided the technologies, on the basis of the types of chemical solvents, into acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and miscellaneous systems. Two miscellaneous chemical decontamination methods (electrochemical processes and foam and gel systems) are also described. A concise technical description of various processes is given, and the report also outlines technical considerations in the choice of technologies, including decontamination effectiveness, waste handing, fields of application, and the advantages and limitations in application. On the basis of this survey, six processes were identified for further evaluation. 144 refs., 2 tabs.

Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Energy Efficiency Opportunities in California Food Processing Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California industry consumes over one-third of the states energy that is not used for electricity generating purposes. The California Energy Commissions (Energy Commission) industrial energy efficiency program has delivered technical assistance to the states industrial sector to reduce their operating costs and help them to remain competitive in a global economy. BestPractices training workshops offered by the local utilities with sponsorship from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Energy Commission cover process steam, process heating, compressed air, motor, pump, and fan systems. Technical services provided consist of conducting both targeted and plant-wide assessments of energy-consuming plant equipment and systems. Since 2004 the Commission has conducted 10 targeted and plant-wide assessments in industrial facilities associated with the food processing industry. Two of these assessments were Energy Savings Assessments (ESA) funded under the DOEs Save Energy Now Program. All the assessments used DOE software tools such as SSST, SSAT and 3E+ for steam system assessment and AirMaster+ for compressed air system assessment. Some of these audits are one-day walk through assessments. This paper summarizes the saving opportunities identified in these assessments with the focus on steam system assessments.

Wong, T.; Kazama, D; Wang, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

GRR/Section 7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process 7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-HI-b - Renewable Energy Facility Siting Process 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism Regulations & Policies Hawaii Revised Statutes 201N Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 15, Chapter 36 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf 07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

85

IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

86

SHIELD certification package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certification as applied to existing computer codes includes the verification and validation process, placing the code in configuration control, establishing user qualification standards and training requirements. All software intended for use in critical calculations must be certified. This report is intended to fulfill the requirements for the certification of the SHIELD, SHLDED, GEDIT, GENPRT, FIPROD, FPCALC, and PROCES modules of the SHIELD system built February, 1992, by W.S. Parks. These modules are used for burnup, cooling, separate, and edit calculations.

Boman, C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

BLENDING ANALYSIS FOR RADIOACTIVE SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated methods to mix and blend the contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank such as Tank 21 and Tank 24 to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The tank contents consist of three forms: dissolved salt solution, other waste salt solutions, and sludge containing settled solids. This paper focuses on developing the computational model and estimating the operation time of submersible slurry pump when the tank contents are adequately blended prior to their transfer to the SWPF facility. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach was taken by using the full scale configuration of SRS Type-IV tank, Tank 21H. Major solid obstructions such as the tank wall boundary, the transfer pump column, and three slurry pump housings including one active and two inactive pumps were included in the mixing performance model. Basic flow pattern results predicted by the computational model were benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data. Tank 21 is a waste tank that is used to prepare batches of salt feed for SWPF. The salt feed must be a homogeneous solution satisfying the acceptance criterion of the solids entrainment during transfer operation. The work scope described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the steady state flow pattern calculations before the addition of acid solution for tank blending operation and the transient mixing analysis during miscible liquid blending operation. The transient blending calculations were performed by using the 95% homogeneity criterion for the entire liquid domain of the tank. The initial conditions for the entire modeling domain were based on the steady-state flow pattern results with zero second phase concentration. The performance model was also benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data.

Lee, S.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration in a Meat Processing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A case study is reviewed on a heat recovery system installed in a meat processing facility to preheat water for the plant hot water supply. The system utilizes waste superheat from the facility's 1,350-ton ammonia refrigeration system. The heat recovery system consists of a shell and tube heat exchanger (16"? x 14'0") installed in the compressor hot gas discharge line. Water is recirculated from a 23,000-gallon tempered water storage tank to the heat exchanger by a circulating pump at the rate of 100 gallons per minute. All make-up water to the plant hot water system is supplied from this tempered water storage tank, which is maintained at a constant filled level. Tests to determine the actual rate of heat recovery were conducted from October 3, 1979 to October 12, 1979, disclosing an average usage of 147,000 gallons of hot water daily. These tests illustrated a varied heat recovery of from 0.5 to 1.0 million BTU per hour. The deviations were the result of both changing refrigeration demands and compressor operating modes. An average of 16 million BTU per day was realized, resulting in reduced boiler fuel costs of $30,000 annually, based on the present $.80 per gallon #2 fuel oil price. At the total installed cost of $79,000, including test instrumentation, the project was found to be economically viable. The study has demonstrated the technical and economic feasibility of refrigeration waste heat recovery as a positive energy conservation strategy which has broad applications in industry and commerce.

Murphy, W. T.; Woods, B. E.; Gerdes, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

New Waste Calcining Facility Non-radioactive Process Decontamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a test of the New Calcining Facility (NWCF) process decontamination system. The decontamination system test occurred in December 1981, during non-radioactive testing of the NWCF. The purpose of the decontamination system test was to identify equipment whose design prevented effective calcine removal and decontamination. Effective equipment decontamination was essential to reduce radiation fields for in-cell work after radioactive processing began. The decontamination system test began with a pre-decontamination inspection of the equipment. The pre-decontamination inspection documented the initial condition and cleanliness of the equipment. It provided a basis for judging the effectiveness of the decontamination. The decontamination consisted of a series of equipment flushes using nitric acid and water. A post-decontamination equipment inspection determined the effectiveness of the decontamination. The pre-decontamination and post-decontamination equipment inspections were documented with hotographs. The decontamination system was effective in removing calcine from most of the NWCF equipment as evidenced by little visible calcine residue in the equipment after decontamination. The decontamination test identified four areas where the decontamination system required improvement. These included the Calciner off-gas line, Cyclone off-gas line, fluidizing air line, and the Calciner baffle plates. Physical modifications to enhance decontamination were made to those areas, resulting in an effective NWCF decontamination system.

Swenson, Michael Clair

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

New Waste Calcining Facility Non-Radioactive Process Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a test of the New Calcining Facility (NWCF) process decontamination system. The decontamination system test occurred in December 1981, during non-radioactive testing of the NWCF. The purpose of the decontamination system test was to identify equipment whose design prevented effective calcine removal and decontamination. Effective equipment decontamination was essential to reduce radiation fields for in-cell work after radioactive processing began. The decontamination system test began with a pre-decontamination inspection of the equipment. The pre- decontamination inspection documented the initial condition and cleanliness of the equipment. It provided a basis for judging the effectiveness of the decontamination. The decontamination consisted of a series of equipment flushes using nitric acid and water. A post-decontamination equipment inspection determined the effectiveness of the decontamination. The pre-decontamination and post-decontamination equipment inspections were documented with photographs. The decontamination system was effective in removing calcine from most of the NWCF equipment as evidenced by little visible calcine residue in the equipment after decontamination. The decontamination test identified four areas where the decontamination system required improvement. These included the Calciner off-gas line, Cyclone off-gas line, fluidizing air line, and the Calciner baffle plates. Physical modifications to enhance decontamination were made to those areas, resulting in an effective NWCF decontamination system.

Swenson, Michael C.

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Building success : the role of the state in the cultural facility development process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the question of what is the current role of the state in the cultural facility development process, and, in light of facility-related warnings that have been made over the years, what role should ...

Choy, Carolyn (Carolyn Anne)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Evaluation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Public Outreach Program during the Certification Process at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The evaluation was charged with identifying for the WIPP recertification process. The evaluation consisted of 54 interviews of stakeholders from, the EPA WIPP web site, EPA WIPP public dockets, and toured the WIPP facility. Findings The evaluation team

93

Facility Siting and Layout Optimization Based on Process Safety.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work, a new approach to optimize facility layout for toxic release, fire and explosion scenarios is presented. By integrating a risk analysis in (more)

Jung, Seungho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Energy Analysis Department Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Analysis Department Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates: An Exploration of Policy Options about different approaches to clarifying the ownership of renewable energy certificates (RECs), focusing the output from certain Qualifying Facilities, including cogeneration and renewable energy generators · PURPA

95

Equipment Certification Requirements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equipment Certification Requirements Equipment Certification Requirements Jump to: navigation, search Policies requiring renewable energy equipment to meet certain standards serve to protect consumers from buying inferior equipment. These requirements not only benefit consumers; they also protect the renewable energy industry by making it more difficult for substandard systems to reach the market. [1] Contents 1 Equipment Certification Incentives 2 References Equipment Certification Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 19) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) Environmental Regulations Equipment Certification Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Generation Disclosure Industry Recruitment/Support Safety and Operational Guidelines

96

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.13 Operations Aspects of Facility Chemistry and Unique Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPERATIONS ASPECTS OF FACILITY CHEMISTRY AND UNIQUE PROCESSES OPERATIONS ASPECTS OF FACILITY CHEMISTRY AND UNIQUE PROCESSES 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that the contractor has provided for an effective interface between facility operations personnel and personnel responsible for operation of individual processes. The Facility Representative interviews facility and process operations personnel, observes ongoing work activities including shift rounds, and evaluates procedures and training for responding to off-normal or emergency conditions. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1032-93, Guide to Good Practices for Operations Aspects of Unique Processes 3.0 Requirements Implemented

97

Plantwide Energy Assessment of a Sugarcane Farming and Processing Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plantwide energy assessment was performed at Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co., an integrated sugarcane farming and processing facility on the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii. There were four main tasks performed for the plantwide energy assessment: 1) pump energy assessment in both field and factory operations, 2) steam generation assessment in the power production operations, 3) steam distribution assessment in the sugar manufacturing operation, and 4) electric power distribution assessment of the company system grid. The energy savings identified in each of these tasks were summarized in terms of fuel savings, electricity savings, or opportunity revenue that potentially exists mostly from increased electric power sales to the local electric utility. The results of this investigation revealed eight energy saving projects that can be implemented at HC&S. These eight projects were determined to have potential for $1.5 million in annual fuel savings or 22,337 MWh equivalent annual electricity savings. Most of the savings were derived from pump efficiency improvements and steam efficiency improvements both in generation and distribution. If all the energy saving projects were implemented and the energy savings were realized as less fuel consumed, there would be corresponding reductions in regulated air pollutants and carbon dioxide emissions from supplemental coal fuel. As HC&S is already a significant user of renewable biomass fuel for its operations, the projected reductions in air pollutants and emissions will not be as great compared to using only coal fuel for example. A classification of implementation priority into operations was performed for the identified energy saving projects based on payback period and ease of implementation.

Jakeway, L.A.; Turn, S.Q.; Keffer, V.I.; Kinoshita, C.M.

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

99

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

100

Summary - Salt Waste Processing Facility Design at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility ETR Report Date: November 2006 ETR-4 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Salt Waste Processing Facility Design at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is intended to remove and concentrate the radioactive strontium (Sr), actinides, and cesium (Cs) from the bulk salt waste solutions in the SRS high-level waste tanks. The sludge and strip effluent from the SWPF that contain concentrated Sr, actinide, and Cs wastes will be sent to the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), where they will be vitrified. The decontaminated salt solution (DSS) that is left after removal of the highly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GRR/Section 7-CA-c - California Energy Facility CPUC Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 7-CA-c - California Energy Facility CPUC Process GRR/Section 7-CA-c - California Energy Facility CPUC Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-CA-c - California Energy Facility CPUC Process 07CACCaliforniaEnergyFacilityCPUCProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Public Utilities Commission Regulations & Policies Warren-Alquist Energy Resources Conservation and Development Act General Order 131-D California Environmental Quality Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07CACCaliforniaEnergyFacilityCPUCProcess.pdf 07CACCaliforniaEnergyFacilityCPUCProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

102

Assessment of the ISO 9000 Quality Management System (QMS) Registrar Accreditation and Supplier Certification Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the assessment of key processes associated with administration and implementation of the International Organization for Standardization's (ISO's) family of standards known as ISO 9000. The results of this assessment were used to develop guidance to assist utilities when dedicating commercial-grade items procured from ISO 9000 suppliers. (The resulting guidance is published in EPRI Report 1003105, "Dedicating Commercial-Grade Items Procured From ISO 9000 Suppliers.")

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

103

Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

104

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

105

Overview of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary The safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is intended to provide the international community with credible assurance that a State is fulfilling its safeguards obligations. Effective and cost-efficient IAEA safeguards at the facility level are, and will remain, an important element of IAEA safeguards as those safeguards evolve towards a State-Level approach. The Safeguards by Design (SBD) concept can facilitate the implementation of these effective and cost-efficient facility-level safeguards (Bjornard, et al. 2009a, 2009b; IAEA, 1998; Wonder & Hockert, 2011). This report, sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administrations Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, introduces a methodology intended to ensure that the diverse approaches to Safeguards by Design can be effectively integrated and consistently used to cost effectively enhance the application of international safeguards.

Bari, Robert A.; Hockert, John; Wonder, Edward F.; Johnson, Scott J.; Wigeland, Roald; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial...

107

RECOMMENDED FRIT COMPOSITION FOR INITIAL SLUDGE BATCH 5 PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

FRIT OPTIMIZATION FOR SLUDGE BATCH PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

Fox, K.

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Facility design philosophy: Tank Waste Remediation System Process support and infrastructure definition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the current facility design philosophy for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process support and infrastructure definition. The Tank Waste Remediation System Facility Configuration Study (FCS) initially documented the identification and definition of support functions and infrastructure essential to the TWRS processing mission. Since the issuance of the FCS, the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has proceeded to develop information and requirements essential for the technical definition of the TWRS treatment processing programs.

Leach, C.E.; Galbraith, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Grant, P.R.; Francuz, D.J.; Schroeder, P.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter establishes the permitting standards for solid waste sites or facilities, the standards applicable to all solid waste sites or facilities, and the standards for certification of...

111

Safety analysis of IFR fuel processing in the Argonne National Laboratory Fuel Cycle Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) includes on-site processing and recycling of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process is being demonstrated in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL`s Idaho site. This paper describes the safety analyses that were performed in support of the FCF program; the resulting safety analysis report was the vehicle used to secure authorization to operate the facility and carry out the program, which is now under way. This work also provided some insights into safety-related issues of a commercial IFR fuel processing facility. These are also discussed.

Charak, I; Pedersen, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Forrester, R.J.; Phipps, R.D. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1

113

Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1

114

Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2011 May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and...

115

Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

KESSLER, S.F.

2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

116

DOE Certification Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Certification Programs DOE Certification Programs DOE Certification Programs The following are certification programs offered at DOE: Acquisition Career Management Program (ACMP) - is managed by the Office of Acquisition and Project Management's (OAPM) Professional Development Division (PDD). ACMP implements Federal Acquisition Certifications established by the Office of Federal Procurement Policy in accordance with the provisions of 41 USC 433 regarding professionalization of the non-DOD acquisition workforce. IT Project Management Qualification Process - is developed by the Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) to provide a framework for certifying Federal IT Project Managers as having the qualifications necessary to manage IT projects. Per the Office of Management and Budget

117

Plutonium production story at the Hanford site: processes and facilities history  

SciTech Connect

This document tells the history of the actual plutonium production process at the Hanford Site. It contains five major sections: Fuel Fabrication Processes, Irradiation of Nuclear Fuel, Spent Fuel Handling, Radiochemical Reprocessing of Irradiated Fuel, and Plutonium Finishing Operations. Within each section the story of the earliest operations is told, along with changes over time until the end of operations. Chemical and physical processes are described, along with the facilities where these processes were carried out. This document is a processes and facilities history. It does not deal with the waste products of plutonium production.

Gerber, M.S., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

118

Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas  

SciTech Connect

This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Summary - Salt Waste Processing Facility Design at the Savannah...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a seismically qualified valve that isolates the process system in the event of an earthquake. The design of this valve is very different from other valves which have been...

120

Zero-Release Mixed Waste Process Facility Design and Testing  

SciTech Connect

A zero-release offgas cleaning system for mixed-waste thermal treatment processes has been evaluated through experimental scoping tests and process modeling. The principles can possibly be adapted to a fluidized-bed calcination or stream reforming process, a waste melter, a rotarykiln process, and possibly other waste treatment thermal processes. The basic concept of a zero-release offgas cleaning system is to recycle the bulk of the offgas stream to the thermal treatment process. A slip stream is taken off the offgas recycle to separate and purge benign constituents that may build up in the gas, such as water vapor, argon, nitrogen, and CO2. Contaminants are separated from the slip stream and returned to the thermal unit for eventual destruction or incorporation into the waste immobilization media. In the current study, a standard packed-bed scrubber, followed by gas separation membranes, is proposed for removal of contaminants from the offgas recycle slipstream. The scrub solution is continuously regenerated by cooling and precipitating sulfate, nitrate, and other salts that reach a solubility limit in the scrub solution. Mercury is also separated by the scrubber. A miscible chemical oxidizing agent was shown to effectively oxidize mercury and also NO, thus increasing their removal efficiency. The current study indicates that the proposed process is a viable option for reducing offgas emissions. Consideration of the proposed closed-system offgas cleaning loop is warranted when emissions limits are stringent, or when a reduction in the total gas emissions volume is desired. Although the current closed-loop appears to be technically feasible, economical considerations must be also be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Richard D. Boardman; John A. Deldebbio; Robert J. Kirkham; Martin K. Clemens; Robert Geosits; Ping Wan

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Grout pump selection process for the Transportable Grout Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selected low-level radioactive liquid wastes at Hanford will be disposed by grouting. Grout is formed by mixing the liquid wastes with solid materials, including Portland cement, fly ash, and clay. The mixed grouts will be pumped to disposal sites (e.g., trenches and buried structures) where the grout will be allowed to harden and, thereby, immobilize the wastes. A Transportable Grout Facility (TGF) will be constructed and operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations to perform the grouting function. A critical component of the TGF is the grout pump. A preliminary review of pumping requirements identified reciprocating pumps and progressive cavity pumps as the two classes of pumps best suited for the application. The advantages and disadvantages of specific types of pumps within these two classes were subsequently investigated. As a result of this study, the single-screw, rotary positive displacement pump was identified as the best choice for the TGF application. This pump has a simple design, is easy to operate, is rugged, and is suitable for a radioactive environment. It produces a steady, uniform flow that simplifies suction and discharge piping requirements. This pump will likely require less maintenance than reciprocating pumps and can be disassembled rapidly and decontaminated easily. If the TGF should eventually require discharge pressures in excess of 500 psi, a double-acting duplex piston pump is recommended because it can operate at low speed, with only moderate flow rate fluctuations. However, the check valves, stuffing box, piston, suction, and discharge piping must be designed carefully to allow trouble-free operations.

McCarthy, D.; Treat, R.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The performance assessment process for DOE low-level waste disposal facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety of the low-level waste disposal facilities, as well as al US DOE facilities, is a primary criterion in their design and operation. Safety of low-level waste disposal facilities is evaluated from two perspectives. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation. The safety evaluations vary from simple safety assessments to very complex safety analysis reports, depending on the degree of hazard associated with the facility operation. Operational requirements for the Department's low-level waste disposal facilities, including long-term safety are contained in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management (1). This paper will focus on the process of conducting long-term performance analyses rather than on operational safety analysis.

Wilhite, E.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The performance assessment process for DOE low-level waste disposal facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety of the low-level waste disposal facilities, as well as al US DOE facilities, is a primary criterion in their design and operation. Safety of low-level waste disposal facilities is evaluated from two perspectives. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation. The safety evaluations vary from simple safety assessments to very complex safety analysis reports, depending on the degree of hazard associated with the facility operation. Operational requirements for the Department`s low-level waste disposal facilities, including long-term safety are contained in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management (1). This paper will focus on the process of conducting long-term performance analyses rather than on operational safety analysis.

Wilhite, E.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This ACDR was performed following completed of the Conceptual Design Report in July 1992; the work encompassed August 1992 to January 1994. Mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage at Hanford and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford from about DOE sites. This volume provides an introduction to the ACDR process and the scope of the task along with a project summary of the facility, treatment technologies, cost, and schedule. Major areas of departure from the CDR are highlighted. Descriptions of the facility layout and operations are included.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Potential For Energy, Peak Demand, and Water Savings in California Tomato Processing Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tomato processing is a major component of California's food industry. Tomato processing is extremely energy intensive, with the processing season coinciding with the local electrical utility peak period. Significant savings are possible in the electrical energy, peak demand, natural gas consumption, and water consumption of facilities. The electrical and natural gas energy usage and efficiency measures will be presented for a sample of California tomato plants. A typical end-use distribution of electrical energy in these plants will be shown. Results from potential electrical efficiency, demand response, and natural gas efficiency measures that have applications in tomato processing facilities will be presented. Additionally, water conservation measures and the associated savings will be presented. It is shown that an estimated electrical energy savings of 12.5%, electrical demand reduction of 17.2%, natural gas savings of 6.0%, and a fresh water usage reduction of 15.6% are achievable on a facility-wide basis.

Trueblood, A. J.; Wu, Y. Y.; Ganji, A. R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A case study of process facility optimization using discrete event simulation and genetic algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization problems such as resource allocation, job-shop scheduling, equipment utilization and process scheduling occur in a broad range of processing industries. This paper presents modeling, simulation and optimization of a port facility such that ... Keywords: GA, bulk handling port system, optimization, simulation

K. P. Dahal; S. J. Galloway; G. M. Burt; J. R. McDonald; I. Hopkins

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

512-S Facility, Actinide Removal Process Radiological Design Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains top-level requirements for the various areas of radiological protection for workers. Detailed quotations of the requirements for applicable regulatory documents can be found in the Radiological Design Summary Report Implementation Guide. For the purposes of demonstrating compliance with these requirements, per Engineering Standard 01064, ''shall consider / shall evaluate'' indicates that the designer must examine the requirement for the design and either incorporate or provide a technical justification as to why the requirement is not incorporated. This report describes how the Building 512-S, Actinide Removal Process meets the required radiological design criteria and requirements based on 10CFR835, DOE Order 420.1A, WSRC Manual 5Q and various other DOE guides and handbooks. The analyses supporting this Radiological Design Summary Report initially used a source term of 10.6 Ci/gallon of Cs-137 as the basis for bulk shielding calculations. As the project evolved, the source term was reduced to 1.1 Ci/gallon of Cs-137. This latter source term forms the basis for later dose rate evaluations.

Nathan, S.J.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nuclear Solid Waste Processing Design at the Idaho Spent Fuels Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spent nuclear fuels (SNF) repackaging and storage facility was designed for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with nuclear solid waste processing capability. Nuclear solid waste included contaminated or potentially contaminated spent fuel containers, associated hardware, machinery parts, light bulbs, tools, PPE, rags, swabs, tarps, weld rod, and HEPA filters. Design of the nuclear solid waste processing facilities included consideration of contractual, regulatory, ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) exposure, economic, logistical, and space availability requirements. The design also included non-attended transfer methods between the fuel packaging area (FPA) (hot cell) and the waste processing area. A monitoring system was designed for use within the FPA of the facility, to pre-screen the most potentially contaminated fuel canister waste materials, according to contact- or non-contact-handled capability. Fuel canister waste materials which are not able to be contact-handled after attempted decontamination will be processed remotely and packaged within the FPA. Noncontact- handled materials processing includes size-reduction, as required to fit into INEEL permitted containers which will provide sufficient additional shielding to allow contact handling within the waste areas of the facility. The current design, which satisfied all of the requirements, employs mostly simple equipment and requires minimal use of customized components. The waste processing operation also minimizes operator exposure and operator attendance for equipment maintenance. Recently, discussions with the INEEL indicate that large canister waste materials can possibly be shipped to the burial facility without size-reduction. New waste containers would have to be designed to meet the drop tests required for transportation packages. The SNF waste processing facilities could then be highly simplified, resulting in capital equipment cost savings, operational time savings, and significantly improved ALARA exposure.

Dippre, M. A.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

129

File:07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:07HIBRenewableEnergyFacilitySitingProcessREFSP.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 3 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:39, 27 December 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:39, 27 December 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 3 pages (124 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information)

130

GRR/Section 18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) 18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) 18CABRCRAProcess (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances Control Regulations & Policies Resource Conservation and Recovery Act 40 CRF 261 Title 22, California Code of Regulations, Division 4.5 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18CABRCRAProcess (2).pdf 18CABRCRAProcess (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

131

Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP), 2336W Building, on the Hanford Site is designed to receive, confirm, repackage, certify, treat, store, and ship contact-handled transuranic and low-level radioactive waste from past and present U.S. Department of Energy activities. The WRAP facility is comprised of three buildings: 2336W, the main processing facility (also referred to generically as WRAP); 2740W, an administrative support building; and 2620W, a maintenance support building. The support buildings are subject to the normal hazards associated with industrial buildings (no radiological materials are handled) and are not part of this analysis except as they are impacted by operations in the processing building, 2336W. WRAP is designed to provide safer, more efficient methods of handling the waste than currently exist on the Hanford Site and contributes to the achievement of as low as reasonably achievable goals for Hanford Site waste management.

TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

132

ENERGY STAR certification for your building | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

certification for your building certification for your building Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Find financing Earn recognition 20-percent recognition ENERGY STAR certification How to apply for ENERGY STAR certification Tips for low-cost verifications Submit a profile of your building

133

ENERGY STAR certification | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR certification ENERGY STAR certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Find out who's partnered with ENERGY STAR Become an ENERGY STAR partner Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants ENERGY STAR certification Featured research and reports Facts and stats Climate change and buildings ENERGY STAR certification

134

Waste minimization and the goal of an environmentally benign plutonium processing facility: A strategic plan  

SciTech Connect

To maintain capabilities in nuclear weapons technologies, the Department of Energy (DOE) has to maintain a plutonium processing facility that meets all the current and emerging standards of environmental regulations. A strategic goal to transform the Plutonium Processing Facility at Los Alamos into an environmentally benign operation is identified. A variety of technologies and systems necessary to meet this goal are identified. Two initiatives now in early stages of implementation are described in some detail. A highly motivated and trained work force and a systems approach to waste minimization and pollution prevention are necessary to maintain technical capabilities, to comply with regulations, and to meet the strategic goal.

Pillay, K.K.S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

On software certification: we need product-focused approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we begin by examining the certification of a consumer product, a baby walker, that is product-focused, i.e., the certification process requires the performance of precisely defined tests on the product with measurable ...

Alan Wassyng; Tom Maibaum; Mark Lawford

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Recycling Partnership Plastics Separation Pilot Plant Vehicle Recycling Partnership Plastics Separation Pilot Plant Sam Jody and displays recycled plastics Bassam Jody displays plastics recovered from shredder residue by the Argonne separation process and successfully tested for making auto parts. The Challenge of Separating Plastic Waste Separating plastics at high concentrations from waste streams has been a challenge because many conventional separation methods depend on material density or employ organic solvents. Many plastics have overlapping densities and, therefore, could not be separated from each other based on density differences alone. Organic solvents pose environmental risks. Argonne's Froth-flotation Process Argonne has developed a process for separating individual polymers and groups of compatible polymers from various polymer rich waste streams. The

137

Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designers attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

Coles, Garill A.; Hockert, John; Gitau, Ernest TN; Zentner, Michael D.

2013-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

138

Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designers attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

Coles, Garill A.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

139

Assessment of nuclear safety and nuclear criticality potential in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will initially process Batch 1 sludge in the sludge-only processing mode, with simulated non-radioactive Precipitate Hydrolysis, Aqueous (PHA) product, without the risk of nuclear criticality. The dilute concentration of fissile material in the sludge combined with excess of neutron absorbers during normal operations make criticality throughout the whole process incredible. Subsequent batches of the DWPF involving radioactive precipitate slurry and PHA will require additional analysis. Any abnormal or upset process operations, which are not considered in this report and could potentially separate fissile material, must be individually evaluated. Scheduled maintenance operation procedures are not considered to be abnormal.

Ha, B.C.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

Standards and Certification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Standards and Certification. Voluntary Voting System Guidelines (VVSG). The Help America Vote Act instructed the Election ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

IBM Certification White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IBM Certification White Paper The value of IT Certification #12;The value of IT Certification White · Respect and admiration of peers · Entrance into a community of like-minded professionals This white paper that can be evaluated in terms of ROI. Those most often #12;The value of IT Certification White paper

142

AOCS Membership Certificate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certificates are 8 1/2 x 11 and are suitable for framing. AOCS Membership Certificate Membership Merchandise Membership Merchandise These two color certificates are signed by the AOCS President. Certificates are 8 1/2 x 11 and are suitable for fr

143

Liquid Waste Processing Facilities (LWPF) Reliability and Availability and Maintainability (RAM) Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) analysis was prepared for the liquid effluents support being provided to the River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The availability of liquid effluents services to the WTP was determined. Recommendations are provided on improvements and upgrades to increase the availability of the Liquid Waste Processing Facilities treatment and disposal systems.

LOWE, S.S.

2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

144

Chilled Ammonia Process Product Validation Facility at American Electric Power Mountaineer Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A CO2 capture and storage (CCS) pilot plant was constructed at American Electric Powers (AEPs) 1300-MWe Mountaineer station in New Haven, West Virginia, employing Alstom Powers Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP). The CAP Product Validation Facility (PVF) treated a slipstream of flue gas from ...

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

LANL | Partnering | User Facility - Los Alamos National Lab ...  

The facility's runs a pulse standard certification program for outside users. The HSEL facilities comprise over 1,200 square feet of laboratory and office space.

146

Trace component analysis of process hydrogen streams at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes subcontracted work done by the Radian Corporation to analyze trace components in process hydrogen streams at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The data will be used to help define whether the gas streams to be treated in the hydrogen processing unit in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant will require further treatment to remove trace contaminants that could be explosive under certain conditions. 2 references.

Bronfenbrenner, J.C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

American Electric Power/Alstom Chilled Ammonia Process Validation Facility -- Material Inspection Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A CO2 capture and storage (CCS) pilot plant was constructed at American Electric Powers (AEPs) 1300-MWe Mountaineer station in New Haven, West Virginia, employing Alstom Powers Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP). This CAP Process Validation Facility (PVF) was operated for 7900 hours between September 2009 and May 2011, when the demonstration ended. One of the objectives of the program was a determination of the adequacy of the materials that had been selected for the ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

148

Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Weight Scale Analysis Fairbanks Weight Scale Evaluation Results  

SciTech Connect

Fairbanks Weight Scales are used at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility to determine the weight of waste drums as they are received, processed, and shipped. Due to recent problems, discovered during calibration, the WRAP Engineering Department has completed this document which outlines both the investigation of the infeed conveyor scale failure in September of 1999 and recommendations for calibration procedure modifications designed to correct deficiencies in the current procedures.

JOHNSON, M.D.

2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

149

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System Software Requirements Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

Brann, E.C. II

1994-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

Nuclear criticality safety analysis summary report: The S-area defense waste processing facility  

SciTech Connect

The S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) can process all of the high level radioactive wastes currently stored at the Savannah River Site with negligible risk of nuclear criticality. The characteristics which make the DWPF critically safe are: (1) abundance of neutron absorbers in the waste feeds; (2) and low concentration of fissionable material. This report documents the criticality safety arguments for the S-Area DWPF process as required by DOE orders to characterize and to justify the low potential for criticality. It documents that the nature of the waste feeds and the nature of the DWPF process chemistry preclude criticality.

Ha, B.C.

1994-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

Safeguards design strategies: designing and constructing new uranium and plutonium processing facilities in the United States  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) is transforming its outdated and oversized complex of aging nuclear material facilities into a smaller, safer, and more secure National Security Enterprise (NSE). Environmental concerns, worker health and safety risks, material security, reducing the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy while maintaining the capability for an effective nuclear deterrence by the United States, are influencing this transformation. As part of the nation's Uranium Center of Excellence (UCE), the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, will advance the U.S.'s capability to meet all concerns when processing uranium and is located adjacent to the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF), designed for consolidated storage of enriched uranium. The HEUMF became operational in March 2010, and the UPF is currently entering its final design phase. The designs of both facilities are for meeting anticipated security challenges for the 21st century. For plutonium research, development, and manufacturing, the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement (CMRR) building at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico is now under construction. The first phase of the CMRR Project is the design and construction of a Radiological Laboratory/Utility/Office Building. The second phase consists of the design and construction of the Nuclear Facility (NF). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) selected these two sites as part of the national plan to consolidate nuclear materials, provide for nuclear deterrence, and nonproliferation mission requirements. This work examines these two projects independent approaches to design requirements, and objectives for safeguards, security, and safety (3S) systems as well as the subsequent construction of these modern processing facilities. Emphasis is on the use of Safeguards-by-Design (SBD), incorporating Systems Engineering (SE) principles for these two projects.

Scherer, Carolynn P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Long, Jon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

152

Use of process monitoring for verifying facility design of large-scale reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect

During the decade of the 1990s, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) faces the challenge of implementing safeguards in large, new reprocessing facilities. The Agency will be involved in the design, construction, checkout and initial operation of these new facilities to ensure effective safeguards are implemented. One aspect of the Agency involvement is in the area of design verification. The United States Support Program has initiated a task to develop methods for applying process data collection and validation during the cold commissioning phase of plant construction. This paper summarizes the results of this task. 14 refs., 1 tab.

Hakkila, E.A.; Zack, N.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ehinger, M.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Franssen, F. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report FY 2002 (October 1, 2001-September 30, 2002)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary user centers: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing (including extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, and high-density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, and bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; and (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high-performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials databases A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state-of-the-art materials characterization capabilities, and high-performance computing to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized user-submitted proposal and a user agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provided free of charge, while for proprietary efforts, the user pays the entire project costs based on DOE guidelines for ORNL costs.

Angelini, P

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Identification of Process Energy and Pollution Reduction Opportunities at DoD Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities operated by the Department of Defense consume large amounts of energy and emit significant quantities of air pollutants. Recent Executive Orders issued by the President set goals for increased energy efficiency and reduced emissions which must be met by these industrial facilities. These new energy and environmental directives in most instances exceed the performance capabilities of DoD's installed industrial technologies. Cost-effective compliance with these directives in the existing DoD industrial base will require a thorough evaluation of DoD industrial activities and their potential for improvements. Understanding the energy-use patterns and options in DoD production sites could be invaluable in identifying energy and emission reduction opportunities. Under the sponsorship of the Federal Energy Management program, the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (US ACERL) initiated a project to identify energy and pollution reduction opportunities in processes at DoD industrial facilities in which reduced energy consumption can, via energy efficiency and operational improvements, simultaneously bring about significant reduction of pollutant emissions. In this project, major DoD industrial energy-consuming activities were screened and qualitatively evaluated with respect to their potential to emit pollutants. Site visits were made to representative bases, one for each of the three services, to (1) collect and evaluate available energy consumption/emissions data, (2) directly observe various types of process activities and operations, (3) examine facility conditions, and (4) recommend energy conservation opportunities to reduce energy use and pollution. Based on the opportunities identified, as well as data from other studies and a review of other installations, estimates of generalized DoD-wide process energy savings were developed. A significant amount of potential energy savings were identified. It is recommended that additional work would be beneficial to develop a process database with equipment inventory as well as energy consumption information at DoD industrial facilities, which could then be used to identify and evaluate specific opportunities.

Lin, M. C.; Northrup, J. I.; Smith, E. D.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

SEISMIC DESIGN REQUIREMENTS SELECTION METHODOLOGY FOR THE SLUDGE TREATMENT & M-91 SOLID WASTE PROCESSING FACILITIES PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

In complying with direction from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) (07-KBC-0055, 'Direction Associated with Implementation of DOE-STD-1189 for the Sludge Treatment Project,' and 08-SED-0063, 'RL Action on the Safety Design Strategy (SDS) for Obtaining Additional Solid Waste Processing Capabilities (M-91 Project) and Use of Draft DOE-STD-I 189-YR'), it has been determined that the seismic design requirements currently in the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) will be modified by DOE-STD-1189, Integration of Safety into the Design Process (March 2007 draft), for these two key PHMC projects. Seismic design requirements for other PHMC facilities and projects will remain unchanged. Considering the current early Critical Decision (CD) phases of both the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and the Solid Waste Processing Facilities (M-91) Project and a strong intent to avoid potentially costly re-work of both engineering and nuclear safety analyses, this document describes how Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) will maintain compliance with the PHMC by considering both the current seismic standards referenced by DOE 0 420.1 B, Facility Safety, and draft DOE-STD-1189 (i.e., ASCE/SEI 43-05, Seismic Design Criteria for Structures, Systems, and Components in Nuclear Facilities, and ANSI!ANS 2.26-2004, Categorization of Nuclear Facility Structures, Systems and Components for Seismic Design, as modified by draft DOE-STD-1189) to choose the criteria that will result in the most conservative seismic design categorization and engineering design. Following the process described in this document will result in a conservative seismic design categorization and design products. This approach is expected to resolve discrepancies between the existing and new requirements and reduce the risk that project designs and analyses will require revision when the draft DOE-STD-1189 is finalized.

RYAN GW

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

Just-in-time characterization and certification of DOE-generated wastes  

SciTech Connect

Transportation and disposal of wastes generated by Department of Energy (DOE) activities, including weapons production and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities, require that wastes be certified as complying with various regulations and requirements. These certification requirements are typically summarized by disposal sites in their specific waste acceptance criteria. Although a large volume of DOE wastes have been generated by past activities and are presently in storage awaiting disposal, a significant volume of DOE wastes, particularly from D&D projects. have not yet been generated. To prepare DOE-generated wastes for disposal in an efficient manner. it is suggested that a program of just-in-time characterization and certification be adopted. The goal of just-in-time characterization and certification, which is based on the just-in-time manufacturing process, is to streamline the certification process by eliminating redundant layers of oversight and establishing pro-active waste management controls. Just-in-time characterization and certification would rely on a waste management system in which wastes are characterized at the point of generation, precertified as they are generated (i.e., without iterative inspections and tests subsequent to generation and storage), and certified at the point of shipment, ideally the loading dock of the building from which the wastes are generated. Waste storage would be limited to accumulating containers for cost-efficient transportation.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Primozic, F.J. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility A photo of a grey, three-story research facility on a large campus. The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) incorporates a large number of energy efficiency and sustainability practices into its cutting-edge design. This facility received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Gold-level certification from the U.S. Green Building Council and supports a variety of advanced biofuels projects and enables researchers and industry partners to develop, test, evaluate, and demonstrate processes for the production of bio-based products and fuels. Fast Facts Cost: $33.5M Square feet: 27,000 Occupants: 32 Labs/Equipment: high-bay biochemical conversion pilot plant that

158

Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD).

Sullivan, N.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

Assessment of nuclear safety and nuclear criticality potential in the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

A panel of experts in the fields of process engineering, process chemistry, and safety analysis met together on January 26, 1993, and February 19, 1993, to discuss nuclear safety and nuclear criticality potential in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes. Nuclear safety issues and possibilities of nuclear criticality incidents in the DWPF were examined in depth. The discussion started at the receipt of slurry feeds: The Low Point Pump Pit Precipitate Tank (LPPPPT) and the Low Point Pump Pit Sludge Tank (LPPPST), and went into detail the whole DWPF processes. This report provides discussion of each of the areas and processes of the DWPF in terms of potential nuclear safety issues and nuclear criticality concerns.

Ha, B.C.

1993-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term.

Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States); Peterson, P.K. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States)

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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161

Review of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of5 of5 U.S. Department of Energy Subject: Review of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Line:~ HS: Rev: Eff. Date: HSS CRAD 45-57 0 January 31,2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Acting Direc or, Office of Sifety and Emergency Management Evaluations Date: January 31, 2013 Criteria Review and Approach Document LL.v. ~·M Criteria Lead:ife\riew of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Page 1 of 5 Date: January 31, 2013 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), the Office of Enforcement and Oversight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) mission is to assess the effectiveness of the

162

Automation of a cryogenic facility by commercial process-control computer  

SciTech Connect

To insure that Brookhaven's superconducting magnets are reliable and their field quality meets accelerator requirements, each magnet is pre-tested at operating conditions after construction. MAGCOOL, the production magnet test facility, was designed to perform these tests, having the capacity to test ten magnets per five day week. This paper describes the control aspects of MAGCOOL and the advantages afforded the designers by the implementation of a commercial process control computer system.

Sondericker, J.H.; Campbell, D.; Zantopp, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Technical evaluation of the waste-to-oil process development facility at Albany, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The broad objective of ERDA's solar energy program at Albany, Oregon, is to develop biomass-to-synfuel technology in the Albany process development facility, which is now nearing completion. In the study reported here, the process development plant design was reevaluated, and a number of modifications and additions are recommended to facilitate and accelerate development of biomass conversion processes. Sketches of the recommended modifications and estimates of costs and installation time schedules have been provided. It has been found expedient to implement some of these modifications before construction is completed. Biomass-to-synfuel processes under development or under consideration elsewhere have been reviewed, and some have been identified that are appropriate for further development at Albany. Potential environmental impacts associated with the operation of the Albany, Oregon, facility were reviewed to identify the magnitude of the impacts and the effects of any resultant operational constraints. Two discrete environmental impact categories have been identified with respect to process development operation. These are (1) production, storage, and disposal of product oil and residual solid, liquid, and gaseous waste; and (2) disturbances to the local community. An assessment has been made of unit process waste discharges and mitigation procedures, environmental setting and community considerations, possible operational constraints, and monitoring programs.

Houle, E.H.; Ciriello, S.F.; Ergun, S.; Basuino, D.J.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hanford Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable Design in EM Complex: New groundwater treatment facility will be Hanford's largest, greenest pump-and-treat system Hanford Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable Design in EM Complex: New groundwater treatment facility will be Hanford's largest, greenest pump-and-treat system May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers use a lift to access part of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility. Workers use a lift to access part of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility. Pump-and-treat construction managers David Fink (left) and Delise Pargmann (right) review information for the LEED gold certification of the main process building for the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility.

165

Improved Uranium Recovery from the Process Streams in an Electroplating Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses results of testing to improve uranium recovery from the process streams in an electroplating facility. Cylindrical uranium slugs are used as irradiation targets in the production reactors at the Savannah River Plant. These slugs are first chemically etched, nickel plated, encased in aluminum, inspected, and individually pressure tested. An improved process was developed to recover the uranium from the acidic etching streams for controlling pH and the PO4 to U ratio so that the precipitation of the uranium as hydrogen uranyl phosphate was maximized.

Pickett, J.B.

1984-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

166

Involvement of Certification Agencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are also used with other specific meanings, MIL-HDBK- 17 (qualification and certification) or a government

167

Self Certifications | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Policy Coordination and Implementation » Electricity Policy Coordination and Implementation » International Electricity Regulation » Self Certifications Self Certifications Title II of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.), provides that no new baseload electric powerplant may be constructed or operated without the capability to use coal or another alternate fuel as a primary energy source. In order to meet the requirement of coal capability, the owner or operator of such facilities proposing to use natural gas or petroleum as its primary energy source shall certify, pursuant to FUA section 201(d), and Section 501.60(a)(2) of DOE's regulations to the Secretary of Energy prior to construction, or prior to operation as a base load powerplant, that such

168

Tritium Facilities Modernization and Consolidation Project Process Waste Assessment (Project S-7726)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the Tritium Facility Modernization {ampersand} Consolidation (TFM{ampersand}C) Project (S-7726) at the Savannah River Site (SS), all tritium processing operations in Building 232-H, with the exception of extraction and obsolete/abandoned systems, will be reestablished in Building 233-H. These operations include hydrogen isotopic separation, loading and unloading of tritium shipping and storage containers, tritium recovery from zeolite beds, and stripping of nitrogen flush gas to remove tritium prior to stack discharge. The scope of the TFM{ampersand}C Project also provides for a new replacement R&D tritium test manifold in 233-H, upgrading of the 233- H Purge Stripper and 233-H/234-H building HVAC, a new 234-H motor control center equipment building and relocating 232-H Materials Test Facility metallurgical laboratories (met labs), flow tester and life storage program environment chambers to 234-H.

Hsu, R.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Oji, L.N.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Public Address System Review Findings  

SciTech Connect

Public address system operation at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility was reviewed. The review was based on an Operational Readiness Review finding that public address performance was not adequate in parts of the WRAP facility. Several improvements were made to the WRAP Public Address (PA) system to correct the deficiencies noted. Speaker gain and position was optimized. A speech processor was installed to boost intelligibility in high noise areas. Additional speakers were added to improve coverage in the work areas. The results of this evaluation indicate that further PA system enhancements are not warranted. Additional speakers cannot compensate for the high background sound and high reverberation levels found in the work areas. Recommendations to improve PA system intelligibility include minor speaker adjustments, enhanced PA announcement techniques, and the use of sound reduction and abatement techniques where economically feasible.

HUMPHRYS, K.L.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

170

Program for certification of waste from contained firing facility: Establishment of waste as non-reactive and discussion of potential waste generation problems  

SciTech Connect

Debris from explosives testing in a shot tank that contains 4 weight percent or less of explosive is shown to be non-reactive under the specified testing protocol in the Code of Federal Regulations. This debris can then be regarded as a non-hazardous waste on the basis of reactivity, when collected and packaged in a specified manner. If it is contaminated with radioactive components (e.g. depleted uranium), it can therefore be disposed of as radioactive waste or mixed waste, as appropriate (note that debris may contain other materials that render it hazardous, such as beryllium). We also discuss potential waste generation issues in contained firing operations that are applicable to the planned new Contained Firing Facility (CFF). The goal of this program is to develop and document conditions under which shot debris from the planned Contained Firing Facility (CFF) can be handled, shipped, and accepted for waste disposal as non-reactive radioactive or mixed waste. This report fulfills the following requirements as established at the outset of the program: 1. Establish through testing the maximum level of explosive that can be in a waste and still have it certified as non-reactive. 2. Develop the procedure to confirm the acceptability of radioactive-contaminated debris as non-reactive waste at radioactive waste disposal sites. 3. Outline potential disposal protocols for different CFF scenarios (e.g. misfires with scattered explosive).

Green, L., Garza, R., Maienschein, J., Pruneda, C.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Darlington tritium removal facility and station upgrading plant dynamic process simulation  

SciTech Connect

Ontario Power Generation Nuclear (OPGN) has a 4 x 880 MWe CANDU nuclear station at its Darlington Nuclear Div. located in Bowmanville. The station has been operating a Tritium Removal Facility (TRF) and a D{sub 2}O station Upgrading Plant (SUP) since 1989. Both facilities were designed with a Distributed Control System (DCS) and programmable logic controllers (PLC) for process control. This control system was replaced with a DCS only, in 1998. A dynamic plant simulator was developed for the Darlington TRF (DTRF) and the SUP, as part of the computer control system replacement. The simulator was used to test the new software, required to eliminate the PLCs. The simulator is now used for operator training and testing of process control software changes prior to field installation. Dynamic simulation will be essential for the ITER isotope separation system, where the process is more dynamic than the relatively steady-state DTRF process. This paper describes the development and application of the DTRF and SUP dynamic simulator, its benefits, architecture, and the operational experience with the simulator. (authors)

Busigin, A. [NITEK USA, Inc., 6405 NW 77 PL, Parkland, FL 33067 (United States); Williams, G. I. D.; Wong, T. C. W.; Kulczynski, D.; Reid, A. [Ontario Power Generation Nuclear, Box 4000, Bowmanville, ON L1C 3Z8 (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed experimental work, additional data analysis, and future modeling programs. These proposals have led to recent investigations into the mercury issue and the effect of co-precipitating noble metals which will be documented in two separate reports. SRS hydrogen generation work since 2002 will also be collected and summarized in a future report on the effect of noble metal-sludge matrix interactions on hydrogen generation. Other potential factors for experimental investigation include sludge composition variations related to both the washing process and to the insoluble species with particular attention given to the role of silver and to improving the understanding of the interaction of nitrite ion with the noble metals.

Koopman, D. C.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

First Results from the CARIBU Facility: Mass Measurements on the r-Process Path  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer has made mass measurements of 33 neutron-rich nuclides provided by the new Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The studied region includes the 132Sn double shell closure and ranges in Z from In to Cs, with Sn isotopes measured out to A = 135, and the typical measurement precision is at the 100 ppb level or better. The region encompasses a possible major waiting point of the astrophysical r process, and the impact of the masses on the r process is shown through a series of simulations. These first-ever simulations with direct mass information on this waiting point show significant increases in waiting time at Sn and Sb in comparison with commonly used mass models, demonstrating the inadequacy of existing models for accurate r-process calculations.

J. Van Schelt; D. Lascar; G. Savard; J. A. Clark; P. F. Bertone; S. Caldwell; A. Chaudhuri; 1 A. F. Levand; G. Li; G. E. Morgan; R. Orford; R. E. Segel; K. S. Sharma; M. G. Sternberg

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

INSTALLATION OF BUBBLERS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITED DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC assumed the liquid waste contract at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the summer of 2009. The main contractual agreement was to close 22 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks in eight years. To achieve this aggressive commitment, faster waste processing throughout the SRS liquid waste facilities will be required. Part of the approach to achieve faster waste processing is to increase the canister production rate of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) from approximately 200 canisters filled with radioactive waste glass per year to 400 canisters per year. To reach this rate for melter throughput, four bubblers were installed in the DWPF Melter in the late summer of 2010. This effort required collaboration between SRR, SRR critical subcontractor EnergySolutions, and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, including the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The tasks included design and fabrication of the bubblers and related equipment, testing of the bubblers for various technical issues, the actual installation of the bubblers and related equipment, and the initial successful operation of the bubblers in the DWPF Melter.

Smith, M.; Iverson, D.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

175

IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

176

Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Certifications | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Management Processes and Procedures Cost & Contingency EDIA Escalation Rates Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Certifications Awards Lessons Learned Tools & Resources SC...

177

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

MCNP certification package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to a Department of Energy (DOE) request, Westinghouse Savannah River Company committed to certify all computer codes used in critical calculations at the site. Since the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon Transport (MCNP) code will be used to perform critical analyses involving criticality and shielding, the code must be certified. Certification as applied to existing computer codes includes the verification and validation process, placing the code in configuration control, and establishing user qualification standards and training requirements. All software intended for use in critical calculations must be certified. This report is intended to fulfill the requirements for the certification of the MCNP code, version 4.2, built June 11, 1992, by J.H. Hightower on the SRS CRAY. This report does not release MCNP for use under production status for any application for which a MCNP validation document does not exist. These validation documents will describe the specific range of applicability, limitations on use, results and biases for a particular MCNP application.

Trumble, E.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The use of management science techniques to improve decision making in poultry processing facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of the poultry industry into a major meat producing agribusiness has caused poultry processing facilities to evolve into major complexes that rely increasingly on machinery to process mass numbers of chicken carcasses. This results in a less flexible environment in which production decisions are made. A software system has been developed to meet these challenges. Parts Pro utilizes its model builder (MB) component to gather statistical and genetic information about the poultry flock to develop a mathematical model representing the constraints of the facility, as well as the request of the decision maker. This information is delivered to the second component, the model solder (MS) which is responsible for solving the mathematical model. Three experiments were conducted to determine if PartsPro was capable of representing a poultry processing facility. In Experiment 1 , genetic information from four different strains of broilers (A,B,C,D), was used in combination with the incrementally increased profits of white and dark meat final products to determine the effects of prices and strain cross on final product. A composite-base control trial was run using a composite average of the strain cross data and base final product prices. Strain cross A combined with 20% increases in white meat final products offered the highest profit of any combinations. Experiment 2 was conducted to determine if the system was capable of accommodating user made production decisions. Final profits and final product mixes were compared to a composite-base run that was the average genetic yields of all strain crosses, and base prices of final products. The system altered cut-up means to accommodate the production of requested products. Final trial profits were less than the composite-base trial. Experiment 3 was conducted to determine the system's sensitivity to price changes of unproduced products. A nearly 60% increase in price of the unproduced product caused the system to alter final product mix. Total profit of the newly altered product mix was less than the composite-base trial. This research demonstrates that management science techniques can be applied successfully to aid decision making in a poultry processing facility.

Conrad, Kenneth Allen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microsoft Word - Policy_Flash_09_02_Interim_Certification.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 13, 2009 March 13, 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR ALL PROGRAM ELEMENTS FROM: PMCDP CERTIFICATION REVIEW BOARD SUBJECT: Temporary Project Management Career Development Certification The Project Management Career Development Program (PMCDP) Certification Review Board (CRB) established a new process whereby candidates with strong project management experience from outside the Department, hired into project director positions, may be granted a temporary PMCDP certification. Temporary certification allows the federal employee to be assigned project manager responsibilities on capital asset project while simultaneously completing DOE-specific training and preparing their certification packages for final CRB action. Temporary certification will be good for one calendar year.

182

STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor Examples of Energy Facility Licensing Schedules for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exempt thermal power plants from the certification process if the project is less than 100 megawatts Facility Licensing Schedules for 12-Month AFC Process and Small Power Plant Exemption (SPPE) 12-Month are requested to match the state schedule. . #12;Small Power Plant Exemption (SPPE) The Energy Commission may

183

Criticality safety evaluation report for the cold vacuum drying facility's process water handling system  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

NELSON, J.V.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

A SPECIALIZED, MULTI-USER COMPUTER FACILITY FOR THE HIGH-SPEED, INTERACTIVE PROCESSING OF EXPERIMENTAL DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL to develop a specialized computer facility specificallyto process o a large computer (e.g. , CDC7600) may require iof modern, mid-range computers. Unfortunately the data

Maples, C.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Successful Experimental Verification of the Tokamak Exhaust Processing Concept of ITER with the CAPER Facility  

SciTech Connect

One of the design targets for the Tokamak Exhaust Processing (TEP) system of ITER is not to lose more than 10{sup -5}gh{sup -1} into the Normal Vent Detritiation system of the Tritium Plant. The plasma exhaust gas therefore needs to be processed in a way that a tritium removal efficiency of about 10{sup 8} with respect to the flow rate is achieved. Expressed in terms of tritium concentrations this corresponds to a decontamination from about 130 gm{sup -3} down to about 10{sup -4} gm{sup -3} (about 1 Cim{sup -3} = 3.7*10{sup 10} Bqm{sup -3}). The three step reference process for the TEP system of ITER is called CAPER and has been developed and realized at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). After the successful commissioning of the PERMCAT reactor as the key component of the third step detailed parametric tritium testing of the 3 steps involving the processing of more than 300 g tritium has been carried out and decontamination factors beyond the design requirements have been demonstrated for each process step and for the process as a whole. Not only the decontamination factor of 10{sup 8} as required by ITER, but also the operational mode of TEP as a waste dump for gases from diverse sources has been experimentally validated with the CAPER facility.

Bornschein, B.; Glugla, M.; Guenther, K.; Le, T.L.; Simon, K.H.; Welte, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

187

Review of the Implementation Verification Rev iew Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities, September 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implementation Verification Review Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Review of the Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1

188

Review of the Implementation Verification Rev iew Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities, September 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation Verification Review Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Review of the Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1

189

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

190

Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the catalytic ligand species. Such conditions are likely to adversely impact the ability of the transferred mass to produce hydrogen at the same rate (per unit mass SRAT or SME slurry) as in the SRAT or SME vessels.

Koopman, D. C.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

191

The low moisture eastern coal processing system at the UTSI-DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A low moisture, eastern coal processing system was constructed at the Department of Energy`s Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), located at the University of Tennessee Space Institute in Tullahoma, Tennessee, to provide a metered and regulated supply of seeded, pulverized coal to support magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation research. The original system configuration is described as well as major modifications made in response to specific operational problems. Notable among these was the in-house development of the Moulder flow control valve which exhibited marked improvement in durability compared to previous valves used with pulverized coal. Coal processing system performance parameters are discussed. A summary of tests conducted and significant events are included.

Evans, B.R.; Washington, E.S.; Sanders, M.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Study of the processes resulting from the use of alkaline seed in natural gas-fired MHD facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various ways of ionizing seed injection and recovery, applicable to open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation facilities, operating on sulfur-free gaseous fossil fuel, are discussed and experimentally verified. The physical and chemical changes of the seed and the heat and mass transfer processes resulting from seed application are investigated using the U-02 experimental MHD facility and laboratory test facilities. Engineering methods for calculating the processes of seed droplet vaporization, condensation and the precipitation of submicron particles of K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ on the heat exchange surface are also included.

Styrikovich, M.A.; Mostinskii, I.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

194

Stochastic Programming Approaches for the Placement of Gas Detectors in Process Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The release of flammable and toxic chemicals in petrochemical facilities is a major concern when designing modern process safety systems. While the proper selection of the necessary types of gas detectors needed is important, appropriate placement of these detectors is required in order to have a well-functioning gas detection system. However, the uncertainty in leak locations, gas composition, process and weather conditions, and process geometries must all be considered when attempting to determine the appropriate number and placement of the gas detectors. Because traditional approaches are typically based on heuristics, there exists the need to develop more rigorous optimization based approaches to handling this problem. This work presents several mixed-integer programming formulations to address this need. First, a general mixed-integer linear programming problem is presented. This formulation takes advantage of precomputed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to determine a gas detector placement that minimizes the expected detection time across all scenarios. An extension to this formulation is added that considers the overall coverage in a facility in order to improve the detector placement when enough scenarios may not be available. Additionally, a formulation considering the Conditional-Value-at-Risk is also presented. This formulation provides some control over the shape of the tail of the distribution, not only minimizing the expected detection time across all scenarios, but also improving the tail behavior. In addition to improved formulations, procedures are introduced to determine confidence in the placement generated and to determine if enough scenarios have been used in determining the gas detector placement. First, a procedure is introduced to analyze the performance of the proposed gas detector placement in the face of unforeseen scenarios, or scenarios that were not necessarily included in the original formulation. Additionally, a procedure for determine the confidence interval on the optimality gap between a placement generated with a sample of scenarios and its estimated performance on the entire uncertainty space. Finally, a method for determining if enough scenarios have been used and how much additional benefit is expected by adding more scenarios to the optimization is proposed. Results are presented for each of the formulations and methods presented using three data sets from an actual process facility. The use of an off-the-shelf toolkit for the placement of detectors in municipal water networks from the EPA, known as TEVA-SPOT, is explored. Because this toolkit was not designed for placing gas detectors, some adaptation of the files is necessary, and the procedure for doing so is presented.

Legg, Sean W

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design-Build Process for Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility An in-depth look at how the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory used a performance-based design-build contract process to build one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world. Table of Contents The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility | 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Building Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Owner Roles and Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Acquisition Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Defining Performance Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

196

Manufacturing Skills Certification System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... system to their business so that they utilize the skills certification system ... provide input to The Manufacturing Institute about aggregate skill needs of ...

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

197

Acquisition Certifications Program Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program (ACMP) was established to provide a formal, structured approach to certification of DOEs acquisition workforce.

198

Patent Certification | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patent Certification Patent Certification SF-2050.11, Patent Certification More Documents & Publications DOE F 2050.11 C:FormsDOE F 2050.11.cdr DOE F 2050.10...

199

Basic Data Report -- Defense Waste Processing Facility Sludge Plant, Savannah River Plant 200-S Area  

SciTech Connect

This Basic Data Report for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)--Sludge Plant was prepared to supplement the Technical Data Summary. Jointly, the two reports were intended to form the basis for the design and construction of the DWPF. To the extent that conflicting information may appear, the Basic Data Report takes precedence over the Technical Data Summary. It describes project objectives and design requirements. Pertinent data on the geology, hydrology, and climate of the site are included. Functions and requirements of the major structures are described to provide guidance in the design of the facilities. Revision 9 of the Basic Data Report was prepared to eliminate inconsistencies between the Technical Data Summary, Basic Data Report and Scopes of Work which were used to prepare the September, 1982 updated CAB. Concurrently, pertinent data (material balance, curie balance, etc.) have also been placed in the Basic Data Report. It is intended that these balances be used as a basis for the continuing design of the DWPF even though minor revisions may be made in these balances in future revisions to the Technical Data Summary.

Amerine, D.B.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Experience of Hot Cell Renovation Work in CPF (Chemical Processing Facility)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renovation work for operation room A of the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was carried out. Cell renovation work involved disassembly, removal and installation of new equipment for the CA-3 cell of operation room A and the crane renovation work involved the repair of the in-cell crane for the CA-5 cell of operation room A. There were not many examples of renovation work performed on cells under high radiation environment and alpha contamination in Japan. Lessons learnt: With respect to the cell renovation work and crane repair work, a method that gave full consideration to safety was employed and the work was performed without accidents or disaster. Moreover, through improvement of the method, reduction of radioactive exposure of the workers was achieved and a melt reduction device was designed to deal with the radioactive waste material that was generated in the renovation work to achieve significant melt reduction of waste material.

Toyonobu Nabemoto; Fujio Katahira; Tadatsugu Sakaya [IHI Corporation: Isogo-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa pref, 235-8501 (Japan); Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency: Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki pref, 319-1194 (Japan)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Training, Certification, and Mentoring | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training, Certification, and Mentoring Training, Certification, and Mentoring Training, Certification, and Mentoring The Project Management Coordination Office (PMCO) is working to support programs in ensuring that team members have the necessary training and certifications to enable meaningful stewardship of their projects and programs. Greater awareness of the process and understanding of the full assistance/acquisition project lifecycle will help each program meet its objectives. Project Managers help ensure awards and acquisitions are put in place in a timely manner, are aligned with the technology's road-map and receive adequate, effective oversight and management. In order to improve program and project management, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) will ensure all projects are managed by appropriately trained

202

Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping and Pipe Supports, September 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports September 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1

203

Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping and Pipe Supports, September 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports September 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1

204

SWEAP, Solid Waste Environmental Assessment Plan: Component 3, technology evaluation: Discussion paper No. 3. 5 A,B,C, addendum to documents: Extension of process to identify candidate sites (step 2) and the development of comparative evaluation process for step 3 of the site selection process for a materials recovery facility, compost facility and energy from waste facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The facility design assumptions for a materials recovery facility, a compost facility and an energy from waste facility were intended to result in a facility with minimal impact on the natural environment. The criteria described in discussion paper 3.5A were based on this assumption. This addendum describes the additional criteria identified for use in Step 2 of the site selection process, the revised criteria to be used in Step 3 and the method that will be used to apply the revised Step 3 criterial. Step 2 addresses the type of technology used to minimize adverse effects on the natural environment. Step 3 addresses the selection of short-listed sites from a longer list and the methods used.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Graduate Certificate in Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate Certificate in Transportation Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning of Engineering and Computer Science integrated transportation systems. The Graduate Certificate in Transportation their capabilities. Students in the program can choose among a wide range of relevant courses in transportation

Bertini, Robert L.

206

Building Operator Certification: Improving Commercial Building Energy Efficiency Through Operator Training and Certification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Operator Certification (BOC) is a competency-based certification for building operators designed to improve the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. Operators earn certification by attending training sessions and completing project assignments in their facilities. The certification provides a credential for their professional development while also offering employers a way to identify skilled operators. Developed as a market transformation venture with funding from the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, evaluation research has shown BOC participants are saving money and energy in their facilities, and awareness among major employers is growing. BOC is now expanding to serve other regions of the country including the Northeast, California and Wisconsin. It is being offered as a turnkey program to interested organizations and utilities and can be operationalized within a year to serve customers quickly. It also serves as a platform for other energy efficiency initiatives such as building commissioning, EnergyStar benchmarking, and resource conservation manager. This paper will discuss the development and implementation of the Building Operator Certification, market response to BOC in the Northwest and Northeast, and energy saving and customer service benefits.

Putnam, C.; Mulak, A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The high moisture western coal processing system at the UTSI-DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original eastern coal processing system at the Department of Energy`s Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), located at the University of Tennessee Space Institute in Tullahoma, Tennessee, was modified to pulverize and dry Montana Rosebud, a western coal. Significant modifications to the CFFF coal processing system were required and the equipment selection criteria are reviewed. Coal processing system performance parameters are discussed. A summary of tests conducted and significant events are included.

Sanders, M.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility, October 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02 Site: Y-12 UPF Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Dates of Activity: October 2, 2012 Report Preparer: Timothy Mengers Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12

209

Review of the Long Lead Procurement Processed Used by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC for the Uranium Processing Facility Proect, July 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long Lead Procurement Processes Used by Long Lead Procurement Processes Used by Babcock &Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC for the Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1

210

Application of accident progression event tree technology to the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility SAR analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Accident Analysis in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has recently undergone an upgrade. Non-reactor SARs at SRS (and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites) use probabilistic techniques to assess the frequency of accidents at their facilities. This paper describes the application of an extension of the Accident Progression Event Tree (APET) approach to accidents at the SRS DWPF. The APET technique allows an integrated model of the facility risk to be developed, where previous probabilistic accident analyses have been limited to the quantification of the frequency and consequences of individual accident scenarios treated independently. Use of an APET allows a more structured approach, incorporating both the treatment of initiators that are common to more than one accident, and of accident progression at the facility.

Brandyberry, M.D.; Baker, W.H.; Wittman, R.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Amos, C.N. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

ENERGY STAR plant certification | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» ENERGY STAR plant certification » ENERGY STAR plant certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year Award

212

ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for applying |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for applying Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

213

ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Professional Engineers' Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Plant Certification: Professional Industrial Plant Certification: Professional Engineers' Guide Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

214

Qualification of the Nippon Instrumentation for use in Measuring Mercury at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system installed in 221-S M-14 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a side-by-side comparison of the Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system with the currently used Bacharach Mercury Analyzer. The side-by-side testing included standards for instrument calibration verifications, spiked samples and unspiked samples. The standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The side-by-side work included the analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. With the qualification of the Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system in M-14, the DWPF lab will be able to perform a head to head comparison of a second Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system once the system is installed. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analyzes receipt and product samples from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) to determine the mercury (Hg) concentration in the sludge slurry. The SRAT receipt is typically sampled and analyzed for the first ten SRAT batches of a new sludge batch to obtain an average Hg concentration. This average Hg concentration is then used to determine the amount of steam stripping required during the concentration/reflux step of the SRAT cycle to achieve a less than 0.6 wt% Hg in the SRAT product solids. After processing is complete, the SRAT product is sampled and analyzed for mercury to ensure that the mercury concentration does not exceed the 0.45 wt% limit in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The DWPF Laboratory utilizes Bacharach Analyzers to support these Hg analyses at this facility. These analyzers are more than 10 years old, and they are no longer supported by the manufacturer. Due to these difficulties, the Bacharach Analyzers are to be replaced by new Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 systems. DWPF issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) for the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist in the qualification of the new systems. SRNL prepared a task technical and quality assurance (TT&QA) plan that outlined the activities that are necessary and sufficient to meet the objectives of the TTR. In addition, TT&QA plan also included a test plan that provided guidance to the DWPF Lab in collecting the data needed to qualify the new Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 systems.

Edwards, T.; Mahannah, R.

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE D&D OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place.

HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

216

Biofuels and certification. A workshop at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Liquid biofuels can provide a substitute for fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Many countries have mandated the use of biofuels, by creating targets for their use. If not implemented with care, however, actions that increase biofuel production can put upward pressure on food prices, increase greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and exacerbate degradation of land, forest, and water sources. A strong global biofuels industry will not emerge unless these environmental and social concerns are addressed. Interested parties around the world are actively debating the design and implementation of policies to meet the biofuel goals, particularly those established in the United States and Europe. In general, policy options for managing the potential risks and benefits of biofuel development should specify not only clear standards governing biofuel content and production processes, but also certification processes for verifying whether particular biofuels meet those standards, and specific metrics or indicators on which to base the certification. Historically, many standards in the energy and environment fields have ultimately been set or supported by governments. Many of the certification processes have been voluntary, carried out by independent third parties. The biofuels case is a young one, however, with questions of goals, standards, certification, and metrics still in interdependent flux. The workshop focused its discussions on certification issues, but found the discussions naturally reaching into ongoing debates regarding possible goals, standards, and metrics. Many countries are proposing that for a biofuel to qualify as contributing to government-mandated targets or goals, it must be certified to meet certain standards. These standards could be limited to the amount of GHG emitted in the production process or could include a number of other environmental sustainability concerns ranging from deforestation and biodiversity to water resources. While the threat to both forests and food supplies from increased biofuel production is real, it is not clear that setting broad sustainability standards and then requiring sellers to certify that all of those standards have been met is the best way to address these interconnected problems. In particular, if too many standards and related certification requirements are put in place too soon, this could constrain the development of a global biofuels market. In contrast, certification targeted at a specific and limited set of problems and designed with the flexibility to adjust to changes in policies and programs can enhance the public's acceptance of the biofuel option while protecting key social and environmental goals. A second set of questions revolves around the locus of responsibility for certifying whether biofuel production meets sustainability targets. Should the biofuel processing firms, third parties, or governments be responsible for certifying the production of biofuels? This question also elicited significant discussion. While it could be easier to have individual country governments assume the certification of production responsibility, some governments may not have the capacity to implement an effective certification process. Production facilities that comply with international standards should not be kept out of the market because of their government's inability to manage the process. The possible contribution to effective certification of third party organizations or public-private partnerships should not be underestimated.

Devereaux, Charan; Lee, Henry

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

0707A5 Certificate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certified Reference Material Address: 2710 S. Boulder Drive, Urbana, IL 61802 USA Email: CRM@aocs.org Tel:+1-217-359-2344; Fax: +1-217-351-8091 ISO Guide 34 A2LA Certificate 3438.01

218

Certification Application Templates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The application templates for each level of FPD certification mirror the competency requirements listed in the CEG. Candidates may use these to prepare their profiles in an editable format prior to...

219

Independent Oversight Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of Implementation Verification Review Processes at Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities, May 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of Implementation Verification Review Processes at Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents Acronyms ......................................................................................................................................................ii Executive Summaiy .....................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 1

220

Independent Oversight Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of Implementation Verification Review Processes at Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities, May 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of Implementation Verification Review Processes at Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents Acronyms ......................................................................................................................................................ii Executive Summaiy .....................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Process Testing to Support the Conceptual Design of a Plutonium Vitrification Facility  

SciTech Connect

In the aftermath of the Cold War, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has identified up to 50 metric tonnes of excess plutonium that needs to be dispositioned. The bulk of the material is slated to be blended with uranium and fabricated into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel for subsequent burning in commercial nuclear reactors. Excess plutonium-containing materials that are not suitable for fabrication into MOX fuel will need to be dispositioned via other means. A lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass was identified as a preferred form for the disposition of the impure plutonium-containing feeds. The LaBS glass formulation uses a lanthanide borosilicate frit rather than the alkali borosilicate frit used to vitrify high level waste. The LaBS glass has been shown to be able to accommodate high quantities of fissile material (greater than 10 wt % elemental plutonium) and tolerate the impurities expected in the plutonium feed streams. A conceptual design effort is now underway at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to design a vitrification facility to immobilize the excess Pu feeds that are not slated for disposition via MOX fuel. The conceptual design phase is planned to complete in FY07. A test program was initiated at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to provide input data to the conceptual design effort. A major component of this test effort involves vitrification process testing. A cylindrical induction melter (CIM) was developed for the vitrification of actinide feed streams. Due to the high temperatures required to incorporate high plutonium oxide contents into the glass by dissolution and melting, the melter vessel is constructed out of Pt/Rh alloy and can be operated at temperatures up to 1600 deg. C. Additionally, the melter design is compact to facilitate installation in a glovebox (the size of the conceptual facility melter is approximately 6'' in diameter by 18'' tall). The CIM has proven to be a viable means to process the LaBS glass at processing temperatures of 1400-1500 deg. C. In this paper, the offgas sampling tests conducted in the CIM to capture and analyze the particulate and vapors emitted from lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) Frit X with HfO{sub 2} as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and added impurities are discussed. The tests with impurities added showed that alkali salts such as NaCl and KCl were substantially emitted into the offgas system as the salt particulate, HCl, or Cl{sub 2}. Retention of Na and K in the glass were about 80 and 55%, respectively. Chloride retention was about 35%; chloride remaining in the glass was 0.29-0.37 wt%. Overall, about 58-72% of the impurities added were volatilized. Virtually all of the particulate species were collected on the nominal 0.3 {mu}m filter. The particulate was found to be as small as 0.2 {mu}m and have an approximate median size of 0.5 {mu}m. The particulate salt was also found to stick together by forming bridges between particles. (authors)

Zamecnik, J.R.; Jones, T.M.; Miller, D.H.; Herman, D.T.; Marra, J.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten, the Proctor Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites, for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A separate Appendix provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. 26 figs., 121 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex, May 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appraisal of the Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2011 May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

224

Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex, May 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appraisal of the Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2011 May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

225

Surface water transport and distribution of uranium in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extent of remobilization of uranium from contaminated soils adjacent to a nuclear weapons processing facility during episodic rain events was investigated. In addition, information on the solid phase associations of U in floodplain and suspended sediments was assessed by an eight-step sequential extraction procedure to gauge U chemical lability and its propensity for transport. Comparisons were drawn between the easily dispersible, or water dispersible clay fraction (WDC) of the floodplain sediments to the stream suspended sediments transported during storms. Mass flux estimates determined from base flow measurements potentially underestimate the amount of U transported from contaminated terrestrial sources to surface water systems. During the storm events measured, approximately 145 7 to 2 8 3 8 % more U was mobilized to Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) relative to base flow calculations. The suspended sediment load transports the bulk of U in labile forms predominantly as acid soluble (specifically adsorbed), MnO2 occluded and organically bound phases. This implies that U may be available to the environment under a range of changing conditions (e.g., Eh and pH). Sequential extractions of the floodplain sediments demonstrated the presence of chemically labile forms, but in different proportions to the suspended sediments. More U was associated with the organically bound phases in the floodplain sediments, while the easily dispersible fraction of floodplain sediments correlated with the suspended sediments. A strong relationship exists between the suspended sediments and the WDC fraction, suggesting that fine particles are eroded from the floodplain and transported in labile forms. This study demonstrates the need to revise current monitoring schemes to include mass transport evaluation during storms. In addition, sequential extraction studies provide knowledge of U chemical lability in contaminated sediments, which may suggest environmentally sound and more cost effective remediation techniques than ones currently in use.

Batson, Vicky Lynn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries  

SciTech Connect

Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming <25 wt% total solids, or equivalently 2,000 mg nitrite/kg total solids) is sufficient to effectively deactivate the noble metal catalysts at temperatures between room temperature and boiling. This is a potential strategy for eliminating catalytic hydrogen generation from the list of concerns for sludge carried over into the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) or Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). These conclusions are drawn in large part from the various phases of the DWPF catalytic hydrogen generation program conducted between 2005 and 2009. The findings could apply to various situations, including a solids carry-over from either the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) into the SMECT with subsequent transfer to the RCT, as well as a spill of formic acid into the sump system and transfer into an RCT that already contains sludge solids. There are other potential mitigating factors for the SMECT and RCT, since these vessels are typically operated at temperatures close to the minimum temperatures that catalytic hydrogen has been observed to occur in either the SRAT or SME (pure slurry case), and these vessels are also likely to be considerably more dilute in both noble metals and formate ion (the two essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the catalytic ligand species. Such conditions are likely to adversely impact the ability of the transferred mass to produce hydrogen at the same rate (per unit mass SRAT or SME slurry) as in the SRAT or SME vessels.

Koopman, D. C.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

401 Certification (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

401 Certification (Vermont) 401 Certification (Vermont) Eligibility Utility Industrial Savings For Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Program Information Vermont...

228

International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification Methods for Appliances Title International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification Methods for...

229

Processing capabilties for the elimination of contaminated metal scrapyards at DOE/ORO-managed sites. [Metal smelting facility  

SciTech Connect

Capabilities exist for reducing all the contaminated nickel, aluminum, and copper scrap to ingot form by smelting. Processing these metals at existing facilities could be completed in about 5 or 6 years. However, these metals represent only about 20% of the total metal inventories currently on hand at the DOE/ORO-managed sites. No provisions have been made for the ferrous scrap. Most of the ferrous scrap is unclassified and does not require secured storage. Also, the potential resale value of the ferrous scrap at about $100 per ton is very low in comparison. Consequently, this scrap has been allowed to accumulate. With several modifications and equipment additions, the induction melter at PGDP could begin processing ferrous scrap after its commitment to nickel and aluminum. The PGDP smelter is a retrofit installation, and annual throughput capabilities are limited. Processing of the existing ferrous scrap inventories would not be completed until the FY 1995-2000 time frame. An alternative proposal has been the installation of induction melters at the other two enrichment facilities. Conceptual design of a generic metal smelting facility is under way. The design study includes capital and operating costs for scrap preparation through ingot storage at an annual throughput of 10,000 tons per year. Facility design includes an induction melter with the capability of melting both ferrous and nonferrous metals. After three years of operation with scrapyard feed, the smelter would have excess capacity to support on-site decontamination and decomissioning projects or upgrading programs. The metal smelting facility has been proposed for FY 1984 line item funding with start-up operations in FY 1986.

Mack, J.E.; Williams, L.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL I APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL I APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATION TECHNICAL PROJECT OFFICER LEVEL I PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Name (Last, First, Middle initial)_____________________________________________ Email Address____________________________________________________________ Phone __________________________________________________________________ Agency Name____________________________________________________________ Agency Address__________________________________________________________ Title, Series, Grade________________________________________________________ Education: Please specify degree and major: a. Degree: Associates: __; Bachelors __; Masters: __; Doctorate: __

231

SUMMARY OF FY11 SULFATE RETENTION STUDIES FOR DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of studies related to the incorporation of sulfate in high level waste (HLW) borosilicate glass produced at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A group of simulated HLW glasses produced for earlier sulfate retention studies was selected for full chemical composition measurements to determine whether there is any clear link between composition and sulfate retention over the compositional region evaluated. In addition, the viscosity of several glasses was measured to support future efforts in modeling sulfate solubility as a function of predicted viscosity. The intent of these studies was to develop a better understanding of sulfate retention in borosilicate HLW glass to allow for higher loadings of sulfate containing waste. Based on the results of these and other studies, the ability to improve sulfate solubility in DWPF borosilicate glasses lies in reducing the connectivity of the glass network structure. This can be achieved, as an example, by increasing the concentration of alkali species in the glass. However, this must be balanced with other effects of reduced network connectivity, such as reduced viscosity, potentially lower chemical durability, and in the case of higher sodium and aluminum concentrations, the propensity for nepheline crystallization. Future DWPF processing is likely to target higher waste loadings and higher sludge sodium concentrations, meaning that alkali concentrations in the glass will already be relatively high. It is therefore unlikely that there will be the ability to target significantly higher total alkali concentrations in the glass solely to support increased sulfate solubility without the increased alkali concentration causing failure of other Product Composition Control System (PCCS) constraints, such as low viscosity and durability. No individual components were found to provide a significant improvement in sulfate retention (i.e., an increase of the magnitude necessary to have a dramatic impact on blending, washing, or waste loading strategies for DWPF) for the glasses studied here. In general, the concentrations of those species that significantly improve sulfate solubility in a borosilicate glass must be added in relatively large concentrations (e.g., 13 to 38 wt % or more of the frit) in order to have a substantial impact. For DWPF, these concentrations would constitute too large of a portion of the frit to be practical. Therefore, it is unlikely that specific additives may be introduced into the DWPF glass via the frit to significantly improve sulfate solubility. The results presented here continue to show that sulfate solubility or retention is a function of individual glass compositions, rather than a property of a broad glass composition region. It would therefore be inappropriate to set a single sulfate concentration limit for a range of DWPF glass compositions. Sulfate concentration limits should continue to be identified and implemented for each sludge batch. The current PCCS limit is 0.4 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass, although frit development efforts have led to an increased limit of 0.6 wt % for recent sludge batches. Slightly higher limits (perhaps 0.7-0.8 wt %) may be possible for future sludge batches. An opportunity for allowing a higher sulfate concentration limit at DWPF may lay lie in improving the laboratory experiments used to set this limit. That is, there are several differences between the crucible-scale testing currently used to define a limit for DWPF operation and the actual conditions within the DWPF melter. In particular, no allowance is currently made for sulfur partitioning (volatility versus retention) during melter processing as the sulfate limit is set for a specific sludge batch. A better understanding of the partitioning of sulfur in a bubbled melter operating with a cold cap as well as the impacts of sulfur on the off-gas system may allow a higher sulfate concentration limit to be established for the melter feed. This approach would have to be taken carefully to ensure that a

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

232

EVALUATION OF A TURBIDITY METER FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediations (SRRs) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a peanut vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 weight percent (wt%). A go/no-go decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a go decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a no-go determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. Subsequent to the issuance of the initial version of this report but under the scope of the original request for technical assistance, WSE asked for this report to be revised to include the go/no-go CU value corresponding to 0.28 wt% solids. It was this request that led to the preparation of Revision 1 of the report. The results for the 0.28 wt% solids value were developed following the same approach as that utilized for the 0.14 wt% solids value. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a go/no-go CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the go/no-go decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the go/no-go criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from the sludge batch, Sludge Batch 7b, being processed at the time of this testing. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

Mahannah, R.; Edwards, T.

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

Renovation of CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) for Development of Advanced Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) was constructed at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) in 1980 as a basic research field where spent fuel pins from fast reactor (FR) and high level liquid waste can be dealt with. The renovation consists of remodeling of the CA-3 cell and the laboratory A, installation of globe boxes, hoods and analytical equipments to the laboratory C and the analytical laboratory. Also maintenance equipments in the CA-5 cell which had been out of order were repaired. The CA-3 cell is the main cell in which important equipments such as a dissolver, a clarifier and extractors are installed for carrying out the hot test using the irradiated FR fuel. Since the CPF had specialized originally in the research function for the Purex process, it was desired to execute the research and development of such new, various reprocessing processes. Formerly, equipments were arranged in wide space and connected with not only each other but also with utility supply system mainly by fixed stainless steel pipes. It caused shortage of operation space in flexibility for basic experimental study. Old equipments in the CA-3 cell including vessels and pipes were removed after successful decontamination, and new equipments were installed conformably to the new design. For the purpose of easy installation and rearranging the experimental equipments, equipments are basically connected by flexible pipes. Since dissolver is able to be easily replaced, various dissolution experiments is conducted. Insoluble residue generated by dissolution of spent fuel is clarified by centrifugal. This small apparatus is effective to space-saving. Mini mixer settlers or centrifugal contactors are put on to the prescribed limited space in front of the backside wall. Fresh reagents such as solvent, scrubbing and stripping solution are continuously fed from the laboratory A to the extractor by the reagent supply system with semi-automatic observation system. The in-cell crane in CA-5 was renovated to increase driving efficiency. At the renovation for the in-cell crane, full scale mockup test and 3D simulation test had been executed in advance. After the renovation, hot tests in the CPF had been resumed from JFY 2002. New equipments such as dissolver, extractor, electrolytic device, etc. were installed in CA-3 conformably to the new design laid out in order to ensure the function and space. Glove boxes in the analysis laboratory were renewed in order to let it have flexibility from the viewpoint of conducting basic experiments (ex. U crystallization). Glove boxes and hoods were newly installed in the laboratory A for basic research and analysis, especially on MA chemistries. One laboratory (the laboratory C) was established to research about dry reprocessing. The renovation of the CPF has been executed in order to contribute to the development on the advanced fast reactor fuel cycle system, which will give us many sort of technical subject and experimental theme to be solved in the 2. Generation of the CPF.

Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency:4-33, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki pref, 319-1194 (Japan)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c~-?i-- c~-?i-- I ,3-l Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) .Complex and the Hot Cave Facility (Bldg. 003), Santa Susana ,Fie!d Laboratory, Chatsworth, California ..:'..~::Yerlette Gatl in, MA-232 I am attaching for entry into the Public Document Room, one copy of the N -23 subject documentat ion. These documents are the backup data for the certification that the facilfties are radiologically acceptable for b- unrestricted use as noted in the certification statement published in the &aney Federal Register. Inasmuch as the certification for unrestricted use is 9/2(/85 being published in the Federal Register, it is prudent that the attached documentation also be available to the public. These documents should be retained In accordance with DOE Order 1324.2--disposal schedule 25.

235

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? Edward Holt, RyanME 04079 edholt@igc.org Renewable energy certificates (RECs)convey the attributes of a renewable energy generator and

Holt, Edward; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

certification_poststandardchange.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Certification Following a Change Certification Following a Change in the Applicable Energy or Water Conservation Standard The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended, (EPCA or the ''Act'') authorizes the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE or the ''Department'') to enforce compliance with the energy conservation standards established for certain consumer products and commercial equipment. 42 U.S.C. §§ 6299-6305 (consumer products), 6316 (commercial and industrial equipment). To ensure that all covered products distributed in the United States comply with DOE's energy conservation standards, the Department has promulgated enforcement regulations, which include specific certification and compliance requirements. See Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) part 430, subpart F; 10 CFR part 431,

237

Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility, July 19-22, 210  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadowing of the Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility on July 19-22, 2010 A Department of Energy Construction Project Review (CPR) of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) project was conducted on July 19-22, 2010, at the request of the Principal Deputy Secretary, Office of Environmental Management (EM-2). The purpose of the review was to assess the cost, schedule, and technical progress against the approved Performance Baseline. Specific review areas were Engineering; Commissioning; Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance; Cost, Schedule, and Risk; and Management and Acquisition.

238

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development May 2011 August 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology ......................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................................... 3

239

Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF) (Book)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An in-depth look at how the U.S. DOE and NREL used a performance-based design-build contract to build the Research Support Facility (RSF); one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Fuel Processing Research Facility - A Platform for the Conduct of Synthesis Gas Technology R&D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vision 21 is the U. S. Department of Energy's initiative to deploy high efficiency, ultraclean co-production coal conversion power plants in the twenty-first century. These plants will consist of power and co-production modules, which are integrated to meet specific power and chemical markets. A variety of fuel gas processing technology issues involving gas separations, cleanup, gas-to-liquid fuels production and chemical synthesis, to mention a few, will be addressed by the program. The overall goal is to effectively eliminate, at competitive costs, environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for producing electricity and transportation fuels. The Fuel Processing Research Facility (FPRF) was developed as a fuel-flexible platform to address many of these technology needs. The facility utilizes a simplified syngas generator that is capable of producing 2,000 standard cubic feet per hour of 900 degree Celsius and 30 atmosphere synthesis gas that can be tailored to the gas composition of interest. It was built on a ''mid-scale'' level in an attempt to successfully branch the traditionally difficult scale-up from laboratory to pilot scale. When completed, the facility will provide a multi-faceted R&D area for the testing of fuel cells, gas separation technologies, and other gas processing unit operations.

Monahan, Michael J.; Berry, David A.; Gardner, Todd H.; Lyons, K. David

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

REMOTE IN-CELL SAMPLING IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM AT THESAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote Systems Engineering (RSE) of the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) in combination with the Defense Waste Processing Facility(DWPF) Engineering and Operations has evaluated the existing equipment and processes used in the facility sample cells for 'pulling' samples from the radioactive waste stream and performing equipment in-cell repairs/replacements. RSE has designed and tested equipment for improving remote in-cell sampling evolutions and reducing the time required for in-cell maintenance of existing equipment. The equipment within the present process tank sampling system has been in constant use since the facility start-up over 17 years ago. At present, the method for taking samples within the sample cells produces excessive maintenance and downtime due to frequent failures relative to the sampling station equipment and manipulator. Location and orientation of many sampling stations within the sample cells is not conducive to manipulator operation. The overextension of manipulators required to perform many in-cell operations is a major cause of manipulator failures. To improve sampling operations and reduce downtime due to equipment maintenance, a Portable Sampling Station (PSS), wireless in-cell cameras, and new commercially available sampling technology has been designed, developed and/or adapted and tested. The uniqueness of the design(s), the results of the scoping tests, and the benefits relative to in-cell operation and reduction of waste are presented.

Marzolf, A

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Certificate-Based Approach to Marketing Green Power and Constructing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certificate-Based Approach to Marketing Green Power and Constructing New Wind Energy Facilities Preprint May 2002 * NRELCP-620-32430 E. Blank Community Energy, Inc. L. Bird and B....

243

Non-ferrous Metals Industry Energy Management System Certification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-ferrous Metals Industry Energy Management System Certification Details about China Quality Certification Center and Energy Management System certifications....

244

Ecological survey for the siting of the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of field ecological surveys conducted by the Center for Integrated Environmental Technologies (CIET) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) at four candidate locations for the siting of the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility (MLLWTF) and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility (IWPF). The purpose of these surveys was to comply with all Federal laws and Executive Orders to identify and evaluate any potential environmental impacts because of the project. The boundaries of the candidate location were marked with blaze-orange lath survey marker stakes by the project management. Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of the marker stakes were made, and input to the Arc/Info{reg_sign} geographic information system (GIS). Field surveys were conducted to assess any potential impact to any important species, important habitats, and to any environmental study areas. The GIS location data was overlayed onto the INEL vegetation map and an analysis of vegetation classes on the locations was done. Results of the field surveys indicate use of Candidate Location {number_sign}1 by pygmy rabbits (Sylvilagus idahoensis) and expected use by them of Candidate Locations {number_sign}3 and {number_sign}9. Pygmy rabbits are categorized as a C2 species by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Two other C2 species, the ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) and the loggerhead shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) would also be expected to frequent the candidate locations. Candidate Location {number_sign}5 at the north end of the INEL is in the winter range of a large number of pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana).

Hoskinson, R.L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Risk-Based Disposal Plan for PCB Paint in the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Canal  

SciTech Connect

This Toxic Substances Control Act Risk-Based Polychlorinated Biphenyl Disposal plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to address painted surfaces in the empty canal under 40 CFR 761.62(c) for paint, and under 40 CFR 761.61(c) for PCBs that may have penetrated into the concrete. The canal walls and floor will be painted with two coats of contrasting non-PCB paint and labeled as PCB. The canal is covered with open decking; the access grate is locked shut and signed to indicate PCB contamination in the canal. Access to the canal will require facility manager permission. Protective equipment for personnel and equipment entering the canal will be required. Waste from the canal, generated during ultimate Decontamination and Decommissioning, shall be managed and disposed as PCB Bulk Product Waste.

R. A. Montgomery

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

247

Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

processed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site or other appropriate disposal facility. Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) operated...

248

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process RA Bari SJ Johnson J Hockert R Wigeland EF Wonder MD Zentner August 2012 PNNL- 21698 Overview of the Facility...

249

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

facilities or research facilities that involve previously unused processes or technologies, comparison with previously required safeguard design features may not be...

250

Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site: Results of Technology Down-Selection and Research and Development to Support New Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of HLW for disposal. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) is the salt waste (water-soluble) treatment portion of this effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction, and operation of technologies to prepare the salt-waste feed material for immobilization at the site's Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility [DWPF]). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to DWPF include cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and actinides. In April 2000, the DOE Deputy Secretary for Project Completion (EM-40) established the SRS Salt Processing Project Technical Working Group (TWG) to manage technology development of treatment alternatives for SRS high-level salt wastes. The separation alternatives investigated included three candidate Cs-removal processes selected, as well as actinide and Sr removal that are also required as a part of each process. The candidate Cs-removal processes are: crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange (CST); caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX); and small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). The Tanks Focus Area was asked to assist DOE by managing the SPP research and development (R&D), revising roadmaps, and developing down-selection criteria. The down-selection decision process focused its analysis on three levels: (a) identification of goals that the selected technology should achieve, (b) selection criteria that are a measure of performance of the goal, and (c) criteria scoring and weighting for each technology alternative. After identifying the goals and criteria, the TWG analyzed R&D results and engineering data and scored the technology alternatives versus the criteria. Based their analysis and scoring, the TWG recommended CSSX as the preferred alternative. This recommendation was formalized in July 2001 when DOE published the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and was finalized in the DOE Record of Decision issued in October 2001.

Lang, K.; Gerdes, K.; Picha, K.; Spader, W.; McCullough, J.; Reynolds, J.; Morin, J. P.; Harmon, H. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

251

Microsoft Word - Policy_Flash_09_01_Interim_Certification.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JANUARY 16, 2009 JANUARY 16, 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR ALL PROGRAM ELEMENTS FROM: PMCDP CERTIFICATION REVIEW BOARD SUBJECT: Project Management Career Development Interim Certification The Project Management Career Development Program (PMCDP) Certification Review Board (CRB) established a new process whereby candidates with strong project management experience from outside the Department, hired into project director positions, may be granted an interim PMCDP certification. Interim certification allows the federal employee to act as a certified federal project director. Interim certifications are granted by the sponsoring CRB member, or their designee. If the sponsoring program office is not a voting member of the CRB, the Office of Engineering and Construction Management will act as the grantor of interim certification.

252

Design and Commissioning of Upgraded Impurity Processing System at the JET Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purification and Chemical Process / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

A. Perevezentsev; A. Bell; P. D. Brennan; C. Gibbons; J. Hemmerich; S. Knipe; R. Stagg; J. Yorkshades

253

A SPECIALIZED, MULTI-USER COMPUTER FACILITY FOR THE HIGH-SPEED, INTERACTIVE PROCESSING OF EXPERIMENTAL DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a proposed five user facility is shown In Figure 1. TheA SPECIALIZED, MULTI-USER COMPUTE* FACILITY FOR THE HIGH-to support aultiple ' users on the facility, each capable.of

Maples, C.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under the Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Action Plan for Tank System TRA-009. The tank system to be closed is identified as VCO-SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-009. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

K. Winterholler

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY I hereby certify that this transcript constitutes an accurate record of the full Council meeting of the National Coal Council held on November 14,2008 at the Westin Grand Hotel, Washington, D.C. ~ i c h a e l G. Mueller, Chair National Coal Council I NATIONAL COAL COUNCIL 1 FULL COUNCIL MEETING FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14, 2 0 0 8 The Full Council meeting convened at 9 : 0 0 a.m. in the Washington Ballroom of the Westin Grand Hotel, 2 3 5 0 M Street, NW, Washington, DC, Chair Michael G. Mueller presiding. ATTENDEES: MIKE MUELLER, Arneren Energy Fuels & Services Company, Chair RICH EIMER, Dynegy Inc., Vice-Chair ROBERT BECK, National Coal Council, Executive Vice-President SY ALI, Clean Energy Consulting BARB ALTIZER, Eastern Coal Council

256

certification_samplingplan.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applicable Sampling Plan Applicable Sampling Plan for Certification of Consumer Products The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended, (EPCA or the ''Act'') authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE or the ''Department'') to enforce compliance with the energy conservation standards established for certain consumer products and commercial equipment. 42 U.S.C. §§ 6299-6305. To ensure that all covered products distributed in the United States comply with DOE's energy conservation standards, the Department has promulgated enforcement regulations, which include specific certification and compliance requirements. See 10 CFR part 430, subpart F. Each manufacturer must certify that each basic model meets the applicable energy conservation standard before distributing that model in commerce. 10 CFR 430.62(a). To

257

TORT certification package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TORT code has been certified. TORT is a three-dimensional discrete ordinates transport theory code, than can solve neutron, photon, or coupled neutron/photon problems. The code will be used primarily for shielding and radiation field calculations SRS. As defined in this work, certification dies not imply validation. The code must be validated for a particular type of calculation before it can be used for critical applications.

Frost, R.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T. [Ai-Farabi Kazakh National University, Chemical Faculty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Galkin, A. [KATEP Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Bachilova, N. [NIISTROMPROEKT Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Blynskiy, A. [Nuclear Technology Safety Centre, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Maev, V. [MAEK-Kazatomprom Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Wells, D. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom); Herrick, A. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Caithness (United Kingdom); Michelbacher, J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

GRR/Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14IDDSection401WaterQualityCertificationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency U S Army Corps of Engineers Regulations & Policies Idaho Environmental Protection and Health Act Idaho Administrative Procedure Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14IDDSection401WaterQualityCertificationProcess.pdf 14IDDSection401WaterQualityCertificationProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

260

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

LANCE HAYS

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Smart Grid Testing and Certification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ensure the benefits of rigorous test programs are ... Smart Grid products are tested and certified. ... SGIP), particularly the SGIP Testing and Certification ...

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

Applications for Certificates for Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas Transmission Facilities (Ohio) Applications for Certificates for Electric, Gas, or Natural Gas Transmission Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider The Ohio Power Siting Board An applicant for a certificate to site a major electric power, gas, or natural gas transmission facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a reference for state and local governments and for the public. The applicant shall provide a statement explaining the need for the

263

AMPX-77 Phase 1 certification package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AMPX-77 Phase 1 modules have been certified. AMPX-77 is a modular code system for generating coupled multigroup neutron-gamma cross section libraries from Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B). All basic cross-section data are input from the formats used by the ENDF/B, and output can be obtained from a variety of formats, included in its own internal and very general formats, along with a variety of other useful formats used by major transport, diffusion theory, and Monte Carlo codes. Processing is provided for both neutron and gamma-ray data. The AMPX-77 code system will be used at SRS to perform critical calculations related to nuclear criticality safety. The AMPX-77 modular codes system contains forty-seven separate modules. For the certification process, the 47 modules have been divided into three groups or phases. This Certification Package is for the Phase 1 modules: BONAMI, LAPHNGAS, MALOCS, NITAWL, ROLAIDS, SMUG, and XSDRNPM.

Niemer, K.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Green Power Network: Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Retail Products Table of Retail Products Table of Commercial Certificate Marketers List of REC Marketers REC Prices National Renewable Energy Certificate Tracking Systems Map Carbon Offsets State Policies Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) Renewable energy certificates (RECs), also known as renewable energy credits, green certificates, green tags, or tradable renewable certificates, represent the environmental attributes of the power produced from renewable energy projects and are sold separate from commodity electricity. Customers can buy green certificates whether or not they have access to green power through their local utility or a competitive electricity marketer. And they can purchase green certificates without having to switch electricity suppliers. Table of Retail Products

265

Building Technologies Office: Implementation, Certification and Enforcement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implementation, Implementation, Certification and Enforcement to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Implementation, Certification and Enforcement on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Implementation, Certification and Enforcement on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Implementation, Certification and Enforcement on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Implementation, Certification and Enforcement on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Implementation, Certification and Enforcement on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Implementation, Certification and Enforcement on AddThis.com... About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement Standardized Templates for Reporting Test Results

266

Puerto Rico - Renewable Energy Equipment Certification | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Puerto Rico - Renewable Energy Equipment Certification Puerto Rico - Renewable Energy Equipment Certification Eligibility Construction InstallerContractor Savings For Solar Buying...

267

Earn ENERGY STAR certification | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earn ENERGY STAR certification Earn ENERGY STAR certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Build an energy program Improve building and plant performance Earn the ENERGY STAR and other recognition Benchmark energy use ENERGY STAR in action Communicate and educate ENERGY STAR communications toolkit Bring Your Green to Work with ENERGY STAR

268

RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D{sub Cs} in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is {approx}15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under construction, will use the same process chemistry. The Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) expressed an interest in investigating the further optimization of the organic solvent by replacing the BoBCalixC6 extractant with a more efficient extractant. This replacement should yield dividends in improving cesium removal from the caustic waste stream, and in the rate at which the caustic waste can be processed. To that end, EM-31 provided funding for both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRNL wrote a Task Technical Quality and Assurance Plan for this work. As part of the envisioned testing regime, it was decided to perform an ESS test using a simulated waste that simulated a typical envisioned SWPF feed, but with added potassium to make the waste more challenging. Potassium interferes in the cesium removal, and its concentration is limited in the feed to <1950 mg/L. The feed to MCU has typically contained <500 mg/L of potassium.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

269

Compliance Certification Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40 CFR Part 191 40 CFR Part 191 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Appendix PIC United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Passive Institutional Controls Conceptual Design Report PASSIVE INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT REVISION 0 MAY 14, 1996 1 C PASSIVE INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS DESIGN REPORT REVISION 0 PASSIVE INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT MAY 1 4 . 1 9 9 6 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A . Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B . Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 C . Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 I1 . SITE DESCRIPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 I11 . DESIGN REQUIREMENTS/CRITERIA . . . . . . . . . . 17 IV . MESSAGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

270

DORT certification package  

SciTech Connect

The DORT code has been certified. DORT is a two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport theory code, that can solve neutron, photon, or coupled neutron/photon problems. It is anticipated that DORT will be used for criticality calculations as well as for shielding and radiation field analysis at SRS. In addition to the DORT module itself, 5 utility programs that are useful in certain DORT applications have been certified. These modules are: GIP, DOS, GRTUNCL, BNDRYS, and RTFLUM. As defined in this work, certification does not imply validation. These codes must be validated for a particular type of calculation before they can be used for critical applications.

Frost, R.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Challenges of Preserving Historic Resources During the Deactivation and Decommissioning of Highly Contaminated Historically Significant Plutonium Process Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that are included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Site-wide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP. (authors)

Hopkins, A.; Minette, M.; Sorenson, D.; Heineman, R.; Gerber, M. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., PO Box 1000 Richland WA 99352 (United States); Charboneau, S. [US Department of Energy PO Box 550, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Bond, F. [Washington State Department of Ecology, WDOE 3100 Port of Benton Blvd., Richland WA, 99354 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

CHALLENGES OF PRESERVING HISTORIC RESOURCES DURING THE D & D OF HIGHLY CONTAMINATED HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT PLUTONIUM PROCESS FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that ere included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE'S Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Sitewide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP.

HOPKINS, A.M.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

273

CHALLENGES OF PRESERVING HISTORIC RESOURCES DURING THE D & D OF HIGHLY CONTAMINATED HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT PLUTONIUM PROCESS FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that ere included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE'S Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Sitewide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP.

HOPKINS, A.M.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

ERDA Geothermal Component Test Facility (GCTF), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California. Test operations management plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion of the operation of the Geothermal Component Test Facility (GCTF), established for testing heat extraction and energy conversion equipment and materials, is presented under the following section headings: purposes of the facility; operating policies: service, conflicts, safety and environmental, investigator activities, shops and equipment, and test certification; organization: chart; Lawrence Berkely Laboratory: organization, responsibilities, individual responsibilities, and funding; Bureau of Reclamation: organization, responsibilities, and funding; operations contractor: contract, qualifications, and personnel; Test Operations Advisory Board; experiment processing: test acceptance, scheduling and priorities, cost reimbursement, and activities flow chart.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Full-Scale Cross-Flow Filter Testing in Support of the Salt Waste Processing Facility Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parsons and its team members General Atomics and Energy Solutions conducted a series of tests to assess the constructability and performance of the Cross-Flow Filter (CFF) system specified for the Department of Energy (DOE) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The testing determined the optimum flow rates, operating pressures, filtrate-flow control techniques, and cycle timing for filter back pulse and chemical cleaning. Results have verified the design assumptions made and have confirmed the suitability of cross-flow filtration for use in the SWPF. In conclusion: The CFF Test Program demonstrated that the SWPF CFF system could be successfully fabricated, that the SWPF CFF design assumptions were conservative with respect to filter performance and provided useful information on operational parameters and techniques. The filter system demonstrated performance in excess of expectations. (authors)

Stephens, A.B.; Gallego, R.M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Singer, S.A.; Swanson, B.L. [Energy Solutions, Aiken, SC (United States); Bartling, K. [Parsons, Aiken, SC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Soft x-ray scattering facility at the Advanced Light Source with real-time data processing and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the development and characterization of a dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering facility. Capable of operation over a wide energy range, the beamline and endstation are primarily used for scattering from soft matter systems around the carbon K-edge ({approx}285 eV). We describe the specialized design of the instrument and characteristics of the beamline. Operational characteristics of immediate interest to users such as polarization control, degree of higher harmonic spectral contamination, and detector noise are delineated. Of special interest is the development of a higher harmonic rejection system that improves the spectral purity of the x-ray beam. Special software and a user-friendly interface have been implemented to allow real-time data processing and preliminary data analysis simultaneous with data acquisition.

Gann, E.; Collins, B. A.; Ade, H. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Young, A. T.; Nasiatka, J.; Padmore, H. A.; Hexemer, A.; Wang, C. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Yan, H. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

DEVELOPMENT OF REMOTE HANFORD CONNECTOR GASKET REPLACEMENT TOOLING FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested development of tooling for remote replacement of gaskets in mechanical Hanford connectors. The facility has compressed air supply, two master-slave manipulators (MSM's) and a lightweight robotic arm for operation of the remote tools. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed and tested multiple tools to perform the gasket replacement tasks. Separate pneumatic snap-ring removal tools that use the connector skirt as a reaction surface were developed for removal of the snap ring and spent gasket on both vertical and horizontal Hanford connectors. A pneumatic tool that clamps and centers on the jumper pipe ID was developed to simultaneously install the new gasket and snap ring. A pneumatic snap-ring-loading tool was developed that compresses the snap ring and places it in a groove in the installation tool. All of the tools are located on a custom work table with a pneumatic valve station that directs compressed air to the desired tool and vents the tools as needed. The entire system has been successfully tested using MSM's to manipulate the various tools. Deployment of the entire system is expected during FY08. The Hanford connector gasket replacement tooling has been successfully tested using MSM's to manipulate the various tools. Nitric acid is used in many of the decontamination processes performed in the REDC, where the tooling will be deployed. Although most of the tool components were fabricated/purchased with nitric acid and radioactive service in mind, some of the prototype parts must be replaced with parts that are more compatible with nitric acid/radioactive service. Several modifications to the various tools are needed to facilitate maintenance and replacement of failed components. Development of installation tools for replacement of 1-inch, 2-inch and multi-hole gaskets is being considered. Deployment of the existing system in the DWPF REDC is expected during FY08.

Krementz, D

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

278

Certification of solar products - The Florida experience  

SciTech Connect

Florida legislation enacted in 1976 directed the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) to develop standards for solar energy systems manufactured or sold in the state, establish criteria for testing the performance of solar energy systems, and provide a means to display compliance with approved performance tests for these systems. This mandate has been effectively implemented for both solar domestic water heating and solar pool heating systems. With growing interest and markets for photovoltaic systems, plans are presently being developed to expand the scope of the mandate to include photovoltaic technology. This paper discusses four complementary facets of a photovoltaic (PV) system certification program. They include PV module performance characterization and rating; PV system design review and approval; examination and authorization of photovoltaic system installers; and inspection and acceptance testing of PV system installation. The suggested photovoltaic system process builds on lessons learned from over 20 years of testing, certifying and labeling of solar thermal collectors, and the certification of solar thermal systems.

POST,HAROLD N.; ROLAND,JAMES D.; VENTRE,GERARD G.; HUGGINS,JAMES C.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Intelligent Building Control System for EPBD Certification Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building commissioning is a developing concept also in the Czech Republic. At present time only some aspects of building commissioning are implemented as a part of the facility management and energy auditing processes that are related to EPBD implementation. The project, presented in this paper, aims to find ways of energy-efficient operation of existing and designed energy- efficient buildings and is based on the fact that many buildings designed according to modern principles, in its operation does not behave as expected. The project is investigating and developing procedures to help change the current often intuitive approach to operate buildings in a systematic activity, taking into account energy conservation. Modern control systems of intelligent HVAC buildings could provide not only the information needed for the operational control of building, but also to detect faults and to evaluate the energy performance of the building. Under the IEA Annex 47 project, authors started to develop tools that support additional aspects of the commissioning process, including new control system for building energy services. The paper is focused on specification of new function of building control system, providing information for existing building EPBD certification. Results in terms of implementation of this function into existing building energy control system are discussed.

Kabele, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT [SEC 1 & 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L.L.

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Directory of Federal Government Certification Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NBS Special Publication 739 Directory of Federal Government Certification Programs Maureen Breitenberg, Editor ...

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

DataTrends: ENERGY STAR Certification | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Certification ENERGY STAR Certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

283

Solar Equipment Certification | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Equipment Certification Solar Equipment Certification Solar Equipment Certification < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Equipment Certification Provider Minnesota Department of Commerce Minnesota law requires that all active solar space-heating and water-heating systems, sold, offered for sale, or installed on residential and commercial buildings in the state meet Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) standards. Specifically, the rule references SRCC's "Operating Guidelines" pertaining to collector certification and system certification: OG-100 and OG-300, respectively. Local building officials

284

Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) supported the qualification of the processing of this glass system at the DWPF. A recommendation from the SRNL studies was the need for the DWPF Laboratory to establish a method to measure thorium by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES). This recommendation led to the set of thorium-bearing glasses from the SB6 Variability Study (VS) being submitted to the DWPF Laboratory for chemical composition measurement. The measurements were conducted by the DWPF Laboratory using the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method routinely employed for analysis of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). These measurements are presented and reviewed in this report. The review indicates that the measurements provided by the DWPF Laboratory are comparable to those provided by Analytical Development's laboratory at SRNL for these same glasses. As a result, the authors of this report recommend that the DWPF Laboratory begin using its routine peroxide fusion dissolution method for the measurement of thorium in SME samples of SB6. The purpose of this technical report is to present the measurements generated by the DWPF Laboratory for the SB6 VS glasses and to compare the measurements to the targeted compositions for these VS glasses as well as to SRNL's measurements (both sets, targeted and measured, of compositional values were reported by SRNL in [2]). The goal of these comparisons is to provide information that will lead to the qualification of peroxide fusion dissolution as a method for the measurement by the DWPF Laboratory of thorium in SME glass samples.

Edwards, T.; Click, D.; Feller, M.

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

285

EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

EPA Redesigns EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies At a recent meeting held in Washington, DC, officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) opened dialogue about proposed changes to its emission certification policies that affect alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). "We are trying to accommo- date the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) and Executive Order requirements while trying to change enforce- ment policies and guidance with respect to conversions," said Rich Ackerman of EPA's Enforcement Office. The meeting, attended by representatives of more than 60 organizations, was held to discuss actions addressing AFV emission certification. Specifically, topics included * Conversion emissions perfor- mance data * Status of environmental laws pertaining to alternative fuel

286

Renewable Energy Certificate Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was primarily to develop and implement a curriculum which will train undergraduate and graduate students at the University seeking a degree as well as training for enrollees in a special certification program to prepare individuals to be employed in a broad range of occupations in the field of renewable energy and energy conservation. Curriculum development was by teams of Saint Francis University Faculty in the Business Administration and Science Departments and industry experts. Students seeking undergraduate and graduate degrees are able to enroll in courses offered within these departments which will combine theory and hands-on training in the various elements of wind power development. For example, the business department curriculum areas include economic modeling, finance, contracting, etc. The science areas include meteorology, energy conversion and projection, species identification, habitat protection, field data collection and analysis, etc.

Gwendolyn S. Andersen

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

287

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates?  

SciTech Connect

Renewable energy certificates (RECs) are tradable instruments that convey the attributes of a renewable energy generator and the right to make certain claims about energy purchases. RECs first appeared in US markets in the late 1990s and are particularly important in states that accept or require them as evidence of compliance with renewables portfolio standards (RPS). The emergence of RECs as a tradable commodity has made utilities, generators, and regulators increasingly aware of the need to specify who owns the RECs in energy transactions. In voluntary transactions, most agree that the question of REC ownership can and should be negotiated privately between the buyer and the seller, and should be clearly established by contract. Claims about purchasing or using renewable energy should only be made if REC ownership can be documented. In many other cases, however, renewable energy transactions are either mandated or encouraged through state or federal policy. Because of the recent appearance of RECs, legislation and regulation mandating the purchase of renewable energy has sometimes been silent on the disposition of the RECs associated with that generation. Furthermore, some renewable energy contracts pre-date the existence of RECs, and therefore do not address REC ownership. In both of these instances, the issue of REC ownership must often be answered by legislative or regulatory authorities. The resulting uncertainty in REC ownership has hindered the development of robust REC markets and has, in some cases, led to contention between buyers and sellers of renewable generation. This article, which is based on a longer Berkeley Lab report, reviews federal and state efforts to clarify the ownership of RECs from Qualifying Facilities (QFs) that sell their generation under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978. The full report also addresses state efforts to clarify REC ownership in two other situations, customer-owned generation that benefits from state net metering rules, and generation facilities that receive financial incentives from state or utility funds. The issue of REC ownership most often arises in states that have adopted an RPS. In such states, both parties to QF contracts have a lot at stake: either additional cost to a utility if RECs are awarded to the QF, or loss of value to the QF if RECs are awarded to the utility. As a rough estimate, QF RECs that are eligible for state RPS programs could have a value between $35 million and $175 million, so there is significant economic value riding on the ownership question.

Holt, Edward; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Policy Flash 2013-54 Acquisition Certification Program Handbook...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Flash 2013-54 Acquisition Certification Program Handbook 4th Edition Policy Flash 2013-54 Acquisition Certification Program Handbook 4th Edition Acquisition Certifications...

289

LEED Certification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Certification Certification Jump to: navigation, search Name LEED Certification/U.S. Green Building Council Address U.S. Green Building Council 2101 L Street, NW Suite 500 Place Washington, District of Columbia Zip 20037 Sector Buildings Product Certification system Website http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPa Coordinates 38.889471°, -77.0578855° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.889471,"lon":-77.0578855,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

290

Guide to research facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Building an Energy Efficient Plant Certification Program: Management System for Energy 2000:2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The US Department of Energys Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) is partnering with industry to drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017and also contribute to an 18% reduction in carbon intensity economy-wide by 2012. To expedite progress in achieving these targets, ITP and industry are collaborating with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), non-profits, USEPA and NIST to facilitate the development of a certification for manufacturing plants. A key element in this certification program is the ANSI/MSE 2000:2008 national standard for energy management. Currently being revised in 2008, this standard promotes a continual improvement model which leads to sustained energy savings as well as further energy reductions. The paper will describe the model, the revision process and the contributions of national energy stakeholders to the changes in the standard. In addition, a national pilot program that tests the adoption of the standard in industrial facilities will be presented. Finally, international interest in energy management is driving the development of an ISO management standard. The U.S. DOE is leading this effort in partnership with other countries and expects ANSI/MSE 2000:2008 to be a foundational document for a new international energy management standard.

Meffert, B; Brown, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Proposed Use of a Constructed Wetland for the Treatment of Metals in the S-04 Outfall of the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF is part of an integrated waste treatment system at the SRS to treat wastes containing radioactive contaminants. In the early 1980s the DOE recognized that there would be significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the radioactive waste in a stable solid form. The Defense Waste Processing Facility was designed and constructed to accomplish this task.

Glover, T.

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Appendices to the final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten Island, the Proctor and Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. This appendix to the final report provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

296

Considerations for Emerging Markets for Energy Savings Certificates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

certificates; ESCs; energy efficiency; renewable energy;renewable energy certificates; RECs;state policy; renewable energy development; state policy

Friedman, Barry

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

International Facility Management Association Strategic Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Management Association Facility Management Association Strategic Facility Planning: A WhIte PAPer Strategic Facility Planning: A White Paper on Strategic Facility Planning © 2009 | International Facility Management Association For additional information, contact: 1 e. Greenway Plaza, Suite 1100 houston, tX 77046-0104 USA P: + 1-713-623-4362 F: + 1-713-623-6124 www.ifma.org taBle OF cOntentS PreFace ......................................................... 2 executive Summary .................................... 3 Overview ....................................................... 4 DeFinitiOn OF Strategic Facility Planning within the Overall cOntext OF Facility Planning ................. 5 SPecializeD analySeS ................................ 9 OrganizatiOnal aPPrOacheS tO SFP ... 10 the SFP PrOceSS .......................................

298

Official Certificate List Level(s)* Academic Administrative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Educational Policy Studies EDUU S/295 Certificate in Energy Analysis and Policy at the Graduate Level IESG310&SU101 Certificate in Air Resources Management IESG104 Certificate in American Indian Studies L&SU S/110 Certificate in Archaeology L&SU S/120 Certificate in Asian American Studies L&SU201 Certificate

Sheridan, Jennifer

299

SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES (CERTIFICATE) www.ee.washington.edu/admissions/pmp/certificates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES (CERTIFICATE) www.ee.washington.edu/admissions/pmp/certificates NOT ADMITTING FOR FALL 2011 ~ NEXT OFFERING OF SMART GRID CERTIFICATE TENTATIVELY FALL 2012 The Certificate in Smart Grid Technologies & Management in Electrical Engineering serves the growing need for engineers

Washington at Seattle, University of

300

Microsoft Word - CERTIFICATION LEVEL REQUIREMENTS.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERTIFICATION LEVEL CERTIFICATION LEVEL The CEG is intended to provide program secretarial officers and field element managers (including operations offices, site offices, area offices, project offices, and service centers) with the requirements and guidelines for evaluating PMCDP candidate competencies and requests for equivalencies at all four certification levels and continuing education. Persons planning to be certified under the PMCDP may attain certification levels with the following total project cost (TPC) limits: * Certification Level 4: TPC exceeding $400 million (M) * Certification Level 3: TPC greater than $100M and equal to or less than $400M * Certification Level 2: TPC greater than $20M and equal to or less than $100M * Certification Level 1: TPC greater than $5M and equal to or less than $20M

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PREPARING FOR A SUCCESSFUL EVMS CERTIFICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The client, a government agency, requires its contractor to obtain an Earned Value Management System (EVMS) certification that meets the intent of ANSI/EIA-748-B, Earned Value Management Systems. The contractor has extensive experience with certification preparation, having completed two certifications within two years. Information from a previous EVMS certification and internal system surveillances are used to prepare for client-based EVMS certifications and bi-annual surveillances. The contractor also sent members of its group to assist other companies preparing for surveillances and certifications to perform 'Black Hat Reviews.' This paper is a lessons learned on preparing a team for EVMS certification. The information is also applicable for surveillances, since the contractor prepares its team for the surveillance in the same manner as the initial certification. Some of the areas covered include required documents, tracing the data through the systems, Control Account Manager (CAM) preparation, and system verification.

CROWE SL; BASCHE AD

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

302

Improving the usability of VeriSign SSL certificate enrollment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the methodology used to redesign the SSL Certificate enrollment process for VeriSign, Inc.Like many technology companies in which time to market is of critical importance, VeriSign's release schedules and fast response to customer ... Keywords: digital security, input and interaction technologies, prototyping, service design, usability testing and evaluation, user interface design

Krista Van Laan; Eva Jonshult

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Certification and Accreditation Process Handbook for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This handbook is part of a series of documents on C&A with which the ... responsibility due to system failure; (3) availability of manual backup systems ...

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

304

NIF's Operations Support Building awarded LEED certification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIF's Operations Support Building awarded LEED certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

305

certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

needs to be redone. certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment (CRE) More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI...

306

ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Professional Engineers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program...

307

Building Energy Performance Certificate. Asset Rating.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: LCEA029636 Keywords: Energy Performance Certificate ...

308

Certification testing for small wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the testing procedures for obtaining type certification for a small wind turbine. Southwest Windpower (SWWP) is seeking type certification from Underwriters Laboratory (UL) for the AIR 403 wind turbine. UL is the certification body and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is providing technical assistance including conducting the certification testing. This is the first small turbine to be certified in the US, therefore standards must be interpreted and test procedures developed.

Corbus, D.; Link, H.; Butterfield, S.; Stork, C.; Newcomb, C.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

309

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from fossil-fuel fired cogeneration is priced the same asFERC noted that cogeneration facilities, to receive QFis a pre-requisite to a cogeneration facilitys achieving QF

Holt, Edward; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging Facility. As the ongoing design evolution remains fluid, the results from this design calculation should be evaluated for applicability to any new or modified design. Consequently, the results presented in this document are limited to the current design. The information contained in this document was developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering and is intended for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the various criticality related activities performed in the Aging Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before the use of the information for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

C.E. Sanders

2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

311

Expanding Small Wind Turbine Certification Testing - Establishment of Regional Test Centers (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

Presented at the WINDPOWER 2010 Conference & Exhibition, 23-26 May 2010, Dallas, Texas. The rapid growth of the small wind turbine (SWT) market is attracting numerous entrants. Small wind turbine purchasers now have many options but often lack information (such as third-party certification) to select a quality turbine. Most SWTs do not have third-party certification due to the expense and difficulty of the certification process. Until recently, the only SWT certification bodies were in Europe. In North America, testing has been limited to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsidized tests conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) under the ongoing Independent Testing Project. The goal is to increase the number of certified turbines and gain greater consumer confidence in SWT technology. To reduce certification testing costs, DOE/NREL is assisting in establishing a network of Regional Test Centers (RTCs) to conduct SWT third-party certification testing. To jump-start these RTCs, DOE/NREL is providing financial and technical assistance for an initial round of tests. The goal is to establish a lower-cost U.S. small wind testing capability that will lead to increased SWT certification. This poster describes the project, describes how it fits within broader SWT certification activities, and provides current status.

Jimenez, A.; Bowen, A.; Forsyth, T.; Huskey, A.; Sinclair, K.; van Dam, J.; Smith, J.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

GRR/Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of...

313

Comparison of silver sorbents for application to radioiodine control at the PUREX process facility modification. [Iodine 129  

SciTech Connect

In continued support of the design of the gaseous radioiodine control system for the PUREX Process Facility Modification (PFM), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted laboratory-scale measurements of the performance of four state-of-the-art sorbents for radioiodine in the dissolver offgas (DOG) of a nuclear reprocessing plant. The PFM is a new head-end treatment plant being designed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the PUREX Plant at the Hanford Site. The experiments performed measured the iodine effluent concentration from Norton silver mordenite (NAgZ), Linde silver mordenite (LAgZ), Linde silver faujasite (AgX), and silver nitrate-impregnated silicic acid (AgNO/sub 3/Si) during simulated normal operating conditions in the PFM after three shutdown/startup cycles, and during standby. At normal operating conditions the input gas is expected to have a dew point of 35/degree/C to 40/degree/C and contain 0.1 ..mu..mol I/L, 1 vol% NO, and 1 vol% NO /sub 2/. The sorbent bed would be at 150/degree/C. A shutdown/startup cycle consisted of eliminating iodine and NO/sub x/ from the input gas, cooling the bed to room temperature, stopping gas flow, and restarting the system. During standby conditions the input gas contained no iodine or NO/sub x/, the dew point was at 30/degree/C to 35/degree/C, and the bed temperature remained at 150/degree/C. This experimental study showed that 20 cm beds of NAgZ, LAgZ, and 18 wt% silver AgX could load up to 0.25 mmol I/g sorbent and routinely reduce the iodine concentration in a simulated PFM DOG from 0.1 ..mu..mol I/L to less than the target level of 10/sup /minus/5/ ..mu..mol I/L. In contrast, the AgNO/sub 3/Si unexpectedly failed to achieve this required level of performance, reducing the concentration on a routine basis only to 10/sup /minus/4/ to 10/sup /minus/2/ ..mu..mol I/L. 5 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Halko, B.T.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Certificate of Public Good--Gas and Electric (Vermont) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Certificate of Public Good--Gas and Electric (Vermont) Certificate of Public Good--Gas and Electric (Vermont) Certificate of Public Good--Gas and Electric (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Siting and Permitting This Public Service Board rule limits the construction of electric and natural gas facilities and restricts the amounts that companies can buy from non-Vermont sources. No company, as defined in section 201 of this title, may in any way purchase electric capacity or energy from outside the state; invest in an electric generation or transmission facility located

315

User Facilities - Learn More  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Source Search by Equipment or Process User Portal Quick Links ORNL home User facility contacts ORNL Guest House Open Helpful Travel Information Learn More User...

316

FAQS Qualification Card - NNSA Package Certification Engineer |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA Package Certification Engineer NNSA Package Certification Engineer FAQS Qualification Card - NNSA Package Certification Engineer A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-NNSAPackageCertificationEngineer.docx Description NNSA Package Certification Engineer Qualification Card

317

Compliance Certification Enforcement | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Certification Enforcement Compliance Certification Enforcement Compliance Certification Enforcement DOE enforces the energy and water conservation regulations established by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Appliance Standards Program to ensure that residential, commercial and industrial equipment deliver the energy and cost savings required by law. To ensure that all covered products comply with the energy and water conservation standards, the enforcement office reviews manufacturers' compliance with certification requirements. Products covered under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended, are required annually to ''certify by means of a certification report that each basic model(s) meets the applicable energy conservation standard." This program

318

Offline count-limited certificates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the idea of offline count-limited certificates (or clics for short), and show how these can be implemented using minimal trusted hardware functionality already widely available today. Offline count-limited ... Keywords: authentication, offline payments, smartcards, trusted platform module (TPM)

Luis F. G. Sarmenta; Marten van Dijk; Jonathan Rhodes; Srinivas Devadas

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Postgraduate Certificate in Geothermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Postgraduate Certificate in Geothermal Energy Technology Department of Engineering Science to study for the PGCertGeothermTech will require a visa. Details about how to obtain a visa to study in New your visa. Geothermal Training in New Zealand New Zealand is a beautiful country in the South Pacific

Auckland, University of

320

Nuclear Facilities Production Facilities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sand 2011-4582P. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) The GIF provides test cells for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

SciTech Connect

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

H-Coal pilot plant. Topical report: evaluation of a commercial laundry process for cleaning work clothing from a synthetic-fuels facility, E and H-12  

SciTech Connect

A scientific study was undertaken by Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc., to evaluate the cleaning efficiency of work clothing from the H-Coal Pilot Plant by a commercial laundry facility. Laundry process conditions for cleaning clothes were determined, and procedures were developed for laboratory analysis to detect coal liquefaction heavy distillate in work clothing and laundry wastewater. Laboratory testing and longwave ultraviolet light were used to monitor for skin contamination from recycled work clothing. Laboratory studies with spiked, unwashed cloth swatches showed a heavy distillate recovery efficiency of 86%. The laundry process was found to remove 98% of heavy distillate from spiked, washed cloth swatches. Low levels of heavy distillate and three polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons were found in laundry wastewater, recycled work shirts and uncleaned T-shirts worn in process areas. Hydrocarbon material content in wastewater can be satisfactorily treated by process wastewater treatment units at synfuels facilities. There were data to suggest that process material accumulates in recycled work shirts (outer clothing) to about three times the level in new control shirts, but this accumulation was not noted in T-shirts (underclothing). Although residual process material was found in work shirts and gloves after cleaning, skin fluorescence monitoring with ultraviolet light indicates that skin contamination from contact with recycled gloves and work shirts is not occurring.

Hill, R.H.; Tussey, L.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

ENERGY STAR Focus on Energy Efficiency in Food Processing | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Processing Food Processing Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Tools for benchmarking energy management practices Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants

325

THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones, milestones completed to date, and the vision of bringing PFP to slab-on-grade. Innovative approaches in planning and regulatory strategies, as well new technologies from within the United States and from other countries and field decontamination techniques developed by workforce personnel, such as the ''turkey roaster'' and the ''lazy Susan'' are covered in detail in the paper. Critical information on issues and opportunities during the performance of the work such as concerns regarding the handling and storage of special nuclear material, concerns regarding criticality safety and the impact of SNM de-inventory at PFP are also provided. The continued success of the PFP D&D effort is due to the detailed, yet flexible, approach to planning that applied innovative techniques and tools, involved a team of experienced independent reviewers, and incorporated previous lessons learned at the Hanford site, Rocky Flats, and commercial nuclear D&D projects. Multi-disciplined worker involvement in the planning and the execution of the work has produced a committed workforce that has developed innovative techniques, resulting in safer and more efficient work evolutions.

CHARBONEAU, S.L.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones, milestones completed to date, and the vision of bringing PFP to slab-on-grade. Innovative approaches in planning and regulatory strategies, as well new technologies from within the United States and from other countries and field decontamination techniques developed by workforce personnel, such as the ''turkey roaster'' and the ''lazy Susan'' are covered in detail in the paper. Critical information on issues and opportunities during the performance of the work such as concerns regarding the handling and storage of special nuclear material, concerns regarding criticality safety and the impact of SNM de-inventory at PFP are also provided. The continued success of the PFP D&D effort is due to the detailed, yet flexible, approach to planning that applied innovative techniques and tools, involved a team of experienced independent reviewers, and incorporated previous lessons learned at the Hanford site, Rocky Flats, and commercial nuclear D&D projects. Multi-disciplined worker involvement in the planning and the execution of the work has produced a committed workforce that has developed innovative techniques, resulting in safer and more efficient work evolutions.

CHARBONEAU, S.L.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Solar production of industrial process steam. Phase III. Operation and evaluation of the Johnson and Johnson solar facility. Final report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar facility that generates 177/sup 0/C (350/sup 0/F) process steam has been designed and constructed by Acurex Corporation and has operated for 1 yr supplying steam to the Johnson and Johnson manufacturing plant in Sherman, Texas. The facility consists of 1068 m/sup 2/ (11,520 ft/sup 2/) of parabolic trough concentrating collectors, a 18,900 1 (5000 gal) flash boiler, and an 18.6 kW (25 hp) circulating pump. In the first year of operation the system was available 97 percent of the days, and with sufficient solar radiation available it operated 70 percent of the days during this period. The measured data showed that the collector field operated at an efficiency of 25.4 percent for the year, and that at least 75 percent of the energy reaching the flash boiler was delivered to the plant as steam. A total of 309,510 kg (682,400 lb) of steam was produced by the solar facility for the first year. An analysis of the data showed that the delivered energy was within 90 to 100 percent of the predicted value. The successful completion of the first year of operation has demonstrated the technical feasibility of generating industrial process steam with solar energy.

Brink, D.F.; Kendall, J.M.; Youngblood, S.B.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Non-ferrous Metals Industry Energy Management System Certification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ferrous Metals Industry ferrous Metals Industry Energy Management System Certification China Quality Certification Center Zhigang Wang 1. Importance Energy Management System 2. Pilot Programs of Energy Management System Certification Contents China Quality Certification Center A professional certification body under the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of the PRC. Member of the following international organizations: IECEE and IQNet. CQC provides the following services; System certification, Product certification and Training . Main Qualifications -State authorized administrator of the Energy Conservation Label -Provides compulsory product certification as outlined by the Certification and Accreditation Administration(CNCA) of the PRC

329

NNSA Package Certification Engineer Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1026-2009 February 2009 DOE STANDARD NNSA PACKAGE CERTIFICATION ENGINEER FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1026-2009 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1026-2009 iv INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1026-2009 v TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT ................................................................................................................ vii PURPOSE ....................................................................................................................................1

330

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix C: Scoping Summary Report for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities - Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C: SCOPING SUMMARY REPORT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITIES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SCOPING PROCESS Scoping Summary Report C-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Scoping Summary Report C-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C This appendix contains the summary report prepared after the initial public scoping period for the depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facilities environmental impact statement (EIS) project. The scoping period for the EIS began with the September 18, 2001, publication of a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (66 FR 23213) and was extended to January 11, 2002. The report summarizes the different types of public involvement opportunities provided and the content of the comments received.

331

Seismic Analysis Issues in Design Certification Applications for New Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The licensing framework established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 52, Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants, provides requirements for standard design certifications (DCs) and combined license (COL) applications. The intent of this process is the early reso- lution of safety issues at the DC application stage. Subsequent COL applications may incorporate a DC by reference. Thus, the COL review will not reconsider safety issues resolved during the DC process. However, a COL application that incorporates a DC by reference must demonstrate that relevant site-specific de- sign parameters are within the bounds postulated by the DC, and any departures from the DC need to be justified. This paper provides an overview of several seismic analysis issues encountered during a review of recent DC applications under the 10 CFR Part 52 process, in which the authors have participated as part of the safety review effort.

Miranda, M.; Morante, R.; Xu, J.

2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

332

Structural Design Challenges in Design Certification Applications for New Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The licensing framework established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 52, Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants, provides requirements for standard design certifications (DCs) and combined license (COL) applications. The intent of this process is the early reso- lution of safety issues at the DC application stage. Subsequent COL applications may incorporate a DC by reference. Thus, the COL review will not reconsider safety issues resolved during the DC process. However, a COL application that incorporates a DC by reference must demonstrate that relevant site-specific de- sign parameters are confined within the bounds postulated by the DC, and any departures from the DC need to be justified. This paper provides an overview of structural design chal- lenges encountered in recent DC applications under the 10 CFR Part 52 process, in which the authors have participated as part of the safety review effort.

Miranda, M.; Braverman, J.; Wei, X.; Hofmayer, C.; Xu, J.

2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

333

Application for COR Certification-Recertification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEMORANDUM FOR SITE ACQUISITION CAREER MANAGER FROM: SUBJECT: Application for COR Certification- In accordance with DOE Order 361.1B, paragraph 4.B, the following application for COR certification is submitted, based on completion of the required minimum experience and training and my existing and/or pending COR appointment. E-mail address: _____________________ Program Office: Phone: ____________________________ Duty Station (city/state): I am COR to a or ________________________ under Contract/Solicitation number _________________________ 1. Previous certification (attached): Date last issued or renewed:____________

334

Nondestructive Evaluation: Balance-of-Plant Eddy Current Central Certification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process for eddy current examination certification, repeated examinations, and multiple audits are cumbersome for utilities, individuals, and employers. Sustaining a similar pool of data analysis skills and quality across the power industry has also become a challenge. EPRI believes that this certification program will support the NDE workforce shortage issues by retaining a skilled workforce as a result of limiting the written examination requirements and moving toward performance-based initiatives.

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

336

Financial Assistance Certification Financial Assistance Qualification Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assistance Certification Financial Assistance Certification Financial Assistance Qualification Standards Financial assistance award and administration in DOE is performed primarily by contract specialists. The Office of Personnel Management qualification standards for GS- 1 102 contract specialists are relevant but not fully sufficient for performing financial assistance duties. Contract specialists performing financial assistance in addition to, or in place of, acquisition duties must also meet the certification requirements established by the Financial Assistance Career Development (FACD) program. The FACD Program is built upon the skills acquired by the contract specialists in the performance of their acquisition duties and the training provided under the Contracting/Purchasing certification program.

337

Contractor Earned Value Management System Certification Status...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Contractor Earned Value Management System Certification Status Contractor Earned...

338

Guidance Concerning Applicable Sampling Plan for Certification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sampling Plan for Certification of Consumer Product The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended, authorizes the Department of Energy to enforce compliance...

339

New Employee Orientation- Ethics Briefing Certification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Required Ethics Certification form where a new employee indicates that they have reviewed the New Employee Orientationinformation on the Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees in the Executive...

340

Energy Performance Certificate Non-Domestic Building  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

66 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... This certificate shows the energy rating of this building.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

How to Apply for Energy Star Certification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Receive notification of the application's status. June 2013 1 Property Types Eligible for ENERGY STAR Certification Bank Branch Courthouse Data Center Distribution Center Financial...

342

ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Senior care resources Small business resources State and local government resources ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for applying This document...

343

FAQS Reference Guide NNSA Package Certification Engineer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the February 2009 edition of DOE-STD-1026-2009, NNSA Package Certification Engineer Functional Area Qualification Standard.

344

How to Apply for ENERGY STAR Certification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a site visit, verifying the information in your application. Property Types Eligible for ENERGY STAR Certification Bank Branch Courthouse Data Center Distribution Center Financial...

345

Creating a Certification Package | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the different levels of PMCDP certification. The PMCDP Knowledge Diagram provides a matrix of the different knowledge, skills, and abilities required for each level of PMCDP...

346

Implementing waste minimization at an active plutonium processing facility: Successes and progress at technical area (TA) -55 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory has ongoing national security missions that necessitate increased plutonium processing. The bulk of this activity occurs at Technical Area -55 (TA-55), the nations only operable plutonium facility. TA-55 has developed and demonstrated a number of technologies that significantly minimize waste generation in plutonium processing (supercritical CO{sub 2}, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, supercritical H{sub 2}O oxidation, WAND), disposition of excess fissile materials (hydride-dehydride, electrolytic decontamination), disposition of historical waste inventories (salt distillation), and Decontamination & Decommissioning (D&D) of closed nuclear facilities (electrolytic decontamination). Furthermore, TA-55 is in the process of developing additional waste minimization technologies (molten salt oxidation, nitric acid recycle, americium extraction) that will significantly reduce ongoing waste generation rates and allow volume reduction of existing waste streams. Cost savings from reduction in waste volumes to be managed and disposed far exceed development and deployment costs in every case. Waste minimization is also important because it reduces occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, risks of transportation accidents, and transfer of burdens from current nuclear operations to future generations.

Balkey, J.J.; Robinson, M.A.; Boak, J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Environmental assessment operation of the HB-Line facility and frame waste recovery process for production of Pu-238 oxide at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0948, addressing future operations of the HB-Line facility and the Frame Waste Recovery process at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, DOE has concluded that, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Juice Processing Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Juice Processing Plant EPI Juice Processing Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

349

Reducing Plug and Process Loads for a Large Scale, Low Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the design and operational plug and process load energy efficiency measures needed to allow a large scale office building to reach ultra high efficiency building goals. The appendices of this document contain a wealth of documentation pertaining to plug and process load design in the RSF, including a list of equipment was selected for use.

Lobato, C.; Pless, S.; Sheppy, M.; Torcellini, P.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

City of Oakland - Self Certification for Renewables (California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the permit process by exempting qualifying facilities from design review. Most solar energy systems installations are likely to be able to meet the requirements for...

351

An Integrated Approach to Evaluating the Technical and Commercial Options for Cogeneration Facilities in the Process Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration under the PURPA law is providing opportunity to the Process Industry not only to conserve fuel and electric costs associated with commercial process production, but effectively to share in the revenue from the sale of consumer power. The law permits release of fuel energy significantly in excess of that required for the process, expressly for the production of export electric power, with only a small required fraction contributing to sequential production of useful heat. The low required thermal energy fraction ostensibly allows systems which are hardly integrated at all with the processes involved, subject to evolving agency/legal interpretations. However, greater degrees of process/power system integration can produce increased conservation, not only of energy but of financial resources. This paper describes an integrated approach wherein technical and economic criteria are applied to size and select candidate cogeneration systems. The approach is integrated with regard to technical, economic and financial considerations, as well as to the determination of the appropriate degree of thermal integration of the power and process subsystems. An overview of steam and gas turbine cycle options for process/power integration typical of the refinery, olefins, and other industry complexes is presented. The cycles described include hot gas and steam heat recovery, going beyond the currently popular gas-turbine/ heat-recovery-steam-generator combination.

Cooke, D. H.; McCue, R. H.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Policy Flash 2013-25 Acquisition Certifications Program Handbook...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Flash 2013-25 Acquisition Certifications Program Handbook 3rd Edition released Policy Flash 2013-25 Acquisition Certifications Program Handbook 3rd Edition released Attached...

353

Guidance Concerning Certification Following a Change in the Applicable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concerning Certification Following a Change in the Applicable Energy or Water Conservation Standard Guidance Concerning Certification Following a Change in the Applicable Energy or...

354

Texas UST Registration and Self-Certification Form | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas UST Registration and Self-Certification Form Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Texas UST Registration and Self-Certification...

355

Certifications for use with DOE Loan Guarantees | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for use with DOE Loan Guarantees Certifications for use with DOE Loan Guarantees Certifications for Use with DOE Loan Guarantees More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - Loan...

356

Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Review of Certification, Compliance and Enforcement Powerpoint Presentation for ASHRAE Conference, January 31, 2011 Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification,...

357

File:07TXBRECGeneratorCertification.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TXBRECGeneratorCertification.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:07TXBRECGeneratorCertification.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels....

358

Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Energy Performance Certification of...

359

DOE Convening Report on Certification of Commercial HVAC and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Convening Report on Certification of Commercial HVAC and CRE Products DOE Convening Report on Certification of Commercial HVAC and CRE Products This document is the convening...

360

Policy Flash 2013-54 Acquisition Certification Program Handbook...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

54 Acquisition Certification Program Handbook 4th Edition Policy Flash 2013-54 Acquisition Certification Program Handbook 4th Edition Questions concerning this policy flash should...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Facility Microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

GRR/Section 7-CO-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 7-CO-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity GRR/Section 7-CO-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-CO-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity 07COCCertificateOfPublicConvenienceAndNecessity.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Public Utilities Commission Regulations & Policies 4 Code of Colorado Regulations (CCR) 723-3 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07COCCertificateOfPublicConvenienceAndNecessity.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A utility seeking authority to construct and to operate a facility or an

363

Conflict-of-Interest/Non-Disclosure Certificate For Reviewers Involved in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conflict-of-Interest/Non-Disclosure Certificate For Reviewers Conflict-of-Interest/Non-Disclosure Certificate For Reviewers Involved in the Selection of Subcontractors for NEUP Research and Development Funds Conflict-of-Interest/Non-Disclosure Certificate For Reviewers Involved in the Selection of Subcontractors for NEUP Research and Development Funds The Department of Energy has a policy that individuals with a conflict of interest cannot participate in the technical review of procurement proposals. This certification must be completed by individuals prior to their participation in the pre-application and/or proposal review processes. 1. I will not participate in the review of any pre-application or proposal involving a particular matter that would have a direct and predictable effect on any person, company or organization with which I have a

364

Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study: Hawai`i Biofuel Projects Prepared 12.1 Deliverable Bioenergy Analyses Prepared by Hawai`i Biofuel Foundation And NCSI Americas Inc agency thereof. #12;1 RSB Certification Readiness Study: Hawaii Biofuel Projects Prepared For Hawaii

365

SF STATE Extended Learning EXECUTIVE CERTIFICATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Participants in the certificate program must have a four-year degree or equivalent work experience. AnySF STATE Extended Learning 2013/2014 EXECUTIVE CERTIFICATE in FINANCIAL PLANNING PROGRAM FREE as a webcast. For exact dates and times, visit www.cel.sfsu.edu/financial. · Learn about the program · Meet

366

T-586: Microsoft Advisory about fraudulent SSL Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

586: Microsoft Advisory about fraudulent SSL Certificates 586: Microsoft Advisory about fraudulent SSL Certificates T-586: Microsoft Advisory about fraudulent SSL Certificates March 23, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Microsoft just released an advisory alerting its customers that a total of 9 certificates were issued using the leaked/stolen CA certificated from Comodo. PLATFORM: These certificates affect the following Web properties: login.live.com mail.google.com www.google.com login.yahoo.com (3 certificates) login.skype.com addons.mozilla.org "Global Trustee" ABSTRACT: Microsoft Advisory about fraudulent SSL Certificates. reference LINKS: Microsoft Security Advisory: 2524375 ISC 2011-03-23 Security updates IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Microsoft is aware of nine fraudulent digital certificates issued by Comodo, a certification authority present in the Trusted Root Certification

367

Renewable Energy Certificates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Certificates Renewable Energy Certificates Renewable Energy Certificates October 16, 2013 - 5:15pm Addthis Image of a red balloon reading 'Electricity' plus a green balloon reading 'REC' equals a purple balloon reading 'Renewable Power' Components of a Renewable Energy Certificate Two separate products exist from electricity produced by renewable energy projects that can be sold together or treated separately. One is the actual electrons produced, which can either be transferred through the power grid to provide power to utility customers or used off-grid or at a customer site. Although they are not common in the market, Federal renewable energy policy recognizes renewable energy certificates (RECs) from thermal renewable energy projects. For thermal RECs the energy product is British

368

Solar Equipment Certification | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Equipment Certification Solar Equipment Certification Solar Equipment Certification < Back Eligibility Construction General Public/Consumer Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Florida Program Type Equipment Certification Provider Florida Solar Energy Center Under the Solar Energy Standards Act of 1976, the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) is responsible for certifying all solar equipment sold in Florida. A manufacturer who wishes to have their solar equipment certified first contacts FSEC for an application and requests that FSEC test samples of the product at random. Equipment is then subjected to a series of tests in order to be approved or denied certification. Standards and applications procedures for specific technologies are available on the FSEC web site.

369

Successful Demolition of Historic Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Facilities: Managing the Process to Maximize Recycle Value to Fund Demolition  

SciTech Connect

This paper will present the history of the Atlas 36 and Titan 40 Space Launch Complexes (SLC), the facility assessment process, demolition planning, recycle methodology, and actual facility demolition that resulted in a 40% reduction in baseline cost. These two SLC launched hundreds of payloads into space from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS), Florida. The Atlas-Centaur family of rockets could lift small- to medium-size satellites designed for communications, weather, or military use, placing them with near pinpoint accuracy into their intended orbits. The larger Titan family was relied upon for heavier lifting needs, including launching military satellites as well as interplanetary probes. But despite their efficiency and cost-effectiveness, the Titan rockets, as well as earlier generation Atlas models, were retired in 2005. Concerns about potential environmental health hazards from PCBs and lead-based paint chipping off the facilities also contributed to the Air Force's decision in 2005 to dismantle and demolish the Atlas and Titan missile-launching systems. Lockheed Martin secured the complex following the final launch, removed equipment and turned over the site to the Air Force for decommissioning and demolition (D and D). AMEC was retained by the Air Force to perform demolition planning and facility D and D in 2004. AMEC began with a review of historical information, interviews with past operations personnel, and 100% facility assessment of over 100 structures. There where numerous support buildings that due to their age contained asbestos containing material (ACM), PCB-impacted material, and universal material that had to be identified and removed prior to demolition. Environmental testing had revealed that the 36B mobile support tower (MST) exceeded the TSCA standard for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) paint (<50 ppm), as did the high bay sections of the Titan Vertical Integration Building (VIB). Thus, while most of the steel structures could be completely recycled, about one-third of 36B MST and the affected areas of the VIB were to be consigned to an on-site regulated waste landfill. In all, it is estimated that approximately 10,000,000 kg (11,000 tons) of PCB-coated steel will be land-filled and 23,000,000 kg (25,000 tons) will be recycled. The recycling of the steel and other materials made it possible to do additional demolition by using these funds. Therefore, finding ways to maximize the recycle value of materials became a key factor in the pre-demolition characterization and implementation strategy. This paper will present the following: - Critical elements in demolition planning working at an active launch facility; - Characterization and strategy to maximize steel recycle; - Waste disposition strategy to maximize recycle/reuse and minimize disposal; - Recycle options available at DOD installations that allow for addition funds for demolition; - Innovation in demolition methodologies for large structures - explosive demolition and large-scale dismantlement; - H and S aspects of explosive demolition and large scale dismantlement. In conclusion: The Cape Canaveral AFS Demolition Program has been a great success due to the integration of multiple operations and contractors working together to determine the most cost-effective demolition methods. It is estimated that by extensive pre-planning and working with CCAFS representatives, as well as maximizing the recycle credits of various material, primarily steel, that the government will be able to complete what was base-lined to be a $30 M demolition program for < $20 M. Other factors included a competitive subcontractor environment where they were encouraged with incentives to maximize recycle/reuse of material and creative demolition solutions. Also, by overlapping multiple demolition tasks at multiple facilities allowed for a reduction in field oversight. (authors)

Jones, A.; Hambro, L. [AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc., Cocoa, FL (United States); Hooper, K. [U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing, Patrick AFB, Florida (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

FAQS Job Task Analyses - NNSA Package Certification Engineer FAQS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA Package Certification Engineer Functional Area NNSA Package Certification Engineer Functional Area Qualification Standard DOE-STD-1026-2009 Step 1 Identify and evaluate tasks - Develop a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job. o A great starting point is the list of Duties and Responsibilities from the FAQS. o Give careful thought to additional tasks that could be considered. o Don't worry about deleting tasks at this point - that is a part of the process further down. - List the tasks (and their sources, e.g., Duties and Responsibilities #1) in the chart below. - Discuss each task as a group and come to a consensus pertaining to Importance and Frequency of the task (i.e., each team member can consent to the assigned value, even if they don't exactly agree with it).

371

Building a community-based Linux certification program: an update on the progress of the Linux professional institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A report to the community on the progress of the LPI certification program (which will be well underway at the time of presentation), explaining future directions, outlining how people can become more involved in the process, and soliciting feedback ...

Dan York

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

ACCELERATING HANFORD TRANSURANC (TRU) WASTE CERTIFICATION & SHIPMENT FROM 2 PER YEAR TO 12 PER MONTH  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's site at Hanford has significantly accelerated the characterization of transuranic (TRU) waste and its subsequent shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)--from a total of two shipments in fiscal year 2002 to twelve shipments per month. The challenges encountered and experience gained in achieving this acceleration provide valuable lessons that can be used by others in the waste industry. Lessons learned as well as estimates of cost savings and schedule benefits are described. At the start of the acceleration effort, three separate facilities managed by multiple organizations characterized and handled the drums. To consolidate the majority of these activities under one organization and in one facility required RCRA permit and safety basis modifications. and a myriad of construction activities--but all with very visible benefit. Transferring drums between the separate facilities involved multiple organizations, and required meeting a complex set of transportation and safety basis requirements. Consolidating characterization activities into a single facility greatly simplified this process, realizing very significant operational efficiencies. Drums stockpiled in buildings for future processing previously were stored with recognition of physical, chemical, and radiological hazards, but without consideration for future processing. Drums are now stored using a modular approach so that feed for characterization processing takes drums from the accessible module face rather than randomly throughout the storage building. This approach makes drum handling more efficient, minimizes the potential for worker injuries, and supports the principles of ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) exposure from the waste. Sampling the headspace gas of the TRU waste packages was a major bottleneck in the characterization process, and hence an obstacle to acceleration. Sampling rates were improved by a combination of insulating and heating a waste storage building to provide sufficient space for the required temperature residence time; installing filter and sample ports in the drums using a pneumatic dart method; improving gas analysis time using cryofocusing technology and using both onsite and offsite labs for redundancy of analysis capability. The need for real-time radiography was reduced by implementing avisual examination technique as the waste was being packaged. Key to implementing the visual examination technique was the use of a ''portable procedure'' that can be used anywhere on the Hanford Site. This approach has been used successfully for packaging newly generated waste from various decontamination and decommissioning projects. Using a glovebox for repackaging drums has also been a rate-limiting step in accelerating the characterization of TRU waste at Hanford. The impacts of this requirement, however, have been minimized in two ways: first, by venting certain heat-sealed bags, and second, by implementing hydrogen and methane testing of headspace gas for high gram drums with multiple layers of confinement. The details of these specific efforts are included in a separate paper. Payload assembly and loading efficiencies of the TRUPACT-II, and certification and shipment efficiencies were instrumental to Hanford's successfully accelerating shipments. Loading time of TRUPACT II's for a shipment (three TRUPACTS per shipment) went from four days to two days. Future acceleration plans include certification of a box radioassay unit to assay TRU standard waste boxes (SWB) for shipment to WIPP and adding additional payload building/loadout stations to increase the shipping capabilities.

MCDONALD, K.M.

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Better define your customers facility requirements by optimizing your customers processes with value engineering before conceptual design  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses a new value engineering approach successfully being used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the design process of major construction projects. Of particular interest is how value engineers are applying the principles of Total Quality Management (TQM), utilizing value engineering techniques. Discussed are the associated problems with how major construction projects were previously planned, designed, value engineered, and then redesigned. Benefits of applying value engineering techniques early-on in the design process, far ahead of the traditional time for VE execution, is examined. The author provides a pro-con analysis of the benefits of early-on value engineering effort, and uses data gathered from several value engineering studies to support the conclusions of this paper.

Carpenter, R.L. Jr.

1993-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

374

A West Valley Demonstration Project Milestone - Achieving Certification to Ship Waste to the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) has successfully pretreated and vitrified nearly all of the 600,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste that was generated at the site of the only commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant to have operated in the United States. Low-level waste (LLW) generated during the course of the cleanup effort now requires disposal. Currently the WVDP only ships Class A LLW for off-site disposal. It has been shipping Class A wastes to Envirocare of Utah, Inc. since 1997. However, the WVDP may also have a future need to ship Class B and Class C waste, which Envirocare is not currently authorized to accept. The Nevada Test Site (NTS), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility, can accept all three waste classifications. The WVDP set a goal to receive certification to begin shipping Class A wastes to NTS by 2001. Formal certification/approval was granted by the DOE Nevada Operations Office on July 12, 2001. This paper discusses how the WVDP contractor, West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO), completed the activities required to achieve NTS certification in 2001 to ship waste to its facility. The information and lessons learned provided are significant because the WVDP is the only new generator receiving certification based on an NTS audit in January 2001 that resulted in no findings and only two observations--a rating that is unparalleled in the DOE Complex.

Jackson, J. P.; Pastor, R. S.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

375

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2012 [Facility News] 6, 2012 [Facility News] News Tips from 2012 EGU General Assembly Bookmark and Share The ARM Facility is attending the 2012 European Geophysical Union General Assembly at the Austria Center in Vienna for the first time. The ARM Facility is attending the 2012 European Geophysical Union General Assembly at the Austria Center in Vienna for the first time. VIENNA - The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is the world's most comprehensive outdoor laboratory and data archive for research related to atmospheric processes that affect Earth's climate. At the European Geophysical Union (EGU) General Assembly 2012 in Vienna, find out how scientists use the ARM Facility to study the interactions between clouds,

376

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2013 [Facility News] 4, 2013 [Facility News] Work Cut Out for ARM Science Board Bookmark and Share With a new fixed site on the horizon in the Azores, a third ARM Mobile Facility gearing up for action in the Arctic, and more aircraft probes and sensors than scientists can shake a stick at, the ARM Facility continues to expand its considerable suite of assets for conducting climate research. Along with this impressive inventory comes the responsibility to ensure the Facility is supporting the highest-value science possible. Enter the ARM Science Board. This eleven-member group annually reviews complex proposals for use of the ARM mobile and aerial facilities. To maintain excellence and integrity in the review process, each member serves a renewable term of two years, with membership updated annually.

377

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2011 [Facility News, Publications] 8, 2011 [Facility News, Publications] Journal Special Issue Includes Mobile Facility Data from Germany Bookmark and Share The ARM Mobile Facility operated in Heselbach, Germany, as part of the COPS surface network. The ARM Mobile Facility operated in Heselbach, Germany, as part of the COPS surface network. In 2007, the ARM Mobile Facility participated in one of the most ambitious field studies ever conducted in Europe-the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Now, 21 papers published in a special issue of the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society demonstrate that the data collected during COPS are providing new insight into: the key chemical and physical processes leading to convection initiation and to the modification of precipitation by orography;

378

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Backup Software Improves Processing, Reliability at Data Management New Backup Software Improves Processing, Reliability at Data Management Facility Bookmark and Share Real-time data from all three of the ARM Climate Research Facility sites (North Slope of Alaska, Southern Great Plains, and Tropical Western Pacific) are collected and processed at the ARM Climate Research Facility Data Management Facility (DMF) each day. Processing involves the application of algorithms for performing simple averaging routines, qualitative comparisons, or more complicated experimental calculations. With continual advances in computer technology, keeping up with the volume and pace of incoming data is a daunting challenge. And because the remote sites do not provide backups, reliable backups of these data at the DMF are critical. In addition, significant numbers of value-added datasets are

379

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Records Set Again; New Process Enhances Reporting of User Facility Statistics The 2006 year-end ARM statistics included a spatial distribution of global (shown here; click map for...

380

forest certification in guatemala yale school of forestry & environmental studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the rules and regulations governing the forest concessions and stip- ulating mandatory certification

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Quick Guide: Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Guide for Federal agencies considering renewable energy certificate (REC) purchases to fulfill Federal renewable energy requirements.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Lessons Learned from the 200 West Pump and Treatment Facility Construction Project at the US DOE Hanford Site - A Leadership for Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-Certified Facility  

SciTech Connect

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) designed, constructed, commissioned, and began operation of the largest groundwater pump and treatment facility in the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) nationwide complex. This one-of-a-kind groundwater pump and treatment facility, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation Site (Hanford Site) in Washington State, was built to an accelerated schedule with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. There were many contractual, technical, configuration management, quality, safety, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) challenges associated with the design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of this $95 million, 52,000 ft groundwater pump and treatment facility to meet DOEs mission objective of treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site with a new facility by June 28, 2012. The project teams successful integration of the projects core values and green energy technology throughout design, procurement, construction, and start-up of this complex, first-of-its-kind Bio Process facility resulted in successful achievement of DOEs mission objective, as well as attainment of LEED GOLD certification, which makes this Bio Process facility the first non-administrative building in the DOE Office of Environmental Management complex to earn such an award.

Dorr, Kent A.; Ostrom, Michael J.; Freeman-Pollard, Jhivaun R.

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

384

Application: Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Option.. Papavergos, PG; 1991. Halon 1301 Use in Oil and Gas Production Facilities: Alaska's North Slope.. Ulmer, PE; 1991. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

385

FACILITY SAFETY (FS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACILITY SAFETY (FS) FACILITY SAFETY (FS) OBJECTIVE FS.1 - (Core Requirement 7) Facility safety documentation in support of SN process operations,is in place and has been implemented that describes the safety envelope of the facility. The, safety documentation should characterize the hazards/risks associated with the facility and should, identify preventive and mitigating measures (e.g., systems, procedures, and administrative, controls) that protect workers and the public from those hazards/risks. (Old Core Requirement 4) Criteria 1. A DSA has been prepared by FWENC, approved by DOE, and implemented to reflect the SN process operations in the WPF. (10 CFR 830.200, DOE-STD-3009-94) 2. A configuration control program is in place and functioning such that the DSA is

386

Facilities Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of facilities maintenance is very broad and is commonly interpreted quite differently among maintenance managers at power plants and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear and process facilities. In many cases, the maintenance of administrative buildings, support structures, and "real property" is managed separately from the maintenance of process equipment. The scope and breadth of each maintenance program varies from site to site, as does the formality of the program established to address...

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iea.org/papers/pathways/buildings_certification.pdf Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Screenshot References: nergy Performance Certification of Buildings[1] Logo: Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency

388

U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) support to Department of Energy Rocky Flats Facility (DOE RF) saltcrete processing. Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work authorized for technical and scientific support to waste cementation and saltcrete processing operations. During this report period, tasks described in amendment M003 were initiated, some were completed, and an additional task not listed in M003 also was completed at the request of DOE RF. Summaries of task-specific activities are in four enclosures to this progress report. Other activities during this quarter included negotiation and initiation of amendment M004, to extend the period of performance and continue WES assistance to DOE RF. The four enclosures are: continuing support to waste cementation and saltcrete operations at DOE Rocky Flats Facility; review of ``Analyses of saltcrete``; review of Connell, et al ``Saltcrete evaluation`` report dated August 16, 1993; and scoping study of simulated saltcrete.

NONE

1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

TRUPACT-2 design, testing and certification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large volume of contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) nuclear waste has been generated and has accumulated at ten Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Approximately 168,000 cubic meters of this waste has been targeted for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Shipment of all of this waste is expected to require more than 15,000 shipments, totalling approximately 38 million kilometers of travel. The TRUPACT-II is a reusable package for shipment of CH TRU waste; it is designed in accordance with US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for Type B packages found in 10 CFR 71. There are two separate levels of containment to permit shipment of plutonium in excess of 740 GBq per package. The packaging is a right circular cylinder in shape, with a domed top and a flat bottom; external dimensions are 240 centimeters in diameter and 309 centimeters high. The capacity of each TRUPACT-II is 3182 kilograms of waste that can be loaded into fourteen 210-1 drums; or two 1.9 cubic meters standard waste boxes (SWBs). Three TRUPACT-II packages are transported on a custom designed semitrailer which is pulled by a conventional tractor for highway transport of CH TRU waste between DOE sites and to the WIPP near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the TRUPACT-II Package was initially submitted to the NRC in March 1989. Four revisions were issued during the period from May through August 1989. NRC certification of the package was received on August 30, 1989. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Cruse, J. (Pacific Nuclear Systems, Inc., Federal Way, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Certificate of Current Cost and Pricing Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERTIFICATE OF CURRENT COST AND PRICING DATA (OCT 1997) CERTIFICATE OF CURRENT COST AND PRICING DATA (OCT 1997) This is to certify that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, the cost or pricing data (as defined in section 15.401 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and required under FAR subsection 15.403-4) submitted, either actually or by specific identification in writing, to the Contracting Officer or to the Contracting Officer's representative in support of * are accurate, complete, and current as of **. This certification includes the cost or pricing data supporting any advance agreements and forward pricing rate agreements between the offeror and the Government that are

391

EIS Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process The EIS Process The two Conversion Facility EISs have been prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, Council on Environmental Quality NEPA...

392

Implementation, Certification and Enforcement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation, Certification Implementation, Certification and Enforcement Implementation, Certification and Enforcement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is authorized by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (as amended) to enforce compliance with the energy and water conservation standards established for certain consumer products and commercial and industrial equipment. To ensure the implementation of the current standards for covered appliances and equipment, DOE has published certification, compliance, and enforcement regulations for these products and equipment in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 10 CFR part 429. Please note that the previous link is to the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (e-CFR), which is a version of the CFR updated daily. It is not an official legal edition of

393

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria within which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria with in which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

395

AOCS Membership Certificate and Lapel Pin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Membership Certificate and Lapel Pin Membership Merchandise Membership Merchandise Buy both and save! 47FDA0A38045E70092CA08D7BAAE35D8 M-CERTPIN 2011

396

RCRA facility assessments  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) broadened the authorities of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by requiring corrective action for releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents at treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. The goal of the corrective action process is to ensure the remediation of hazardous waste and hazardous constituent releases associated with TSD facilities. Under Section 3004(u) of RCRA, operating permits issued to TSD facilities must address corrective actions for all releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from any solid waste management unit (SWMU) regardless of when the waste was placed in such unit. Under RCRA Section 3008(h), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may issue administrative orders to compel corrective action at facilities authorized to operate under RCRA Section 3005(e) (i.e., interim status facilities). The process of implementing the Corrective Action program involves the following, in order of implementation; (1) RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA); (2) RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI); (3) the Corrective Measures Study (CMS); and (4) Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI). The RFA serves to identify and evaluate SWMUs with respect to releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents, and to eliminate from further consideration SWMUs that do not pose a threat to human health or the environment. This Information Brief will discuss issues concerning the RFA process.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

multipurpose, multi-laboratory facility focused on thermal energy processes, thermal handling equipment, and energy management. The Automated Home Energy Management Lab...

398

Solar production of industrial process hot water: operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility. Final report, September 1, 1979-December 10, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility designed by Acurex Corporation and installed (November 1977) at the Campbell Soup Company Sacramento, California canning plant is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance of the facility. Minor modifications to the facility were completed. The system was operated for 15 months, and 12 months of detailed data were evaluated. The facility was available for operation 99% of the time during the last 8 months of evaluation. A detailed description of the solar facility and of the operating experience is given, and a summary of system performance for the 12 month operation/evaluation period is presented. Recommendations for large-scale solar facilities based on this project's experience are given, and an environmental impact assessment for the Campbell Soup solar facility is provided. (WHK)

Kull, J. I.; Niemeyer, W. N.; Youngblood, S. B.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Certification plan for reactor analysis computer codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A certification plan for reactor analysis computer codes used in Technical Specifications development and for other safety and production support calculations has been prepared. An action matrix, checklists, a time schedule, and a resource commitment table have been included in the plan. These items identify what is required to achieve certification of the codes, the time table that this will be accomplished on, and the resources needed to support such an effort.

Toffer, H.; Crowe, R.D.; Schwinkendorf, K.N. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pevey, R.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Home Energy Professional Certifications (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

As the weatherization and home energy upgrade industries expand and gain recognition, the need for a qualified workforce becomes more apparent. The certification component of the Guidelines project was designed to create meaningful and lasting careers for weatherization workers. Intended for experienced home energy professionals, the four new certifications focus on the most common jobs in the industry: energy auditor, retrofit installer technician, crew leader, and quality control inspector.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Facility Security Officer Contractor Toolcart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOREIGN OWNERSHIP, CONTROL OR INFLUENCE (FOCI) PROGRAM FOREIGN OWNERSHIP, CONTROL OR INFLUENCE (FOCI) PROGRAM It is DOE policy to obtain information that indicates whether a company that SNL will enter into a contract with is Owned, Controlled, or Influenced by a foreign person or entity and whether as a result, the potential for an undue risk to the common defense and national security may exist. Reference: Department of Energy Order (DOE O) 470.1, Safeguards and Security Program, Change 1, Chapter VI, Section 1 The DOE conducts a background check to determine FOCI, based on the information the company provides through the e-FOCI website: https://foci.td.anl.gov. Upon favorable FOCI certification by DOE, a facility clearance is granted. Facility cleareance is required in order to support personnel clearances needed to perform the work under contractual agreement with Sandia.

402

ARM Aerial Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govSitesAerial Facility govSitesAerial Facility AAF Information Proposal Process Science (PDF) Baseline Instruments Campaign Instruments Instrumentation Workshop 2008 AAF Fact Sheet G-1 Fact Sheet Images Field Campaigns AAF Campaigns 2007 - UAV Campaigns 1993 - 2006, 2015 Other Aircraft Campaigns 1993 - 2010 AAF Contacts Rickey Petty DOE AAF Program Director Beat Schmid Technical Director ARM Aerial Facility Numerous instrumented aircraft participated in CLASIC, a cross-disciplinary interagency research effort. Numerous instrumented aircraft participated in CLASIC, a cross-disciplinary interagency research effort. As an integral measurement capability of the ARM Climate Research Facility, the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) provides airborne measurements required to answer science questions proposed by the ARM Science Team and the external

403

T-587: Firefox Blocking Fraudulent Certificates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

587: Firefox Blocking Fraudulent Certificates 587: Firefox Blocking Fraudulent Certificates T-587: Firefox Blocking Fraudulent Certificates March 24, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Security Advisory: Several invalid HTTPS certificates were placed on the certificate blacklist to prevent their misuse. PLATFORM: Firefox, Thunderbird, SeaMonkey ABSTRACT: Firefox Blocking Fraudulent Certificates. reference LINKS: MFSA 2011-11 Mozilla Bug 644012 Mozilla Security updates IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Firefox will crashes when trying to access a HTTPS website with a certificate that does not contain the fields issuerName. Mozilla has been informed about the issuance of several fraudulent SSL certificates for public websites. The certificates have been revoked by their issuer which should protect most users. This is not a

404

User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's National User Facilities are available for cooperative research with institutions and the private sector worldwide. The Environmental...

405

Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Carolina) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Carolina) Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation applies to electric generating plants and associated facilities designed for or capable of operation at a capacity of more than 75 MW. A certificate from the Public Service Commission is required prior

406

San Diego County - Design Standards for County Facilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Standards for County Facilities Design Standards for County Facilities San Diego County - Design Standards for County Facilities < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Energy Sources Solar Wind Other Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider San Diego County The San Diego County Board of Supervisors established design standards for county facilities and property. Among other requirements, the policy requires that all new county buildings or major building renovations obtain U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) LEED Building Certification.

407

Introduction to Energy Savings in Process Heating for the Corn Refining  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savings in Process Heating for the Corn Savings in Process Heating for the Corn Refining Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

408

Draft Tomato Product Processing Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Tomato Product Processing Plant EPI Draft Tomato Product Processing Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

409

Web Design and Web Development Certification Program CORE COURSES FOR BOTH CERTIFICATES (exams required for completion)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web Design and Web Development Certification Program CORE COURSES FOR BOTH CERTIFICATES (exams) (1-day) Introduction to Web Design & Development: Workflow That Works (4-day) HTML & CSS (2-day completion of exam, PS2 can be substituted) (3-day) *Web Graphics & Interface Design Using Photo

Duong, Timothy Q.

410

Facility Security Officer Contractor Toolcart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. DOE SECURITY CLEARANCES U.S. DOE SECURITY CLEARANCES Clearnce Home Initial Clearance Clearance Reinstate Clearance Upgrade Clearance Downgrade Clearance Extension Clearance Reciprocity Clearance Reinvestigation Clearance Termination Clearance Transfer Sandia National Laboratories sponsors and processes U.S. DOE Security Clearances for contractor personnel working on an authorized contract requiring access to classified information. Clearance Office Functions Contractor Pre-Process Background Review Certification Clearance File Change Drug Testing e-Fingerprinting Enrollment Process Maintaining a DOE Security Clearance During an Extended Absence DOE Personnel Security Reporting Requirements Data Report on Spouse/Cohabitant Name Change Change in Citizenship Contractor Clearance Tools Clearance Action Status Inquiries

411

A Case Study on Testing and Certification of Equipment for a Volt-VAR Control Application at Hydro-Qubec  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study shares the practical experience gained in the certification and testing of the various distribution devices that are part of Hydro-Qubecs voltage-var control project. The certification process at Hydro-Qubec is specifically addressed, which included testing and validation at the Hydro-Qubec Research Institute (the Institut de recherche dHydro-Qubec, or IREQ), field measurements from a pilot project, and experience related to ...

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

412

TRITIUM EXTRACTION FACILITY ALARA  

SciTech Connect

The primary mission of the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) is to extract tritium from tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) that have been irradiated in a commercial light water reactor and to deliver tritium-containing gas to the Savannah River Site Facility 233-H. The tritium extraction segment provides the capability to deliver three (3) kilograms per year to the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The TEF includes processes, equipment and facilities capable of production-scale extraction of tritium while minimizing personnel radiation exposure, environmental releases, and waste generation.

Joye, BROTHERTON

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

413

Tritium Recycling (Processing) Facility Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design, Operation, and Maintenance of Tritium System / Proceedings of the Fifth Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology In Fission, Fusion, and Isotopic Applications Belgirate, Italy May 28-June 3, 1995

Jack Metzler; Thuy Le

414

Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Reference Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar, - Solar PV Topics: Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Reference[1] Resources Establishment of Local PV Systems Certification Capability Preparation of Small Private Power Producers Grid Connection Standards Establishment of Local PV System Battery Testing Procedure References ↑ "Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification

415

Defense Waste Processing Facility Process Enhancements  

Remote Operations Flushing Requirements Reliable Separation Efficiency ... Eliminate/minimize storage and handling hazards of formic acid 2.

416

Mobile Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

417

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

T-724: Microsoft Security Advisory: Fraudulent digital certificates could  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

724: Microsoft Security Advisory: Fraudulent digital certificates 724: Microsoft Security Advisory: Fraudulent digital certificates could allow spoofing T-724: Microsoft Security Advisory: Fraudulent digital certificates could allow spoofing September 22, 2011 - 12:45pm Addthis PROBLEM: Microsoft Security Advisory: Fraudulent digital certificates could allow spoofing. PLATFORM: Microsoft Untrusted Certificate Store: DigiNotar root certificates ABSTRACT: Microsoft has released a Microsoft security advisory about this issue for IT professionals. reference LINKS: MS Article ID: 2616676 Microsoft Security Advisory: 2607712 DOE-CIRC Tech Bulletin: T-706 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The Microsoft update revokes the trust of the following DigiNotar root certificates by putting them in the Microsoft Untrusted Certificate Store:

419

Guidance Concerning Certification Following a Change in the Applicable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concerning Certification Following a Change in the Concerning Certification Following a Change in the Applicable Energy or Water Conservation Standard Guidance Concerning Certification Following a Change in the Applicable Energy or Water Conservation Standard Guidance regardling the applicability of changes in the EPCA standards. If any manufacturer's previous certification demonstrates that the basic model meets the NEW standard, no additional certification is necessary. If any manufacturer's previous certification does not demonstrate that the basic model meets the NEW standard, that model has not been certified. It may not be distributed once the new standard takes effect unless the manufacturer submits a new certification report demonstrating that the basic model meets the new standard. Guidance Concerning Certification Following a Change in the Applicable

420

T-711: Fraudulent Google Digital Certificates Could Allow Man...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11: Fraudulent Google Digital Certificates Could Allow Man-in-the-Middle Attacks T-711: Fraudulent Google Digital Certificates Could Allow Man-in-the-Middle Attacks September 7,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facility certification process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF) LABORATORY GERMANIUM OXIDE USE ON RECYCLE TRANSFERS TO THE H-TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect

When processing High Level Waste (HLW) glass, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. Therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream feed stream, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. This strategy is known as 'feed forward statistical process control.' The DWPF depends on chemical analysis of the feed streams from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) where the frit plus adjusted sludge from the SRAT are mixed. The SME is the last vessel in which any chemical adjustments or frit additions can be made. Once the analyses of the SME product are deemed acceptable, the SME product is transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and onto the melter. The SRAT and SME analyses have been analyzed by the DWPF laboratory using a 'Cold Chemical' method but this dissolution did not adequately dissolve all the elemental components. A new dissolution method which fuses the SRAT or SME product with cesium nitrate (CsNO{sub 3}), germanium (IV) oxide (GeO{sub 2}) and cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) into a cesium germanate glass at 1050 C in platinum crucibles has been developed. Once the germanium glass is formed in that fusion, it is readily dissolved by concentrated nitric acid (about 1M) to solubilize all the elements in the SRAT and/or SME product for elemental analysis. When the chemical analyses are completed the acidic cesium-germanate solution is transferred from the DWPF analytic laboratory to the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) where the pH is increased to {approx}12 M to be released back to the tank farm and the 2H evaporator. Therefore, about 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2}/year will be diluted into 1.4 million gallons of recycle. This 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2} may increase to 4 kg/yr when improvements are implemented to attain an annual canister production goal of 400 canisters. Since no Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) exists for germanium in the Tank Farm, the Effluent Treatment Project, or the Saltstone Production Facility, DWPF has requested an evaluation of the fate of the germanium in the caustic environment of the RCT, the 2H evaporator, and the tank farm. This report evaluates the effect of the addition of germanium to the tank farm based on: (1) the large dilution of Ge in the RCT and tank farm; (2) the solubility of germanium in caustic solutions (pH 12-13); (3) the potential of germanium to precipitate as germanium sodalites in the 2H Evaporator; and (4) the potential of germanium compounds to precipitate in the evaporator feed tank. This study concludes that the impacts of transferring up to 4 kg/yr germanium to the RCT (and subsequently the 2H evaporator feed tank and the 2H evaporator) results in <2 ppm per year (1.834 mg/L) which is the maximum instantaneous concentration expected from DWPF. This concentration is insignificant as most sodium germanates are soluble at the high pH of the feed tank and evaporator solutions. Even if sodium aluminosilicates form in the 2H evaporator, the Ge will likely substitute for some small amount of the Si in these structures and will be insignificant. It is recommended that the DWPF continue with their strategy to add germanium as a laboratory chemical to Attachment 8.2 of the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan (WCP).

Jantzen, C.; Laurinat, J.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

FEDERAL ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION FOR PROGRAM AND PROJECT MANAGERS (FAC-P/PM)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERTIFICATION FOR PROGRAM AND PROJECT CERTIFICATION FOR PROGRAM AND PROJECT MANAGERS (FAC-P/PM) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. Purpose. The Federal Acquisition Certification for Program and Project Managers (FAC-P/PM) establishes general training and experience requirements for program and project managers in civilian agencies. The FAC- P/PM focuses on essential competencies needed for program and project managers; the program does not include functional or technical competencies, such as those for information technology, or agency- specific competencies. 2. Background. The quality and effectiveness of the federal acquisition process depend on the development of a capable and competent workforce. The Services Acquisition Reform Act of 2003 (SARA, P.L. 108-136) expanded the definition of acquisition to include functions performed by program and project managers.

423

Exploring Age-Related Environmental Attitudes in the Context of Wood Product Certification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are general environmental attitudes, attitudes about the extraction and manufacturing of various resources and the processing of various building materials can predict attitudes about certification. In addition, other, the fourth section asks respondents whether or not they regard the extraction or manufacturing of certain

424

Functions of the cask maintenance facility: A white paper  

SciTech Connect

The shipping cask systems are the mobile components of the transportation system, designed to safely transport spent nuclear fuel between different facilities under both normal and accident conditions. The cask system will consist of the heavily shielded cask, the cask transport vehicle (truck trailer or railcar), and any associated ancillary equipment (covers, impact limiters, lifting devices, etc.). The cask and certain parts of the cask system must be operated within the limits imposed by a certificate of compliance (COC) granted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Each cask system must transport spent fuel safely during the life of the system. To maintain the operational effectiveness and safety of the cask systems, a cask maintenance facility (CMF) will be included as an integral part of the transportation system. The planning activity of the transportation system and the design effort of the CMF require that the functions to be performed by the CMF be explicitly defined. The purpose of this paper is to (1) define the potential transportation system functions to be performed at the CMF; (2) examine the impact of this functional definition on the overall transportation system; (3) identify any unresolved issues concerning the interaction of the CMF with other elements of the transportation system; and (4) make recommendations to resolve any unresolved issues so that decisions can be made early in the transportation system planning process.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

425

Solar Renewable Energy Certificates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Renewable Energy Certificates Solar Renewable Energy Certificates Solar Renewable Energy Certificates < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate $500/MWh (the Solar Alternative Compliance Payment, or SACP) or $0.50/kWh Program Info Start Date 01/01/2006 State District of Columbia Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Varies based on market conditions. As of December 2012 the market price for D.C.-sourced SRECs was approximately $310/MWh ($0.31/kWh) although some individual trades have taken place at substantially lower and higher

426

SF-2050.11, Patent Certification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 OMB Control No. (2-87) 1910-0800 (Previous GC-792) Contractor Interim Certification Final Certification DOE Prime and/or Subcontract Nos. Contractor hereby certifies that: 1. All procedures for identifying and disclosing subject inventions as required by the patent clause of the con- tract have been followed throughout the reporting period. 2. There were no subcontracts or purchase orders involving research, development, and demonstration except as follows: [State none when applicable.] 3. No inventions or discoveries were made or conceived in the course of or under this contract other than the 4. The completion date of this contract is as follows: Month Day Year Contractor Address Month Day Year Signature Date of Certification

427

The Impact of Forest Certification on Firm Financial Performance in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

empirically the impact of environmental certification on firm financial performance ... QMI: Quality Management Institute; SFI: Sustainable. Forestry Initiative; SCS:...

428

Certification of SRM 2492: Bingham Paste Mixture for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NIST Special Publication 260-174 Rev. 2012 Certification of SRM 2492: Bingham Paste Mixture for Rheological Measurements ...

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

429

PNNL: About PNNL - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Facilities Scientific Facilities At PNNL, we offer scientific researchers access to unique equipment housed in state-of-the-art facilities as well as onsite experts to help visiting researchers take advantage of and make best use of the capabilities. You also have the opportunity to collaborate with our world-renowned scientists and engineers who can help you advance your scientific research and publish your results. Take a virtual tour of some of our laboratories. William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) EMSL EMSL is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national user facility currently shared and used by researchers from around the world. Research at EMSL focuses principally on developing a molecular-level understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that underlie the most

430

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Facility Beta Testing Complete; System Headed to California Seashore Mobile Facility Beta Testing Complete; System Headed to California Seashore Bookmark and Share A key addition to the ARM Climate Research Facility scientific infrastructure is ready to roll...literally. In February, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is being packed up and shipped from Richland, Washington, to the Point Reyes National Seashore north of San Francisco, California. There, it will be reassembled in preparation for its first deployment as part of a 6-month experiment to study the microphysical characteristics of marine stratus clouds, and in particular, marine stratus drizzle processes. Throughout the deployment, the AMF will accommodate aerosol observing equipment for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) researchers co-sponsored by ARM and the DOE Aerosol Science Program.

431

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 3, 2004 [Facility News] December 3, 2004 [Facility News] First Deployment of ARM Mobile Facility to Occur on California Coast Bookmark and Share Image - Point Reyes Beach Image - Point Reyes Beach Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, has been identified as the official location for the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). As part of a 6-month field campaign beginning in March 2005 to study the microphysical characteristics of marine stratus and, in particular, marine stratus drizzle processes, the AMF will provide a mature instrument system to help fill information gaps in the existing limited surveys of marine stratus microphysical structure. Marine stratus clouds are known to be susceptible to the byproducts of fossil fuel consumption, a

432

Student Medical Certificate Faculty of Science Department of Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student Medical Certificate Faculty of Science ­ Department of Economics This form has been adapted, with permission, from the University of Windsor Faculty of Law Student Medical Certificate and the University of Western Ontario Student Medical Certificate. A. TO BE COMPLETED BY THE STUDENT: I

433

EUROPEAN COGENERATION CERTIFICATE TRADING- ECOCERT Demand creation and scheme interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As interest in market-based domestic mechanisms has increased in the EU, a tradable certificate scheme for CHP is an option. During the period January 2002- April 2003, within the European Cogeneration Certificate Trading (ECoCerT) project, activities have been undertaken in a series of phases to analyse a CHP certificate scheme. The ECoCerT project was financially supported

M. G. Boots

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Treatment Alternatives For Process Wastewater at ORNL, ORNLCF-0603-R1, November 2007; HFIR and REDC Process Waste Drains and Waste Treatment Plant, ORNL Facilities Development...

435

CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects ..-.. --__- _".-.-l--_--l -_._ _- --- ~~~. . ..~ CONTENTS Page - - I NTRODUCTI ON 1 Purpose 1 Docket Contents 1 Exhibit I: Summary of Activities at Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania I-l Exhibit II: Documents Supporting the Certification of Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania iii II-1 . . .- .__.^ I ^_... _.-__^-____-. - CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

436

WICF Certification, Compliance and Enforcement webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WICF Testing, Certification, WICF Testing, Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview August 30, 2011 2 | Building Technologies Program & General Counsel's Office of Enforcement eere.energy.gov Agenda 2 Certified Ratings 3 1 Testing Basic Model Enforcement 4 5 Manufacturer How to Submit Questions 6 3 | Building Technologies Program & General Counsel's Office of Enforcement eere.energy.gov Manufacturer Explanation A Manufacturer of a WICF * Is a domestic manufacturer or an importer. * Produces a component of a walk-in cooler or walk-in freezer that affects energy consumption, including, but not limited to, refrigeration, doors, lights, windows, or walls.