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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

2

PUREX facility hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Operation of PUREX is the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for PUREX. DOE Order 5500.3A requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification. In October of 1990, WHC was directed to place PUREX in standby. In December of 1992 the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management authorized the termination of PUREX and directed DOE-RL to proceed with shutdown planning and terminal clean out activities. Prior to this action, its mission was to reprocess irradiated fuels for the recovery of uranium and plutonium. The present mission is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration at the PUREX facility and to preserve that condition for 10 years. The ten year time frame represents the typical duration expended to define, authorize and initiate follow-on decommissioning and decontamination activities.

Sutton, L.N.

1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level...

4

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct,...

5

Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

6

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

7

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the Effects of GlobalASCR User Facilities User

8

Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

Richard C. Logan

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

9

Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment. (3) Vital US. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

J. L. Kubicek

2001-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

340 Waste handling Facility Hazard Categorization and Safety Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis presented in this document provides the basis for categorizing the facility as less than Hazard Category 3.

T. J. Rodovsky

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

11

Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Hazards Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) located on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for WESF. DOE Orders require an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification.

COVEY, L.I.

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

12

Preliminary hazards analysis for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In summary, it provides: a general description of the facility and its operation; identification of hazards at the facility; and details of the hazards analysis, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions. As part of the safety analysis procedure set forth by DOE, a PHA must be performed for the NIF. The PHA characterizes the level of intrinsic potential hazard associated with a facility, and provides the basis for hazard classification. The hazard classification determines the level of safety documentation required, and the DOE Order governing the safety analysis. The hazard classification also determines the level of review and approval required for the safety analysis report. The hazards of primary concern associated with NIF are radiological and toxicological in nature. The hazard classification is determined by comparing facility inventories of radionuclides and chemicals with threshold values for the various hazard classification levels and by examining postulated bounding accidents associated with the hazards of greatest significance. Such postulated bounding accidents cannot take into account active mitigative features; they must assume the unmitigated consequences of a release, taking into account only passive safety features. In this way, the intrinsic hazard level of the facility can be ascertained.

Brereton, S.J.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by and October, 2011 Presentation Outline I. Introductions II. Pantex III. 10 Year Update IV. Final...

14

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used...

15

Modern tornado design of nuclear and other potentially hazardous facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tornado wind loads and other tornado phenomena, including tornado missiles and differential pressure effects, have not usually been considered in the design of conventional industrial, commercial, or residential facilities in the United States; however, tornado resistance has often become a design requirement for certain hazardous facilities, such as large nuclear power plants and nuclear materials and waste storage facilities, as well as large liquefied natural gas storage facilities. This article provides a review of current procedures for the design of hazardous industrial facilities to resist tornado effects. 23 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs.

Stevenson, J.D. [J.D. Stevenson Consulting Engineer, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zhao, Y. [Battele Energy Systems Group, Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) was issued on October 27, 1999 [1]. Since that time, the WIPP has sought modifications to clarify the permit language, provide alternative methods for meeting permit requirements and to update permit conditions. Significant advancements have been made in transuranic (TRU) waste management as the result of modifications to the HWFP. Among these advancements is a modification to obtain a drum age criteria (DAC) value to perform headspace gas sampling on drums to be super-compacted and placed in a 100-gallon overpack drum. In addition, the Section 311 permit modification request that would allow for more efficient waste characterization, and the modification to authorize the shipment and disposal of Remote-Handled (RH) TRU waste were merged together and submitted to the regulator as the Consolidated Permit Modification Request (PMR). The submittal of the Consolidated PMR came at the request of the regulator as part of responses to Notices of Deficiency (NODs) for the separate PMRs which had been submitted in previous years. Section 311 of the fiscal year 2004 Energy and Water Developments Appropriations Act (Public Law 108-137) [2] directs the Department of Energy to submit a permit modification that limits waste confirmation to radiography or visual examination of a statistical subpopulation of containers. Section 311 also specifically directs that disposal room performance standards be to be met by monitoring for volatile organic compounds in the underground disposal rooms. This statute translates into the elimination of other waste confirmation methods such as headspace gas sampling and analysis and solids sampling and analysis. These methods, as appropriate, will continue to be used by the generator sites during hazardous waste determinations or characterization activities. This modification is expected to reduce the overall cost of waste analysis by hundreds of millions of dollars [3]. Combining both the chap. 311 and RH TRU waste permit modification requests allows for both the regulator and DOE to expedite action on the modification requests. The Combined PMR reduces costs by having only one administrative process for both modification requests. (authors)

Kehrman, B.; Most, W. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, 4021 National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

18

EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct the Hazardous Waste Staging Facility that would help to alleviate capacity problems as well as provide a single compliant...

19

Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Hazards Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Hazard Analysis to support the CVDF Final Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports,'' and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.''

CROWE, R.D.

2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

ALTERNATE APPROACH TO HAZARD CATEGORIZATION FOR SALTSTONE FACILITY AT SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) was originally segmented into two segments: the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Based on the inventory of radionuclides available for release the SPF and SDF were categorized as Nonreactor Hazard Category (HC)-3. The hazard categorization recognized the SDF will contain contributions of radionuclides which would exceed the HC-2 Threshold Quantity (TQ) in the form of grout. However it was determined not to impact the facility hazard categorization based on the grout being in a solid, monolithic form which was not easily dispersible. But, the impact of a quantity of unset grout expected to be present at the vault following operation of the process was not addressed. A Potential Inadequacy in Safety Analysis (PISA) was later issued based on the hazard categorization determination for the facility not addressing unset grout. This initiated a re-evaluation of the accident scenarios within the hazards analysis. During this re-evaluation, the segmentation of the facility was challenged based on the potential interaction between facility segments; specifically, the leachate return line and the grout transfer line, which were considered separate segments, are located in close proximity at one point. such that for certain events (NPH as well as External Vehicle Impact) both could be damaged simultaneously and spill contents on the ground that could commingle. This would violate the guideline for segmentation. Therefore, the Hazard Categorization (HC) was reevaluated based on the facility being a single segment and including the additional unset grout as part of total inventory. This total inventory far exceeded the limit for HC-2 TQ and made the facility's initial categorization as HC-2. However, alternative analysis methodology based on credible release fractions allowed in DOE-STD-1027-92 (Ref.1) showed that the Saltstone facility could still be categorized as Hazard Category 3 Nuclear Facility with no segmentation. Since it was the first time any facility at SRS tried this alternate approach safety analyst had to face substantial resistance and reservations from both the facility and local DOE customers which were eventually overcome with approval and acceptance from DOE-HQ.

Roy, B.

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

340 Facility emergency preparedness hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the 340 Facility on the Hanford Site. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and Emergency Planning Zone, is demonstrated.

CAMPBELL, L.R.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

22

Natural hazards phenomena mitigation with respect to seismic hazards at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information on the seismic hazard for design of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), a facility designed for the disposal of wastes generated during the cleanup of Hanford Site aggregate areas. The preferred ERDF site is located south and east of 200 East and 200 West Areas. The Washington State Groundwater Protection Program (WAC 173-303-806 (4)(a)(xxi)) requires that the characteristics of local and regional hydrogeology be defined. A plan for that work has been developed (Weekes and Borghese 1993). In addition, WAC 173-303-282 provides regulatory guidance on siting a dangerous waste facility, and US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.28 requires consideration of natural phenomena hazards mitigation for DOE sites and facilities. This report provides information to evaluate the ERDF site with respect to seismic hazard. The ERDF will be a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) as defined by 40 CFR 260.10.

Reidel, S.P.

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hazard classification criteria for non-nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories` Integrated Risk Management Department has developed a process for establishing the appropriate hazard classification of a new facility or operation, and thus the level of rigor required for the associated authorization basis safety documentation. This process is referred to as the Preliminary Hazard Screen. DOE Order 5481.1B contains the following hazard classification for non-nuclear facilities: high--having the potential for onsite or offsite impacts to large numbers of persons or for major impacts to the environment; moderate--having the potential for considerable onsite impacts but only minor offsite impacts to people or the environment; low--having the potential for only minor onsite and negligible offsite impacts to people or the environment. It is apparent that the application of such generic criteria is more than likely to be fraught with subjective judgment. One way to remove the subjectivity is to define health and safety classification thresholds for specific hazards that are based on the magnitude of the hazard, rather than on a qualitative assessment of possible accident consequences. This paper presents the results of such an approach to establishing a readily usable set of non-nuclear facility hazard classifications.

Mahn, J.A.; Walker, S.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Overview of hazardous-waste regulation at federal facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is organized in a fashion that is intended to explain the legal duties imposed on officials responsible for hazardous waste at each stage of its existence. Section 2 describes federal hazardous waste laws, explaining the legal meaning of hazardous waste and the protective measures that are required to be taken by its generators, transporters, and storers. In addition, penalties for violation of the standards are summarized, and a special discussion is presented of so-called imminent hazard provisions for handling hazardous waste that immediately threatens public health and safety. Although the focus of Sec. 2 is on RCRA, which is the principal federal law regulating hazardous waste, other federal statutes are discussed as appropriate. Section 3 covers state regulation of hazardous waste. First, Sec. 3 explains the system of state enforcement of the federal RCRA requirements on hazardous waste within their borders. Second, Sec. 3 discusses two peculiar provisions of RCRA that appear to permit states to regulate federal facilities more strictly than RCRA otherwise would require.

Tanzman, E.; LaBrie, B.; Lerner, K.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fire Hazard Analysis assesses the risk from fire within individual fire areas in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Hanford Site in relation to existing or proposed fire protection features to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE Order 5480.7A Fire Protection are met.

JOHNSON, B.H.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Surface Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report-Constructor Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Facility Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment; Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R.E. Flye

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

URS Consultants, Inc.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Improvements--2007 Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most significant changes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit to date were completed during the past year with the implementation of significant revisions to the Waste Analysis Plan and the authorization to dispose of remote-handled transuranic waste. The modified Permit removes the requirement for reporting headspace gas sampling and analysis results for every container of transuranic mixed waste and provides for the use of radiography and visual examination to confirm a statistically representative subpopulation of the waste stream in each waste shipment as well as other changes that streamline the analytical data management process. Implementation began on November 17, 2006. (authors)

Kehrman, R.; Most, W. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Design characteristics for facilities which process hazardous particulate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory is establishing a research and processing capability for beryllium. The unique properties of beryllium, including light weight, rigidity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and nuclear properties make it critical to a number of US defense and aerospace programs. Concomitant with the unique engineering properties are the health hazards associated with processing beryllium in a particulate form and the potential for worker inhalation of aerosolized beryllium. Beryllium has the lowest airborne standard for worker protection compared to all other nonradioactive metals by more than an order of magnitude. This paper describes the design characteristics of the new beryllium facility at Los Alamos as they relate to protection of the workforce. Design characteristics to be reviewed include; facility layout, support systems to minimize aerosol exposure and spread, and detailed review of the ventilation system design for general room air cleanliness and extraction of particulate at the source.

Abeln, S.P.; Creek, K.; Salisbury, S.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum Products and Hazardous Materials (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations apply to underground storage facilities for petroleum and hazardous waste, and seek to protect water resources from contamination. The regulations establish procedures for the...

33

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying facility (CVD) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CVDF is a nonreactor nuclear facility that will process the Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) presently stored in the 105-KE and 105-KW SNF storage basins. Multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) will be loaded (filled) with K Basin fuel transported to the CVDF. The MCOs will be processed at the CVDF to remove free water from the fuel cells (packages). Following processing at the CVDF, the MCOs will be transported to the CSB for interim storage until a long-term storage solution can be implemented. This operation is expected to start in November 2000. A Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is required for all new facilities and all nonreactor nuclear facilities, in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection. This FHA has been prepared in accordance with DOE 5480.7A and HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazard Analysis Requirements. Additionally, requirements or criteria contained in DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) RL Implementing Directive (RLID) 5480.7, Fire Protection, or other DOE documentation are cited, as applicable. This FHA comprehensively assesses the risk of fire at the CVDF to ascertain whether the specific objectives of DOE 5480.7A are met. These specific fire protection objectives are: (1) Minimize the potential for the occurrence of a fire. (2) Ensure that fire does not cause an onsite or offsite release of radiological and other hazardous material that will threaten the public health and safety or the environment. (3) Establish requirements that will provide an acceptable degree of life safety to DOE and contractor personnel and ensure that there are no undue hazards to the public from fire and its effects in DOE facilities. (4) Ensure that vital DOE programs will not suffer unacceptable delays as a result of fire and related perils. (5) Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. (6) Ensure that process control and safety systems are not damaged by fire or related perils. This FHA is based on the facility as constructed and with planned operation at the time of document preparation. Changes in facility planned and actual operation require that the identified fire risks associated with the CVDF be re-evaluated. Consequently, formal documentation and future revision of this FHA may be required.

SINGH, G.

2000-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying facility (CVD) Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CVDF is a nonreactor nuclear facility that will process the Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) presently stored in the 105-KE and 105-KW SNF storage basins. Multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) will be loaded (filled) with K Basin fuel transported to the CVDF. The MCOs will be processed at the CVDF to remove free water from the fuel cells (packages). Following processing at the CVDF, the MCOs will be transported to the CSB for interim storage until a long-term storage solution can be implemented. This operation is expected to start in November 2000. A Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is required for all new facilities and all nonreactor nuclear facilities, in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection. This FHA has been prepared in accordance with DOE 5480.7A and HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazard Analysis Requirements. Additionally, requirements or criteria contained in DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) RL Implementing Directive (RLID) 5480.7, Fire Protection, or other DOE documentation are cite...

Singh, G

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Guide for the Mitigation of Natural Phenomena Hazards for DOE Nuclear Facilities and NonNuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This document provides guidance in implementing the Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation requirements of DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.4, "Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation." This Guide does not establish or invoke any new requirements. Any apparent conflicts arising from the NPH guidance would defer to the requirements in DOE O 420.1. No cancellation.

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Design and evaluation guidelines for Department of Energy facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Panel have developed uniform design and evaluation guidelines for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of the guidelines is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. The guidelines apply to both new facilities (design) and existing facilities (evaluation, modification, and upgrading). The intended audience is primarily the civil/structural or mechanical engineers conducting the design or evaluation of DOE facilities. The likelihood of occurrence of natural phenomena hazards at each DOE site has been evaluated by the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazard Program. Probabilistic hazard models are available for earthquake, extreme wind/tornado, and flood. Alternatively, site organizations are encouraged to develop site-specific hazard models utilizing the most recent information and techniques available. In this document, performance goals and natural hazard levels are expressed in probabilistic terms, and design and evaluation procedures are presented in deterministic terms. Design/evaluation procedures conform closely to common standard practices so that the procedures will be easily understood by most engineers. Performance goals are expressed in terms of structure or equipment damage to the extent that: (1) the facility cannot function; (2) the facility would need to be replaced; or (3) personnel are endangered. 82 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs.

Kennedy, R.P. (Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (USA)); Short, S.A. (ABB Impell Corp., Mission Viejo, CA (USA)); McDonald, J.R. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA)); McCann, M.W. Jr. (Benjamin (J.R.) and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA (USA)); Murray, R.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Hill, J.R. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and He

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

M-Area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring report -- first quarter 1994. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during first quarter 1994 as required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. During first quarter 1994, 42 point-of-compliance (POC) wells at the M-Area HWMF were sampled for drinking water parameters.

Evans, C.S.; Washburn, F.; Jordan, J.; Van Pelt, R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Category 3 threshold quantities for hazard categorization of nonreactor facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the information necessary to determine Hazard Category 3 threshold quantities for those isotopes of interest not listed in WHC-CM-4-46, Section 4, Table 1.''Threshold Quantities.''

Mandigo, R.L.

1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards not found in most  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards not found in most laboratory environments. The NMR facilities maintain superconducting magnets which have for asphyxiation. Once energized the field of the superconducting magnet of the spectrometer is always present

Maroncelli, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799, 799A, and 770C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Materials & Fuel Complex (MFC) facilities 799 Sodium Processing Facility (a single building consisting of two areas: the Sodium Process Area (SPA) and the Carbonate Process Area (CPA), 799A Caustic Storage Area, and 770C Nuclear Calibration Laboratory have been declared excess to future Department of Energy mission requirements. Transfer of these facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management, and an associated schedule for doing so, have been agreed upon by the two offices. The prerequisites for this transfer to occur are the removal of nonexcess materials and chemical inventory, deinventory of the calibration source in MFC-770C, and the rerouting and/or isolation of utility and service systems. This report provides a description of the current physical condition and any hazards (material, chemical, nuclear or occupational) that may be associated with past operations of these facilities. This information will document conditions at time of transfer of the facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management and serve as the basis for disposition planning. The process used in obtaining this information included document searches, interviews and facility walk-downs. A copy of the facility walk-down checklist is included in this report as Appendix A. MFC-799/799A/770C are all structurally sound and associated hazardous or potentially hazardous conditions are well defined and well understood. All installed equipment items (tanks, filters, etc.) used to process hazardous materials remain in place and appear to have maintained their integrity. There is no evidence of leakage and all openings are properly sealed or closed off and connections are sound. The pits appear clean with no evidence of cracking or deterioration that could lead to migration of contamination. Based upon the available information/documentation reviewed and the overall conditions observed during the facilities walk-down, it is concluded that these facilities may be disposed of at minimal risk to human health, safety or the environment.

Gary Mecham; Don Konoyer

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information.

Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

43

Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE standard gives design and evaluation criteria for natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE 5480.28. Goal of the criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, flooding, etc. They apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities; they may also be used for modification and upgrading of the latter.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Fire hazards analysis for the uranium oxide (UO{sub 3}) facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) documents the deactivation end-point status of the UO{sub 3} complex fire hazards, fire protection and life safety systems. This FHA has been prepared for the Uranium Oxide Facility by Westinghouse Hanford Company in accordance with the criteria established in DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection and RLID 5480.7, Fire Protection. The purpose of the Fire Hazards Analysis is to comprehensively and quantitatively assess the risk from a fire within individual fire areas in a Department of Energy facility so as to ascertain whether the objectives stated in DOE Order 5480.7, paragraph 4 are met. Particular attention has been paid to RLID 5480.7, Section 8.3, which specifies the criteria for deactivating fire protection in decommission and demolition facilities.

Wyatt, D.M.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued an Order 420.1 which establishes policy for its facilities in the event of natural phenomena hazards (NPH) along with associated NPH mitigation requirements. This DOE Standard gives design and evaluation criteria for NPH effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE Order 420.1 and the associated implementation Guides. These are intended to be consistent design and evaluation criteria for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of these criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. These criteria apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities. They may also be used for modification and upgrading of existing facilities as appropriate. The design and evaluation criteria presented herein control the level of conservatism introduced in the design/evaluation process such that earthquake, wind, and flood hazards are treated on a consistent basis. These criteria also employ a graded approach to ensure that the level of conservatism and rigor in design/evaluation is appropriate for facility characteristics such as importance, hazards to people on and off site, and threat to the environment. For each natural phenomena hazard covered, these criteria consist of the following: Performance Categories and target performance goals as specified in the DOE Order 420.1 NPH Implementation Guide, and DOE-STD-1 021; specified probability levels from which natural phenomena hazard loading on structures, equipment, and systems is developed; and design and evaluation procedures to evaluate response to NPH loads and criteria to assess whether or not computed response is permissible.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Assessment of External Hazards at Radioactive Waste and Used Fuel Management Facilities - 13505  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key lessons from the Fukushima accident is the importance of having a comprehensive identification and evaluation of risks posed by external events to nuclear facilities. While the primary focus has been on nuclear power plants, the Canadian nuclear industry has also been updating hazard assessments for radioactive waste and used fuel management facilities to ensure that lessons learnt from Fukushima are addressed. External events are events that originate either physically outside the nuclear site or outside its control. They include natural events, such as high winds, lightning, earthquakes or flood due to extreme rainfall. The approaches that have been applied to the identification and assessment of external hazards in Canada are presented and analyzed. Specific aspects and considerations concerning hazards posed to radioactive waste and used fuel management operations are identified. Relevant hazard identification techniques are described, which draw upon available regulatory guidance and standard assessment techniques such as Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPs) and 'What-if' analysis. Consideration is given to ensuring that hazard combinations (for example: high winds and flooding due to rainfall) are properly taken into account. Approaches that can be used to screen out external hazards, through a combination of frequency and impact assessments, are summarized. For those hazards that cannot be screened out, a brief overview of methods that can be used to conduct more detailed hazard assessments is also provided. The lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident have had a significant impact on specific aspects of the approaches used to hazard assessment for waste management. Practical examples of the effect of these impacts are provided. (authors)

Gerchikov, Mark; Schneider, Glenn; Khan, Badi; Alderson, Elizabeth [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)] [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Public Comments to Community Relations Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9Harvey Brooks, 1960OptionsHazardous Waste

48

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Public Comments to Community Relations Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9Harvey Brooks, 1960OptionsHazardous Waste

49

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Public Comments to Community...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 SECTION COMMENT POST? 2.0 & 4.0 1. Fix broken links on pages 3 and 4 for the HWA permit. Yes 2.0 2. Revise a sentence on page 4 to: "Limits on LANL waste facilities may be...

50

Upgrades to meet LANL SF, 121-2011, hazardous waste facility permit requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Members of San IIdefonso have requested information from LANL regarding implementation of the revision to LANL's Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (the RCRA Permit). On January 26, 2011, LANL staff from the Waste Disposition Project and the Environmental Protection Division will provide a status update to Pueblo members at the offices of the San IIdefonso Department of Environmental and Cultural Preservation. The Waste Disposition Project presentation will focus on upgrades and improvements to LANL waste management facilities at TA-50 and TA-54. The New Mexico Environment Department issued LANL's revised Hazardous Waste Facility permit on November 30, 2010 with a 30-day implementation period. The Waste Disposition Project manages and operates four of LANL's permitted facilities; the Waste Characterization, Reduction and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) at TA-SO, and Area G, Area L and the Radioassay and Nondestructive Testing facility (RANT) at TA-54. By implementing a combination of permanent corrective action activities and shorter-term compensatory measures, WDP was able to achieve functional compliance on December 30, 2010 with new Permit requirements at each of our facilities. One component of WOP's mission at LANL is centralized management and disposition of the Laboratory's hazardous and mixed waste. To support this mission objective, WOP has undertaken a project to upgrade our facilities and equipment to achieve fully compliant and efficient waste management operations. Upgrades to processes, equipment and facilities are being designed to provide defense-in-depth beyond the minimum, regulatory requirements where worker safety and protection of the public and the environment are concerned. Upgrades and improvements to enduring waste management facilities and operations are being designed so as not to conflict with future closure activities at Material Disposal Area G and Material Disposal Area L.

French, Sean B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johns - Hughes, Kathryn W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 325 hazardous waste treatment units. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application for the 325 Hazardous Waste Treatment Units (325 HWTUs) which consist of the Shielded Analytical Laboratory, the 325 Building, and the 325 Collection/Loadout Station Tank. The 325 HWTUs receive, store, and treat dangerous waste generated by Hanford Facility programs. Routine dangerous and/or mixed waste treatment that will be conducted in the 325 HWTUs will include pH adjustment, ion exchange, carbon absorption, oxidation, reduction, waste concentration by evaporation, precipitation, filtration, solvent extraction, solids washing, phase separation, catalytic destruction, and solidification/stabilization.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Development of Probabilistic Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Parameters for Moderate and High Hazard Facilities at INEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) horizontal and vertical response spectra are developed for moderate and high hazard facilities or Performance Categories (PC) 3 and 4, respectively, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The probabilistic DBE response spectra will replace the deterministic DBE response spectra currently in the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) Architectural Engineering Standards that govern seismic design criteria for several facility areas at the INEEL. Probabilistic DBE response spectra are recommended to DOE Naval Reactors for use at the Naval Reactor Facility at INEEL. The site-specific Uniform Hazard Spectra (UHS) developed by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde Federal Services are used as the basis for developing the DBE response spectra. In 1999, the UHS for all INEEL facility areas were recomputed using more appropriate attenuation relationships for the Basin and Range province. The revised UHS have lower ground motions than those produced in the 1996 INEEL site-wide probabilistic ground motion study. The DBE response spectra were developed by incorporating smoothed broadened regions of the peak accelerations, velocities, and displacements defined by the site-specific UHS. Portions of the DBE response spectra were adjusted to ensure conservatism for the structural design process.

S. M. Payne; V. W. Gorman; S. A. Jensen; M. E. Nitzel; M. J. Russell; R. P. Smith

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of equipment and piping of Gaseous Diffusion Plant Uranium Enrichment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report Upgrade program (GDP SARUP), a natural phenomena hazards evaluation was performed for the main process equipment and piping in the uranium enrichment buildings at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants. In order to reduce the cost of rigorous analyses, the evaluation methodology utilized a graded approach based on an experience data base collected by SQUG/EPRI that contains information on the performance of industrial equipment and piping during past earthquakes. This method consisted of a screening walkthrough of the facility in combination with the use of engineering judgment and simple calculations. By using these screenings combined with evaluations that contain decreasing conservatism, reductions in the time and cost of the analyses were significant. A team of experienced seismic engineers who were trained in the use of the DOE SQUG/EPRI Walkdown Screening Material was essential to the success of this natural phenomena hazards evaluation.

Singhal, M.K.; Kincaid, J.H.; Hammond, C.R.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Technical Programs and Services; Brock, W.R.; Denton, D.R. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

A New Concept: Use of Negotiations in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permitting Process in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a unique negotiation process leading to authorization of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to manage and dispose remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The negotiation process involved multiple entities and individuals brought together under authority of the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) to discuss and resolve technical and facility operational issues flowing from an NMED-issued hazardous waste facility Draft Permit. The novel negotiation process resulted in numerous substantive changes to the Draft Permit, which were ultimately memorialised in a 'Draft Permit as Changed'. This paper discusses various aspects of the negotiation process, including events leading to the negotiations, regulatory basis for the negotiations, negotiation participants, and benefits of the process. (authors)

Johnson, G.J. [Washington TRU Solutions, LLC, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, New Mexico (United States); Rose, W.M. [U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, New Mexico (United States); Domenici, P.V.; Hollingsworth, L. [Domenici Law Firm PC, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-270-2080, Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a health hazard evaluation was conducted at the Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility (HSGF)(SIC-4953) concerning possible exposure to fly ash, combustion products and asbestos (1332214). The facility was a waste to energy site where municipal refuse was incinerated at approximately 1400 degrees-F. The steam generated was either sold directly or converted to electricity via an on site turbine. Employees used hard hats, safety shoes and glasses, work clothes and single use disposable dust and mist respirators. There was a potential for exposure to fly ash for employees working in the boiler and basement areas. Total particulate exposures ranged from 5 to llmg/m3 for laborers. The concentration of lead (7439921) exceeded the standards set by OSHA permissible exposure level of 0.05mg/kg in three of the personal breathing zone air samples. Amosite (12172735) and chrysotile (12001295) asbestos were identified in bulk samples of insulation and asbestos taken from a settled dust sample in the boiler area. Surface wipe samples indicated the possibility of hand to mouth contact with fly ash, particularly in the break and locker rooms. The author concludes that there is a need for reducing worker exposure to fly ash particulate. The author recommends engineering and work practice controls to reduce particulate exposures, increased cleaning and maintenance activities; and further evaluation of asbestos contamination at the facility.

Seitz, T.A.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for selected heavy metals, field measurements, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Total organic halogens exceeded its Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criterion during first quarter 1995 as in fourth quarter 1994. Aluminum, iron, and manganese, which were not analyzed for during fourth quarter 1994, exceeded the Flag 2 criteria in at least two wells each during first quarter 1995. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting the determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Unit were also similar to previous quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Multiattribute utility analysis as a framework for public participation siting a hazardous waste facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How can the public play a role in decisions involving complicated scientific arguments? This paper describes a public participation exercise in which stakeholders used multiattribute utility analysis to select a site for a hazardous waste facility. Key to success was the ability to separate and address the two types of judgements inherent in environmental decisions: technical judgements on the likely consequences of alternative choices and value judgements on the importance or seriousness of those consequences. This enabled technical specialists to communicate the essential technical considerations and allowed stakeholders to establish the value judgements for the decision. Although rarely used in public participation, the multiattribute utility approach appears to provide a useful framework for the collaborative resolution of many complex environmental decision problems.

Merkhofer, M.W. [Applied Decision Analysis, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Chemical inventory control program for mixed and hazardous waste facilities at SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed Waste (MW) and Hazardous Waste (HW) are being stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) pending onsite and/or offsite treatment and disposal. The inventory control for these wastes has recently been brought under Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) in accordance with DOE Order 5480.22. With the TSRs was the question of the degree of rigor with which the inventory is to be tracked, considering that the variety of chemicals present, or that could be present, numbers in the hundreds. This paper describes the graded approach program to track Solid Waste (SW) inventories relative to TSRs. The approach uses a ratio of the maximum anticipated chemical inventory to the permissible inventory in accordance with Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) limits for on- and off-site receptors. A specific threshold ratio can then be determined. The chemicals above this threshold ratio are to be included in the chemical inventory control program. The chemicals that fall below the threshold ratio are managed in accordance with existing practice per State and RCRA hazardous materials requirements. Additionally, the facilities are managed in accordance with process safety management principles, specifically using process hazards analyses, which provides safety assurance for even the small quantities that may be excluded from the formal inventory control program. The method yields a practical approach to chemical inventory control, while maintaining appropriate chemical safety margins. The resulting number of specific chemicals that require inclusion in a rigorous inventory control program is greatly reduced by about 80%, thereby resulting in significant reduction in chemical data management while preserving appropriate safety margins.

Ades, M.J.; Vincent, A.M. III

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report. Second quarter 1995, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site during second quarter 1995. Topics include: changes in sampling, analysis, and reporting; water levels; remedial action of groundwater; and hydrology of the affected aquifer zones.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hazardous Materials Verification and Limited Characterization Report on Sodium and Caustic Residuals in Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799/799A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a companion to the Facilities Condition and Hazard Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Sodium Processing Facilities MFC-799/799A and Nuclear Calibration Laboratory MFC-770C (referred to as the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment). This report specifically responds to the requirement of Section 9.2, Item 6, of the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment to provide an updated assessment and verification of the residual hazardous materials remaining in the Sodium Processing Facilities processing system. The hazardous materials of concern are sodium and sodium hydroxide (caustic). The information supplied in this report supports the end-point objectives identified in the Transition Plan for Multiple Facilities at the Materials and Fuels Complex, Advanced Test Reactor, Central Facilities Area, and Power Burst Facility, as well as the deactivation and decommissioning critical decision milestone 1, as specified in U.S. Department of Energy Guide 413.3-8, “Environmental Management Cleanup Projects.” Using a tailored approach and based on information obtained through a combination of process knowledge, emergency management hazardous assessment documentation, and visual inspection, this report provides sufficient detail regarding the quantity of hazardous materials for the purposes of facility transfer; it also provides that further characterization/verification of these materials is unnecessary.

Gary Mecham

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Third and fourth quarters 1996, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for various hazardous and radioactive constituents as required by Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery ACT (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995. Currently, the H-Area HWMF monitoring network consists of 130 wells of the HSB series and 8 wells of the HSL series screened in the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area HWMF. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program as identified in provision IIIDH.11.c

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, samples from seven new AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for a comprehensive list of constituents. Two parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. Lead and nickel appear to exceed final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in AMB-18A. These data were suspect and a rerun of the samples showed levels below flagging criteria. This data will be monitored in 3Q95. Aluminum, iron, manganese, boron, silver and total organic halogens exceeded Flag 2 criteria in at least one well each during second quarter 1995. This data, as well, will be confirmed by 3Q95 testing. Groundwater flow directions in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters; the flow rate estimate, however, differs because of an error noted in the scales of measurements used for previous estimates. The estimate was 470 ft/year during second quarter 1995. Reliable estimates of flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone could not be determined in previous quarters because data were insufficient. The first estimate from second quarter 1995 shows a 530 ft/year rate. Reliable estimates of flow directions and rates in the Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone and in the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the CBCU could not be calculated because of the low horizontal gradient and the near-linear distribution of the monitoring wells. During second quarter 1994, SRS received South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control approval for constructing five point-of-compliance wells and two plume definition wells near the Met Lab HWMF. This project began in July 1994 and was completed in March of this year. Analytical data from these wells are presented in this report for the first time.

Chase, J.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report (U). Third and fourth quarters 1996, Vol. I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hazard Baseline Documentation  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This standard establishes uniform Office of Environmental Management (EM) guidance on hazard baseline documents that identify and control radiological and non-radiological hazards for all EM facilities.

1995-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

72

Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, Third and fourth quarters 1995: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater at the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) is monitored in compliance with applicable regulations. Monitoring results are compared to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental control (SCDHEC) Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS). Historically as well as currently, nitrate-nitrite as nitrogen, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the second half of 1995. Elevated constituents were found primarily in the water table (Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2}), however, constitutents exceeding standards also occurred in several different aquifer zones monitoring wells. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the H-Area HWMF have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington.

NONE

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

75

Waste management facilities cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains cost information on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex waste streams that will be addressed by DOE in the programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) project. It describes the results of the task commissioned by DOE to develop cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste. It contains transportation costs for most types of DOE waste streams: low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), alpha LLW and alpha MLLW, Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) LLW and DOE equivalent waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and hazardous waste. Unit rates for transportation of contact-handled (<200 mrem/hr contact dose) and remote-handled (>200 mrem/hr contact dose) radioactive waste are estimated. Land transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste is subject to regulations promulgated by DOE, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and state and local agencies. The cost estimates in this report assume compliance with applicable regulations.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.; Burton, D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwate Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1998, Volumes I, II, & III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah river Site (SRS) during first and second quarters 1998. This program is required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Report requirements are described in the 1995 RCRA Renewal Permit, effective October 5, 1995, Section IIIB.H.11.b for the M-Area HWMF and Section IIIG.H.11.b for the Met Lab HWMF.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

78

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

79

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

M-area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report, First quarter 1995, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, in three volumes, describes the ground water monitoring and c corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the fourth quarter 1994 and first quarter 1995. Concise description of the program and considerable data documenting the monitoring and remedial activities are included in the document. This is Volume 1 covering the following topics: sampling and results; hydrogeologic assessment; water quality assessment; effectiveness of the corrective-action program; corrective-action system operation and performance; monitoring and corrective-action program assessment; proposed monitoring and corrective-action program modifications. Also included are the following appendicies: A-standards; B-flagging criteria; C-figures; D-monitoring results tables; E-data quality/usability assessment.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Reduction of COD in leachate from a hazardous waste landfill adjacent to a coke-making facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hazardous waste landfill adjacent to a coke manufacturing facility was in operation between July 1990 and December 1991. A system was constructed to collect and treat the leachate from the landfill prior to discharge to the river. Occasionally, the discharge from the treatment facility exceeded the permit limitations for Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), and Total Organic Carbon (TOC). The objectives of this study were to determine treatment methods which would enable compliance with the applicable discharge limits; to establish the desired operating conditions of the process; and to investigate the effect of various parameters such as pH, catalyst dosage, and reaction time on the COD destruction efficiency. The characteristics of the landfill leachate in question were significantly variable in terms of chemical composition. A review of the influent quality data suggests that the COD concentration ranges between 80 and 390 mg/l. The oxidation processes using Fenton`s reagent or a combination of UV/hydrogen peroxide/catalyst are capable of reducing the COD concentration of the leachate below the discharge limitation of 35 mg/l. The estimated capital cost associated with the Fenton`s reagent process is approximately $525,000, and the annual operating and maintenance cost is $560,000. The estimated capital cost for the UV/hydrogen peroxide/catalyst treatment system is $565,000. The annual operating and maintenance cost of this process would be approximately $430,000.

Banerjee, K.; O`Toole, T.J. [Chester Environmental, Moon Township, PA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Hazard ranking system evaluation of CERCLA inactive waste sites at Hanford: Volume 2: Engineered-facility sites (HISS data base)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to formally document the assessment activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. These activities were carried out pursuant to the DOE orders that address the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program for the cleanup of inactive waste sites. The DOE orders incorporate the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology, which is based on the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. This methodology includes: PA/SI, remedial investigation/feasibility study, record of decision, design and implementation of remedial action, operation and monitoring, and verification monitoring. Volume 1 of this report discusses the CERCLA inactive waste-site evaluation process, assumptions, and results of the Hazard Ranking System methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the data on the individual CERCLA engineered-facility sites at Hanford, as contained in the Hanford Inactive Site Surveillance (HISS) Data Base. Volume 3 presents the data on the individual CERCLA unplanned-release sites at Hanford, as contained in the HISS Data Base. 13 refs.

Jette, S.J.; Lamar, D.A.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Van Houten, N.C.; Stenner, R.D.; Cramer, K.H.; Higley, K.A.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental...

85

Hazardous Material Security (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All facilities processing, storing, managing, or transporting hazardous materials must be evaluated every five years for security issues. A report must be submitted to the Department of the...

86

3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

Cole, C.M. Sr.

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

87

Facility Microgrids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities...

89

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: Introduction and Summary of Results; Facility Background; Facility Emissions; Atmospheric Dispersion and Deposition Modeling of Emissions; Human Health Risk Assessment; Screening Ecological Risk Assessment; Accident Analysis; Additional Analysis in Response to Peer Review Recommendations; References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: Overview; Facility Background; Risk Assessment History at WTI; Peer Review Comments and Key Assumptions; and References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 99-01: Enforcement of 10 CFR Part 830.120 (Quality Assurance Rule) for Facilities below Hazard Category III  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH Enforcement) periodically to issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. During the past 18 months, EH Enforcement has identified a number of examples in which both DOE and contractor organizations have incorrectly exempted activities from applicability of the DOE Quality Assurance Rule 10 CFR 830.120 (QA Rule). The contractors excluded these activities on the basis that the QA Rule did not apply if the activity was classified as less than a Hazard Category III under DOE Standard 1027-92 (Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports). Standard 1027 provides guidance for determining whether a facility, activity or area requires a Safety Analysis Report but it does not provide a basis for exclusion from the provisions of the QA Rule.

92

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 99-01:Enforcement of 10 CFR Part 830.120 (Quality Assurance Rule)for Facilities Below Hazard Category III  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH Enforcement) periodically to issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. During the past 18 months, EH Enforcement has identified a number of examples in which both DOE and contractor organizations have incorrectly exempted activities fromapplicability of the DOE Quality Assurance Rule 10 CFR 830.120 (QA Rule). The contractors excluded these activities on the basis that the QA Rule did not apply if the activity was classified as less than a Hazard Category III under DOE Standard 1027-92 (Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports). Standard 1027 provides guidance for determining whether a facility, activity or area requires a Safety Analysis Report but it does not provide a basis for exclusion from the provisions of the QA Rule.

93

Hazardous Materials and Controlled Hazardous Substances (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A permit is required to own, establish, operate, or maintain a facility in the state of Maryland that transfers quantities of a single hazardous material in excess of 100,000 pounds at any time...

94

Hazardous Waste Management Standards and Regulations (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act states the standards and regulations for the management of hazardous waste. No person shall construct, modify or operate a hazardous waste facility or otherwise dispose of hazardous waste...

95

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility...

96

Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize...

97

Health assessment for Royal Hardage Industrial Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Facility, Criner, Oklahoma, Region 6. CERCLIS No. OKD000400093. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Royal Hardage Industrial Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Facility (Hardage/Criner) National Priorities List Site is located in Criner, McClain County, Oklahoma. The site is located in an agricultural area. There are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and several heavy metals present in the groundwater and soil, and VOCs in surface water and sediment. The Record of Decision signed November 1986 selected several remedial actions which included excavation of the primary source material and separation of the wastes for treatment, solids to be disposed of in an on-site landfill that meets Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, organic liquids to be incinerated, and inorganic liquids to be treated by other means as necessary. The site is currently in the remedial-design phase.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume provides a description of the facility, and its location and setting in the three-state area of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia; an overview of previous risk assessments conducted by U.S. EPA for this site, including the preliminary assessment of inhalation exposure and the screening-level risk analyses of indirect exposure; and a summary of comments provided by the Peer Review Panel on the Project Plan.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

Chase, J.

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

100

RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility, Permit Number NEV HW0101, Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the EPA identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

Arnold, Patrick [NSTec] [NSTec

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hazard Analysis Database Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from the results of the hazard evaluations, and (2) Hazard Topography Database: Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

GRAMS, W.H.

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

103

Class 1 Permit Modification Notification Addition of Structures within Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11, Dome 375 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, July 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is to notify the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in November 2010. The modification adds structures to the container storage unit at Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, Pad 11. Permit Section 3.1(3) requires that changes to the location of a structure that does not manage hazardous waste shall be changed within the Permit as a Class 1 modification without prior approval in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 (40 CFR), {section}270.42(a)(1). Structures have been added within Dome 375 located at TA-54, Area G, Pad 11 that will be used in support of waste management operations within Dome 375 and the modular panel containment structure located within Dome 375, but will not be used as waste management structures. The Class 1 Permit Modification revises Figure 36 in Attachment N, Figures; and Figure G.12-1 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Descriptions of the structures have also been added to Section A.4.2.9 in Attachment A, TA - Unit Descriptions; and Section 2.0 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Full description of the permit modification and the necessary changes are included in Enclosure 1. The modification has been prepared in accordance with 40 CFR {section}270.42(a)(l). This package includes this letter and an enclosure containing a description of the permit modification, text edits of the Permit sections, and the revised figures (collectively LA-UR-12-22808). Accordingly, a signed certification page is also enclosed. Three hard copies and one electronic copy of this submittal will be delivered to the NMED-HWB.

Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lechel, Robert A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K East (KE)/K West (KW) Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site have been used for storage of irradiated N Reactor and single-pass reactor fuel. Remaining spent fuel is continuing to be stored underwater in racks and canisters in the basins while fuel retrieval activities proceed to remove the fuel from the basins. The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project is adding equipment to the facility in preparation for removing the fuel and sludge from the basins In preparing this hazard analysis, a variety of hazard analysis techniques were used by the K Basins hazard analysis team, including hazard and operability studies, preliminary hazard analyses, and ''what if'' analyses (WHC-SD-SNF-PHA-001, HNF-2032, HNF-2456, and HNF-SD-SNF-SAD-002). This document summarizes the hazard analyses performed as part of the safety evaluations for the various modification projects and combines them with the original hazard analyses to create a living hazard analysis document. As additional operational activities and modifications are developed, this document will be updated as needed to ensure it covers all the hazards at the K Basins in a summary form and to ensure the subsequent safety analysis is bounding. This hazard analysis also identifies the preliminary set of design features and controls that the facility could rely on to prevent or reduce the frequency or mitigate consequences of identified accident conditions based on their importance and significance to safety. The operational controls and institutional programs relied on for prevention or mitigation of an uncontrolled release are identified as potential technical safety requirements. All operational activities and energy sources at the K Basins are evaluated in this hazard analysis. Using a systematic approach, this document identifies hazards created by abnormal operating conditions and external events (e.g., earthquakes) that have the potential for causing undesirable consequences to the facility worker, the onsite individual, or the public. This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and complies with the requirements of 10 CFR 830.

SEMMENS, L.S.

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

105

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

106

K Basins Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

WEBB, R.H.

1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

PECH, S.H.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

108

Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste and other land uses. The regulations require an...

111

Oil and Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Anyone who owns or operates a vessel or facility that transports, stores, or otherwise handles hazardous wastes must take reasonable steps to prevent the discharge of those materials.

112

The strategy of APO-Hazardous Waste Management Agency in forming the model of public acceptance of Croatian Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of basic elements related to public participation in hazardous and radioactive waste management in Croatia are underlined in the paper. Most of them are created or led by the APO-Hazardous Waste Management Agency. Present efforts in improvement of public participation in the field of hazardous and radioactive waste management are important in particular due to negligible role of public in environmentally related issues during former Yugoslav political system. For this reason it is possible to understand the public fearing to be deceived or neglected again. Special attention is paid to the current APO editions related to public information and education in the field of hazardous and radioactive waste management. It is important because only the well-informed public can present an active and respectful factor in hazardous and radioactive waste management process.

Klika, M.C.; Kucar-Dragicevic, S.; Lokner, V. [APO, Zagreb (Croatia)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a...

115

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for...

116

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

340 waste handling facility interim safety basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents an interim safety basis for the 340 Waste Handling Facility classifying the 340 Facility as a Hazard Category 3 facility. The hazard analysis quantifies the operating safety envelop for this facility and demonstrates that the facility can be operated without a significant threat to onsite or offsite people.

VAIL, T.S.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

340 Waste handling facility interim safety basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents an interim safety basis for the 340 Waste Handling Facility classifying the 340 Facility as a Hazard Category 3 facility. The hazard analysis quantifies the operating safety envelop for this facility and demonstrates that the facility can be operated without a significant threat to onsite or offsite people.

Stordeur, R.T.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

119

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

122

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release...

123

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations prescribe the management of hazardous waste facilities in New York State. They identify and list different types of hazardous wastes and describe standards for generators,...

124

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Parts 595-599: Hazardous Substances (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations aim to prevent the release of hazardous substances into surface water and groundwater resources. They contain guidance for facilities which store and process hazardous substances,...

125

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

126

FIRE HAZARDS ANALYSIS - BUSTED BUTTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas at the Busted Butte Test Facility and to ascertain whether the DOE fire safety objectives are met. The objective, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Section 4.2, is to establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees. (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R. Longwell; J. Keifer; S. Goodin

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

127

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

INTERNAL HAZARDS ANALYSIS FOR LICENSE APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this internal hazards analysis is to identify and document the internal hazards and potential initiating events associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain. Internal hazards are those hazards presented by the operation of the facility and by its associated processes that can potentially lead to a radioactive release or cause a radiological hazard. In contrast to external hazards, internal hazards do not involve natural phenomena and external man-made hazards. This internal hazards analysis was performed in support of the preclosure safety analysis and the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. The methodology for this analysis provides a systematic means to identify internal hazards and potential initiating events that may result in a radiological hazard or radiological release during the repository preclosure period. These hazards are documented in tables of potential internal hazards and potential initiating events (Section 6.6) for input to the repository event sequence categorization process. The results of this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply to the performance of event sequence analyses for the repository preclosure period. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that internal hazards that have not been previously evaluated are identified.

R.J. Garrett

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

B Plant facility description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings 225B, 272B, 282B, 282BA, and 294B were removed from the B Plant facility description. Minor corrections were made for tank sizes and hazardous and toxic inventories.

Chalk, S.E.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

133

1992 system disturbances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a utility experiences an electric system emergency that requires reporting to the DOE, the utility sends a copy of the report to its Regional Council, which then sends a copy to NERC. Canadian utilities often voluntarily file emergency reports to DOE and NERC as well. NERC's annual review of system disturbances begins in November when the Disturbance Analysis Working Group meets to discuss each disturbance reported to NERC so far that year. The Group then contacts the Regional Council or utility(ies) involved and requests a detailed report of each incident. The Group then summarizes the report for this Review and analyzes it using the NERC Operating Guides and Planning Policies and Guides as the analysis categories. The Commentary section includes the conclusions and recommendations that were formulated from the analyses in this report plus the general experiences of the Working Group through the years. In 1992, utilities reported 22 incidents of system disturbances, load reductions, or unusual occurrences. This is eight fewer than reported in 1991. These incidents are listed chronologically and categorized as: fourteen system interruptions that resulted in loss of customer service, eight unusual occurrences that did not cause a service interruption. No public appeals to reduce demand or voltage reductions occurred in 1992. This document contains reports of 11 incidents plus a summary of the damage from Hurricane Andrew. Each utility or Region approved its analysis in this report. Included is a table of Disturbances by Analysis Category that offers a quick review of the categories applicable to each incident.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance...

135

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RL Facility Representative Program March 21, 1995 Surveillance Guide OSS 19.5 Revision 0 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Page 6 of Error Bookmark...

136

RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2012, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101, issued 10/17/10.

,

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

137

RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream; a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility; the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream; a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken; a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received; any unusual occurrences; and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

WHC fire hazards analysis policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish the fire protection policy for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) relative to US Department of Energy (DOE) directives for Fire Hazards Analyses (FHAs) and their relationship to facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) as promulgated by the DOE Richland Operations Office.

Evans, C.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Toxic hazards of underground excavation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Implementation of the hazardous debris rule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

Sailer, J.E.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) includes an evaluation of available biotic information from the site vicinity to provide a preliminary description of potential ecological receptors (e.g., rare, threatened and endangered species; migratory birds; and important game species), and important ecological habitats (e.g., wetland areas). A conceptual site model is developed that describe show stressors associated with the WTI facility might affect the ecological components in the surrounding environment through the development and evaluation of specific ecological endpoints. Finally, an estimate of the potential for current and/or future adverse impacts to the biotic component of the environment is provided, based on the integration of potential exposures of ecological receptors to WTI emissions and toxicological threshold values.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

300 Area Disturbance Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

Canister storage building hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', and meets the intent of HNF-PRO-704, ''Hazard and Accident Analysis Process''. This hazard analysis implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports''.

POWERS, T.B.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

144

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis to support the final CSB Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis process identified hazardous conditions and material-at-risk, determined causes for potential accidents, identified preventive and mitigative features, and qualitatively estimated the frequencies and consequences of specific occurrences. The hazard analysis was performed by a team of cognizant CSB operations and design personnel, safety analysts familiar with the CSB, and technical experts in specialty areas. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process. Attachment A provides two lists of hazard analysis team members and describes the background and experience of each. The first list is a complete list of the hazard analysis team members that have been involved over the two-year long process. The second list is a subset of the first list and consists of those hazard analysis team members that reviewed and agreed to the final hazard analysis documentation. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process involving formal facilitated group sessions and independent hazard and accident analysis work. The hazard analysis process led to the selection of candidate accidents for further quantitative analysis. New information relative to the hazards, discovered during the accident analysis, was incorporated into the hazard analysis data in order to compile a complete profile of facility hazards. Through this process, the results of the hazard and accident analyses led directly to the identification of safety structures, systems, and components, technical safety requirements, and other controls required to protect the public, workers, and environment.

POWERS, T.B.

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

d upstream downstream disturbance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microphone Cm (s) C e (s) Controller (a) m Pmd (s) d Cm (s) Pmu (s) P ed (s) u P eu (s) e C e (s) (b) Figure) #12; y 2 =m Pmd (s) w 1 =d w 2 D 2 C m (s) Pmu (s) z 2 P ed (s) D 1 W 2 W 3 z 3 D 3 w 3 1 0 0005 1 0 with experimental data and the HÂĄ/ QFT synthesized controller #12; disturbance speaker detection control error

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

146

Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

REMAIZE, J.A.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hanford facility contingency plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit- specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. Applicability of this plan to Hanford Facility activities is described in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion, General Condition II.A. General Condition II.A applies to Part III TSD units, Part V TSD units, and to releases of hazardous substances which threaten human health or the environment. Additional information about the applicability of this document may also be found in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Handbook (DOE/RL-96-10). This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous substance spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. The term hazardous substances is defined in WAC 173-303-040 as: ``any liquid, solid, gas, or sludge, including any material, substance, product, commodity, or waste, regardless of quantity, that exhibits any of the physical, chemical or biological properties described in WAC 173-303-090 or 173-303-100.`` Whenever the term hazardous substances is used in this document, it will be used in the context of this definition. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases of hazardous substances occurring at areas between TSD units that may, or may not, threaten human health or the environment.

Sutton, L.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-338-2187, IMC Corporation, Sterlington, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from an authorized representative of the Construction and General Laborers Union, Local 762, an investigation was made of potential hazards for asbestos abatement contract workers at IMC Corporation, (SIC-2869), Sterlington, Louisiana. The IMC facility consisted of two ammonia facilities, a nitroparaffin (NP) facility, and a NP derivatives facility. An explosion occurred on May 1, 1991 in the NP facility, caused by a faulty compressor. During the post explosion renovation activities, an asbestos abatement firm was working on site due to the large amounts of asbestos (1332214) insulation which had been disturbed by the explosion. Records indicated that several workers complained of ill effects and odors on June 17 and 19. The incidents were investigated but no chemical exposure explanation was found. Routine and complaint based industrial hygiene monitoring was primarily area monitoring and not substance specific. Of the 25 workers interviewed, 22 had symptoms they felt were related to their work at IMC. The symptoms included those of the upper respiratory tract, central nervous system, and gastrointestinal system. The most common included diarrhea, nausea, headache, dizziness, and cough, each experienced by significantly more than half the subjects. The symptoms could not be linked conclusively to any specific chemical release, job task, work location, or food or drink source.

Kiefer, M.; Tepper, A.; Miller, R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report The following information...

150

Office of Nuclear Safety Basis and Facility Design  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design establishes safety basis and facility design requirements and expectations related to analysis and design of nuclear facilities to ensure protection of workers and the public from the hazards associated with nuclear operations.

151

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

WIPP Documents - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (RCRA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | Blandine Jerome VelenciaNewsNewsFederal Regulations 40

153

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 382  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUSBudget Advanced DISCLAIMERMechanical

154

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 400  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUSBudget Advanced DISCLAIMERMechanical Equipment

155

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 411  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUSBudget Advanced DISCLAIMERMechanical1 Equipment

156

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 412  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUSBudget Advanced DISCLAIMERMechanical1 Equipment2

157

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 413  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUSBudget Advanced DISCLAIMERMechanical1

158

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 420  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUSBudget Advanced DISCLAIMERMechanical120 Equipment

159

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - EAA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUSBudget Advanced DISCLAIMERMechanical120

160

Canister storage building hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the final CSB safety analysis report (SAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Report, and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

Krahn, D.E.; Garvin, L.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Phase 2 fire hazard analysis for the canister storage building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fire hazard analysis assesses the risk from fire in a facility to ascertain whether the fire protection policies are met. This document provides a preliminary FHA for the CSB facility. Open items have been noted in the document. A final FHA will be required at the completion of definitive design, prior to operation of the facility.

Sadanaga, C.T., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

283-E and 283-W hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the 200 area water treatment plants 283-E and 283-W located on the US DOE Hanford Site. Operation of the water treatment plants is the responsibility of ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide emergency planning technical basis for the water treatment plants. This document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE ORDER 5500.3A which requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification.

Sutton, L.N.

1994-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working with hazardous materials should receive annual training that addresses storage, use, and disposal of hazardous before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

165

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

166

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

167

Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket (docket). Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Facilities Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket (``docket``) identifies Federal facilities that may be contaminated with hazardous substances and that must be evaluated to determine if they pose a risk to public health or the environment The docket, required by Section 120(c) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), also provides a vehicle for making information about potentially contaminated facilities available to the public. Facilities listed on the docket must complete site assessments that provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with information needed to determine whether or not the facility should be included on he National Priorities List (NPL). This Information Brief, which revises the previous Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compiliance Docket Information Brief, provides updated information on the docket listing process, the implications of listing, and facility status after listing.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

Atlas, M.

170

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Fire hazards analysis for solid waste burial grounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document comprises the fire hazards analysis for the solid waste burial grounds, including TRU trenches, low-level burial grounds, radioactive mixed waste trenches, etc. It analyzes fire potential, and fire damage potential for these facilities. Fire scenarios may be utilized in future safety analysis work, or for increasing the understanding of where hazards may exist in the present operation.

McDonald, K.M.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 26632675, 2011 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/11/2663/2011/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is responsible for studying the safety and hazards of abandoned mines. One of the main scientific aims- gan on new extraction facilities and the mine operator kindly agreed to collaborate on the experiment

Boyer, Edmond

173

Addressing concerns related to geologic hazards at the site of the proposed Transuranic Waste Facility , TA-63, Los Alamos National Laboratory: focus on the current Los Alamos Seismic Network earthquake catalog, proximity of identified seismic events to the proposed facility , and evaluation of prev  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical paper presents the most recent and updated catalog of earthquakes measured by the Los Alamos Seismic Network at and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), with specific focus on the site of the proposed transuranic waste facility (TWF) at Technical Area 63 (TA-63). Any questions about the data presented herein, or about the Los Alamos Seismic Network, should be directed to the authors of this technical paper. LANL and the Los Alamos townsite sit atop the Pajarito Plateau, which is bounded on its western edge by the Pajarito fault system, a 35-mile-long system locally comprised of the down-to-the-east Pajarito fault (the master fault) and subsidiary down-to-the-west Rendija Canyon, Guaje Mountain, and Sawyer Canyon faults (Figure 1). This fault system forms the local active western margin of the Rio Grande rift near Los Alamos, and is potentially seismogenic (e.g., Gardner et al., 2001; Reneau et al., 2002; Lewis et al., 2009). The proposed TWF area at TA-63 is situated on an unnamed mesa in the north-central part of LANL between Twomile Canyon to the south, Ten Site Canyon to the north, and the headwaters of Canada del Buey to the east (Figure 2). The local bedrock is the Quaternary Bandelier Tuff, formed in two eruptive pulses from nearby Valles caldera, the eastern edge of which is located approximately 6.5 miles west-northwest of the technical area. The older member (Otowi Member) of the Bandelier Tuff has been dated at 1.61 Ma (Izett and Obradovich 1994). The younger member (Tshirege Member) of the Bandelier Tuff has been dated at 1.256 Ma (age from Phillips et al. 2007) and is widely exposed as the mesa-forming unit around Los Alamos. Several discrete cooling units comprise the Tshirege Member. Commonly accepted stratigraphic nomenclature for the Tshirege Member is described in detail by Broxton and Reneau (1995), Gardner et al. (2001), and Lewis et al. (2009). The Tshirege Member cooling unit exposed at the surface at TA-63 is Qbt3. Understanding the subtle differences between Tshirege Member cooling units and the nature of the contacts between cooling units is critical to identifying the presence or absence of faults associated with the Pajarito fault system on the Pajarito Plateau. The Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN) continuously monitors local earthquake activity in the Los Alamos area in support of LANL's Seismic Hazards program. Seismic monitoring of LANL facilities is a requirement of DOE Order 420.1B (Facility Safety). LASN currently consists of nine permanent seismic instrument field stations that telemeter real-time sensitive ground motion data to a central recording facility. Four of these stations are located on LANL property, with three of those within 2.5 miles of TA-63. The other five stations are in remote locations in the Jemez Mountains, Valles Caldera, St Peters Dome, and the Caja del Rio plateau across the Rio Grande from the Los Alamos area. Local earthquakes are defined as those with locations within roughly 100 miles of Los Alamos. Plate 1 shows the current LASN station locations and all local earthquakes recorded from 1973 through 2011. During this time period, LASN has detected and recorded over 850 local earthquakes in north-central New Mexico. Over 650 of these were located within about 50 miles of Los Alamos, and roughly 60 were within 10 miles. The apparent higher density of earthquakes close to Los Alamos, relative to the rest of north-central New Mexico, is due largely to the fact that LASN is a sensitive local seismic network, recording many very small nearby events (magnitude less than 1.0) that are undetectable at greater distances.

Roberts, Peter M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelley, Richard E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

Yurconic, M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

Yurconic, M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR NATURAL EVENT HAZARDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for natural event hazard (NEH)-initiated accidents. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

KRIPPS, L.J.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Advanced Materials Laboratory hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order 55OO.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the AML. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is a nominal area that conforms to DOE boundaries and physical/jurisdictional boundaries such as fence lines and streets.

Barnett, B.; Banda, Z.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Modified hazard ranking system for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes. User manual.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes both the original Hazard Ranking System and the modified Hazard Ranking System as they are to be used in evaluating the relative potential for uncontrolled hazardous substance facilities to cause human health or safety problems or ecological or environmental damage. Detailed instructions for using the mHRS/HRS computer code are provided, along with instructions for performing the calculations by hand. Uniform application of the ranking system will permit the DOE to identify those releases of hazardous substances that pose the greatest hazard to humans or the environment. However, the mHRS/HRS by itself cannot establish priorities for the allocation of funds for remedial action. The mHRS/HRS is a means for applying uniform technical judgment regarding the potential hazards presented by a facility relative to other facilities. It does not address the feasibility, desirability, or degree of cleanup required. Neither does it deal with the readiness or ability of a state to carry out such remedial action, as may be indicated, or to meet other conditions prescribed in CERCLA. 13 refs., 13 figs., 27 tabs.

Hawley, K.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Stenner, R.D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a comprehensive, Statewide program to manage hazardous wastes through regulating hazardous waste generation, transportation, storage,...

180

Sustainable System for Residual Hazards Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous, radioactive and other toxic substances have routinely been generated and subsequently disposed of in the shallow subsurface throughout the world. Many of today’s waste management techniques do not eliminate the problem, but rather only concentrate or contain the hazardous contaminants. Residual hazards result from the presence of hazardous and/or contaminated material that remains on-site following active operations or the completion of remedial actions. Residual hazards pose continued risk to humans and the environment and represent a significant and chronic problem that require continuous longterm management (i.e. >1000 years). To protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, a sustainable system is required for the proper management of residual hazards. A sustainable system for the management of residual hazards will require the integration of engineered, institutional and land-use controls to isolate residual contaminants and thus minimize the associated hazards. Engineered controls are physical modifications to the natural setting and ecosystem, including the site, facility, and/or the residual materials themselves, in order to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to contaminants of concern (COCs). Institutional controls are processes, instruments, and mechanisms designed to influence human behavior and activity. System failure can involve hazardous material escaping from the confinement because of system degradation (i.e., chronic or acute degradation) or by externalintrusion of the biosphere into the contaminated material because of the loss of institutional control. An ongoing analysis of contemporary and historic sites suggests that the significance of the loss of institutional controls is a critical pathway because decisions made during the operations/remedial action phase, as well as decisions made throughout the residual hazards management period, are key to the longterm success of the prescribed system. In fact, given that society has become more reliant on and confident of engineered controls, there may be a growing tendency to be even less concerned with institutional controls.

Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7...

182

Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

183

Hazard Analysis Database report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

Hazard analysis results report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Results for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction Center (SPC) Watch Atmospheric conditions are right for hazardous weather ­ hazardous weather is likely to occur Issued by SPC Warning Hazardous weather is either imminent or occurring Issued by local NWS office #12;Outlooks--SPC Storm Prediction Center (SPC) Outlook=Convective Outlook Day 1 Day 2

186

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

WHC natural phenomena hazards mitigation implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature which pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment. Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado),snow, flooding, volcanic ashfall, and lightning strike are examples of NPH at Hanford. It is the policy of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct and operate DOE facilitiesso that workers, the public and the environment are protected from NPH and other hazards. During 1993 DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) transmitted DOE Order 5480.28, ``Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation,`` to Westinghouse Hanford COmpany (WHC) for compliance. The Order includes rigorous new NPH criteria for the design of new DOE facilities as well as for the evaluation and upgrade of existing DOE facilities. In 1995 DOE issued Order 420.1, ``Facility Safety`` which contains the same NPH requirements and invokes the same applicable standards as Order 5480.28. It will supersede Order 5480.28 when an in-force date for Order 420.1 is established through contract revision. Activities will be planned and accomplished in four phases: Mobilization; Prioritization; Evaluation; and Upgrade. The basis for the graded approach is the designation of facilities/structures into one of five performance categories based upon safety function, mission and cost. This Implementation Plan develops the program for the Prioritization Phase, as well as an overall strategy for the implemention of DOE Order 5480.2B.

Conrads, T.J.

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

188

Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Standard identifies safety requirements for magnetic fusion facilities. Safety functions are used to define outcomes that must be achieved to ensure that exposures to radiation, hazardous materials, or other hazards are maintained within acceptable limits. Requirements applicable to magnetic fusion facilities have been derived from Federal law, policy, and other documents. In addition to specific safety requirements, broad direction is given in the form of safety principles that are to be implemented and within which safety can be achieved.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Disturbance Rejection for Nonlinear Systems Zongxuan Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disturbance Rejection for Nonlinear Systems Zongxuan Sun Research and Development Center General result for a class of minimum phase nonlinear systems with linear disturbances. Sun and Tsao (1999, 2001

Tsao, Tsu-Chin

190

Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes requirements for verifying readiness for startup of new Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations, and for restart of existing Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations that have been shut down. Cancels DOE O 425.1C. Adm Chg 1, dated 4-2-13.

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

191

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan will ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, at a minimum, every 3 years.

Greager, E.M.

1997-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

Wiegand, D.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

194

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefings adequately address controls for the identified hazards? Examples would be lockouttagout requirements, hold points, confined space, radiological work permits, fire...

195

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

196

Modified Hazard Ranking System/Hazard Ranking System for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes: Software documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mHRS/HRS software package was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a uniform method for DOE facilities to use in performing their Conservation Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Phase I Modified Hazard Ranking System or Hazard Ranking System evaluations. The program is designed to remove the tedium and potential for error associated with the performing of hand calculations and the interpreting of information on tables and in reference books when performing an evaluation. The software package is designed to operate on a microcomputer (IBM PC, PC/XT, or PC/AT, or a compatible system) using either a dual floppy disk drive or a hard disk storage system. It is written in the dBASE III language and operates using the dBASE III system. Although the mHRS/HRS software package was developed for use at DOE facilities, it has direct applicability to the performing of CERCLA Phase I evaluations for any facility contaminated by hazardous waste. The software can perform evaluations using either the modified hazard ranking system methodology developed by DOE/PNL, the hazard ranking system methodology developed by EPA/MITRE Corp., or a combination of the two. This document is a companion manual to the mHRS/HRS user manual. It is intended for the programmer who must maintain the software package and for those interested in the computer implementation. This manual documents the system logic, computer programs, and data files that comprise the package. Hardware and software implementation requirements are discussed. In addition, hand calculations of three sample situations (problems) with associated computer runs used for the verification of program calculations are included.

Stenner, R.D.; Peloquin, R.A.; Hawley, K.A.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

none,

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Electric Disturbance Events (OE-417) | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Electric Disturbance Events (OE-417) Electric Disturbance Events (OE-417) The Electric Emergency Incident and Disturbance Report (Form OE-417) collects information on electric...

199

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Natural phenomena hazards site characterization criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The criteria and recommendations in this standard shall apply to site characterization for the purpose of mitigating Natural Phenomena Hazards (wind, floods, landslide, earthquake, volcano, etc.) in all DOE facilities covered by DOE Order 5480.28. Criteria for site characterization not related to NPH are not included unless necessary for clarification. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology, and geotechnical studies.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

Wayne Moe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard associated with compressed gas cylinders and methods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

Cadwallader, L.C. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

Lee C. Cadwallader

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Effect of sample disturbance in opalinus clay shales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sample disturbance problem for different geomaterials is reviewed in this thesis. A general discussion on the disturbance sources and complexities of the disturbance problem is followed by detailed reviews on disturbance ...

Pei, Jianyong, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment; evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provide estimates of: (1) individual risks based on central tendency exposure; (2) individual risks based on maximum environmental concentrations; (3) risks to highly exposed or susceptible subgroups of the population (e.g., subsistence farmers and school children); (4) risks associated with specific activities that may result in elevated exposures (e.g., subsistence fishermen and deer hunters); and (5) population risk. This approach allows for the estimation of risks to specific segments of the population taking into consideration activity patterns, number of individuals, and actual locations of individuals in these subgroups with respect to the facility. The fate and transport modeling of emissions from the facility to estimate exposures to identified subgroups is described.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

207

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste...

208

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

Crummel, G.M.

1998-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

209

INL Reactor Technology Complex Out-of-Service Buried Piping Hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Reactor Technology Complex (RTC) buried piping and components are being characterized to determine if they should be managed as hazardous waste and subject to the Hazardous Waste Management Act /Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RTC buried piping and components involve both active piping and components from currently operating nuclear facilities, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and inactive lines from facilities undergoing D&D activities. The issue exists as to the proper methods to analyze and control hazards associated with D&D activities on facilities collocated with existing operating nuclear facilities, or future collocated facilities being considered with the resurgent nuclear industry. During initial characterization activities, it was determined that residual radioactive material in several inactive RTC lines and components could potentially exceed hazard category (HC) 3 thresholds. In addition, concerns were raised as to how to properly isolate active nuclear facility piping and components from those inactive lines undergoing RCRA actions, and whether the operating facility safety basis could be impacted. Work was stopped, and a potential inadequacy in the safety analysis (PISA) was declared, even though no clear safety basis existed for the inactive, abandoned lines and equipment. An unreviewed safety question (USQ) and an occurrence report resulted. A HC 3 or greater Nuclear Facility/Activity for the buried piping and components was also declared in the occurrence report. A qualitative hazard assessment was developed to evaluate the potential hazards associated with characterization activities, and any potential effects on the safety basis of the collocated RTC operating nuclear facilities. The hazard assessment clearly demonstrated the low hazards associated with the activities based on form and dispersiblity of the radioactive material in the piping and components. The hazard assessment developed unique controls to isolate active RTC piping and components from inactive components, and demonstrated that existing safety management programs were adequate for protection of the worker.

Douglas M. Gerstner

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building Safety Information Document (SID)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Safety Information Document (SID) provides a description and analysis of operations for the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Treatment Building (the Treatment Building). The Treatment Building has been classified as a moderate hazard facility, and the level of analysis performed and the methodology used are based on that classification. Preliminary design of the Treatment Building has identified the need for two separate buildings for waste treatment processes. The term Treatment Building applies to all these facilities. The evaluation of safety for the Treatment Building is accomplished in part by the identification of hazards associated with the facility and the analysis of the facility`s response to postulated events involving those hazards. The events are analyzed in terms of the facility features that minimize the causes of such events, the quantitative determination of the consequences, and the ability of the facility to cope with each event should it occur. The SID presents the methodology, assumptions, and results of the systematic evaluation of hazards associated with operation of the Treatment Building. The SID also addresses the spectrum of postulated credible events, involving those hazards, that could occur. Facility features important to safety are identified and discussed in the SID. The SID identifies hazards and reports the analysis of the spectrum of credible postulated events that can result in the following consequences: Personnel exposure to radiation; Radioactive material release to the environment; Personnel exposure to hazardous chemicals; Hazardous chemical release to the environment; Events leading to an onsite/offsite fatality; and Significant damage to government property. The SID addresses the consequences to the onsite and offsite populations resulting from postulated credible events and the safety features in place to control and mitigate the consequences.

Fatell, L.B.; Woolsey, G.B.

1993-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using specific guidelines. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

213

Hazardous Waste Management (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A person shall not generate, dispose, store, treat, or transport hazardous waste in this state without complying with the requirements of this article. The department, in the conduct of its duties...

214

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

215

Proceedings Hazards and Disasters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liang-Chun Chen, Jie-Ying Wu, Yi-Chung Liu, Sung-Ying Chien HAZARDS EDUCATION BY GEOGRAPHERS: A DECADE-DISASTER CONDOMINIUM HOUSING RECONSTRUCTION AND HOUSEHOLD CHARACTERISTICS............. 35 Jie-Ying Wu, Liang-Chun Chen

Wang, Hai

216

Automated Job Hazards Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

217

Financial Incentives Available for Facilities that are Affected by the US EPA ÂŤNational Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters; Final Rule"  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecordFederal Registry Comments MayDepartment ofSonyaAvailable for Facilities

218

HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Hazardous Ignitable Reactive Toxic Oxidizer Other ( explain ) Generator Building Dept. HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL: Generator Building Dept. Please fill out the hazardous waste label on line and download labels on to a plainHAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY 5-4170 Corrosive Non

Schaefer, Marcus

219

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

220

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan Colorado Multi-Hazards Mitigation Plan July 2002 the May 2001 Report to the Governor, Colorado Wildland Urban Interface; Section 2 includes the Hazard the status of the Wildland Urban Interface in Colorado; the hazards that exist; mitigation measures

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction,...

222

Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Identification of Aircraft Hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

K. Ashley

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

224

Site maps and facilities listings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Biosafety Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide assists DOE/NNSA field elements and operating contractors in incorporating hazardous biological agents/toxins into emergency management programs, as required by DOE O 151.1C. No cancellation.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

Preliminary fire hazard analysis for the PUTDR and TRU trenches in the Solid Waste Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document represents the Preliminary Fire Hazards Analysis for the Pilot Unvented TRU Drum Retrieval effort and for the Transuranic drum trenches in the low level burial grounds. The FHA was developed in accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A to address major hazards inherent in the facility.

Gaschott, L.J.

1995-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

A complete electrical hazard classification system and its application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, NFPA 70E, and relevant OSHA electrical safety standards evolved to address the hazards of 60-Hz power that are faced primarily by electricians, linemen, and others performing facility and utility work. This leaves a substantial gap in the management of electrical hazards in Research and Development (R&D) and specialized high voltage and high power equipment. Examples include lasers, accelerators, capacitor banks, electroplating systems, induction and dielectric heating systems, etc. Although all such systems are fed by 50/60 Hz alternating current (ac) power, we find substantial use of direct current (dc) electrical energy, and the use of capacitors, inductors, batteries, and radiofrequency (RF) power. The electrical hazards of these forms of electricity and their systems are different than for 50160 Hz power. Over the past 10 years there has been an effort to develop a method of classifying all of the electrical hazards found in all types of R&D and utilization equipment. Examples of the variation of these hazards from NFPA 70E include (a) high voltage can be harmless, if the available current is sufficiently low, (b) low voltage can be harmful if the available current/power is high, (c) high voltage capacitor hazards are unique and include severe reflex action, affects on the heart, and tissue damage, and (d) arc flash hazard analysis for dc and capacitor systems are not provided in existing standards. This work has led to a comprehensive electrical hazard classification system that is based on various research conducted over the past 100 years, on analysis of such systems in R&D, and on decades of experience. Initially, national electrical safety codes required the qualified worker only to know the source voltage to determine the shock hazard. Later, as arc flash hazards were understood, the fault current and clearing time were needed. These items are still insufficient to fully characterize all types of electrical hazards. The new comprehensive electrical hazard classification system uses a combination of voltage, shock current available, fault current available, power, energy, and waveform to classify all forms of electrical hazards. Based on this electrical hazard classification system, many new tools have been developed, including (a) work controls for these hazards, (b) better selection of PPE for R&D work, (c) improved training, and (d) a new Severity Ranking Tool that is used to rank electrical accidents and incidents with various forms of electrical energy.

Gordon, Lloyd B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cartelli, Laura [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Glass Formulation and Fabrication Laboratory, Building 864, Hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Glass Formulation and Fabrication Laboratory, Building 864. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 threshold is 96 meters. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters.

Banda, Z.; Wood, C.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Simulation Technology Laboratory Building 970 hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Simulation Technology Laboratory, Building 970. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 and Early Severe Health Effects thresholds are 78 and 46 meters, respectively. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters.

Wood, C.L.; Starr, M.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Environmental Hazards and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2. Pollution -Mexico. 3. Transboundary pollution. 4. Conservation of natural resources - UnitedEnvironmental Hazards and Bioresource Management in the United States- Mexico Borderlands Edited. -(Special studies ;v. 3) Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-87903-503-X 1. Pollution -United States

Murphy, Bob

231

International Facility Management Association Strategic Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility Management Association Strategic Facility Planning: A WhIte PAPer Strategic Facility Planning: A White Paper on Strategic Facility Planning 2009 | International...

232

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

233

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program annual progress report, FY 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Programs (HAZWRAP), a unit of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., supports the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office in broadly environmental areas, especially those relating to waste management and environmental restoration. HAZWRAP comprises six program areas, which are supported by central administrative and technical organizations. Existing programs deal with airborne hazardous substances, pollution prevention, remedial actions planning, environmental restoration, technology development, and information and data systems. HAZWRAP's mission to develop, promote, and apply-cost-effective hazardous waste management and environmental technologies to help solve national problems and concerns. HAZWRAP seeks to serve as integrator for hazardous waste and materials management across the federal government. It applies the unique combination of research and development (R D) capabilities, technologies, management expertise, and facilities in the Energy Systems complex to address problems of national importance. 24 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

abiotic disturbance population: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disturbing, but that the disturbance is still non-zero. Asger C. Ipsen 2014-09-11 269 Timber supply on public land in response to catastrophic natural disturbance: a...

236

ameliorating metabolic disturbances: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disturbing, but that the disturbance is still non-zero. Asger C. Ipsen 2014-09-11 218 Timber supply on public land in response to catastrophic natural disturbance: a...

237

acutely disturbed patients: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disturbing, but that the disturbance is still non-zero. Asger C. Ipsen 2014-09-11 258 Timber supply on public land in response to catastrophic natural disturbance: a...

238

Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened and Endangered Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened and Endangered Species on U.S. Army-05 #12;#12;Disturbance Dependent T&E Species Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened

239

Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a hazardous waste management program to provide for the reduction of hazardous waste generation, reuse, recovery, and...

240

John C. Barnes of Savannah River Operations named 2012 Facility...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Savannah River Site, including the F and H-Canyons and the HB-Line. These facilities conduct hazardous nuclear chemistry, packaging, and processing operations on plutonium and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Facility Safety (9-23-10)--Withdrawn  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Withdrawn, 5-19-2014--This approval includes revision of the three implementing Guides: DOE G 420.1-1, Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Design Criteria and Explosive Safety Criteria Guide for Use with DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety; DOE G 420.1-2, Guide for the Mitigation of Natural Phenomena Hazards for DOE Nuclear Facilities and NonNuclear Facilities; and DOE G 420.1-3, Implementation Guide for DOE Fire Protection and Emergency Services Programs for Use with DOE O 420.1B, Facility Safety

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

WESF natural phenomena hazards survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team of engineers conducted a systematic natural hazards phenomena (NPH) survey for the 225-B Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The survey is an assessment of the existing design documentation to serve as the structural design basis for WESF, and the Interim Safety Basis (ISB). The lateral force resisting systems for the 225-B building structures, and the anchorages for the WESF safety related systems were evaluated. The original seismic and other design analyses were technically reviewed. Engineering judgment assessments were made of the probability of NPH survival, including seismic, for the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems. The method for the survey is based on the experience of the investigating engineers,and documented earthquake experience (expected response) data.The survey uses knowledge on NPH performance and engineering experience to determine the WESF strengths for NPH resistance, and uncover possible weak links. The survey, in general, concludes that the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems are designed and constructed commensurate with the current Hanford Site design criteria.

Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes requirements for verifying readiness for startup of new Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations, and for restart of existing Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations that have been shut down. Cancels DOE O 425.1C. Adm Chg 1, dated 4-2-13, cancels DOE O 425.1D.

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

Potential health hazards of radiation. Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas to minimize the risks to the public and environment from exposure to the tailings and the radon gas they produce.

none,

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

246

Methodologies for estimating one-time hazardous waste generation for capacity generation for capacity assurance planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains descriptions of methodologies to be used to estimate the one-time generation of hazardous waste associated with five different types of remediation programs: Superfund sites, RCRA Corrective Actions, Federal Facilities, Underground Storage Tanks, and State and Private Programs. Estimates of the amount of hazardous wastes generated from these sources to be shipped off-site to commercial hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities will be made on a state by state basis for the years 1993, 1999, and 2013. In most cases, estimates will be made for the intervening years, also.

Tonn, B.; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Elliot, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Peretz, J.; Bohm, R.; Hendrucko, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Safety analysis report for the National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) at the ORNL Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information concerning: the experiment facility; experiment assembly; instrumentation and controls; materials; radioactivity; shielding; thermodynamics; estimated or measured reactivity effects; procedures; hazards; and quality assurance. (JDB)

Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Richardson, S.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin...

249

AN ENHANCED HAZARD ANALYSIS PROCESS FOR THE HANFORD TANK FARMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., has expanded the scope and increased the formality of process hazards analyses performed on new or modified Tank Farm facilities, designs, and processes. The CH2M HILL process hazard analysis emphasis has been altered to reflect its use as a fundamental part of the engineering and change control process instead of simply being a nuclear safety analysis tool. The scope has been expanded to include identification of accidents/events that impact the environment, or require emergency response, in addition to those with significant impact to the facility worker, the offsite, and the 100-meter receptor. Also, there is now an expectation that controls will be identified to address all types of consequences. To ensure that the process has an appropriate level of rigor and formality, a new engineering standard for process hazards analysis was created. This paper discusses the role of process hazards analysis as an information source for not only nuclear safety, but also for the worker-safety management programs, emergency management, environmental programs. This paper also discusses the role of process hazards analysis in the change control process, including identifying when and how it should be applied to changes in design or process.

SHULTZ MV

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hazardous Materials Introduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSiteAboutRadioactiveHazardous

251

ORISE: Hazard Assessments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK Mapping ApplicationEnvironment AtGraduateHazard

252

Fire Hazards Listing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:EpitaxialtransatlanticUnified| DepartmentFindingHazards Listing

253

B Plant hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning Activities for B Plant on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE Order 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific , Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

Broz, R.E.

1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

254

Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability.

SIMMONS, F.M.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

community-environmentenvironmental-stewardshipprotectioncommunity-relations-plan.php . First name Click here to enter text. Last name Click here to enter text. Email...

256

Baseline Combined Fire Hazards Analysis and Fire Protection Facility...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

is a flat built up membrane over a fluted steel deck supported by the main building beams. The roof construction is a FM Approved Class I assembly. Interior partitions are...

257

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Public Comments to Community...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

covered by the permit. Please use another word for "promulgated," such as "created." This section should state that it is a ten-year permit, set to expire in November 2020. It...

258

Baseline Combined Fire Hazards Analysis and Fire Protection Facility...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

from the water treatment plant to the grid distribution system are provided. In the section of the plant where the 9203 building complex is located, the feeds consist of two...

259

Former Hazardous Waste Management Facility -Perimeter Soils Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of the area continues with current emphasis placed on area to be used for Long Island Solar Farm northeast and southeast of the FHWMF in 2009. Close-out report for clean-up identified additional areas of dispersed contamination in areas southeast of the FHWMF outside the scope of the targeted clean up

Homes, Christopher C.

260

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy Second Quarter Report 2014VehiclesSTATEMENT.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 Frontera STAT. 1867

262

Protocol, High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963 Vol. 79, No. 128Department of Energy

263

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor |InformationNevada:1227118°,HaysvillePermit

264

Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities (TSDF) Guidance  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridorPart A Permit Application Jump to: navigation,|

265

Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012)Tie Ltd |Line, LLC:LLC |Department

266

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley Responsible DOE Office: Office-85(1).pdf094May, 2013NE

267

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012 Greenbuy Program. | DepartmentManagementLasSavings

268

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - 400-EAA Mechanical Mezzanine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUSBudget Advanced DISCLAIMERMechanical Mezzanine

269

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 400-EAA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUSBudget Advanced DISCLAIMERMechanical

270

Hazardous Substances Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture has the authority to promulgate regulations declaring specified substances to be hazardous and establishing labeling, transportation, storage, and...

271

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transportation of hazardous wastes into or through the State of Connecticut requires a permit. Some exceptions apply. The regulations provide information about obtaining permits and other permit...

272

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal...

273

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly...

274

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

276

Development of an auditable safety analysis in support of a radiological facility classification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities commonly have been classified as reactor, non-reactor nuclear, or nuclear facilities. Safety analysis documentation was prepared for these facilities, with few exceptions, using the requirements in either DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System; or DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. Traditionally, this has been accomplished by development of an extensive Safety Analysis Report (SAR), which identifies hazards, assesses risks of facility operation, describes and analyzes adequacy of measures taken to control hazards, and evaluates potential accidents and their associated risks. This process is complicated by analysis of secondary hazards and adequacy of backup (redundant) systems. The traditional SAR process is advantageous for DOE facilities with appreciable hazards or operational risks. SAR preparation for a low-risk facility or process can be cost-prohibitive and quite challenging because conventional safety analysis protocols may not readily be applied to a low-risk facility. The DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management recognized this potential disadvantage and issued an EM limited technical standard, No. 5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation. This standard can be used for developing documentation for a facility classified as radiological, including preparation of an auditable (defensible) safety analysis. In support of the radiological facility classification process, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has developed an auditable safety analysis document based upon the postulation criteria and hazards analysis techniques defined in DOE Order 5480.23.

Kinney, M.D. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States); Young, B. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); De Lorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, NM (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure lonq-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

Lewis, C.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

280

Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Safety Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is prepared in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, and has been written to the format and content guide of DOE-STD-3009-94 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The Hot Cell Facility is a Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facility, and is operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy. This SAR provides a description of the HCF and its operations, an assessment of the hazards and potential accidents which may occur in the facility. The potential consequences and likelihood of these accidents are analyzed and described. Using the process and criteria described in DOE-STD-3009-94, safety-related structures, systems and components are identified, and the important safety functions of each SSC are described. Additionally, information which describes the safety management programs at SNL are described in ancillary chapters of the SAR.

MITCHELL,GERRY W.; LONGLEY,SUSAN W.; PHILBIN,JEFFREY S.; MAHN,JEFFREY A.; BERRY,DONALD T.; SCHWERS,NORMAN F.; VANDERBEEK,THOMAS E.; NAEGELI,ROBERT E.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fire hazards evaluation for light duty utility arm system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection, a Fire Hazards Analysis must be performed for all new facilities. LMHC Fire Protection has reviewed and approved the significant documentation leading up to the LDUA operation. This includes, but is not limited to, development criteria and drawings, Engineering Task Plan, Quality Assurance Program Plan, and Safety Program Plan. LMHC has provided an appropriate level of fire protection for this activity as documented.

HUCKFELDT, R.A.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

DRAINING HAZARDOUS FLUIDS DURING BUILDING 221-1F DEACTIVATION AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several years ago, SRS completed a four year mission to decommission {approx}250 excess facilities. As part of that effort, SRS deactivated multiple facilities (e.g. Building 247-F, Naval Fuels Facility, and Building 211-F, Outside Facilities for F-Canyon) that contained extensive piping systems filled with hazardous material (e.g. nitric acid). Draining of hazardous materials from piping was successfully completed in all facilities without incident. In early 2009, the decommissioning program at SRS was restarted as a result of funding made available by the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Under ARRA, draining of piping containing hazardous material was initiated in multiple facilities including Building 221-1F (or A-Line). This paper describes and reviews the draining of piping containing hazardous materials at A-Line, with emphasis on an incident involving the draining of nitric acid. The paper is intended to be a resource for engineers, planners, and project managers, who face similar draining challenges.

Musall, J.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Disturbance, spatial turnover, and species coexistence in grassland plant communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Humans have dramatically altered natural disturbance regimes. We thus need to understand how these alterations affect plant communities and whether natural disturbance regimes can be restored. I explored the effect of ...

Questad, Erin

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

284

Frequency Analysis of Aircraft hazards for License Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The preclosure safety analysis for the monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain must consider the hazard that aircraft may pose to surface structures. Relevant surface structures are located beneath the restricted airspace of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on the eastern slope of Yucca Mountain, near the North Portal of the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel (Figure 1). The North Portal is located several miles from the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), which is used extensively by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) for training and test flights (Figure 1). The NTS airspace, which is controlled by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for NTS activities, is not part of the NTTR. Agreements with the DOE allow USAF aircraft specific use of the airspace above the NTS (Reference 2.1.1 [DIRS 103472], Section 3.1.1 and Appendix A, Section 2.1; and Reference 2.1.2 [DIRS 157987], Sections 1.26 through 1.29). Commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft fly within several miles to the southwest of the repository site in the Beatty Corridor, which is a broad air corridor that runs approximately parallel to U.S. Highway 95 and the Nevada-California border (Figure 2). These aircraft and other aircraft operations are identified and described in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Sections 6 and 8). The purpose of this analysis is to estimate crash frequencies for aircraft hazards identified for detailed analysis in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Section 8). Reference 2.1.3, Section 8, also identifies a potential hazard associated with electronic jamming, which will be addressed in this analysis. This analysis will address only the repository and not the transportation routes to the site. The analysis is intended to provide the basis for: (1) Categorizing event sequences related to aircraft hazards; (2) Identifying design or operational requirements related to aircraft hazards.

K. Ashley

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

285

Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the Gasoline Tank Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the...

286

The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of agricultural chemicals and the performance of hazardous waste land treatment facilities. This study used a bioassay directed chemical analysis protocol to monitor the environmental fate of mutagenic constituents from a simulated land treatment demonstration...THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF SOIL AND RUNOFF WATER FROM LAND TREATMENT OF THREE HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by PHEBE DAYOL Submitted to the Graduate College of Te xa s ASM Un i ver s i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Davol, Phebe

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Probabilistic risk analysis for Test Area North Hot Shop Storage Pool Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A storage pool facility used for storing spent fuel and radioactive debris from the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident was evaluated to determine the risk associated with its normal operations. Several hazards were identified and examined to determine if any any credible accident scenarios existed. Expected annual occurrence frequencies were calculated for hazards for which accident scenarios were identified through use of fault trees modeling techniques. Fault tree models were developed for two hazards: (1) increased radiation field and (2) spread of contamination. The models incorporated facets of the operations within the facility as well as the facility itself. 6 refs.

Meale, B.M.; Satterwhite, D.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

North Portal Fuel Storage System Fire Hazard Analysis-ESF Surface Design Package ID  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the fire hazard analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within the individual fire areas. This document will only assess the fire hazard analysis within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package ID, which includes the fuel storage system area of the North Portal facility, and evaluate whether the following objectives are met: 1.1.1--This analysis, performed in accordance with the requirements of this document, will satisfy the requirements for a fire hazard analysis in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A. 1.1.2--Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. 1.1.3--Provide input to the ESF Basis For Design (BFD) Document. 1.1.4 Provide input to the facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (Paragraph 3.8).

N.M. Ruonavaara

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

289

Payment Of the New Mexico Environment Department- Hazardous Waste Bureau Annual Business and Generation Fees Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is to transmit to the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB), the Los alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Annual Business and Generation Fees for calendar year 2011. These fees are required pursuant to the provisions of New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act, Chapter 74, Article 4, NMSA (as amended). The Laboratory's Fenton Hill Facility did not generate any hazardous waste during the entire year, and is not required to pay a fee for calendar year 2011. The enclosed fee represents the amount for a single facility owned by the Department of Energy and co-operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS).

Juarez, Catherine L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Research on the Use of Robotics in Hazardous Environments at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many hazardous material handling needs exist in remote unstructured environments. Currently these operations are accomplished using personnel in direct contact with the hazards. A safe and cost effective alternative to this approach is the use of intelligent robotic systems for safe handling, packaging, transport, and even excavation of hazardous materials. The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center of Sandia National Laboratories has developed and deployed robotic technologies for use in hazardous environments, three of which have been deployed in DOE production facilities for handling of special nuclear materials. Other systems are currently under development for packaging special nuclear materials. This paper presents an overview of the research activities, including five delivered systems, at %ndia National Laboratories on the use of robotics in hazardous environments.

Kwok, Kwan S.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

291

Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

Borgeson, M.E.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

292

Method of recycling hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of primary metal from ores has long been a necessary, but environmentally devastating process. Over the past 20 years, in an effort to lessen environmental impacts, the metal processing industry has developed methods for recovering metal values from certain hazardous wastes. However, these processes leave residual molten slag that requires disposal in hazardous waste landfills. A new process recovers valuable metals, metal alloys, and metal oxides from hazardous wastes, such as electric arc furnace (EAF) dust from steel mills, mill scale, spent aluminum pot liners, and wastewater treatment sludge from electroplating. At the same time, the process does not create residual waste for disposal. This new method uses all wastes from metal production processes. These hazardous materials are converted to three valuable products - mineral wool, zinc oxide, and high-grade iron.

NONE

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

293

Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Management Regulations follow the EPA's definitions and guidelines for the most part, which are listed in 40 CFR parts 260-282. In addition to these federal regulations the...

294

Health Hazards in Indoor Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010for VOCs from post-1990 indoor air concentration studies inUnion project on indoor air pollutants. Allergy, 2008. 63(

Logue, Jennifer M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION Huiying Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION by Huiying Sun Ph.D, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, CHINA, 1991 .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1999 c flHuiying Sun, 1999 #12; Abstract We propose using

Heckman, Nancy E.

296

Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This documented safety analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements', and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

Laycak, D

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

298

Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities March 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements,' and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

Laycak, D T

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

299

Guidance Document Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful gases, vapors and fumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidance Document FumeHoods Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful the maximum safe mark (provided by Facilities Management during annual test) Use secondary containment (a hood without permission from EHS. Call EHS or Facilities Management if a hood is not functioning

300

The Chemical Hazards Assessments Prior to D&D of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Hanford Nuclear Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All Hanford facilities, including the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) were evaluated for chemical hazards in 1997, 1998 and 2000. The hazard evaluation, known as the PFP Facility Vulnerability Assessment (FVA), was prompted when chemicals in Tank A-109 in the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) exploded in May 1997. Actions were undertaken to eliminate or reduce what were thought to be the worst hazards following that evaluation. In 2001, a new PFP team was organized to review the progress to date in reducing hazards and to reassess hazards that might still remain within the facility. This reassessment continued into 2002 and is referred to as the 2002 PFP Residual Chemical Hazards Reassessment (RCHR). This report explains the results of the 2001/2002 reassessment of the chemical hazards at PFP. This reassessment effort forms the basis of the RCHR. The RCHR relied on previous assessments as the starting point for the 2001/2002 evaluation and used ranking criteria very similar to previous efforts. The RCHR team was composed of professionals representing Industrial Hygiene, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Hazardous Materials Handling Specialists, Solid Waste Management Specialists and Environmental Specialists. All areas of concern that could be accessed were physically examined and photographed where possible. Information from processing records, facility drawings and documents, design engineers, process engineers and work packages were compiled. The PFP vessel inventory was examined and expanded where required. New items listed in the vessel inventory were investigated. All items investigated were ranked using the hazard ranking criteria developed. This information was put on data sheets and compiled in a database.

FITCH, L.R.; HOPKINS, A.M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years.

DAVIS, W.E.

2000-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

302

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management- December 4, 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30)

303

Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July, 2004 Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated Posture Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated it is possible for these injuries to heal themselves when the ergonomic hazard is removed, cases do exist where;PAGE 2 ERGONOMIC HAZARDS of the SEATED POSTURE BULLETIN NO. 233 Ergonomic interventions to reduce

Martin, Jeff

304

Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Process hazards analysis (PrHA) program, bridging accident analyses and operational safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55 (TA-55) was revised and submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE). As a part of this effort, over seventy Process Hazards Analyses (PrHAs) were written and/or revised over the six years prior to the FSAR revision. TA-55 is a research, development, and production nuclear facility that primarily supports US. defense and space programs. Nuclear fuels and material research; material recovery, refining and analyses; and the casting, machining and fabrication of plutonium components are some of the activities conducted at TA-35. These operations involve a wide variety of industrial, chemical and nuclear hazards. Operational personnel along with safety analysts work as a team to prepare the PrHA. PrHAs describe the process; identi fy the hazards; and analyze hazards including determining hazard scenarios, their likelihood, and consequences. In addition, the interaction of the process to facility systems, structures and operational specific protective features are part of the PrHA. This information is rolled-up to determine bounding accidents and mitigating systems and structures. Further detailed accident analysis is performed for the bounding accidents and included in the FSAR. The FSAR is part of the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) that defines the safety envelope for all facility operations in order to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. The DSA is in compliance with the US. Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management and is approved by DOE. The DSA sets forth the bounding conditions necessary for the safe operation for the facility and is essentially a 'license to operate.' Safely of day-to-day operations is based on Hazard Control Plans (HCPs). Hazards are initially identified in the PrI-IA for the specific operation and act as input to the HCP. Specific protective features important to worker safety are incorporated so the worker can readily identify the safety parameters of the their work. System safety tools such as Preliminary Hazard Analysis, What-If Analysis, Hazard and Operability Analysis as well as other techniques as necessary provide the groundwork for both determining bounding conditions for facility safety, operational safety, and day-to-clay worker safety.

Richardson, J. A. (Jeanne A.); McKernan, S. A. (Stuart A.); Vigil, M. J. (Michael J.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate two mixed (both radioactive and hazardous) waste storage facilities (Buildings 7668 and 7669) in accordance with...

308

Chemical Waste Guide for Facilities Services UW Environmental Health and Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CChemmical Fa Was aciliti Au te G ies S ugust uide Servic t 24, 2 for ces 2011 #12;Chemical Waste Guide for Facilities Services UW Environmental Health and Safety Page 2 Chemical Waste Guide ........................................................................................................... 3 Chemical Hazards

Wilcock, William

309

Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Design Guide for use with DOE O 420.1C, Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides an acceptable approach for safety design of DOE hazard category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities for satisfying the requirements of DOE O 420.1C. Cancels DOE G 420.1-1.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

Safety Analysis Report: X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a safety analysis for the X17B2 beamline synchrotron medical research facility. Health hazards, risk assessment and building systems are discussed. Reference is made to transvenous coronary angiography. (LSP)

Gmuer, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Chemical Hazards and Safety Issues in Fusion Safety Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiological inventory releases have dominated accident consequences for fusion; these consequences are important to analyze and are generally the most severe result of a fusion facility accident event. However, the advent of, or plan for, large-scale usage of some toxic materials poses the additional hazard of chemical exposure from an accident event. Examples of toxic chemicals are beryllium for magnetic fusion and fluorine for laser fusion. Therefore, chemical exposure consequences must also be addressed in fusion safety assessment. This paper provides guidance for fusion safety analysis. US Department of Energy (DOE) chemical safety assessment practices for workers and the public are reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published some guidance on public exposure to releases of mixtures of chemicals, this guidance has been used to create an initial guideline for treating mixed radiological and toxicological releases in fusion; for example, tritiated hazardous dust from a tokamak vacuum vessel. There is no convenient means to judge the hazard severity of exposure to mixed materials. The chemical fate of mixed material constituents must be reviewed to determine if there is a separate or combined radiological and toxicological carcinogenesis, or if other health threats exist with radiological carcinogenesis. Recommendations are made for fusion facility chemical safety evaluation and safety guidance for protecting the public from chemical releases, since such levels are not specifically identified in the DOE fusion safety standard.

Cadwallader, L.C. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Analysis of LNG peakshaving-facility release-prevention systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to provide an analysis of release prevention systems for a reference LNG peakshaving facility. An overview assessment of the reference peakshaving facility, which preceeded this effort, identified 14 release scenarios which are typical of the potential hazards involved in the operation of LNG peakshaving facilities. These scenarios formed the basis for this more detailed study. Failure modes and effects analysis and fault tree analysis were used to estimate the expected frequency of each release scenario for the reference peakshaving facility. In addition, the effectiveness of release prevention, release detection, and release control systems were evaluated.

Pelto, P.J.; Baker, E.G.; Powers, T.B.; Schreiber, A.M.; Hobbs, J.M.; Daling, P.M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Electrical Sitchgear Building No. 5010-ESF Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Fire Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event; (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of the employees, the public, and the environment; (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related event.

N.M. Ruonavaara

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

Maintenance Management Program for DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines the safety management program required by 10 CFR 830.204(b)(5) for maintenance and the reliable performance of Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs) that are part of the safety basis required by 10 CFR 830.202.1 at hazard category 1, 2 and 3 Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 433.1. Canceled by DOE O 433.1B.

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

315

Maintenance Management Program for DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order defines the safety management program required by 10 CFR 830.204(b)(5) for maintenance and the reliable performance of structures, systems and components that are part of the safety basis required by 10 CFR 830.202 at hazard category 1, 2 and 3 DOE nuclear facilities. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-12-2013. Cancels DOE O 433.1A.

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

316

Maintenance Management Program for DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order defines the safety management program required by 10 CFR 830.204(b)(5) for maintenance and the reliable performance of structures, systems and components that are part of the safety basis required by 10 CFR 830.202 at hazard category 1, 2 and 3 DOE nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 433.1A. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-12-2013, cancels DOE O 433.1B.

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

or its sub-tier contractors working to FDNW Safe Work Practices or other safety programsprocedures different from that of the projectcontractor (Ex: HNF-PROs or facility...

318

Flood Assessment at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and the Proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A flood assessment at the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and the proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed to determine the 100-year flood hazard at these facilities. The study was conducted to determine whether the RWMS and HWSU are located within a 100-year flood hazard as defined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and to provide discharges for the design of flood protection.

Schmeltzer, J. S., Millier, J. J., Gustafson, D. L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Secondary plant succession on disturbed sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of secondary plant succession on disturbed sites created during initial site investigations in the late 1970s and early 1980s at Yucca Mountain, NV. Specific study objectives were to determine the rate and success of secondary plant succession, identify plant species found in disturbances that may be suitable for site-specific reclamation, and to identify environmental variables that influence succession on disturbed sites. During 1991 and 1992, fifty seven disturbed sites were located. Vegetation parameters, disturbance characteristics and environmental variables were measured at each site. Disturbed site vegetation parameters were compared to that of undisturbed sites to determine the status of disturbed site plant succession. Vegetation on disturbed sites, after an average of ten years, was different from undisturbed areas. Ambrosia dumosa, Chrysothamnus teretifolius, Hymenoclea salsola, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, Atriplex canescens, and Stephanomeria pauciflora were the most dominant species across all disturbed sites. With the exception of A. dumosa, these species were generally minor components of the undisturbed vegetation. Elevation, soil compaction, soil potassium, and amounts of sand and gravel in the soil were found to be significant environmental variables influencing the species composition and abundance of perennial plants on disturbed sites. The recovery rate for disturbed site secondary succession was estimated. Using a linear function (which would represent optimal conditions), the recovery rate for perennial plant cover, regardless of which species comprised the cover, was estimated to be 20 years. However, when a logarithmic function (which would represent probable conditions) was used, the recovery rate was estimated to be 845 years. Recommendations for future studies and site-specific reclamation of disturbances are presented.

Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.; Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, “Nuclear Safety Management,” Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.”

Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, “Nuclear Safety Management,” Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.”

Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fire hazard analysis for Plutonium Finishing Plant complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fire hazards analysis (FHA) was performed for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The scope of the FHA focuses on the nuclear facilities/structures in the Complex. The analysis was conducted in accordance with RLID 5480.7, [DOE Directive RLID 5480.7, 1/17/94] and DOE Order 5480.7A, ''Fire Protection'' [DOE Order 5480.7A, 2/17/93] and addresses each of the sixteen principle elements outlined in paragraph 9.a(3) of the Order. The elements are addressed in terms of the fire protection objectives stated in paragraph 4 of DOE 5480.7A. In addition, the FHA also complies with WHC-CM-4-41, Fire Protection Program Manual, Section 3.4 [1994] and WHC-SD-GN-FHA-30001, Rev. 0 [WHC, 1994]. Objectives of the FHA are to determine: (1) the fire hazards that expose the PFP facilities, or that are inherent in the building operations, (2) the adequacy of the fire safety features currently located in the PFP Complex, and (3) the degree of compliance of the facility with specific fire safety provisions in DOE orders, related engineering codes, and standards.

MCKINNIS, D.L.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

323

LISA Science Results in the Presence of Data Disturbances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Each spacecraft in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna houses a proof mass which follows a geodesic through spacetime. Disturbances which change the proof mass position, momentum, and/or acceleration will appear in the LISA data stream as additive quadratic functions. These data disturbances inhibit signal extraction and must be removed. In this paper we discuss the identification and fitting of monochromatic signals in the data set in the presence of data disturbances. We also present a preliminary analysis of the extent of science result limitations with respect to the frequency of data disturbances.

Scott E Pollack

2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

324

Sediment Transport in Shallow Subcritical Flow Disturbed by Simulated Rainfall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-14 1968 Sediment Transport in Shallow Subcritical Flow Disturbed by Simulated Rainfall J.L. Machemehl Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

Machemehl, J. L.

325

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

326

Geologic factors controlling patterns of small-volume basaltic volcanism: Application to a volcanic hazards assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hazards assessment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Charles B. Connor,1 John A. Stamatakos,1 David A. Ferrill,1 are often required for facilities, such as nuclear power plants and high-level radioactive waste ­105 years [e.g., Krauskopf, 1988; U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, 1994; U.S. National

Connor, Charles

327

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover bodies (without needles) Container: Sturdy and leakproof with Hazardous Glass label. Either: Plastic resistant, leakproof plastic carboy with green sharps label. Do not fill these containers completely. Leave

Sheridan, Jennifer

328

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6. This Introduction to the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES TSRs is not part of the TSR limits or conditions and contains no requirements related to WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES operations or to the safety analyses of the DSA.

Larson, H L

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

330

Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act is Georgia’s version of Superfund. The Act provides for graduated fees on the disposal of hazardous waste, a trust fund to enable the EPD to clean up or plan...

331

D-Area Preliminary Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive review of hazards associated with the D-Area was performed to identify postulated event scenarios.

Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Paik, I.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, , ()

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

UNPACKING COMPLEXITIES OF DISTURBANCE: INSIGHTS FROM CROSS-SYSTEM COMPARISONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duniway, and Christine Laney are with the US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service;Abstract Current use of definitions of disturbance limit quantitative comparisons of the effects: disturbance, drought, ecological theory, global change, hurricane, overgrazing, thresholds, wildfire 2 #12

Minnesota, University of

333

Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction Operation in Southwest Oregon1. This paper reports results of soil disturbance generated from an integrated forest harvesting/mechanical, mechanical harvesting, soil strength Introduction Currently, there is a lack of information concerning

Bolding, M. Chad

334

CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on or near any system that produces, uses, or stores hazardous energy, a hazardous energy control program by the contractor-managed HECP (e.g., QA's on construction sites, etc.), they shall comply with the contractor and implementation of these activities. Each shall inform the other of their HECPs and Hazardous Energy Control (HEC

US Army Corps of Engineers

335

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-hazardous solid chemicals may go in the trash. Have you disposed of "waste-like", legacy and unknown c Manage anyFocus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you

Wilcock, William

336

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

337

Facilities Services Overview & Discussion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Finance Facilities Services Director: Jeff Butler Human Resources Administrative Services Engineering) Environmental Services Morrison (3) Admin Services Evans (1) Human Resources Engineering (4) ·EngineeringFacilities Services Overview & Discussion Jeff Butler Director ­ Facilities Services November 2011

Maxwell, Bruce D.

338

Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, Set 2, the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part B Permit Application, consists of 15 chapters that address the content of the Part B checklists prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 270), with additional information requirements mandated by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 and revisions of WAC 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology checklist section numbers, in brackets, follow the chapter headings and subheadings. This permit application contains umbrella- type'' documentation with overall application to the Hanford Facility. This documentation is broad in nature and applies to all TSD units that have final status under the Hanford Facility Permit.

none,

1991-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

339

from Isotope Production Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

340

Fuel Fabrication Facility  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6.

Laycak, D T

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Guide to research facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

NEW - DOE O 420.1 Chg 1, Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. This Page Change is limited in scope to changes necessary to invoke DOE-STD-1104, Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis and Safety Design Basis Document, and revised DOE-STD-3009-2014, Preparation of Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analysis as required methods. DOE O 420.1C Chg 1, dated 2-27-15, cancels DOE O 420.1C, dated 12-4-12.

345

Occupational exposures to uranium: processes, hazards, and regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Uranium Registry (USUR) was formed in 1978 to investigate potential hazards from occupational exposure to uranium and to assess the need for special health-related studies of uranium workers. This report provides a summary of Registry work done to date. The history of the uranium industry is outlined first, and the current commercial uranium industry (mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication) is described. This description includes information on basic processes and areas of greatest potential radiological exposure. In addition, inactive commercial facilities and other uranium operations are discussed. Regulation of the commercial production industry for uranium fuel is reported, including the historic development of regulations and the current regulatory agencies and procedures for each phase of the industry. A review of radiological health practices in the industry - facility monitoring, exposure control, exposure evaluation, and record-keeping - is presented. A discussion of the nonradiological hazards of the industry is provided, and the final section describes the tissue program developed as part of the Registry.

Stoetzel, G.A.; Fisher, D.R.; McCormack, W.D.; Hoenes, G.R.; Marks, S.; Moore, R.H.; Quilici, D.G.; Breitenstein, B.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Future Fixed Target Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

ORIGINAL PAPER Does off-trail backcountry skiing disturb moose?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consequences on wildlife's energy budget if wildlife resists habituation, if an animal's risk perception and Gutzwiller 1995; Stankowich 2008). Human-induced disturbances may affect wildlife ecology because they may

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

348

Emulating Natural Disturbance Regimes: an Emerging Approach for Sustainable Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of increasing forest structural complexity, maintenance of landscape connectivity and heterogeneity are modifying silvicultural practices based on concepts from successional and landscape ecology to provide defined from reconstructive research. Disturbance-based landscape management, however, has not yet been

Vermont, University of

349

Scanning probe microscopy with inherent disturbance suppression using micromechanical systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) are affected by disturbances, or mechanical noise, in their environments which can limit their imaging resolution. This thesis introduces a general approach for suppressing out-of-plane ...

Sparks, Andrew William, 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Disturbances, organisms and ecosystems: a global change perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-called "barbarians" are weakly efficient in a stable environment because they waste energy for foraging, growth, to anticipate disturbances will be examined in the light of evolutionary processes. At last, strategies by which

351

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstrumentsPolarExtendedRural Driving Hazards

352

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Realtime controller tuning for periodic disturbance rejection with application to active noise control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

de Callafon. Scheduling control for periodic disturbance at-de Callafon, “Scheduling Control for Periodic DisturbanceR.A. de Callafon, “Scheduling Control for Periodic Distur-

Kinney, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Microsoft Word - VP-MM-820 NEPA.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

recovery, or treatment facilities, but the proposal may include categorically excluded waste storage, disposal, recovery, or treatment actions. 3. Disturb hazardous substances,...

355

Microsoft Word - Teton Sub CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

safety, and health, (ii) require siting and construction or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or treatment facilities, (iii) disturb hazardous...

356

Microsoft Word - Energetics Solar CX.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

safety, and health, (ii) require siting and construction or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or treatment facilities, (iii) disturb hazardous...

357

Microsoft Word - G0421-ReedsportWavePark-CX.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

safety, and health, (ii) require siting and construction or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or treatment facilities, (iii) disturb hazardous...

358

Microsoft Word - Wireless - Nike CX.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

safety, and health, (ii) require siting and construction or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or treatment facilities, (iii) disturb hazardous...

359

Microsoft Word - DRAFT Cowlitz Longview CX memo 080910.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

siting and construction or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or treatment facilities, (iii) disturb hazardous substances, pollutants, contaminants, or...

360

Freeze Concentration Applied to Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steps to remove or destroy the hazardous components prior to discharge. Incineration is widely used to destroy a broad range of these hazardous components. Its disposal efficiency is often used when defining the Best Available Technology for EPA... standards. However, high water content streams are expensive to incinerate since the incinerator must be designed to handle the feed volume even though the water in the feed is in itself harmless. Some hazardous components require operating temperatures...

Ruemekorf, R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces or eliminates waste at the source. It is the policy of...

362

Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the...

363

Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions for storage, treatment, recycling, or disposal of hazardous waste. It provides information about permits and specific requirements...

364

Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs.  Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

365

Mission Support Alliance, LLC Volpentest Hazardous Materials...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Organization (FERO) roles and responsibilities, training requirements and the conduct of operations. Each project is responsible for developing and maintaining EP Hazards...

366

Hazardous Material Transportation Safety (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the Division of Highway Safety, in the Department of Public Safety, to promulgate regulations pertaining to the safe transportation of hazardous materials by a motor...

367

Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law and the regulations created under that law.

369

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

371

Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

Lee Cadwallader

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Safety Basis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis.

373

Hazardous Waste Management: The Role of Journalists in Decision Making Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The journalists are crucial for informing and education of general public about facts related to hazardous and radioactive waste management. Radio programs, TV and newspapers are daily reporting on relevant facts and news. In general, it is true that the majority of journalists are interested more in so called daily politics than in educating general public on certain technical or scientific topics. Therefore, hazardous and radioactive waste management was introduced to Croatian general public in last ten years mainly through various news on site selection of radioactive waste disposal facilities and some problems related to hazardous waste management. This paper presents APO's experience with journalists in last ten years includes program and activities referring informing and educating of journalists from all media.

Eerskov-Klika, M.; Lokner, V.; Subasiae, D.; Schaller, A.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 222-S Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable Federal, State, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

Nickels, J.M.; Warwick, G.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Hanford Site Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring Data Report for Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-facility environmental monitoring is defined as monitoring near facilities that have the potential to discharge or have discharged, stored, or disposed of radioactive or hazardous materials. Monitoring locations are associated with nuclear facilities such as the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Canister Storage Building, and the K Basins; inactive nuclear facilities such as N Reactor and the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility; and waste storage or disposal facilities such as burial grounds, cribs, ditches, ponds, tank farms, and trenches. Much of the monitoring consists of collecting and analyzing environmental samples and methodically surveying areas near facilities. The program is also designed to evaluate acquired analytical data, determine the effectiveness of facility effluent monitoring and controls, assess the adequacy of containment at waste disposal units, and detect and monitor unusual conditions.

Perkins, Craig J.; Dorsey, Michael C.; Mckinney, Stephen M.; Wilde, Justin W.; Poston, Ted M.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Comparison of Hazard Analysisp y Requirements of I&C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) M di l D i A id tShip Accident (Ferry Sewol) Medical Device Accident (Therac-25) 3 NPP Accident­ Software Fault Tree Analysis ­ By AECL, Nancy Leveson Name of Software Hazards No % Remarks For construct hazard 4 7For construct hazard 4 7 Initialization hazard 4 7 IF-THEN-ELSE construct hazard 38 67 CASE

377

FACILITY SAFETY (FS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FACILITY SAFETY (FS) OBJECTIVE FS.1 - (Core Requirement 7) Facility safety documentation in support of SN process operations,is in place and has been implemented that describes the...

378

Technology Transitions Facilities Database  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The types of R&D facilities at the DOE Laboratories available to the public typically fall into three broad classes depending on the mode of access: Designated User Facilities, Shared R&D...

379

Frozen Ground 9 PERMAFROST HAZARDS IN MOUNTAINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and other forms of creeping mountain permafrost may be the source of a number of hazards. Rock glaciers of large rock avalanche disasters are examples of mountain hazards. In the case of the September 20, 2002, rock-ice avalanche at Kolka-Karmadon in the Russian Caucasus, a combined rock-ice avalanche

Kääb, Andreas

380

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Homes built the destruction of fire-tolerant trees if a wildfire moves through the area. Creating fuel breaks (such ignite it. · When ERC grows in forests and wood- lands, it acts as a ladder fuel to allow fire to climb

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT Offered by The College of Architecture and The Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University #12;2 THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL..................................................................................3 C. Approved Courses in the College of Architecture .............................4 D. Approved

382

Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the natural phenomena hazard loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and supports development of double-shell tank systems specifications at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The natural phenomena covered are seismic, flood, wind, volcanic ash, lightning, snow, temperature, solar radiation, suspended sediment, and relative humidity.

Conrads, T.J.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

383

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Great Plains Wind Power Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This multi-year, multi-faceted project was focused on the continued development of a nationally-recognized facility for the testing, characterization, and improvement of grid-connected wind turbines, integrated wind-water desalination systems, and related educational and outreach topics. The project involved numerous faculty and graduate students from various engineering departments, as well as others from the departments of Geosciences (in particular the Atmospheric Science Group) and Economics. It was organized through the National Wind Institute (NWI), which serves as an intellectual hub for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, commercialization and education related to wind science, wind energy, wind engineering and wind hazard mitigation at Texas Tech University (TTU). Largely executed by an academic based team, the project resulted in approximately 38 peer-reviewed publications, 99 conference presentations, the development/expansion of several experimental facilities, and two provisional patents.

Schroeder, John

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Treatment of gaseous effluents at nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Airborne effluents from nuclear facilities represent the major environmental impact from such plants both under routine conditions or after plant accidents. Effective control of such emissions, therefore, constitutes a major aspect of plant design for nuclear power plants and other facilities in the nuclear fuel cycle. This volume brings together a number of review articles by experts in the various areas of concern and describes some of the removal systems that have been designed for power plants and, particularly, for reprocessing plants. Besides controlling the release of radionuclides, other potentially hazardous effluents, such as nitrous oxides, must be minimized, and these are included in some of the systems described. The various chapters deal with historic developments and current technology in reducing emission of fission products, noble gases, iodine, and tritium, and consider design requirements for practical installations.

Goossen, W.R.A. [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Mol (Belgium). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [ed.; Eichholz, G.G.; Tedder, D.W. [eds.] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to understand how changes in climate may affect the structure of landscapes that are subject to periodic disturbances. A general model useful for examining the linkage between climatic change and landscape change has been developed. The model makes use of synoptic climatic data, a geographical information system (GRASS), field data on the location of disturbance patches, simulation code written in the SIMSCRIPT language, and a set of landscape structure analysis programs written specifically for this research project. A simplified version of the model, lacking the climatic driver, has been used to analyze how changes in disturbance regimes (in this case settlement and fire suppression) affect landscape change. Landscape change lagged in its response to changes in the disturbance regime, but the lags differed depending upon the character of the change and the particular measure considered. The model will now be modified for use in a specific setting to analyze the effects of changes in climate on the structure of flood-disturbed patches along the Animas River, Colorado.

Baker, W.L.

1993-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2010 INL Report for Radionuclides (2011)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the calendar Year 2010 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'

Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Better building: LEEDing new facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better building: LEEDing new facilities Better building: LEEDing new facilities We're taking big steps on-site to create energy efficient facilities and improve infrastructure....

391

HAZWOPER project documents for demolition of the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, in support of the Waste Evaporator Facility (WEF) demolition project and contains the Project Work Plan and the Project Health and Safety Plan for demolition and partial remediation actions by ATG at the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506. Various activities will be conducted during the course of demolition, and this plan provides details on the work steps involved, the identification of hazards, and the health and safety practices necessary to mitigate these hazards. The objective of this document is to develop an approach for implementing demolition activities at the WEF. This approach is based on prior site characterization information and takes into account all of the known hazards at this facility. The Project Work Plan provides instructions and requirements for identified work steps that will be utilized during the performance of demolition, while the Health and Safety Plan addresses the radiological, hazardous material exposure, and industrial safety concerns that will be encountered.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Lessons learned from the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste subcontract and ESH&Q liability assessment process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and disposal contracts were first consolidated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1992 by EG&G Idaho, Inc. At that time, disposition of Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste, Toxic Substance Control Act waste, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act hazardous substances and contaminated media, and recyclable hazardous materials was consolidated under five subcontracts. The wastes were generated by five different INEL M&O contractors, under the direction of three different Department of Energy field offices. The consolidated contract reduced the number of facilities handling INEL waste from 27 to 8 qualified treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, with brokers specifically prohibited. This reduced associated transportation costs, amount and cost of contractual paperwork, and environmental liability exposure. EG&G reviewed this approach and proposed a consolidated hazardous waste subcontract be formed for the major EG&G managed DOE sites: INEL, Mound, Rocky Flats, Nevada Test Site, and 10 satellite facilities. After obtaining concurrence from DOE Headquarters, this effort began in March 1992 and was completed with the award of two master task subcontracts in October and November 1993. In addition, the effort included a team to evaluate the apparent awardee`s facilities for environment, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q) and financial liability status. This report documents the evaluation of the process used to prepare, bid, and award the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and/or disposal subcontracts and associated ESH&Q and financial liability assessments; document the strengths and weaknesses of the process; and propose improvements that would expedite and enhance the process for other DOE installations that used the process and for the re-bid of the consolidated subcontract, scheduled for 1997.

Fix, N.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual Progress Report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress during 1989 of 16 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 25 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility. Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 40 refs., 75 figs., 6 tabs.

Smith, R.M.; Gorst, W.R. (eds.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Uintah -a scalable framework for hazard analysis Martin Berzins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uintah - a scalable framework for hazard analysis Martin Berzins Scientific Computing and Imaging of Uintah to a petascale problem in hazard analysis arising from "sympathetic" explosions in which. Devices containing such materials undergo extensive testing for hazard classification prior

Utah, University of

395

Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant succession and environmental disturbance. Aeolian, or wind-driven, sediment transport drives soil erosion, affects biogeochemical cycles, and can lead to the transport of contaminants. Rates of aeolian sediment transport depend in large part on the type, amount, and spatial pattern of vegetation. In particular, the amount of cover from trees and shrubs, which act as roughness elements, alters rates of aeolian sediment transport. The degree to which the understory is disturbed and the associated spacing of bare soil gaps further influence sediment transport rates. Changes in vegetation structure and patterns over periods of years to centuries may have profound impacts on rates of wind-driven transport. For recently disturbed areas, succession is likely to occur through a series of vegetation communities. Area G currently exhibits a mosaic of vegetation cover, with patches of grass and forbs over closed disposal units, and bare ground in heavily used portions of the site. These areas are surrounded by less disturbed regions of shrubland and pinon-juniper woodland; some ponderosa pine forest is also visible in the canyon along the road. The successional trajectory for the disturbed portions of Area G is expected to proceed from grasses and forbs (which would be established during site closure), to shrubs such as chamisa, to a climax community of pinon-juniper woodland. Although unlikely under current conditions, a ponderosa pine forest could develop over the site if the future climate is wetter. In many ecosystems, substantial and often periodic disturbances such as fire or severe drought can rapidly alter vegetation patterns. Such disturbances are likely to increase in the southwestern US where projections call for a warmer and drier climate. With respect to Area G, the 3 most likely disturbance types are surface fire, crown fire, and drought-induced tree mortality. Each type of disturbance has a different frequency or likelihood of occurrence, but all 3 tend to reset the vegetation succession cycle to earlier stages. The Area G performance assessment and composite an

Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirchner, Thomas B. [New Mexico State University; Breshears, David D. [University of Arizona; Field, Jason P. [University of Arizona

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

396

DOE standard guidelines for use of probabilistic seismic hazard curves at Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Standard is intended to provide guidance in the use of the seismic hazard curves developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Experience to-date has shown that application of these methodologies can yield significantly different results. In response to this issue, a Seismic Working Group (SWG) has been formed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters to coordinate the application of these methodologies within DOE in a consistent manner. The position developed by the SWG and contained in this Standard is intended for immediate use in developing seismic hazard estimates at DOE sites for the evaluation of new and existing, nuclear and non-nuclear DOE facilities. This Standard is needed not only to address the LLNL/EPRI issue but also to assure that state-of-the-art seismic hazard methods are incorporated into DOE standards as soon as possible. The DOE is currently involved in a joint program with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and EPRI to evaluate these existing probabilistic seismic hazard methodologies and to develop recommendations for an improved methodology for the 1990`s. The final product of this effort is expected to result in more stable hazard estimates and will supersede this Standard in approximately two years.

Not Available

1992-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

397

HYTEST Phase I Facility Commissioning and Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to report the first year accomplishments of two coordinated Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects that utilize a hybrid energy testing laboratory that couples various reactors to investigate system reactance behavior. This work is the first phase of a series of hybrid energy research and testing stations - referred to hereafter as HYTEST facilities – that are planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A HYTEST Phase I facility was set up and commissioned in Bay 9 of the Bonneville County Technology Center (BCTC). The purpose of this facility is to utilize the hydrogen and oxygen that is produced by the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis test reactors operating in Bay 9 to support the investigation of kinetic phenomena and transient response of integrated reactor components. This facility provides a convenient scale for conducting scoping tests of new reaction concepts, materials performance, new instruments, and real-time data collection and manipulation for advance process controls. An enclosed reactor module was assembled and connected to a new ventilation system equipped with a variable-speed exhaust blower to mitigate hazardous gas exposures, as well as contract with hot surfaces. The module was equipped with a hydrogen gas pump and receiver tank to supply high quality hydrogen to chemical reactors located in the hood.

Lee P. Shunn; Richard D. Boardman; Shane J. Cherry; Craig G. Rieger

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building throughput study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hazardous waste/mixed waste HW/MW Treatment Building (TB) is the specified treatment location for solid hazardous waste/mixed waste at SRS. This report provides throughput information on the facility based on known and projected waste generation rates. The HW/MW TB will have an annual waste input for the first four years of approximately 38,000 ft{sup 3} and have an annual treated waste output of approximately 50,000 ft{sup 3}. After the first four years of operation it will have an annual waste input of approximately 16,000 ft{sup 3} and an annual waste output of approximately 18,000 ft. There are several waste streams that cannot be accurately predicted (e.g. environmental restoration, decommissioning, and decontamination). The equipment and process area sizing for the initial four years should allow excess processing capability for these poorly defined waste streams. A treatment process description and process flow of the waste is included to aid in understanding the computations of the throughput. A description of the treated wastes is also included.

England, J.L.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

1991-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hazard Categorization Reduction via Nature of the Process Argument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents the Hazard Categorization (HC) and Critical Safety Evaluation (CSE) for activities performed using an Inspection Object (IO) in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit of 700 g of U-235. By virtue of exceeding the single parameter subcritical limit and the subsequent potential for criticality, the IO HC is initially categorized as HC2. However, a novel application of the nature of the process argument was employed to reduce the IO HC from HC2 to less than HC3 (LTHC3). The IO is composed of five separate uranium metal plates that total no greater than 3.82 kg of U-235 (U(20)). The IO is planned to be arranged in various configurations. As the IO serves as a standard for experimentation aimed at establishing techniques for detection of fissionable materials, it may be placed in close proximity to various reflectors, moderators, or both. The most reactive configurations of the IO were systematically evaluated and shown that despite the mass of U-235 and potential positioning near various reflectors and moderators, the IO cannot be assembled into a critical configuration. Therefore, the potential for criticality does not exist. With Department of Energy approval, a Hazards Assessment Document with high-level (facility-level) controls on the plates negates the potential for criticality and satisfies the nature of the process argument to reduce the HC from HC2 to LTHC3.

Chelise A. Van De Graaff; Dr. Chad Pope; J. Todd Taylor

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facility Investigation Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Program Plan has been developed to provide a framework for the completion of RCRA Facility Investigations (RFI) at identified units on the Savannah Rive Site (SRS) facility. As such, the RFI Program Plan provides: technical guidance for all work to be performed, managerial control, a practical, scientific approach. The purpose of this Overview is to demonstrate how the basic RFI Program Plan elements (technical, management, and approach) are interwoven to provide a practical and workable plan. The goal of the RFI Program Plan is to provide a systematic, uniform approach for performance and reporting. In addition, the RFI Program Plan has been developed to be specific to the SRS facility and to adhere to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) RFI guidance received as part of the SRS. The US EPA publication ``Characterization of Hazardous Waste Sites`` has been liberally adapted for use in this RFI Program Plan.

Not Available

1989-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Notice of Intent to Revise DOE G 226.1-2, Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This revision will incorporate new content devoted to Federal oversight and evaluation of effectiveness of activity-level work planning and control (WP&C) at Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities.

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

402

Policy Name: Asbestos Management Policy Originating/Responsible Department: Facilities Management and Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or unintentional disturbance of asbestos- containing materials in University-owned or managed buildings. The Asbestos Management Program will address access to areas which house asbestos-containing materials as wellPolicy Name: Asbestos Management Policy Originating/Responsible Department: Facilities Management

Carleton University

403

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are located downstream of control technologies and just before discharge to the atmosphere. The need for monitoring airborne emissions of hazardous chemicals is established in the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit and in notices of construction. Based on the current potential-to-emit, the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit does not contain general monitoring requirements for BOP facilities. However, the permit identifies monitoring requirements for specific projects and buildings. Needs for future monitoring will be established by future permits issued pursuant to the applicable state and federal regulations. A number of liquid-effluent discharge systems serve the BOP facilities: sanitary sewer, process sewer, retention process sewer, and aquaculture system. Only the latter system discharges to the environment; the rest either discharge to treatment plants or to long-term storage. Routine compliance sampling of liquid effluents is only required at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Liquid effluents from other BOP facilities may be sampled or monitored to characterize facility effluents or to investigate discharges of concern. Effluent sampling and monitoring for the BOP facilities depends on the inventories, activities, and environmental permits in place for each facility. A description of routine compliance monitoring for BOP facilities is described in the BOP FEMP.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

405

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations is to help maintain accountability and track data on the hazardous and nonhazardous waste sites in...

406

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

407

Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of...

408

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar...

409

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

410

Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluidtight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC (about 1" WC) higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes.

Chang, Robert C. W. (Martinez, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluid-tight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes. 1 figure.

Chang, R.C.W.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

412

Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

Osterman, Robert A. (Canonsburg, PA); Cox, Robert (West Mifflin, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE's Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site's waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE`s Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site`s waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J. (eds.)

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Small Power Production Facilities (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that:...

419

Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

Washington Division of URS

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 2001 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a), and incorporates comments from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2001 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. The permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the newest guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, the permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

Winokur, Michael

422

Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Altering the natural disturbance regime of a landscape produces changes in the structure of that landscape as the landscape adjusts to the new disturbance regime. A computer simulation model was designed to enable analyses of the longterm changes to be expected in landscapes as their disturbance regime changes. The model, DISPATCH, is the first dynamic spatial simulation model built around a geographical information system (GIS). The model also includes a new set of programs, the r.le programs, that is the first set of programs designed for calculating landscape structure measures within a GIS. The DISPATCH model was used, to analyze the effects of human alterations of disturbance regimes and global change on landscape structure. Landscapes do not adjust quickly to these alterations based on available data. Landscapes subjected to warming or to longterm fire suppression experience a decline in patch richness, Shannon diversity, the amount of edge and contrast, but an increase in distance between patches, angular second moment (texture measure) and patch size. In contrast, landscapes subjected to cooling, the short-term effects of fire suppression, fragmentation, or traditional prescribed burning tend to respond with increasing richness, Shannon diversity, edge, and contrast, but declining distance, angular second moment, and size. The pattern of response is different at different scales, with important implications for species.

Baker, W.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Sensitivity of climate mitigation strategies to natural disturbances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present and future concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide depends on both anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks of carbon. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on a progressive transition to carbon12 efficient technologies to reduce industrial emissions, substantially supported by policies to maintain or enhance the terrestrial carbon stock in forests and other ecosystems. This strategy may be challenged if terrestrial sequestration capacity is affected by future climate feedbacks, but how and to what extent is little understood. Here, we show that climate mitigation strategies are highly sensitive to future natural disturbance rates (e.g. fires, hurricanes, droughts), because of potential effect of disturbances on the terrestrial carbon balance. Generally, altered disturbance rates affect the pace of societal and technological transitions required to achieve the mitigation target, with substantial consequences on the energy sector and on the global economy. Understanding the future dynamics and consequences of natural disturbances on terrestrial carbon balance is thus essential for developing robust climate mitigation strategies and policies

Le Page, Yannick LB; Hurtt, George; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

424

Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine Frank Jepsen, Anders Søborg brake in a wind turbine. Brake torque is determined by friction coefficient and clamp force; the latter brake is one1 of the two independent brake systems in a wind turbine. As a consequence of the gearing

Yang, Zhenyu

425

Disturbance Rejection Control of an Electromagnetic Bearing Spindle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The force exerted on the rotor by an active magnetic bearing (AMB) is determined by the current flow in the magnet coils. This force can be controlled very precisely, making magnetic bearings a potential benefit for grinding, where cutting forces act as external disturbances on the shaft, resulting in degraded part finish. It is possible to achieve precise shaft positioning, reduce vibration of the shaft caused by external disturbances, and even damp out resonant modes. Adaptive control is an appealing approach for these systems because the controller can tune itself to account for an unknown periodic disturbance, such as cutting or grinding forces, injected into the system. In this paper the authors show how one adaptive control algorithm can be applied to an AMB system with a periodic disturbance applied to the rotor. An adaptive algorithm was developed and implemented in both simulation and hardware, yielding significant reductions in rotor displacement in the presence of an external excitation. Ultimately, this type of algorithm could be applied to a magnetic bearing grinder to reduce unwanted motion of the spindle which leads to poor part finish and chatter.

PETTEYS,REBECCA; PARKER,GORDON

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The purpose of this Guide is to provide U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) line management with guidance that may be useful to them in effectively and efficiently implementing the requirements of DOE O 226.1B, Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy, date April 25, 2011, as applied to Federal line management of hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

427

Preliminary Safety Design Report for Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new onsite, remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled low-level waste disposal for remote-handled low-level waste from the Idaho National Laboratory and for nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled low-level waste in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This preliminary safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by discussing site characteristics that impact accident analysis, by providing the facility and process information necessary to support the hazard analysis, by identifying and evaluating potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled low-level waste, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

Timothy Solack; Carol Mason

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive...

429

Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

430

Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials, and for modal transportation.

2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

431

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oil or Hazardous Spills Law requires notice to the Environmental Protection Division of the State Department of Natural Resources Emergency Operations Center when there is a spill or release of...

432

CONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

working practice and will encourage the evolution of a positive health and safety culture within the orgCONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH) Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment HEALTH & SAFETY............................................................................................................9 2.6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS

433

Rainfall-induced Landslide Hazard Rating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research develops a Landslide Hazard Rating System for the rainfall-induced landslides in the Chenyulan River basin area in central Taiwan. This system is designed to provide a simplified and quick evaluation of the ...

Chen, Yi-Ting, Civ. E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY).

Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

{open_quotes}Secure Bus{close_quotes} disturbance-free power at the utility substation level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last 18 months Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM), El Camino Real Engineering, Inc. (CRE), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have worked on the development of disturbance-free power at the medium voltage substation level. The work resulted in the Secure Bus concept, a system in which a medium voltage bus in a substation is immune to power outages and voltage sags on the utility source. The Secure Bus voltage is also immune to voltage sags resulting from faults on any distribution feeder connected to the bus. The Secure Bus concept originated from work conducted to improve power quality for large high-tech manufacturing facilities, in particular for large semiconductor manufacturing plants. For the demands on quality power of a modern facility conventional equipment is not adequate for protecting the end user. For example, the operation of conventional vacuum breakers during short circuit conditions on a feeder circuit, requiring 3 to 5 cycles for breaker opening, does not allow for fast enough current interruption to avoid a voltage dip on the main bus. A sever voltage sag could result in a shut down of sensitive equipment being supplied by the other feeder circuits, which are connected to the main bus. The circumvent the problem, a fast breaker was introduced which interrupts the short circuit before the current causes a significant voltage disturbance. To make the bus immune also to power disturbances caused by power outages, energy storage is introduced to provide the necessary energy back-up in case the primary source is not available.

Boenig, H.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jones, W.H. [El Camino Real Engineering, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Process safety management for highly hazardous chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose of this document is to assist US DOE contractors who work with threshold quantities of highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs), flammable liquids or gases, or explosives in successfully implementing the requirements of OSHA Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119). Purpose of this rule is to prevent releases of HHCs that have the potential to cause catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Advanced Technology for Railway Hydraulic Hazard Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1.1 Map of Total Railway Hydraulic Hazard Events from 1982-2011 ............ 2 1.2 90 mi Effective Radar Coverage for Reliable Rainfall Rate Determination ....................................................................... 5 3... Administration (FRA) for the period of 1982-2011. This data was compiled from the FRA Office of Safety Analysis website (FRA, 2011). A map of the railway hydraulic hazard events over the same time period is displayed in Figure 1.1. Table 1.1. U.S. Railway...

Huff, William Edward 1988-

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

438

Science and Technology Facility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

IBRF Project Lessons Learned Report Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Lessons Learned - Stage I Acquisition through Stage II Construction Completion August 2011 This...

439

Programs & User Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Facility Climate, Ocean, and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Terrestrial Ecosystem and Climate Dynamics Fusion Energy Sciences Magnetic Fusion Experiments Plasma Surface...

440

FACILITY SAFETY (FS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- (Core Requirements 4 and 6) Sufficient numbers of qualified personnel are available to conduct and support operations. Adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ARM Mobile Facilities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Existing Facilities Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The NYSERDA Existing Facilities program merges the former Peak Load Reduction and Enhanced Commercial and Industrial Performance programs. The new program offers a broad array of different...

443

Idaho National Laboratory Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor Sustainability Idaho Regional Optical Network LDRD Next Generation Nuclear Plant Docs...

444

Supercomputing | Facilities | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

facilities, and authorization checks for physical access. An integrated cyber security plan encompasses all aspects of computing. Cyber security plans are risk-based....

445

Facility Survey & Transfer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

446

Hot Fuel Examination Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working with INL Community Outreach Visitor Information Calendar of Events ATR National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor...

447

DOE Designated Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactor** Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joint Genome Institute - Production Genomics Facility (PGF)** (joint with LLNL, LANL, ORNL and PNNL) Advanced Light Source (ALS)...

448

Hazards and controls at the Sandia National Laboratories microelectronics development laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) contains 3,000 m{sup 2}, Which includes 1,000 m{sup 2}of Class I clean room space. There are 20 laminar flow Class I clean room bays. The MDL supplies several, full-flow process technologies which produce complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits using 150 nun diameter silicon wafers. All gases, chemicals and physical hazards used in the fabrication processes are controlled to levels well below regulatory requirements. Facility engineering controls in the MDL include toxic and pyrophoric gas monitoring, interlocks, ventilation, substitution and chemical segregation. Toxic and pyrophoric gases are monitored continuously inside processing tools as well as through the exhaust lines, gas cabinets, the valve boxes, and in general work areas. The toxic gas monitoring systems are interlocked to gas shutoff valves and have both low and high level alarms. In-use process gases are stored in exhausted cabinets. All chemicals and gases are segregated by chemical type. The processes are organized into eight sector areas that consist of photolithography, wet processes, dry etch, ion implant, metals, diffusion, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chemical mechanical polishing (CW). Each morning, engineering, safety and facilities personnel meet to review the equipment and wafer lot status and discuss processing issues. Hazards are assessed in the MDL with periodic walkthroughs, continuous toxic and pyrophoric gas monitoring and personal monitoring. All chemicals and gases proposed for use in the MDL are reviewed by the industrial hygienist and must be approved by a manager before they are purchased. All new equipment and processes are reviewed by a hazard and barrier committee and cannot be used in the MDL without the committee`s approval and an IH hazard assessment. Overall risk of operating the MDL has been reduced to a level that is as low as reasonable achievable for this research facility.

Benton, M.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Restoration of areas disturbed by site studies for a mined commercial radioactive waste repository: The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) was undertaken to environmentally characterize a portion of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State as a potential host for the nation's first mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Studies were terminated by Congress in 1987. Between 1976 and 1987, 72 areas located across the Hanford Site were disturbed by the BWIP. These areas include borehole pads, a large Exploratory Shaft Facility, and the Near Surface Test Facility. Most boreholes were cleared of vegetation, leveled, and stabilized with a thick layer of compacted pit-run gravel and sand. The Near Surface Test Facility consists of three mined adits, a rock-spoils bench, and numerous support facilities. Restoration began in 1988 with the objective of returning sites to pre-existing conditions using native species. The Hanford Site retains some of the last remnants of the shrub-steppe ecosystem in Washington. The primary constraints to restoring native vegetation at Hanford are low precipitation and the presence of cheatgrass, an extremely capable alien competitor. 5 figs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Biehert, R.W.; Newell, R.L.; Page, T.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

1999 INEEL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1999. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1999, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers, cabinets

Boynton, Walter R.

453

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers

Boynton, Walter R.

454

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System Facilities Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System ­ Facilities Center I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: Facilities Management System - FacilityCenter 2. IT System Sponsor: Office. IT System Manager: Michelle T. Gooch, Facilities Management Systems Manager 5. PIA Author: Michelle T. Gooch

Mathis, Wayne N.

455

Base closure: Environmental concerns for transfer of a ``GOCO`` facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Faced with funding restrictions, cutbacks and fiscal restraints, the United States Department of Defense (DOD), over the next few years will be required to downsize its military personnel and equipment and divest or transfer some of its facilities. A program of procedures used to assess the environmental conditions of a government facility for transfer to non-federal ownership is required. An environmental site assessment or an Environmental Baseline Survey (EBS) is a program that can be used to evaluate the environmental conditions at a facility and whether it is in compliance with existing environmental regulations. An EBS will be required at both the large military bases and the smaller Government Owned Contractor Operated (GOCO) facilities. This presentation focuses on a case study of an EBS conducted at a GOCO facility in the upper midwest. The unique challenge offered at this site, as opposed to other military bases, is that the property consisted primarily of manufacturing areas. The use of hazardous substances and petroleum products by several defense contractors over the years resulted in environmental concerns that may have affected soil and ground water. Since this site is one of the first divestitures of a GOCO facility, the data collection process, environmental findings, recommendations and unique problems associated with a GOCO facility can serve as a model for future GOCO divestitures.

Henderson, M.R.; Dent, M.J.; McLaurin, E.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Facilities Management CAD Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facilities Management CAD Standards 2011 #12;Facilities Management CAD Standards Providing: Layering Standards 2.1 Layer Name Format 2.2 Layer Name Modifiers 2.3 Layer Attributes 2.4 Special Layer of PDF and DWG Files APPENDIX A: DAL FM CAD Standard Layers APPENDIX B: DAL FM CAD Special Layers

Brownstone, Rob

457

Cornell University Facilities Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requirements, building code, and sustainability objectives. This plan takes a long- term view, projecting workCornell University Facilities Services Contract Colleges Facilities Fernow and Rice Hall in Fernow, Rice, Bruckner, Bradfield and Plant Science buildings. It includes a surging and phasing plan

Manning, Sturt

458

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 ANNUAL REPORT S C I E N C E P O W E R E D B Y S U P E R C O M P U T I N G ANL-11/15 The Argonne Leadership Computing States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees

Kemner, Ken

459

A Materials Facilities Initiative -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

460

Nanotechnology User Facility for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A National Nanotechnology User Facility for Industry Academia Government #12;The National Institute of Commerce's nanotechnology user facility. The CNST enables innovation by providing rapid access to the tools new measurement and fabrication methods in response to national nanotechnology needs. www

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Science &Technology Facilities Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Science & Technology Facilities Council invite you to The ESA Technology Transfer Network SpaceTech2012Science &Technology Facilities Council Innovations Issue 31 October 2012 This issue: 1 STFC International prize for `no needles' breast cancer diagnosis technique 6 CEOI Challenge Workshop ­ Current

462

Emergency Facilities and Equipment  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

463

Example process hazard analysis of a Department of Energy water chlorination process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On February 24, 1992, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released a revised version of Section 29 Code of Federal Regulations CFR Part 1910 that added Section 1910.119, entitled ``Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (the PSM Rule). Because US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 5480.4 and 5483.1A prescribe OSHA 29 CFR 1910 as a standard in DOE, the PSM Rule is mandatory in the DOE complex. A major element in the PSM Rule is the process hazard analysis (PrHA), which is required for all chemical processes covered by the PSM Rule. The PrHA element of the PSM Rule requires the selection and application of appropriate hazard analysis methods to systematically identify hazards and potential accident scenarios associated with processes involving highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs). The analysis in this report is an example PrHA performed to meet the requirements of the PSM Rule. The PrHA method used in this example is the hazard and operability (HAZOP) study, and the process studied is the new Hanford 300-Area Water Treatment Facility chlorination process, which is currently in the design stage. The HAZOP study was conducted on May 18--21, 1993, by a team from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Battelle-Columbus, the DOE, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The chlorination process was chosen as the example process because it is common to many DOE sites, and because quantities of chlorine at those sites generally exceed the OSHA threshold quantities (TQs).

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Enhancement factors for resuspended aerosol radioactivity: Effects of topsoil disturbance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enhancement factor for airborne radionuclides resuspended by wind is defined as the ratio of the activity density (Bq g{sup {minus}1}) in the aerosol to the activity density in the underlying surface of contaminated soil. Enhancement factors are useful for assessment of worst-case exposure scenarios and transport conditions, and are one of the criteria for setting environmental standards for radioactivity in soil. This paper presents results of experimental studies where resuspension of {sup 239}Pu was measured when air concentrations were equilibrated to the soil surface. Enhancement factors were observed for several types of man-made disturbances (bulldozer-blading, soil raking, vacuum-cleaning) and natural disturbances (springtime thaw, soil-drying, wildfire). For some cases, enhancement factors are compared over range of geographical locations (Bikini Atoll, California, Nevada, and South Carolina). The particle-size distributions of aerosol activity are compared to particle-size distributions of the underlying soil.

Shinn, J.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Grand Junction projects office mixed-waste treatment program, VAC*TRAX mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented VAC*TRAX mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses an indirectly heated, batch vacuum dryer to thermally desorb organic compounds from mixed wastes. This process hazards analysis evaluated 102 potential hazards. The three significant hazards identified involved the inclusion of oxygen in a process that also included an ignition source and fuel. Changes to the design of the MTU were made concurrent with the hazard identification and analysis; all hazards with initial risk rankings of 1 or 2 were reduced to acceptable risk rankings of 3 or 4. The overall risk to any population group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

Bloom, R.R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

Wasserman, Stephen R. (Darien, IL); Anderson, Kenneth B. (Lisle, IL); Song, Kang (Woodridge, IL); Yuchs, Steven E. (Naperville, IL); Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

The effects of sample disturbance on preconsolidation pressure for normally consolidated and overconsolidated clays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sample disturbance has always been a particularly challenging topic in Geotechnical Engineering exercise. The effect and importance of disturbance on stress-strain history and undrained shear strength of soft clays are ...

Kontopoulos, Nikolaos S. (Nikolaos Stefanos)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Department of Residential Facilities Facilities Student Employment Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Residential Facilities Facilities Student Employment Office 1205E Leonardtown Service Updated 3/09 #12;EMPLOYMENT HISTORY Have you worked for Residential Facilities before? Yes No If so list

Hill, Wendell T.

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent fire disturbed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

landscapes. Keywords Fire ecology Forest disturbance Climate ... of landscape pattern and vegetation heterogeneity (Foster et al. ... Source: Grissino-Mayer,...

470

Consequences of habitat disturbance and recovery to recruitment and the abundance of kelp forest fishes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consequences of habitat disturbance and recovery to recruitment and the abundance of kelp forest: Disturbance Kelp forest Macrocystis pyrifera Recovery Recruitment Reef fishes The complete or partial removal of kelp forests due to disturbance can alter species composition and cause large reductions

Anderson, Todd

471

Los Alamos National Laboratory corregated metal pipe saw facility preliminary safety analysis report. Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Safety Analysis Report addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and design operation of the processing systems in the Corrugated Metal Pipe Saw Facility with respect to normal and abnormal conditions. Potential hazards are identified, credible accidents relative to the operation of the facility and the process systems are analyzed, and the consequences of postulated accidents are presented. The risk associated with normal operations, abnormal operations, and natural phenomena are analyzed. The accident analysis presented shows that the impact of the facility will be acceptable for all foreseeable normal and abnormal conditions of operation. Specifically, under normal conditions the facility will have impacts within the limits posted by applicable DOE guidelines, and in accident conditions the facility will similarly meet or exceed the requirements of all applicable standards. 16 figs., 6 tabs.

NONE

1990-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

472

Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of the Solid-State Laser System for the Accelerator Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User's Meeting April 3, 2009 Outline Motivation for...

473

Personnel Selection, Training, Qualification, and Certification Requirements for DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes selection, training, qualification, and certification requirements for contractor personnel who can impact the safety basis through their involvement in the operation, maintenance, and technical support of Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 5480.20A. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-29-13.

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

474

Personnel Selection, Training, Qualification, and Certification Requirements for DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes selection, training, qualification, and certification requirements for contractor personnel who can impact the safety basis through their involvement in the operation, maintenance, and technical support of Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 5480.20A. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-29-13, cancels DOE O 426.2.

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

475

EIS-0133: Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy’s San Francisco Operations Office developed this statement to analyze the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts of alternatives for constructing and operating a Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility for nonradioactive (hazardous and nonhazardous) mixed and radioactive wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

476

EA-1957: Cabin Creek Biomass Facility, Placer County, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is proposing to provide funding to Placer County, California to construct and operate a two-megawatt wood-to-energy biomass facility at the Eastern Regional Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) and Landfill in unincorporated Placer County. The wood?to?energy biomass facility would use a gasification technology. The fuel supply for the proposed project would be solely woody biomass, derived from a variety of sources including hazardous fuels residuals, forest thinning and harvest residuals, and Wildland Urban Interface sourced waste materials from residential and commercial property defensible space clearing and property management activities. NOTE: After review of a final California Environmental Quality Act Environmental Impact Report, DOE has determined that preparation of an EA is not necessary. The propsed action fits within DOE's categorical exclusion B5.20. Therefore, this EA is cancelled.

477

HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

Leishear, R

2010-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

478

Magma simulation facility design considerations, capabilities, and operational considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-pressure, high temperature (60 Kpsi or 413.6 MPa/1600/sup 0/C) facility described is being used for molten rock (magma) experiments and metallurgical pressure bonding experiments. The unique design of the facility will accommodate samples as large as 10 cm dia. by 10 cm in height in an isothermal (+-4/sup 0/C at 1400/sup 0/C and 44 Kpsi or 303.3 MPa) cylindrical hot zone. The facility history, capabilities, and operational considerations are thoroughly discussed with appropriate illustrations. Since the system-contained energy while operating is approximately 1 x 10/sup 6/ ft-lbs (1.356 x 10/sup 6/ N-m) or 0.7 lbs (318 g) TNT equivalent, considerable discussion is related to hazards analysis and protection of the equipment and the operating personnel from damage caused by nonstandard conditions (interrupted H/sub 2/O flow, power outage, overpressure, etc.).

Wemple, R.P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Robots, systems, and methods for hazard evaluation and visualization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robot includes a hazard sensor, a locomotor, and a system controller. The robot senses a hazard intensity at a location of the robot, moves to a new location in response to the hazard intensity, and autonomously repeats the sensing and moving to determine multiple hazard levels at multiple locations. The robot may also include a communicator to communicate the multiple hazard levels to a remote controller. The remote controller includes a communicator for sending user commands to the robot and receiving the hazard levels from the robot. A graphical user interface displays an environment map of the environment proximate the robot and a scale for indicating a hazard intensity. A hazard indicator corresponds to a robot position in the environment map and graphically indicates the hazard intensity at the robot position relative to the scale.

Nielsen, Curtis W.; Bruemmer, David J.; Walton, Miles C.; Hartley, Robert S.; Gertman, David I.; Kinoshita, Robert A.; Whetten, Jonathan

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

482

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

FSAR fire accident analysis for a plutonium facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for a plutonium facility as required by DOE Orders 5480.23 and 5480.22 has recently been completed and approved. The facility processes and stores radionuclides such as Pu-238, Pu-239, enriched uranium, and to a lesser degree other actinides. This facility produces heat sources. DOE Order 5480.23 and DOE-STD-3009-94 require analysis of different types of accidents (operational accidents such as fires, explosions, spills, criticality events, and natural phenomena such as earthquakes). The accidents that were analyzed quantitatively, or the Evaluation Basis Accidents (EBAs), were selected based on a multi-step screening process that utilizes extensively the Hazards Analysis (HA) performed for the facility. In the HA, specific accident scenarios, with estimated frequency and consequences, were developed for each identified hazard associated with facility operations and activities. Analysis of the EBAs and comparison of their consequences to the evaluation guidelines established the safety envelope for the facility and identified the safety-class structures, systems, and components. This paper discusses the analysis of the fire EBA. This fire accident was analyzed in relatively great detail in the FSAR because of its potential off-site consequences are more severe compared to other events. In the following, a description of the scenario is first given, followed by a brief summary of the methodology for calculating the source term. Finally, the author discuss how a key parameter affecting the source term, the leakpath factor, was determined, which is the focus of this paper.

Lam, K.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel.

Kelly, K.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

485

Photovoltaic Research Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) at its national laboratory facilities located throughout the country. To encourage further innovation,...

486

NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

None

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

487

NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's electricity from renewable resources by 2010. The Guidebook outlines eligibility and legal requirementsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ` NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK March 2007 CEC-300 Executive Director Heather Raitt Technical Director RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

488

NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK APRIL 2006 CEC-300 Director Heather Raitt Technical Director Renewable Energy Program Drake Johnson Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency, Renewables, and Demand Analysis Division #12;These

489

Liquidity facilities and signaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

Arregui, Nicolás

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

None

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

491

Cornell University Facilities Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Description: The Large Animal Teaching Complex (LATC) will be a joint facility for the College of Veterinary or increase operating costs of the dairy barn; therefore, the College of Veterinary Medicine has agreed

Manning, Sturt

492

Facilities Management Department Restructuring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Zone 2 ­ Mission Bay/East Side: Includes Mission Bay, Mission Center Bldg, Buchanan Dental, Hunters Point, 654 Minnesota, Oyster Point 2. Recommendation that UCSF align all Facility Services and O

Mullins, Dyche

493

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in...

494

Pollution Control Facilities (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For the purpose of this legislation, pollution control facilities are defined as any facilities designed for the elimination, mitigation or prevention of air or water pollution, including all...

495

Compliance of SLAC_s Laser Safety Program with OSHA Requirements for the Control of Hazardous Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SLAC's COHE program requires compliance with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, 'The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)'. This regulation specifies lockout/tagout requirements during service and maintenance of equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment, or release of stored energy, could cause injury to workers. Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE consideration. This paper describes how COHE is achieved at SLAC to protect workers against unexpected Class 3B or Class 4 laser radiation, independent of whether the mode of operation is normal, service, or maintenance.

Woods, Michael; /SLAC

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

496

Safety of Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Full text of publication follows: ensuring safety during all stages of facility life cycle is a widely recognised responsibility of the operators, implemented under the supervision of the regulatory body and other competent authorities. As the majority of the facilities worldwide are still in operation or shutdown, there is no substantial experience in decommissioning and evaluation of safety during decommissioning in majority of Member States. The need for cooperation and exchange of experience and good practices on ensuring and evaluating safety of decommissioning was one of the outcomes of the Berlin conference in 2002. On this basis during the last three years IAEA initiated a number of international projects that can assist countries, in particular small countries with limited resources. The main IAEA international projects addressing safety during decommissioning are: (i) DeSa Project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning; (ii) R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P project on Research Reactors Decommissioning Demonstration Project; and (iii) Project on Evaluation and Decommissioning of Former Facilities that used Radioactive Material in Iraq. This paper focuses on the DeSa Project activities on (i) development of a harmonised methodology for safety assessment for decommissioning; (ii) development of a procedure for review of safety assessments; (iii) development of recommendations on application of the graded approach to the performance and review of safety assessments; and (iv) application of the methodology and procedure to the selected real facilities with different complexities and hazard potentials (a nuclear power plant, a research reactor and a nuclear laboratory). The paper also outlines the DeSa Project outcomes and planned follow-up activities. It also summarises the main objectives and activities of the Iraq Project and introduces the R{sup 2}D{sup 2} Project, which is a subject of a complementary paper.

Batandjieva, B.; Warnecke, E.; Coates, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

497

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, June 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS. The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) underground testing between 1951 and 1992, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing (DOE, 1996a). No nuclear tests have been conducted since September 23,1992 (DOE, 2000), however; radionuclides remaining on the soil surface in many NTS areas after several decades of radioactive decay are re-suspended into the atmosphere at concentrations that can be detected by air sampling. Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (formerly called the Hazardous Materials Spill Center), private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses; handling, transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices or radioactive targets for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun; and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE, 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in calendar year (CY) 2004 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and water pumped from wells used to characterize the aquifers at the sites of past underground nuclear tests, (2) onsite radioanalytical laboratories, (3) the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS facilities, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium (H{sup 3}) and re-suspension of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) and americium ({sup 241}Am) at the sites of past nuclear tests. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). At the NLVF, parts of Building A-1 were contaminated with tritium by a previous contractor in 1995. The incident involved the release of tritium as HTO. This unusual occurrence led to a very small potential exposure to an offsite person. The HTO emission has continued at lower levels (probably re-emanation from building materials), even after cleanup activities in November and December 1997. A description of the incident and the potential effective dose equivalent (EDE) for offsite exposure are set forth in Appendix A.

Robert F. Grossman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout Millersville University - Office Of Environmental Health & Safety Scope & Application The Lockout/Tagout program applies to the control of energy during servicing of this program is to establish procedures for affixing appropriate lockout or tagout devices to energy

Hardy, Christopher R.

499

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous and radioactive mixed waste policies and requirements and to implement the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) within the framework of the environmental programs established under DOE O 5400.1. This directive does not cancel any directives.

1989-02-22T23:59:59.000Z