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1

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The

2

Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

3

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

4

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact SheetLegal Abstract Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet,...

5

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY Project 39GF71024-GPDI21000000 . PANTEX PLANT AMARILLO, TEXAS DOE/EA-0688 JUNE 1993 MASTER DiSTRiBUTiON OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITEI) ffrl TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 Need for Action 1 2.0 Description of Proposed Facility Action 3.0 Location of the Action 8 4.0 Alternatives to Proposed Action 9 4.1 No Action 9 4.2 Redesign and Modify Existing staging Facilities 9 4.3 Use Other Existing Space at Pantex Plant 9 4.4 Use Temporary Structures 9 4.5 Stage Waste at Other Sites 10 4.6 Stage Wastes Separately 10 5.0 Environmental Impacts of Proposed Action 10 5.1 Archeology 10 5.2 FloodplainlW etlands 10 5.3 Threatened and Endangered Species 10 5.4 Surrounding La,nd Use 11 5.5 Construction 11 5.6 Air Emissions 11

6

EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, 688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct the Hazardous Waste Staging Facility that would help to alleviate capacity problems as well as provide a single compliant facility to stage wastes at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 29, 1993 EA-0688: Finding of No Significant Impact Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas January 29, 1993 EA-0688: Final Environmental Assessment Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

7

Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level nuclear waste facilities. This legislation describes the factors considered by the Board in making siting decisions. The Board is authorized to enact rules and regulations pertaining to the siting of hazardous and low-level nuclear

8

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by B&W Technical Services, Pantex and Pro2Serve October, 2011

9

Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities Andrew Maham, Tom Houston, Carl J. Costantino DOE NPH Meeting, Germantown, MD October 2014

10

Protocol, High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 Protocol, High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 November 2012 Protocol for High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight The purpose of this protocol is to establish the requirements and responsibilities for managing and conducting Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) independent oversight of high-hazard nuclear facility projects. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) self regulatory framework for safety and security, DOE Order 227.1, Independent Oversight Program, assigns HSS the responsibility for implementing an independent oversight program. It also requires the HSS Office of Enforcement and Oversight to conduct independent evaluations of safety and security. This

11

WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Update  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) was issued on October 27, 1999 [1]. Since that time, the WIPP has sought modifications to clarify the permit language, provide alternative methods for meeting permit requirements and to update permit conditions. Significant advancements have been made in transuranic (TRU) waste management as the result of modifications to the HWFP. Among these advancements is a modification to obtain a drum age criteria (DAC) value to perform headspace gas sampling on drums to be super-compacted and placed in a 100-gallon overpack drum. In addition, the Section 311 permit modification request that would allow for more efficient waste characterization, and the modification to authorize the shipment and disposal of Remote-Handled (RH) TRU waste were merged together and submitted to the regulator as the Consolidated Permit Modification Request (PMR). The submittal of the Consolidated PMR came at the request of the regulator as part of responses to Notices of Deficiency (NODs) for the separate PMRs which had been submitted in previous years. Section 311 of the fiscal year 2004 Energy and Water Developments Appropriations Act (Public Law 108-137) [2] directs the Department of Energy to submit a permit modification that limits waste confirmation to radiography or visual examination of a statistical subpopulation of containers. Section 311 also specifically directs that disposal room performance standards be to be met by monitoring for volatile organic compounds in the underground disposal rooms. This statute translates into the elimination of other waste confirmation methods such as headspace gas sampling and analysis and solids sampling and analysis. These methods, as appropriate, will continue to be used by the generator sites during hazardous waste determinations or characterization activities. This modification is expected to reduce the overall cost of waste analysis by hundreds of millions of dollars [3]. Combining both the chap. 311 and RH TRU waste permit modification requests allows for both the regulator and DOE to expedite action on the modification requests. The Combined PMR reduces costs by having only one administrative process for both modification requests. (authors)

Kehrman, B.; Most, W. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, 4021 National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

13

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Siting (Connecticut) Facilities Siting (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure,

14

ALTERNATE APPROACH TO HAZARD CATEGORIZATION FOR SALTSTONE FACILITY AT SRS  

SciTech Connect

The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) was originally segmented into two segments: the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Based on the inventory of radionuclides available for release the SPF and SDF were categorized as Nonreactor Hazard Category (HC)-3. The hazard categorization recognized the SDF will contain contributions of radionuclides which would exceed the HC-2 Threshold Quantity (TQ) in the form of grout. However it was determined not to impact the facility hazard categorization based on the grout being in a solid, monolithic form which was not easily dispersible. But, the impact of a quantity of unset grout expected to be present at the vault following operation of the process was not addressed. A Potential Inadequacy in Safety Analysis (PISA) was later issued based on the hazard categorization determination for the facility not addressing unset grout. This initiated a re-evaluation of the accident scenarios within the hazards analysis. During this re-evaluation, the segmentation of the facility was challenged based on the potential interaction between facility segments; specifically, the leachate return line and the grout transfer line, which were considered separate segments, are located in close proximity at one point. such that for certain events (NPH as well as External Vehicle Impact) both could be damaged simultaneously and spill contents on the ground that could commingle. This would violate the guideline for segmentation. Therefore, the Hazard Categorization (HC) was reevaluated based on the facility being a single segment and including the additional unset grout as part of total inventory. This total inventory far exceeded the limit for HC-2 TQ and made the facility's initial categorization as HC-2. However, alternative analysis methodology based on credible release fractions allowed in DOE-STD-1027-92 (Ref.1) showed that the Saltstone facility could still be categorized as Hazard Category 3 Nuclear Facility with no segmentation. Since it was the first time any facility at SRS tried this alternate approach safety analyst had to face substantial resistance and reservations from both the facility and local DOE customers which were eventually overcome with approval and acceptance from DOE-HQ.

Roy, B.

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Natural hazards phenomena mitigation with respect to seismic hazards at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the seismic hazard for design of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), a facility designed for the disposal of wastes generated during the cleanup of Hanford Site aggregate areas. The preferred ERDF site is located south and east of 200 East and 200 West Areas. The Washington State Groundwater Protection Program (WAC 173-303-806 (4)(a)(xxi)) requires that the characteristics of local and regional hydrogeology be defined. A plan for that work has been developed (Weekes and Borghese 1993). In addition, WAC 173-303-282 provides regulatory guidance on siting a dangerous waste facility, and US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.28 requires consideration of natural phenomena hazards mitigation for DOE sites and facilities. This report provides information to evaluate the ERDF site with respect to seismic hazard. The ERDF will be a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) as defined by 40 CFR 260.10.

Reidel, S.P.

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hazard classification criteria for non-nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories` Integrated Risk Management Department has developed a process for establishing the appropriate hazard classification of a new facility or operation, and thus the level of rigor required for the associated authorization basis safety documentation. This process is referred to as the Preliminary Hazard Screen. DOE Order 5481.1B contains the following hazard classification for non-nuclear facilities: high--having the potential for onsite or offsite impacts to large numbers of persons or for major impacts to the environment; moderate--having the potential for considerable onsite impacts but only minor offsite impacts to people or the environment; low--having the potential for only minor onsite and negligible offsite impacts to people or the environment. It is apparent that the application of such generic criteria is more than likely to be fraught with subjective judgment. One way to remove the subjectivity is to define health and safety classification thresholds for specific hazards that are based on the magnitude of the hazard, rather than on a qualitative assessment of possible accident consequences. This paper presents the results of such an approach to establishing a readily usable set of non-nuclear facility hazard classifications.

Mahn, J.A.; Walker, S.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Radiological hazard classification of DOE facilities by DOE STD-1027-92: LANL nuclear facility list  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos facilities containing significant radiological hazards have been reclassified according to DOE-SID 1027-92, a recently issued guide for hazard classification. DOE-STD 1027-92 was provided in support of DOE Order 5480.23 to identify which facilities would be governed under DOE 5480.23 requirements; these would presumably be called nuclear facilities. This new classification has affected the original list of 18 LANL nuclear facilities by increasing it to 39. It has also lowered the classification of TA-55-4, the plutonium processing facility containing highest intrinsic hazard at LANL, from the highest classification to an intermediate classification. This presentation addresses the impact of these changes in the nuclear facility list in the areas of radiological health, safety analysis documentation, and risk management.

Elder, J.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Radiological hazard classification of DOE facilities by DOE STD-1027-92: LANL nuclear facility list  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos facilities containing significant radiological hazards have been reclassified according to DOE-SID 1027-92, a recently issued guide for hazard classification. DOE-STD 1027-92 was provided in support of DOE Order 5480.23 to identify which facilities would be governed under DOE 5480.23 requirements; these would presumably be called nuclear facilities. This new classification has affected the original list of 18 LANL nuclear facilities by increasing it to 39. It has also lowered the classification of TA-55-4, the plutonium processing facility containing highest intrinsic hazard at LANL, from the highest classification to an intermediate classification. This presentation addresses the impact of these changes in the nuclear facility list in the areas of radiological health, safety analysis documentation, and risk management.

Elder, J.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 400  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 72 Volts DC currents < 450 Amps Lifting < 75 lbs Supplies mounted in NEMA enclosures Rack doors locked Power source signage 120/208 VAC covered Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1,7 31020101-00025 3108-00006 310202-00089 3102-00064 2202-00006 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits 6, 7 NA NA NA A ASD108/400 Hi Power DC Power Supply DC voltages < 72 Volts DC currents < 2600 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Supplies built in NEMA enclosures

20

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 420  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 300 Volts DC currents < 500 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 2202-00006 2402-00002 240201-00002 240202-00003 240204-00003 31020101-00025 2202-00004 2202-00006 2202-00009 220209-00057 31020101-00025 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 413  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13 13 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 200 Volts DC currents < 200 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 1110-00124 31020101-00025 1110-00125 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits 6, 7 NA NA NA A ASD108/400 GESPAC Power Supply Control Units 120 VAC Fans Fan blades covered 1, 7 Power Supplies Hot Work Permit

22

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 412  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 300 Volts DC currents < 500 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 2502-00005 2502-00006 2502-00007 2502-00008 2502-00010 250201-00028 250202-00001 2502-00006 2502-00007 250206-00007 2202-00006 2202-00009 250203-00006 250204-00002 250205-00004

23

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Fire Hazard Analysis assesses the risk from fire within individual fire areas in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Hanford Site in relation to existing or proposed fire protection features to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE Order 5480.7A Fire Protection are met.

JOHNSON, B.H.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1020-2012 December 2012 _________________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1020-2002 DOE STANDARD Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1020-2012 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1020-2012 i Foreword Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards

25

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1020-2012 December 2012 _________________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1020-2002 DOE STANDARD Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1020-2012 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1020-2012 i Foreword Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards

26

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Surface Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report-Constructor Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Facility Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment; Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R.E. Flye

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

29

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by and October, 2011 Presentation Outline I. Introductions II. Pantex III. 10 Year Update IV. Final Results V. July 2010 Event VI. Emergency Planning VII.What's Next Pantex The Pantex Plant, located 17 miles northeast of Amarillo, Texas, in Carson County, is charged with maintaining the safety, security and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. Worked performed at Pantex supports three core missions. * Stockpile Stewardship * Nonproliferation and * Safeguards and Security Pantex (cont.) - Location Pantex (cont.) - Weather Patterns * Precipitation is typical for Southwest climate, mainly in the form of Spring and

30

Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

URS Consultants, Inc.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Improvements--2007 Update  

SciTech Connect

The most significant changes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit to date were completed during the past year with the implementation of significant revisions to the Waste Analysis Plan and the authorization to dispose of remote-handled transuranic waste. The modified Permit removes the requirement for reporting headspace gas sampling and analysis results for every container of transuranic mixed waste and provides for the use of radiography and visual examination to confirm a statistically representative subpopulation of the waste stream in each waste shipment as well as other changes that streamline the analytical data management process. Implementation began on November 17, 2006. (authors)

Kehrman, R.; Most, W. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Design characteristics for facilities which process hazardous particulate  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory is establishing a research and processing capability for beryllium. The unique properties of beryllium, including light weight, rigidity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and nuclear properties make it critical to a number of US defense and aerospace programs. Concomitant with the unique engineering properties are the health hazards associated with processing beryllium in a particulate form and the potential for worker inhalation of aerosolized beryllium. Beryllium has the lowest airborne standard for worker protection compared to all other nonradioactive metals by more than an order of magnitude. This paper describes the design characteristics of the new beryllium facility at Los Alamos as they relate to protection of the workforce. Design characteristics to be reviewed include; facility layout, support systems to minimize aerosol exposure and spread, and detailed review of the ventilation system design for general room air cleanliness and extraction of particulate at the source.

Abeln, S.P.; Creek, K.; Salisbury, S.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.1 - What Level of Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Does  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.1 - What Level of Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Does GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.1 - What Level of Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Does the Facility Require < GRR‎ | Elements Jump to: navigation, search Edit 18-CA-b.1 - What Level of Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Does the Facility Require California employs a five-tier permitting program which imposes regulatory requirements matching the degree of risk posed by the level of hazardous waste: * The Full Permit Tier includes all facilities requiring a RCRA permit as well as selected non-RCRA activities under Title 22 California Code of Regulations. * The Standardized Permit Tier includes facilities that manage waste not regulated by RCRA, but regulated as hazardous waste in California. * Onsite Treatment Permits (3-Tiered) includes onsite treatment of non-RCRA waste regulated in California.

34

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying facility (CVD) Facility  

SciTech Connect

The CVDF is a nonreactor nuclear facility that will process the Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) presently stored in the 105-KE and 105-KW SNF storage basins. Multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) will be loaded (filled) with K Basin fuel transported to the CVDF. The MCOs will be processed at the CVDF to remove free water from the fuel cells (packages). Following processing at the CVDF, the MCOs will be transported to the CSB for interim storage until a long-term storage solution can be implemented. This operation is expected to start in November 2000. A Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is required for all new facilities and all nonreactor nuclear facilities, in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection. This FHA has been prepared in accordance with DOE 5480.7A and HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazard Analysis Requirements. Additionally, requirements or criteria contained in DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) RL Implementing Directive (RLID) 5480.7, Fire Protection, or other DOE documentation are cited, as applicable. This FHA comprehensively assesses the risk of fire at the CVDF to ascertain whether the specific objectives of DOE 5480.7A are met. These specific fire protection objectives are: (1) Minimize the potential for the occurrence of a fire. (2) Ensure that fire does not cause an onsite or offsite release of radiological and other hazardous material that will threaten the public health and safety or the environment. (3) Establish requirements that will provide an acceptable degree of life safety to DOE and contractor personnel and ensure that there are no undue hazards to the public from fire and its effects in DOE facilities. (4) Ensure that vital DOE programs will not suffer unacceptable delays as a result of fire and related perils. (5) Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. (6) Ensure that process control and safety systems are not damaged by fire or related perils. This FHA is based on the facility as constructed and with planned operation at the time of document preparation. Changes in facility planned and actual operation require that the identified fire risks associated with the CVDF be re-evaluated. Consequently, formal documentation and future revision of this FHA may be required.

SINGH, G.

2000-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

35

Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear Facilities from Category 3 to Radiological  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Nuclear Safety Technical Position NSTP 2002-2 Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear Facilities from Category 3 to Radiological Issue: DOE-STD-1027-92 defines a lower threshold criterion for preliminary hazard categorization as a nuclear Hazard Category 3 (HC-3) facility or activity. But it does not provide a method other than inventory reduction or segmentation on how an HC-3 facility or activity can be demonstrated to be below HC-3 (i.e., radiological) in final hazard categorization. Background: 10 CFR 830 Subpart B requires that all DOE nuclear facilities categorized as HC-3 or above have a DOE approved safety basis compliant with the requirements of Subpart B. The rule requires the use of DOE-

36

Guide for the Mitigation of Natural Phenomena Hazards for DOE Nuclear Facilities and NonNuclear Facilities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This document provides guidance in implementing the Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation requirements of DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.4, "Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation." This Guide does not establish or invoke any new requirements. Any apparent conflicts arising from the NPH guidance would defer to the requirements in DOE O 420.1. No cancellation.

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

37

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

GRR/Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit GRR/Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit 18MTBHazardousWasteFacilityPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated Title 75, Chapter 10, Part 4 Administrative Rules of Montana Title 17, Chapter 53 40 CFR 260 through 40 CFR 270 40 CFR 124 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18MTBHazardousWasteFacilityPermit.pdf 18MTBHazardousWasteFacilityPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

39

M-Area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring report -- first quarter 1994. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during first quarter 1994 as required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. During first quarter 1994, 42 point-of-compliance (POC) wells at the M-Area HWMF were sampled for drinking water parameters.

Evans, C.S.; Washburn, F.; Jordan, J.; Van Pelt, R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards not found in most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards or steel reinforced concrete, these ferromagnetic materials may have an effect on the magnetic field environmental temperature control is required (2) Structural support for heavy equipment and vibration control

Maroncelli, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Category 3 threshold quantities for hazard categorization of nonreactor facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the information necessary to determine Hazard Category 3 threshold quantities for those isotopes of interest not listed in WHC-CM-4-46, Section 4, Table 1.''Threshold Quantities.''

Mandigo, R.L.

1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 400-EAA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-EAA -EAA Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References Blue Oven Temperature to 600° F voltage 208 VAC Signage 1 NA 6, 7 Physical Agents Training NA NA NA A ASD108/400 Compressed Air Line 65-130 PSI Regulator Pressure relief NA NA 6, 7 ESH119 NA NA A ASD108/400 Various Shop Tools (lathe, drill press, grinder, belt sander, shears, hand tools) Eye hazard Pinch points Abrasive Rotating machinery 120 VAC Hydraulic pressure Guarding Anti-restart devices 1 NA 6, 7 NA NA NA A ASD108/400 Water Flow Test Stand Pressure Slip hazard NA

43

Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities (TSDF...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities (TSDF) Guidance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook:...

44

GRR/Section 18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) 18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-CA-b - RCRA Process (Hazardous Waste Facility Permit) 18CABRCRAProcess (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances Control Regulations & Policies Resource Conservation and Recovery Act 40 CRF 261 Title 22, California Code of Regulations, Division 4.5 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18CABRCRAProcess (2).pdf 18CABRCRAProcess (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

45

Fire hazards analysis for the uranium oxide (UO{sub 3}) facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) documents the deactivation end-point status of the UO{sub 3} complex fire hazards, fire protection and life safety systems. This FHA has been prepared for the Uranium Oxide Facility by Westinghouse Hanford Company in accordance with the criteria established in DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection and RLID 5480.7, Fire Protection. The purpose of the Fire Hazards Analysis is to comprehensively and quantitatively assess the risk from a fire within individual fire areas in a Department of Energy facility so as to ascertain whether the objectives stated in DOE Order 5480.7, paragraph 4 are met. Particular attention has been paid to RLID 5480.7, Section 8.3, which specifies the criteria for deactivating fire protection in decommission and demolition facilities.

Wyatt, D.M.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

Assessment of External Hazards at Radioactive Waste and Used Fuel Management Facilities - 13505  

SciTech Connect

One of the key lessons from the Fukushima accident is the importance of having a comprehensive identification and evaluation of risks posed by external events to nuclear facilities. While the primary focus has been on nuclear power plants, the Canadian nuclear industry has also been updating hazard assessments for radioactive waste and used fuel management facilities to ensure that lessons learnt from Fukushima are addressed. External events are events that originate either physically outside the nuclear site or outside its control. They include natural events, such as high winds, lightning, earthquakes or flood due to extreme rainfall. The approaches that have been applied to the identification and assessment of external hazards in Canada are presented and analyzed. Specific aspects and considerations concerning hazards posed to radioactive waste and used fuel management operations are identified. Relevant hazard identification techniques are described, which draw upon available regulatory guidance and standard assessment techniques such as Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPs) and 'What-if' analysis. Consideration is given to ensuring that hazard combinations (for example: high winds and flooding due to rainfall) are properly taken into account. Approaches that can be used to screen out external hazards, through a combination of frequency and impact assessments, are summarized. For those hazards that cannot be screened out, a brief overview of methods that can be used to conduct more detailed hazard assessments is also provided. The lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident have had a significant impact on specific aspects of the approaches used to hazard assessment for waste management. Practical examples of the effect of these impacts are provided. (authors)

Gerchikov, Mark; Schneider, Glenn; Khan, Badi; Alderson, Elizabeth [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)] [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Upgrades to meet LANL SF, 121-2011, hazardous waste facility permit requirements  

SciTech Connect

Members of San IIdefonso have requested information from LANL regarding implementation of the revision to LANL's Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (the RCRA Permit). On January 26, 2011, LANL staff from the Waste Disposition Project and the Environmental Protection Division will provide a status update to Pueblo members at the offices of the San IIdefonso Department of Environmental and Cultural Preservation. The Waste Disposition Project presentation will focus on upgrades and improvements to LANL waste management facilities at TA-50 and TA-54. The New Mexico Environment Department issued LANL's revised Hazardous Waste Facility permit on November 30, 2010 with a 30-day implementation period. The Waste Disposition Project manages and operates four of LANL's permitted facilities; the Waste Characterization, Reduction and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) at TA-SO, and Area G, Area L and the Radioassay and Nondestructive Testing facility (RANT) at TA-54. By implementing a combination of permanent corrective action activities and shorter-term compensatory measures, WDP was able to achieve functional compliance on December 30, 2010 with new Permit requirements at each of our facilities. One component of WOP's mission at LANL is centralized management and disposition of the Laboratory's hazardous and mixed waste. To support this mission objective, WOP has undertaken a project to upgrade our facilities and equipment to achieve fully compliant and efficient waste management operations. Upgrades to processes, equipment and facilities are being designed to provide defense-in-depth beyond the minimum, regulatory requirements where worker safety and protection of the public and the environment are concerned. Upgrades and improvements to enduring waste management facilities and operations are being designed so as not to conflict with future closure activities at Material Disposal Area G and Material Disposal Area L.

French, Sean B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johns - Hughes, Kathryn W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Hazard Classification of the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is constructing a new facility to replace remote-handled low-level radioactive waste disposal capability for INL and Naval Reactors Facility operations. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) will continue until the facility is full or closed for remediation (estimated at approximately fiscal year 2015). Development of a new onsite disposal facility is the highest ranked alternative and will provide RH-LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate RH-LLW for the foreseeable future. As a part of establishing a safety basis for facility operations, the facility will be categorized according to DOE-STD-1027-92. This classification is important in determining the scope of analyses performed in the safety basis and will also dictate operational requirements of the completed facility. This paper discusses the issues affecting hazard classification in this nuclear facility and impacts of the final hazard categorization.

Boyd D. Christensen

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Hazard Evaluation for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Sludge at the Solid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) storage basin clean-up project, sludge that has accumulated in the K Basins due to corrosion of damaged irradiated N Reactor will be loaded into containers and placed in interim storage. The Hanford Site Treatment Complex (T Plant) has been identified as the location where the sludge will be stored until final disposition of the material occurs. Long term storage of sludge from the K Basin fuel storage facilities requires identification and analysis of potential accidents involving sludge storage in T Plant. This report is prepared as the initial step in the safety assurance process described in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports and HNF-PRO-704, Hazards and Accident Analysis Process. This report documents the evaluation of potential hazards and off-normal events associated with sludge storage activities. This information will be used in subsequent safety analyses, design, and operations procedure development to ensure safe storage. The hazards evaluation for the storage of SNF sludge in T-Plant used the Hazards and Operability Analysis (HazOp) method. The hazard evaluation identified 42 potential hazardous conditions. No hazardous conditions involving hazardous/toxic chemical concerns were identified. Of the 42 items identified in the HazOp study, eight were determined to have potential for onsite worker consequences. No items with potential offsite consequences were identified in the HazOp study. Hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker or offsite consequences are candidates for quantitative consequence analysis. The hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker consequences were grouped into two event categories, Container failure due to overpressure - internal to T Plant, and Spill of multiple containers. The two event categories will be developed into accident scenarios that will be quantitatively analyzed to determine release consequences. A third category, Container failure due to overpressure--external to T Plant, was included for completeness but is not within the scope of the hazards evaluation. Container failures external to T Plant will be addressed as part of the transportation analysis. This document describes the HazOp analysis performed for the activities associated with the storage of SNF sludge in the T Plant.

SCHULTZ, M.V.

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Graded approach for initiating event selection in a facility hazard analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a methodology for selecting initiating events or event scenarios for the hazard analysis of a new Department of Energy (DOE) facility at the Nevada Test Site for nuclear explosive operations called the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). The selection process is a very important first step in conducting the hazard analysis for the facility, which in turn may feed into a quantitative risk analysis. A comprehensive risk analysis is dependent on the identification and inclusion of a complete set of initiating events in the analysis model. A systematic and logical method of grading or screening all the potential initiating events satisfies the needs for completeness within the bounds of efficiency and practicality. By applying the graded approach to the selection of the initiating events, the task and hazard analysis was able to focus its attention on only those events having the potential to develop into credible accident scenarios. Resources were concentrated into the understanding of those scenarios, and assuring that adequate positive measures are in place to control the risk associated with them.

Majumdar, K.; Altenbach, T.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) By: Integrated NPH Team: David Luke, Lead, TJSO Rusty Sprouse, JSA Michael A. Epps, TJSO Richard Korynta, TJSO

54

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-270-2080, Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a health hazard evaluation was conducted at the Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility (HSGF)(SIC-4953) concerning possible exposure to fly ash, combustion products and asbestos (1332214). The facility was a waste to energy site where municipal refuse was incinerated at approximately 1400 degrees-F. The steam generated was either sold directly or converted to electricity via an on site turbine. Employees used hard hats, safety shoes and glasses, work clothes and single use disposable dust and mist respirators. There was a potential for exposure to fly ash for employees working in the boiler and basement areas. Total particulate exposures ranged from 5 to llmg/m3 for laborers. The concentration of lead (7439921) exceeded the standards set by OSHA permissible exposure level of 0.05mg/kg in three of the personal breathing zone air samples. Amosite (12172735) and chrysotile (12001295) asbestos were identified in bulk samples of insulation and asbestos taken from a settled dust sample in the boiler area. Surface wipe samples indicated the possibility of hand to mouth contact with fly ash, particularly in the break and locker rooms. The author concludes that there is a need for reducing worker exposure to fly ash particulate. The author recommends engineering and work practice controls to reduce particulate exposures, increased cleaning and maintenance activities; and further evaluation of asbestos contamination at the facility.

Seitz, T.A.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-2002 0-2002 January 2002 Superseding DOE-STD-1020-94 April 1994 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS DESIGN AND EVALUATION CRITERIA FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1020-2002 iii Foreword This revision provides information to help meet the requirements of 10 CFR Part 830, "Nuclear

56

DOE-STD-3014-96; DOE Standard Accident Analysis For Aircraft Crash Into Hazardous Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE STANDARD DOE STANDARD October 1 996 Reaffirmation May 2006 ACCIDENT CRASH INTO ANALYSIS HAZARDOUS FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 AREA SAFT DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. FOR AIRCRAFT This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE97000162 DOE-STD-3014-96 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS PARAGRAPH PAGE FOREWORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

57

Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1995, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for selected heavy metals, field measurements, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Total organic halogens exceeded its Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criterion during first quarter 1995 as in fourth quarter 1994. Aluminum, iron, and manganese, which were not analyzed for during fourth quarter 1994, exceeded the Flag 2 criteria in at least two wells each during first quarter 1995. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting the determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Unit were also similar to previous quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Multiattribute utility analysis as a framework for public participation siting a hazardous waste facility  

SciTech Connect

How can the public play a role in decisions involving complicated scientific arguments? This paper describes a public participation exercise in which stakeholders used multiattribute utility analysis to select a site for a hazardous waste facility. Key to success was the ability to separate and address the two types of judgements inherent in environmental decisions: technical judgements on the likely consequences of alternative choices and value judgements on the importance or seriousness of those consequences. This enabled technical specialists to communicate the essential technical considerations and allowed stakeholders to establish the value judgements for the decision. Although rarely used in public participation, the multiattribute utility approach appears to provide a useful framework for the collaborative resolution of many complex environmental decision problems.

Merkhofer, M.W. [Applied Decision Analysis, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report. Second quarter 1995, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site during second quarter 1995. Topics include: changes in sampling, analysis, and reporting; water levels; remedial action of groundwater; and hydrology of the affected aquifer zones.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Third and fourth quarters 1996, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for various hazardous and radioactive constituents as required by Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery ACT (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995. Currently, the H-Area HWMF monitoring network consists of 130 wells of the HSB series and 8 wells of the HSL series screened in the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area HWMF. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program as identified in provision IIIDH.11.c

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1995, samples from seven new AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for a comprehensive list of constituents. Two parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. Lead and nickel appear to exceed final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in AMB-18A. These data were suspect and a rerun of the samples showed levels below flagging criteria. This data will be monitored in 3Q95. Aluminum, iron, manganese, boron, silver and total organic halogens exceeded Flag 2 criteria in at least one well each during second quarter 1995. This data, as well, will be confirmed by 3Q95 testing. Groundwater flow directions in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters; the flow rate estimate, however, differs because of an error noted in the scales of measurements used for previous estimates. The estimate was 470 ft/year during second quarter 1995. Reliable estimates of flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone could not be determined in previous quarters because data were insufficient. The first estimate from second quarter 1995 shows a 530 ft/year rate. Reliable estimates of flow directions and rates in the Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone and in the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the CBCU could not be calculated because of the low horizontal gradient and the near-linear distribution of the monitoring wells. During second quarter 1994, SRS received South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control approval for constructing five point-of-compliance wells and two plume definition wells near the Met Lab HWMF. This project began in July 1994 and was completed in March of this year. Analytical data from these wells are presented in this report for the first time.

Chase, J.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report (U). Third and fourth quarters 1996, Vol. I  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

AN APPLICATION OF THE SSHAC LEVEL 3 PROCESS TO THE PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE, EASTERN WASHINGTON, USA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An Application of the SSHAC Level 3 Process to the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for Nuclear Facilities at the Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Kevin J. Coppersmith Coppersmith Consulting, Inc. Julian J. Bommer Consultant Robert W. Bryce Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21-22, 2014 Germantown, MD

64

Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, Third and fourth quarters 1995: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater at the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) is monitored in compliance with applicable regulations. Monitoring results are compared to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental control (SCDHEC) Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS). Historically as well as currently, nitrate-nitrite as nitrogen, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the second half of 1995. Elevated constituents were found primarily in the water table (Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2}), however, constitutents exceeding standards also occurred in several different aquifer zones monitoring wells. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the H-Area HWMF have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Methods for developing seismic and extreme wind-hazard models for evaluating critical structures and equipment at US Department of Energy facilities and commercial plutonium facilities in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing seismic and wind hazard models for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort to establish building design criteria developed with a uniform methodology for seismic and wind hazards at the various DOE sites throughout the United States. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. Phase 2 - development of seismic and wind hazard models - is discussed in this paper, which summarizes the methodologies used by seismic and extreme-wind experts and gives sample hazard curves for the first sites to be modeled. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake (or windspeed) greater than some specified magnitude. In the final phase, the DOE will use the hazards models and LLNL-recommended uniform design criteria to evaluate critical facilities. The methodology presented in this paper also was used for a related LLNL study - involving the seismic assessment of six commercial plutonium fabrication plants licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Details and results of this reassessment are documented in reference.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.; Bernreuter, D.L.

1981-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

68

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwate Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1998, Volumes I, II, & III  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah river Site (SRS) during first and second quarters 1998. This program is required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Report requirements are described in the 1995 RCRA Renewal Permit, effective October 5, 1995, Section IIIB.H.11.b for the M-Area HWMF and Section IIIG.H.11.b for the Met Lab HWMF.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Facility Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

70

Facility Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

71

Risk assessment of CST-7 proposed waste treatment and storage facilities Volume I: Limited-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of proposed CST-7 waste treatment & storage facilities. Volume II: Preliminary hazards analysis of proposed CST-7 waste storage & treatment facilities  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Group [CST-7 (formerly EM-7)] requested the Probabilistic Risk and Hazards Analysis Group [TSA-11 (formerly N-6)] to conduct a study of the hazards associated with several CST-7 facilities. Among these facilities are the Hazardous Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF), the HWTF Drum Storage Building (DSB), and the Mixed Waste Receiving and Storage Facility (MWRSF), which are proposed for construction beginning in 1996. These facilities are needed to upgrade the Laboratory`s storage capability for hazardous and mixed wastes and to provide treatment capabilities for wastes in cases where offsite treatment is not available or desirable. These facilities will assist Los Alamos in complying with federal and state requlations.

Sasser, K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

73

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

M-area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report, First quarter 1995, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report, in three volumes, describes the ground water monitoring and c corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the fourth quarter 1994 and first quarter 1995. Concise description of the program and considerable data documenting the monitoring and remedial activities are included in the document. This is Volume 1 covering the following topics: sampling and results; hydrogeologic assessment; water quality assessment; effectiveness of the corrective-action program; corrective-action system operation and performance; monitoring and corrective-action program assessment; proposed monitoring and corrective-action program modifications. Also included are the following appendicies: A-standards; B-flagging criteria; C-figures; D-monitoring results tables; E-data quality/usability assessment.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Regional differences in the potential exposure of US minority populations to hazardous facilities  

SciTech Connect

In the literature that examines the distribution of environmental disamenities of various types, there is considerable documentation that minority groups and lower income groups are more likely to be exposed. Such differential exposure has been attributed to ``environmental racism`` by some authors, but there has been no systematic investigation of the factors and dynamics underlying this exposure pattern. This study examines regional differences in the proximity of African-American, Hispanics, Asians, and non-Hispanic Whites to a broad range facility types and explores the degree to which this may be related to urban and income factors.

Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, A.L. [Wheaton Coll., Wheaton, IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Regional differences in the potential exposure of US minority populations to hazardous facilities  

SciTech Connect

In the literature that examines the distribution of environmental disamenities of various types, there is considerable documentation that minority groups and lower income groups are more likely to be exposed. Such differential exposure has been attributed to environmental racism'' by some authors, but there has been no systematic investigation of the factors and dynamics underlying this exposure pattern. This study examines regional differences in the proximity of African-American, Hispanics, Asians, and non-Hispanic Whites to a broad range facility types and explores the degree to which this may be related to urban and income factors.

Nieves, L.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Nieves, A.L. (Wheaton Coll., Wheaton, IL (United States) Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Beryllium: Hazards evaluation, facility classification, consequence analysis of releases during potential accidents, and protection of public and workers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comprehensive literature searches on beryllium (Be) and information on the particle size distribution of Be powder (Mishima et al.)1,2 indicate that the new airborne release fraction/respirable fraction (ARF/RF) values for large coherent pieces, turnings/swarfs, chips/powder, and dust are several orders of magnitude lower for explosion, fire, and spill (e.g., 1E?2, 1.5E?5, 1E?6) than earlier estimates based on DOE-HDBK-3010.3 This implies a lower consequence exposure and thus an increase in threshold limit or lower facility hazard classification (HighModerateLow), and less risk of exposure to workers and public during these accident scenarios. This is demonstrated by a case study of using 100lbs chips/powder under various accident conditions (explosion, fire, and spill) in standard terrain (rural) and city terrain (urban) to assess the relative concentrations to a receptor at different distances, using \\{EPIcode\\} (Emergency Prediction Information Code) dispersion model. Beryllium aerosol exposure can cause: (1) acute exposure (short term) from Emergency Response Planning Guideline-3, -2 (ERPG-3, -2) levels; and (2) chronic (long term) from sensitization and chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Per 40 CFR 61.32, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Be emission standard limit to protect the public (no CBD) is 0.01?g/m3 on a 30-day time weighted average (TWA).4 Facility hazard classifications require modeling to be performed to establish a distance beyond which the public is protected. A case study using 100lbs chip/powder release with conservative assumptions (e.g., standard, term release) shows that the public is protected beyond 200m. The American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)5 and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) adopted exposure threshold limit value for workers at 2.0?g/m3, based on 8-hr TWA. However, 10 CFR 850 Rule on CBD and Prevention Program6 requires a protection at 0.2?g/m3 (8h TWA), to further mitigate or prevent any health effects or CBD. Thus, 40 CFR 61.32, ACGIH and OSHA guide, and 10 CFR 850 Rule, coupled with the worker protection program and adequate safety controls, provide adequate protection from the CBD to the workers and public.

J.C. Laul; Rich Norman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hazard ranking system evaluation of CERCLA inactive waste sites at Hanford: Volume 2: Engineered-facility sites (HISS data base)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to formally document the assessment activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. These activities were carried out pursuant to the DOE orders that address the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program for the cleanup of inactive waste sites. The DOE orders incorporate the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology, which is based on the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. This methodology includes: PA/SI, remedial investigation/feasibility study, record of decision, design and implementation of remedial action, operation and monitoring, and verification monitoring. Volume 1 of this report discusses the CERCLA inactive waste-site evaluation process, assumptions, and results of the Hazard Ranking System methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the data on the individual CERCLA engineered-facility sites at Hanford, as contained in the Hanford Inactive Site Surveillance (HISS) Data Base. Volume 3 presents the data on the individual CERCLA unplanned-release sites at Hanford, as contained in the HISS Data Base. 13 refs.

Jette, S.J.; Lamar, D.A.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Van Houten, N.C.; Stenner, R.D.; Cramer, K.H.; Higley, K.A.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

Chase, J.

2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

Contents: Introduction and Summary of Results; Facility Background; Facility Emissions; Atmospheric Dispersion and Deposition Modeling of Emissions; Human Health Risk Assessment; Screening Ecological Risk Assessment; Accident Analysis; Additional Analysis in Response to Peer Review Recommendations; References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction  

SciTech Connect

Contents: Overview; Facility Background; Risk Assessment History at WTI; Peer Review Comments and Key Assumptions; and References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 99-01: Enforcement of 10 CFR Part 830.120 (Quality Assurance Rule) for Facilities below Hazard Category III  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH Enforcement) periodically to issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. During the past 18 months, EH Enforcement has identified a number of examples in which both DOE and contractor organizations have incorrectly exempted activities from applicability of the DOE Quality Assurance Rule 10 CFR 830.120 (QA Rule). The contractors excluded these activities on the basis that the QA Rule did not apply if the activity was classified as less than a Hazard Category III under DOE Standard 1027-92 (Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports). Standard 1027 provides guidance for determining whether a facility, activity or area requires a Safety Analysis Report but it does not provide a basis for exclusion from the provisions of the QA Rule.

83

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 99-01:Enforcement of 10 CFR Part 830.120 (Quality Assurance Rule)for Facilities Below Hazard Category III  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH Enforcement) periodically to issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. During the past 18 months, EH Enforcement has identified a number of examples in which both DOE and contractor organizations have incorrectly exempted activities fromapplicability of the DOE Quality Assurance Rule 10 CFR 830.120 (QA Rule). The contractors excluded these activities on the basis that the QA Rule did not apply if the activity was classified as less than a Hazard Category III under DOE Standard 1027-92 (Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports). Standard 1027 provides guidance for determining whether a facility, activity or area requires a Safety Analysis Report but it does not provide a basis for exclusion from the provisions of the QA Rule.

84

Hazardous Materials and Controlled Hazardous Substances (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A permit is required to own, establish, operate, or maintain a facility in the state of Maryland that transfers quantities of a single hazardous material in excess of 100,000 pounds at any time...

85

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

86

Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize...

87

DOE-STD-1024-92; DOE Standard Guidelines For Use of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Curves at Department of Energy Sites for Department of Energy Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1024-92 STD-1024-92 December 1992 Change Notice #1 January 1996 DOE STANDARD GUIDELINES FOR USE OF PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD CURVES AT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SITES FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; prices available from (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161. Order No. DE93005386 DOE-STD-1024-92 (CH - 1) Subject: CHANGE NOTICE #1

88

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This volume provides a description of the facility, and its location and setting in the three-state area of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia; an overview of previous risk assessments conducted by U.S. EPA for this site, including the preliminary assessment of inhalation exposure and the screening-level risk analyses of indirect exposure; and a summary of comments provided by the Peer Review Panel on the Project Plan.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

Chase, J.

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

90

RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility, Permit Number NEV HW0101, Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the EPA identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

Arnold, Patrick [NSTec] [NSTec

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

Facility Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

92

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rural Driving Hazards Rural Driving Hazards SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Rural Driving Hazards The rural location of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site facilities requires that visitors travel on unpaved, dirt and gravel, roads. Visitors should be aware of the driving hazards this presents by taking the following precautions: Proceed cautiously: Many rural roads have unmarked and blind intersections. Slow down: Sanded and gravel raods can cause a vehicle to swerve. Maintain a safe following distance: During the dry season, vehicles

93

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Seismic Hazard Analysis For Nuclear Facilities At The Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Natural Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook A Probabilistic Approach to...

94

Facility Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

95

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Microsoft Word - Appendix C - Soil Disturbance Evaluation Procedure.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rocky Flats Site Soil Disturbance Evaluation Procedure Rocky Flats Site Soil Disturbance Evaluation Procedure This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Operations Guide July 2013 Doc. No. S03037-6.0 Page C-1 Soil Disturbance Evaluation Process Purpose: The purpose of this Soil Disturbance Evaluation Process is to identify hazards and regulatory requirements so that appropriate work control steps, including regulatory agency and/or engineering approvals, are implemented to address and mitigate the hazard and/or meet regulatory requirements. The soil disturbance evaluation process is a part of the Rocky Flats Site Operations Guide (RFSOG) work planning process (Section 12.1), including consideration of the Health and Safety Manual, LMS/POL/S04321 standard for penetration permits. This

97

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Oil and Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Anyone who owns or operates a vessel or facility that transports, stores, or otherwise handles hazardous wastes must take reasonable steps to prevent the discharge of those materials.

99

RCRA facility assessments  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) broadened the authorities of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by requiring corrective action for releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents at treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. The goal of the corrective action process is to ensure the remediation of hazardous waste and hazardous constituent releases associated with TSD facilities. Under Section 3004(u) of RCRA, operating permits issued to TSD facilities must address corrective actions for all releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from any solid waste management unit (SWMU) regardless of when the waste was placed in such unit. Under RCRA Section 3008(h), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may issue administrative orders to compel corrective action at facilities authorized to operate under RCRA Section 3005(e) (i.e., interim status facilities). The process of implementing the Corrective Action program involves the following, in order of implementation; (1) RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA); (2) RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI); (3) the Corrective Measures Study (CMS); and (4) Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI). The RFA serves to identify and evaluate SWMUs with respect to releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents, and to eliminate from further consideration SWMUs that do not pose a threat to human health or the environment. This Information Brief will discuss issues concerning the RFA process.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

102

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazards Control Hazards Control 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs and policy for establishing controls to mitigate hazards affecting the public, worker, and environment. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to verify implementation of DOE 450.4-1A Volume 2 Appendix E core expectation #3 (CE II-3). CE II-3: An integrated process has been established and is utilized to develop controls which mitigate the identified hazards present within a facility or activity. The set of controls ensure adequate protection of the public, worker, and the environment and are established as agreed upon by DOE.

103

Facility Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

340 waste handling facility interim safety basis  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an interim safety basis for the 340 Waste Handling Facility classifying the 340 Facility as a Hazard Category 3 facility. The hazard analysis quantifies the operating safety envelop for this facility and demonstrates that the facility can be operated without a significant threat to onsite or offsite people.

VAIL, T.S.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

340 Waste handling facility interim safety basis  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an interim safety basis for the 340 Waste Handling Facility classifying the 340 Facility as a Hazard Category 3 facility. The hazard analysis quantifies the operating safety envelop for this facility and demonstrates that the facility can be operated without a significant threat to onsite or offsite people.

Stordeur, R.T.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

106

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

107

Facility Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

108

Facility Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

109

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Parts 595-599: Hazardous Substances (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations aim to prevent the release of hazardous substances into surface water and groundwater resources. They contain guidance for facilities which store and process hazardous substances,...

110

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release...

111

Electrical hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and certification by ANL prior to use. The Control of Hazardous Energy Sources - LockoutTagout (LOTO) Types of Energy Sources 1. Electricity 2. Gas, steam & pressurized...

112

NSTP 2002-2 Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear Facilities from Category 3 to Radiological (11/13/02).  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

0 CFR 830 Subpart B requires that all DOE nuclear facilities categorized as HC-3 or above have a DOEapproved safety basis compliant with the requirements of Subpart B. The rule requires the use of...

113

The application of a computerized storm surge model for hazard mapping within the Galveston Bay Area using an Automated Mapping and Facilities Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAPPING AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM A Thesis by LORA ANNE SCHORNICK Approved as to style and content by: Rennet L. W ite (Chairman of Committee) Ear R. Hos ins (Member) C ris op er C. Mat ewson (Member) ~ 6 (- Brian W. B ouet (Head... Justification BACKGROUND Study Site Storm Surges Hurricanes Selected for the Study Hurricane Carla Hurricane Allen Literature Review of Storm Surge Models Automated Mapping and Facilities Management Systems METHODOLOGY Page vii ix xii 2 2 3 4 4...

Schornick, Lora Anne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

B Plant facility description  

SciTech Connect

Buildings 225B, 272B, 282B, 282BA, and 294B were removed from the B Plant facility description. Minor corrections were made for tank sizes and hazardous and toxic inventories.

Chalk, S.E.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

119

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental Quality is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to all aspects of hazardous waste storage and disposal, and the Act addresses permitting requirements for disposal

120

RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2012, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101, issued 10/17/10.

,

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream; a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility; the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream; a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken; a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received; any unusual occurrences; and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cold Weather Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Cold Weather Hazards June 2010 NSA_cwh_Rev10.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Cold Weather Hazards Winter Conditions at the North Slope of Alaska The North Slope of Alaska is north of the Arctic Circle at latitudes ranging from 69 to 72 degrees. Barrow, the largest town on the North Slope (pop. 4500), is the site of a National Weather Service Station, which has been active for several decades, so the climatology of the Alaska arctic coastal region as represented by Barrow is relatively well known. The North Slope is covered with ice and snow typically eight months of the year (October-May). During part of November, all of December, and most of January, the sun does not come above the horizon; this

123

Lab optimizes burning of hazardous wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new thermal destruction laboratory has gone into operation at Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Mo. The bench-scale facility, which can accommodate gram quantities of hazardous wastes in liquid, slurry, or solid forms, is used to determine ...

WARD WORTHY

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

SOLAR ACTIVITY AND TERRESTRIAL DISTURBANCES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SOLAR ACTIVITY AND TERRESTRIAL DISTURBANCES Donald H. Menzel HARVARD COLLEGE OBSERVATORY SOLAR ACTIVITY AND TERRESTRIAL DISTURBANCES* BY...OBSERVATORY Scientists have long recognized that solar activity is somehow responsible for, or...

Donald H. Menzel

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) includes an evaluation of available biotic information from the site vicinity to provide a preliminary description of potential ecological receptors (e.g., rare, threatened and endangered species; migratory birds; and important game species), and important ecological habitats (e.g., wetland areas). A conceptual site model is developed that describe show stressors associated with the WTI facility might affect the ecological components in the surrounding environment through the development and evaluation of specific ecological endpoints. Finally, an estimate of the potential for current and/or future adverse impacts to the biotic component of the environment is provided, based on the integration of potential exposures of ecological receptors to WTI emissions and toxicological threshold values.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

WHC fire hazards analysis policy  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to establish the fire protection policy for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) relative to US Department of Energy (DOE) directives for Fire Hazards Analyses (FHAs) and their relationship to facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) as promulgated by the DOE Richland Operations Office.

Evans, C.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Implementation of the hazardous debris rule  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

Sailer, J.E.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

d upstream downstream disturbance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microphone Cm (s) C e (s) Controller (a) m Pmd (s) d Cm (s) Pmu (s) P ed (s) u P eu (s) e C e (s) (b) Figure) #12; y 2 =m Pmd (s) w 1 =d w 2 D 2 C m (s) Pmu (s) z 2 P ed (s) D 1 W 2 W 3 z 3 D 3 w 3 1 0 0005 1 0 with experimental data and the H¥/ QFT synthesized controller #12; disturbance speaker detection control error

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

129

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Environmental Management The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental Management is tasked regulating hazardous waste management facilities and practices. Provisions pertaining to permitting, site approval, construction, reporting, transportation, and remediation practices and fees are discussed in these

130

Estimated airborne release of plutonium from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility in the Santa Susana site, California, as a result of postulated damage from severe wind and earthquake hazard  

SciTech Connect

The potential mass of airborne releases of plutonium (source term) that could result from wind and seismic damage is estimated for the Atomics International Company's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF) at the Santa Susana site in California. The postulated source terms will be useful as the basis for estimating the potential dose to the maximum exposed individual by inhalation and to the total population living within a prescribed radius of the site. The respirable fraction of airborne particles is thus the principal concern. The estimated source terms are based on the damage ratio, and the potential airborne releases if all enclosures suffer particular levels of damage. In an attempt to provide a realistic range of potential source terms that include most of the normal processing conditions, a best estimate bounded by upper and lower limits is provided. The range of source terms is calculated by combining a high best estimate and a low damage ratio, based on a fraction of enclosures suffering crush or perforation, with the airborne release from enclosures based upon an upper limit, average, and lower limit inventory of dispersible materials at risk. Two throughput levels are considered. The factors used to evaluate the fractional airborne release of materials and the exchange rates between enclosed and exterior atmospheres are discussed. The postulated damage and source terms are discussed for wind and earthquake hazard scenarios in order of their increasing severity.

Mishima, J.; Ayer, J.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Seismic Hazard Models for Department of Energy Sites  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the US. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final seismic hazard models and response spectra recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 15 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/hwb/hwb_facil.html  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

& Regulations Notifiers LANL Order Documents Contact Us Hazardous Waste Facilities This Web Page provides links to public notices and information on New Mexico hazardous waste...

133

Hanford facility contingency plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit- specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. Applicability of this plan to Hanford Facility activities is described in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion, General Condition II.A. General Condition II.A applies to Part III TSD units, Part V TSD units, and to releases of hazardous substances which threaten human health or the environment. Additional information about the applicability of this document may also be found in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Handbook (DOE/RL-96-10). This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous substance spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. The term hazardous substances is defined in WAC 173-303-040 as: ``any liquid, solid, gas, or sludge, including any material, substance, product, commodity, or waste, regardless of quantity, that exhibits any of the physical, chemical or biological properties described in WAC 173-303-090 or 173-303-100.`` Whenever the term hazardous substances is used in this document, it will be used in the context of this definition. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases of hazardous substances occurring at areas between TSD units that may, or may not, threaten human health or the environment.

Sutton, L.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report The following information...

135

Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

REMAIZE, J.A.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

136

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities, provides criteria and guidance for the analysis and design of facility structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that are necessary to implement the requirements of DOE Order (O) 420.1C, Facility Safety, and to ensure that the SSCs will be able to effectively perform their intended safety functions under the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPHs). This Standard also provides criteria and guidance for the use of industry building codes and voluntary

137

FACILITY SAFETY (FS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACILITY SAFETY (FS) FACILITY SAFETY (FS) OBJECTIVE FS.1 - (Core Requirement 7) Facility safety documentation in support of SN process operations,is in place and has been implemented that describes the safety envelope of the facility. The, safety documentation should characterize the hazards/risks associated with the facility and should, identify preventive and mitigating measures (e.g., systems, procedures, and administrative, controls) that protect workers and the public from those hazards/risks. (Old Core Requirement 4) Criteria 1. A DSA has been prepared by FWENC, approved by DOE, and implemented to reflect the SN process operations in the WPF. (10 CFR 830.200, DOE-STD-3009-94) 2. A configuration control program is in place and functioning such that the DSA is

138

The intermediate disturbance hypothesis, refugia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nov 1, 1995 ... factor correlated with disturbance; correlation does not prove causation. We have ..... Fundamentals of aquatic ecology. Blackwell Sci. Publ. -.

139

Office of Nuclear Safety Basis and Facility Design  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design establishes safety basis and facility design requirements and expectations related to analysis and design of nuclear facilities to ensure protection of workers and the public from the hazards associated with nuclear operations.

140

Implementing DOE guidance for hazards assessments at Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

Hazards Assessments are performed for a variety of activities and facilities at Rocky Flats Plant. Prior to 1991, there was no guidance for performing Hazards Assessments. Each organization that performed Hazards Assessments used its own methodology with no attempt at standardization. In 1991, DOE published guidelines for the performance of Hazards Assessments for Emergency Planning (DOE-EPG-5500.1, ``Guidance for a Hazards Assessment Methodology``). Subsequently, in 1992, DOE published a standard for the performance of Hazards Assessments (DOE-STD-1027-92, ``Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis, Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports``). Although these documents are a step in the direction of standardization, there remains a great deal of interpretation and subjective implementation in the performance of Hazards Assessments. Rocky Flats Plant has initiated efforts to develop a uniform and standard process to be used for Hazards Assessments.

Zimmerman, G.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 382  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NA 6 ESH119 ESH145 NA NA NA A ESH108382 Thin Film Chamber Electrical Compressed gas Cryogenic vacuum Grounded vacuum chamber Safety interlocks on chamber door Safety committee...

143

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility engaged in the operation of storing, treating or disposing of hazardous waste or storing recyclable materials. The Department shall not issue a permit for the treatment, disposal or temporary storage of any liquid hazardous waste in a

144

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a facility. The statute also

145

Phase 2 fire hazard analysis for the canister storage building  

SciTech Connect

The fire hazard analysis assesses the risk from fire in a facility to ascertain whether the fire protection policies are met. This document provides a preliminary FHA for the CSB facility. Open items have been noted in the document. A final FHA will be required at the completion of definitive design, prior to operation of the facility.

Sadanaga, C.T., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(North Carolina) (North Carolina) Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for surface impoundments and location standards for facilities. An applicant applying for a permit for a hazardous waste facility shall

147

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

148

340 Facility compliance assessment  

SciTech Connect

This study provides an environmental compliance evaluation of the RLWS and the RPS systems of the 340 Facility. The emphasis of the evaluation centers on compliance with WAC requirements for hazardous and mixed waste facilities, federal regulations, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) requirements pertinent to the operation of the 340 Facility. The 340 Facility is not covered under either an interim status Part A permit or a RCRA Part B permit. The detailed discussion of compliance deficiencies are summarized in Section 2.0. This includes items of significance that require action to ensure facility compliance with WAC, federal regulations, and WHC requirements. Outstanding issues exist for radioactive airborne effluent sampling and monitoring, radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, non-radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, less than 90 day waste storage tanks, and requirements for a permitted facility.

English, S.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

150

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Grant Program Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities in order to protect public health and safety, foster economic growth and protect the environment. Pennsylvania law establishes a fund to provide to the Department the

151

Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless April 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns hazardous waste into harmless end-products. Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns

153

CRAD, Hazard Analysis- July 25, 2014 (IEA CRAD 31-1, REV. 0)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Criteria Review and Approach Document (IEA CRAD 31-1, REV. 0) provides objectives, criteria, and approaches for reviewing Nuclear Facility Hazard Analysis.

154

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Addressing concerns related to geologic hazards at the site of the proposed Transuranic Waste Facility , TA-63, Los Alamos National Laboratory: focus on the current Los Alamos Seismic Network earthquake catalog, proximity of identified seismic events to the proposed facility , and evaluation of prev  

SciTech Connect

This technical paper presents the most recent and updated catalog of earthquakes measured by the Los Alamos Seismic Network at and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), with specific focus on the site of the proposed transuranic waste facility (TWF) at Technical Area 63 (TA-63). Any questions about the data presented herein, or about the Los Alamos Seismic Network, should be directed to the authors of this technical paper. LANL and the Los Alamos townsite sit atop the Pajarito Plateau, which is bounded on its western edge by the Pajarito fault system, a 35-mile-long system locally comprised of the down-to-the-east Pajarito fault (the master fault) and subsidiary down-to-the-west Rendija Canyon, Guaje Mountain, and Sawyer Canyon faults (Figure 1). This fault system forms the local active western margin of the Rio Grande rift near Los Alamos, and is potentially seismogenic (e.g., Gardner et al., 2001; Reneau et al., 2002; Lewis et al., 2009). The proposed TWF area at TA-63 is situated on an unnamed mesa in the north-central part of LANL between Twomile Canyon to the south, Ten Site Canyon to the north, and the headwaters of Canada del Buey to the east (Figure 2). The local bedrock is the Quaternary Bandelier Tuff, formed in two eruptive pulses from nearby Valles caldera, the eastern edge of which is located approximately 6.5 miles west-northwest of the technical area. The older member (Otowi Member) of the Bandelier Tuff has been dated at 1.61 Ma (Izett and Obradovich 1994). The younger member (Tshirege Member) of the Bandelier Tuff has been dated at 1.256 Ma (age from Phillips et al. 2007) and is widely exposed as the mesa-forming unit around Los Alamos. Several discrete cooling units comprise the Tshirege Member. Commonly accepted stratigraphic nomenclature for the Tshirege Member is described in detail by Broxton and Reneau (1995), Gardner et al. (2001), and Lewis et al. (2009). The Tshirege Member cooling unit exposed at the surface at TA-63 is Qbt3. Understanding the subtle differences between Tshirege Member cooling units and the nature of the contacts between cooling units is critical to identifying the presence or absence of faults associated with the Pajarito fault system on the Pajarito Plateau. The Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN) continuously monitors local earthquake activity in the Los Alamos area in support of LANL's Seismic Hazards program. Seismic monitoring of LANL facilities is a requirement of DOE Order 420.1B (Facility Safety). LASN currently consists of nine permanent seismic instrument field stations that telemeter real-time sensitive ground motion data to a central recording facility. Four of these stations are located on LANL property, with three of those within 2.5 miles of TA-63. The other five stations are in remote locations in the Jemez Mountains, Valles Caldera, St Peters Dome, and the Caja del Rio plateau across the Rio Grande from the Los Alamos area. Local earthquakes are defined as those with locations within roughly 100 miles of Los Alamos. Plate 1 shows the current LASN station locations and all local earthquakes recorded from 1973 through 2011. During this time period, LASN has detected and recorded over 850 local earthquakes in north-central New Mexico. Over 650 of these were located within about 50 miles of Los Alamos, and roughly 60 were within 10 miles. The apparent higher density of earthquakes close to Los Alamos, relative to the rest of north-central New Mexico, is due largely to the fact that LASN is a sensitive local seismic network, recording many very small nearby events (magnitude less than 1.0) that are undetectable at greater distances.

Roberts, Peter M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelley, Richard E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

156

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

Atlas, M.

158

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2006 [Facility News] January 15, 2006 [Facility News] Location, Location, Location... Field Campaign Focuses on Latitude Effects Bookmark and Share A scintillometer was used to detect atmospheric optical disturbances-called scintillations-caused by temperature, pressure and humidity. The instrument emits light from two transmitters, shown at left. The light traverses the local atmosphere, perturbed by density fluctuations. Some of the light enters the receiver, shown at right. (Image from Scintec at www.scintec.com.) A scintillometer was used to detect atmospheric optical disturbances-called scintillations-caused by temperature, pressure and humidity. The instrument emits light from two transmitters, shown at left. The light traverses the local atmosphere, perturbed by density fluctuations. Some of the light

159

Nitrate Losses from Disturbed Ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...or large masses of nutrient-poor...com-petition between plants and decompo-sers...levels prior to treatment. Any or all...nitrifiers and plant roots for ammonium...Purchase, Plant Soil 41, 541...in Municipal Wastewater and Disturbed...to assure the balance of the na-tional...

Peter M. Vitousek; James R. Gosz; Charles C. Grier; Jerry M. Melillo; William A. Reiners; Robert L. Todd

1979-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

160

Hazard Analysis Database report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility  

SciTech Connect

The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

POTENTIAL HEALTH HAZARDS OF RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas to minimize the risks to the public and environment from exposure to the tailings and the radon gas they produce.

none,

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nuclear Facility Design  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Design FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: Headquarters and Field organizations and their contractors ensure that nuclear facilities are designed to assure adequate protection for the public, workers, and the environment from nuclear hazards. REQUIREMENTS:  10 CFR 830.120  10 CFR 830 subpart B  DOE O 413.3  DOE O 420.1B  DOE O 414.1C  DOE O 226.1  DOE M 426.1  DEAR 970-5404-2 Guidance:  DOE G 420.1-1  Project Management Practices, Integrated Quality ( Rev E, June 2003)  DOE Implementation Plan for DNSB Recommendation 2004-2 Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation Contracts between and the contractors who operate nuclear facilities contain adequate requirements concerning the conduct of nuclear facility safety design for nuclear facility capital projects and major modifications and the

164

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

165

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan will ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, at a minimum, every 3 years.

Greager, E.M.

1997-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

166

Electric Disturbance Events (OE-417) | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Electric Disturbance Events (OE-417) Electric Disturbance Events (OE-417) The Electric Emergency Incident and Disturbance Report (Form OE-417) collects information on electric...

167

Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes requirements for verifying readiness for startup of new Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations, and for restart of existing Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations that have been shut down. Cancels DOE O 425.1C. Adm Chg 1, dated 4-2-13.

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

169

Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

none,

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Effect of sample disturbance in opalinus clay shales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sample disturbance problem for different geomaterials is reviewed in this thesis. A general discussion on the disturbance sources and complexities of the disturbance problem is followed by detailed reviews on disturbance ...

Pei, Jianyong, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

Lee C. Cadwallader

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment; evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions  

SciTech Connect

The report provide estimates of: (1) individual risks based on central tendency exposure; (2) individual risks based on maximum environmental concentrations; (3) risks to highly exposed or susceptible subgroups of the population (e.g., subsistence farmers and school children); (4) risks associated with specific activities that may result in elevated exposures (e.g., subsistence fishermen and deer hunters); and (5) population risk. This approach allows for the estimation of risks to specific segments of the population taking into consideration activity patterns, number of individuals, and actual locations of individuals in these subgroups with respect to the facility. The fate and transport modeling of emissions from the facility to estimate exposures to identified subgroups is described.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

LANSCE | Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope Production Facility (IPF) Lujan Neutron Scattering Center Materials Test Station (MTS) Proton Radiography (pRad) Ultracold Neutrons (UCN) Weapons Neutron Research Facility...

175

A disturbance tradeoff principle for quantum measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a fundamental principle of disturbance tradeoff for quantum measurements, along the lines of the celebrated uncertainty principle: The disturbances associated with measurements performed on distinct yet identically prepared ensembles of systems in a pure state cannot all be made arbitrarily small. Indeed, we show that the average of the disturbances associated with a set of projective measurements is strictly greater than zero whenever the associated observables do not have a common eigenvector. For such measurements, we show an equivalence between disturbance tradeoff measured in terms of fidelity and the entropic uncertainty tradeoff formulated in terms of the Tsallis entropy ($T_{2}$). We also investigate the disturbances associated with the class of non-projective measurements, where the difference between the disturbance tradeoff and the uncertainty tradeoff manifests quite clearly.

Prabha Mandayam; M. D. Srinivas

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

Crummel, G.M.

1998-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

177

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop The Energy Department Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop, sponsored by the Chief of Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, was held October 25-26, 2011, in Germantown, Maryland. The workshop brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact nuclear facilities. The workshop featured twenty presentations as well as a breakout session devoted to discussing the status of the commonly used structural analysis code SASSI, a System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction. A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings_1.pdf Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs - A Case Study of Probabilistic

178

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop The Energy Department Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop, sponsored by the Chief of Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, was held October 25-26, 2011, in Germantown, Maryland. The workshop brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact nuclear facilities. The workshop featured twenty presentations as well as a breakout session devoted to discussing the status of the commonly used structural analysis code SASSI, a System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction. A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings_1.pdf Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs - A Case Study of Probabilistic

179

Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area  

SciTech Connect

This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

CHSP: HAZARD CONTROLS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP HAZARD CONTROLS CONTROLS FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS arrow image WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS arrow image CHEMICAL STORAGE GUIDELINES DECOMISSIONING LAB AND SHOP SPACES SPECIFIC CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES arrow image EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND EQUIPMENT arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image spacer image HAZARD CONTROLS This section discusses control procedures for limiting employee exposure to chemical hazards. Technical Areas Technical areas include laboratories, shops, workrooms, and similar areas where non-administrative activities are performed. For the purpose of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

182

WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Wildfires (Jun 02) Recent Declared Disasters in Colorado No Map from FEMA provided #12;National WeatherWEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral

183

Automated Job Hazards Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

184

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan Colorado Multi-Hazards Mitigation Plan July 2002 the May 2001 Report to the Governor, Colorado Wildland Urban Interface; Section 2 includes the Hazard the status of the Wildland Urban Interface in Colorado; the hazards that exist; mitigation measures

185

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

186

Definition: Disturbance Monitoring Equipment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Disturbance Monitoring Equipment Disturbance Monitoring Equipment Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Disturbance Monitoring Equipment Devices capable of monitoring and recording system data pertaining to a Disturbance. Such devices include the following categories of recorders: Sequence of event recorders which record equipment response to the event., Fault recorders, which record actual waveform data replicating the system primary voltages and currents. This may include protective relays., Dynamic Disturbance Recorders (DDRs), which record incidents that portray power system behavior during dynamic events such as low-frequency (0.1 Hz - 3 Hz) oscillations and abnormal frequency or voltage excursions. Phasor Measurement Units and any other equipment that meets the functional requirements of DMEs may qualify as DMEs.[1]

187

Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Assessment of tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic margin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tsunami hazard is a very low-probability, but potentially high-risk natural hazard, posing unique challenges to scientists and policy makers trying to mitigate its impacts. These challenges are illustrated in this assessment of tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic margin. Seismic activity along the U.S. Atlantic margin in general is low, and confirmed paleo-tsunami deposits have not yet been found, suggesting a very low rate of hazard. However, the devastating 1929 Grand Banks tsunami along the Atlantic margin of Canada shows that these events continue to occur. Densely populated areas, extensive industrial and port facilities, and the presence of ten nuclear power plants along the coast, make this region highly vulnerable to flooding by tsunamis and therefore even low-probability events need to be evaluated. We can presently draw several tentative conclusions regarding tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic coast. Landslide tsunamis likely constitute the biggest tsunami hazard to the coast. Only a small number of landslides have so far been dated and they are generally older than 10,000years. The geographical distribution of landslides along the margin is expected to be uneven and to depend on the distribution of seismic activity along the margin and on the geographical distribution of Pleistocene sediment. We do not see evidence that gas hydrate dissociation contributes to the generation of landslides along the U.S. Atlantic margin. Analysis of landslide statistics along the fluvial and glacial portions of the margin indicate that most of the landslides are translational, were probably initiated by seismic acceleration, and failed as aggregate slope failures. How tsunamis are generated from aggregate landslides remains however, unclear. Estimates of the recurrence interval of earthquakes along the continental slope may provide maximum estimates for the recurrence interval of landslide along the margin. Tsunamis caused by atmospheric disturbances and by coastal earthquakes may be more frequent than those generated by landslides, but their amplitudes are probably smaller. Among the possible far-field earthquake sources, only earthquakes located within the Gulf of Cadiz or west of the Tore-Madeira Rise are likely to affect the U.S. coast. It is questionable whether earthquakes on the Puerto Rico Trench are capable of producing a large enough tsunami that will affect the U.S. Atlantic coast. More information is needed to evaluate the seismic potential of the northern Cuba fold-and-thrust belt. The hazard from a volcano flank collapse in the Canary Islands is likely smaller than originally stated, and there is not enough information to evaluate the magnitude and frequency of flank collapse from the Azores Islands. Both deterministic and probabilistic methods to evaluate the tsunami hazard from the margin are available for application to the Atlantic margin, but their implementation requires more information than is currently available.

U.S. ten Brink; J.D. Chaytor; E.L. Geist; D.S. Brothers; B.D. Andrews

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Biosafety Facilities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Guide assists DOE/NNSA field elements and operating contractors in incorporating hazardous biological agents/toxins into emergency management programs, as required by DOE O 151.1C. No cancellation.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

190

Site maps and facilities listings  

SciTech Connect

In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

Not Available

1989-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

192

Certified Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Industrial Leaders: The industrial facilities shown below are among the first to earn certification for Superior Energy Performance (SEP).

193

Order Module--DOE O 420.1B, FACILITY SAFETY | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE O 420.1B, FACILITY SAFETY DOE O 420.1B, FACILITY SAFETY Order Module--DOE O 420.1B, FACILITY SAFETY To ensure that new DOE hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities are designed and constructed in a manner that ensures adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment from nuclear hazards. To ensure that major modifications to hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities comply with the design and construction requirements for new hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. To ensure that new DOE nuclear reactors comply with the requirements of DOE O 420.1B and the design requirements of DOE O 5480.30, Nuclear Reactor Safety Design Criteria. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 420.1B Facility Safety More Documents & Publications Order Module--DOE O 420.2B, SAFETY OF ACCELERATOR FACILITIES

194

Design of Vibration Absorbers for Step Motions and Step Disturbances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of Vibration Absorbers for Step Motions and Step Disturbances Joel Fortgang William Singhose or from external disturbances. The technique of adding a vibration ab- sorber has proven useful at eliminating vibrations from external disturbances and rotational imbalances. Traditionally, vibration

Singhose, William

195

The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective Jeff Kimball Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Staff Department of Energy NPH Conference October 26, 2011

196

Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory Building 878 hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of the hazards assessment process is to document the impact of the release of hazards at the Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (AMPL) that are significant enough to warrant consideration in Sandia National Laboratories` operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment is prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requirement that facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment provides an analysis of the potential airborne release of chemicals associated with the operations and processes at the AMPL. This research and development laboratory develops advanced manufacturing technologies, practices, and unique equipment and provides the fabrication of prototype hardware to meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The focus of the hazards assessment is the airborne release of materials because this requires the most rapid, coordinated emergency response on the part of the AMPL, SNL/NM, collocated facilities, and surrounding jurisdiction to protect workers, the public, and the environment.

Wood, C.; Thornton, W.; Swihart, A.; Gilman, T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Information-Disturbance theorem and Uncertainty Relation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been shown that Information-Disturbance theorem can play an important role in security proof of quantum cryptography. The theorem is by itself interesting since it can be regarded as an information theoretic version of uncertainty principle. It, however, has been able to treat restricted situations. In this paper, the restriction on the source is abandoned, and a general information-disturbance theorem is obtained. The theorem relates information gain by Eve with information gain by Bob.

Takayuki Miyadera; Hideki Imai

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Preliminary fire hazard analysis for the PUTDR and TRU trenches in the Solid Waste Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect

This document represents the Preliminary Fire Hazards Analysis for the Pilot Unvented TRU Drum Retrieval effort and for the Transuranic drum trenches in the low level burial grounds. The FHA was developed in accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A to address major hazards inherent in the facility.

Gaschott, L.J.

1995-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

200

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

John C. Barnes of Savannah River Operations named 2012 Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Savannah River Site, including the F and H-Canyons and the HB-Line. These facilities conduct hazardous nuclear chemistry, packaging, and processing operations on plutonium and...

203

Validation of the strain index in manufacturing facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thirty jobs from two manufacturing facilities were analyzed using the Strain Index and a generic risk factor method to determine whether they exposed workers to an increased risk of developing distal upper extremity disorder (hazard classification...

Rucker, Nathan Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

204

Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Information (Iowa) Facilities Information (Iowa) Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Residential Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board This section applies to any excavation which may impact underground facilities, including those used for the conveyance of electricity or the transportation of hazardous liquids or natural gas. Excavation is prohibited unless notification takes place, as described in this chapter

205

Identifying and modeling safety hazards  

SciTech Connect

The hazard model described in this paper is designed to accept data over the Internet from distributed databases. A hazard object template is used to ensure that all necessary descriptors are collected for each object. Three methods for combining the data are compared and contrasted. Three methods are used for handling the three types of interactions between the hazard objects.

DANIELS,JESSE; BAHILL,TERRY; WERNER,PAUL W.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes requirements for verifying readiness for startup of new Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations, and for restart of existing Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations that have been shut down. Cancels DOE O 425.1C. Adm Chg 1, dated 4-2-13, cancels DOE O 425.1D.

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

207

Science Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) Proton Radiography Trident Laser Facility LOOK INTO LANL - highlights...

208

NSTP 2002-2 Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSTP 2002-2 Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear NSTP 2002-2 Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear Facilities from Category 3 to Radiological (11/13/02). NSTP 2002-2 Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear Facilities from Category 3 to Radiological (11/13/02). 0 CFR 830 Subpart B requires that all DOE nuclear facilities categorized as HC-3 or above have a DOE approved safety basis compliant with the requirements of Subpart B. The rule requires the use of DOESTD- 1027-92 (STD- 1027) as the methodology for categorizing DOE nuclear facilities. STD- 1027 requires a preliminary categorization be established on the basis of the inventory of radionuclides in a facility or involved in an activity. It also permits a safety analyses (see STD-1027 section 3.1.2) to establish a final

209

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Safety Hazards of Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Hazards of Batteries Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the Lithium-ion battery. Cell phones, laptop computers, GPS systems, iPods, and even cars are now using lithium- ion rechargeable battery technology. In fact, you probably have a lithium-ion battery in your pocket or purse right now! Although lithium-ion batteries are very common there are some inherent dangers when using ANY battery. Lithium cells are like any other technology - if they are abused and not used for their intended purpose catastrophic results may occur, such as: first-, second-, and third-degree burns, respiratory problems, fires, explosions, and even death. Please handle the lithium-ion batteries with care and respect.

211

State of Tennessee Hazardous Waste Management Permit, TNHW-127  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Class 1 1 Modification, Dated: 10/20/06 TABLE OF CONTENTS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINER STORAGE AND TREATMENT UNITS BUILDINGS 9206, 9212, 9720-12, 9811-9, AND 9812 AND THE ORGANIC HANDLING UNIT EPA ID NUMBER: TN3 89 009 0001 Page Number I. STANDARD CONDITIONS A. EFFECT OF PERMIT I-1 B. SEVERABILITY I-1 C. DEFINITIONS I-2 D. GENERAL DUTIES AND REQUIREMENTS I-4 E. CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION I-10 F. DOCUMENTS TO BE MAINTAINED AT THE FACILITY I-10 G. ANNUAL MAINTENANCE FEE I-10 H. REQUIRED NOTICES I-10 I. ORDER OF PRECEDENCE I-11 J. PERMIT STRUCTURE I-11 II. GENERAL FACILITY CONDITIONS A. HAZARDOUS WASTES TO BE MANAGED II-1 B. MAINTENANCE OF THE FACILITY II-1

212

State of Tennessee Hazardous Waste Management Permit, TNHW-122  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Class 1 1 Modification, Dated: 12/18/06 TABLE OF CONTENTS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINER STORAGE AND TREATMENT UNITS BUILDINGS 9720-9, 9720-25, AND 9720-31 EPA ID NUMBER: TN3 89 009 0001 Page Number I. STANDARD CONDITIONS A. EFFECT OF PERMIT I-1 B. SEVERABILITY I-1 C. DEFINITIONS I-2 D. GENERAL DUTIES AND REQUIREMENTS I-4 E. CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION I-10 F. DOCUMENTS TO BE MAINTAINED AT THE FACILITY I-10 G. ANNUAL MAINTENANCE FEE I-10 H. REQUIRED NOTICES I-10 I. ORDER OF PRECEDENCE I-11 J. PERMIT STRUCTURE I-11 II. GENERAL FACILITY CONDITIONS A. HAZARDOUS WASTES TO BE MANAGED II-1 B. MAINTENANCE OF THE FACILITY II-1 C. SAMPLING, ANALYSIS, AND MONITORING II-1

213

Methodologies for estimating one-time hazardous waste generation for capacity generation for capacity assurance planning  

SciTech Connect

This report contains descriptions of methodologies to be used to estimate the one-time generation of hazardous waste associated with five different types of remediation programs: Superfund sites, RCRA Corrective Actions, Federal Facilities, Underground Storage Tanks, and State and Private Programs. Estimates of the amount of hazardous wastes generated from these sources to be shipped off-site to commercial hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities will be made on a state by state basis for the years 1993, 1999, and 2013. In most cases, estimates will be made for the intervening years, also.

Tonn, B.; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Elliot, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Peretz, J.; Bohm, R.; Hendrucko, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell, Radioactive Materials...

215

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...

216

Safety analysis report for the National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) at the ORNL Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR)  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information concerning: the experiment facility; experiment assembly; instrumentation and controls; materials; radioactivity; shielding; thermodynamics; estimated or measured reactivity effects; procedures; hazards; and quality assurance. (JDB)

Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Richardson, S.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The Cost of Power Disturbances to Industrial & Digital Economy Companies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cost of Power Disturbances to Industrial & Digital Economy Companies Submitted to: EPRI To Client #12;The Cost of Power Disturbances to Industrial & Digital Economy Companies Confidential of Power Disturbances 1-1 The Cost of Power Disturbances to U.S. Businesses 1-2 Study Objectives 1

Schrijver, Karel

218

Mobile Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

219

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations prescribe the management of hazardous waste facilities in New York State. They identify and list different types of hazardous wastes and describe standards for generators, transporters, as well as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. The regulations also define specific types

220

Alternate airborne release fraction determination for hazardous waste management storage repository hazard categorization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities are used in the handling and processing of solid and liquid radioactive, hazardous, mixed, and medical wastes generated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Waste may be treated or stored in one of the HWM facility units prior to shipment off site for treatment or disposal. Planned facilities such as the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) and the Building 280 Container Storage Unit are expected to handle similar waste streams. A hazard classification was preformed in each facility safety analysis report (SAR) according to the DOE Standard 1027-92 `Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.` The general methodology practiced by HWM to determine alternate airborne release fractions (ARFs) in those SARs was based upon a beyond evaluation basis earthquake accident scenario characterized by the release of the largest amount of respirable, airborne radioactive material. The alternate ARF was calculated using a three-factor formula consisting of the fraction of failed waste containers, fraction of material released from failed waste containers,and the fraction of material entrained to the environment. Recently, in deliberation with DOE-Oakland representatives, HWM decided to modify this methodology. In place of the current detailed analysis, a more straightforward process was proposed based upon material form, credible accident environments, and empirical data. This paper will discuss the methodology and derivation of ARFs specific to HWM treatment and storage facilities that are alternative to those presented in DOE-STD-1027-92.

Brumburgh, G.P.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- October 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On October 25-26, 2011, the DOE Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) hosted a Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) working meeting in Germantown, Maryland. The meeting brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact critical facilities. The meeting was valuable for sharing and discussing research in NPH analysis and mitigation, as well as best practices and lessons learned. Representatives from DOE Headquarters and site offices, four National Laboratories, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and several DOE prime contractors and other private sector firms participated in the meeting. The meeting featured thirty five discussion topics over the two days. Presentation slides from most of these topics are available here, as well as papers on several topics from those speakers who chose to provide them. Questions about the NPH meeting can be directed to Dr. Steve McDuffie of the CNS staff at 509-373-6766, or stephen.mcduffie@rl.doe.gov.

222

Identification of Process Hazards and Accident Scenarios for Site 300 B-Division Firing Areas, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a hazard and accident analysis conducted for Site 300 operations to support update of the ''Site 300 B-Division Firing Areas Safety Analysis Report'' (SAR) [LLNL 1997]. A significant change since the previous SAR is the construction and the new Contained Firing Facility (CFF). Therefore, this hazard and accident analysis focused on the hazards associated with bunker operations to ensure that the hazards at CFF are properly characterized in the updated SAR. Hazard tables were created to cover both the CFF and the existing bunkers with ''open air'' firing tables.

Lambert, H; Johnson, G

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste

224

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Public Comments to Community Relations Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Last saved on: 7/22/2011 Final CRP comment for June 2011 1 SECTION TEXT COMMENT POST? GENERAL COMMENTS N/A We urge the DOE, NNSA and LANL to establish a community calendar so that the various LANL organizations who are scheduling public meetings are aware of other community events, such as the public comment periods on various documents, including PMRs, semi-annual meetings (e.g., CMRR and storm water permit meetings), Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board meetings, RACER, New Mexico Community Foundation FEED meetings, tours, etc. Such a community calendar would be an efficient and effective way to reduce the back and forth about the need for extensions of time and requests to reschedule meetings. It

225

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - 400-EAA Top of Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Piping Pressure Cabinets Signage NA NA 6 ESH119 NA NA A ASD108400 Diagnostics Racks Electrical Low voltage 120 VAC Breaker in rack Extinguisher 20 feet away 1 310504-00008 6 NA 2...

226

Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

community-environmentenvironmental-stewardshipprotectioncommunity-relations-plan.php . First name Click here to enter text. Last name Click here to enter text. Email...

227

Baseline Combined Fire Hazards Analysis and Fire Protection Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is a flat built up membrane over a fluted steel deck supported by the main building beams. The roof construction is a FM Approved Class I assembly. Interior partitions are...

228

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Public Comments to Community...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

covered by the permit. Please use another word for "promulgated," such as "created." This section should state that it is a ten-year permit, set to expire in November 2020. It...

229

Facility Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

231

Facility Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

232

OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that workers who are performing activities associated with characterizing, handling, processing, storing or transporting hazardous wastes are adequately protected. The surveillance also evaluates the effectiveness of programs implemented to protect the health and safety of emergency response personnel who may be called upon to mitigate upset conditions at a facility where hazardous waste operations are conducted. Finally, the surveillance includes evaluations of the contractor's compliance with specific requirements regarding hazardous waste operations and emergency response. OSS19-05.doc

233

Hazardous Substances Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture has the authority to promulgate regulations declaring specified substances to be hazardous and establishing labeling, transportation, storage, and...

234

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure lonq-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

Lewis, C.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

Richardson, R.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A hazard separation system for dismantlement of nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect

Over the next decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must retire and dismantle many nuclear weapon systems. In support of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed the Hazard Separation System (HSS). The HSS combines abrasive waterjet cutting technology and real-time radiography. Using the HSS, operators determine the exact location of interior, hazardous sub-components and remove them through precision cutting. The system minimizes waste and maximizes the recovery of recyclable materials. During 1994, the HSS was completed and demonstrated. Weapon components processed during the demonstration period included arming, fusing, and firing units; preflight control units; neutron generator subassemblies; and x-units. Hazards removed included radioactive krytron tubes and gap tubes, thermal batteries, neutron generator tubes, and oil-filled capacitors. Currently, the HSS is being operated at SNL in a research and development mode to facilitate the transfer of the technology to other DOE facilities for support of their dismantlement operations.

Lutz, J.D.; Purvis, S.T.; Hospelhorn, R.L.; Thompson, K.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Site & Facility Restoration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Restoration Restoration Site & Facility Restoration Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) is the process of taking an active/excess/abandoned facility to a final disposition end state. Because of residual radioactivity, other hazardous constituents, and the physical condition of EM's facilities, D&D presents unique hazards that must be addressed from a safety, programmatic, environmental, and technological standpoint. Read more Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic

238

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

239

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

Sheridan, Jennifer

240

Is Salinity Variability a Benthic Disturbance?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include: salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, conductivity, oxidation-reduction potential, and depth (Monatgna and Kalke 1992, 1995). Measurements were collected both at depth (0.1 m above bay bottom) and at the surface using a sonde... IS SALINITY VARIABILITY A BENTHIC DISTURBANCE? A Thesis by AMANDA D. VAN DIGGELEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University and the Graduate Faculty of The Texas A&M University Corpus...

Van Diggelen, Amanda

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents &...

242

Race, ethnicity, and noxious facilities: Environmental racism re- examined  

SciTech Connect

The charge has been made that hazardous facilities tend to be located in proximity to minority populations. This study uses a facility density measure for three categories of noxious facilities to examine the relationship between facilities and minority population concentrations. County-level data are used in a correlation analysis for African Americans, Hispanics, and Asians in the four major regions of the US. Even controlling for income and housing value, and limiting the data set to urban areas, consistent patterns of moderate to strong association of facility densities with minority population percentages are found.

Nieves, A.L. [Wheaton Coll., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 11, 2011 February 11, 2011 Site Visit Report Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011 INTRODUCTION This report documents the results of a review conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of the Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) documented safety analysis (DSA) at the Hanford Site. During discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE- RL), the review of WESF was jointly selected by HSS and DOE-RL based on the high hazards of the facility and the need to periodically evaluate the facility and DSA by independent reviewers. SCOPE The scope of the review was to evaluate the WESF safety and support systems in detecting, preventing and mitigating analyzed events as described in the facility's DSA, PRC-EDC-10-45190, 2010, Executive

244

Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 11, 2011 February 11, 2011 Site Visit Report Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011 INTRODUCTION This report documents the results of a review conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of the Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) documented safety analysis (DSA) at the Hanford Site. During discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE- RL), the review of WESF was jointly selected by HSS and DOE-RL based on the high hazards of the facility and the need to periodically evaluate the facility and DSA by independent reviewers. SCOPE The scope of the review was to evaluate the WESF safety and support systems in detecting, preventing and mitigating analyzed events as described in the facility's DSA, PRC-EDC-10-45190, 2010, Executive

245

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

246

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

247

Mr. James Bearzi, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carlsbad Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 October 12, 2010 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Results of Evaluation of Sampling Line Loss, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088 - TSDF Dear Mr. Bearzi: As required under Permit Condition IV.F.5.e, the Permittees are hereby notifying the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) of the results of the evaluation of the loss of two hydrogen and methane monitoring sampling lines. The sampling lines involved were in Panel 3 Rooms 7 and 6. These lines are identified as 7E (exhaust side) and 61 (inlet side). These line losses were previously reported to the NMED on September 2, 2010 and September 28, 2010, respectively.

248

Probabilistic risk analysis for Test Area North Hot Shop Storage Pool Facility  

SciTech Connect

A storage pool facility used for storing spent fuel and radioactive debris from the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident was evaluated to determine the risk associated with its normal operations. Several hazards were identified and examined to determine if any any credible accident scenarios existed. Expected annual occurrence frequencies were calculated for hazards for which accident scenarios were identified through use of fault trees modeling techniques. Fault tree models were developed for two hazards: (1) increased radiation field and (2) spread of contamination. The models incorporated facets of the operations within the facility as well as the facility itself. 6 refs.

Meale, B.M.; Satterwhite, D.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Payment Of the New Mexico Environment Department- Hazardous Waste Bureau Annual Business and Generation Fees Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this letter is to transmit to the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB), the Los alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Annual Business and Generation Fees for calendar year 2011. These fees are required pursuant to the provisions of New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act, Chapter 74, Article 4, NMSA (as amended). The Laboratory's Fenton Hill Facility did not generate any hazardous waste during the entire year, and is not required to pay a fee for calendar year 2011. The enclosed fee represents the amount for a single facility owned by the Department of Energy and co-operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS).

Juarez, Catherine L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

GRR/Section 18-CO-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-CO-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process GRR/Section 18-CO-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-CO-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process 18COBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Regulations & Policies Colorado Hazardous Waste Regulations Part 260 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18COBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf 18COBHazardousWastePermitProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Hazardous waste is a regulated substance and facilities that treat, store

251

Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

Borgeson, M.E.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

252

Assessment of Building Damage Hazard Caused by Earthquake: Integration of FNN and GIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this research is to develop an integrated system that implements FNN and GIS to evaluate the building damage hazard caused by earthquake and to calculate the economic losses of damage. This research comprises of four steps which is the development of building damage hazard zones, the development of building database, the assessment of building damage hazard and the impact of economic losses in of damage. The result of the analysis showed that more than 97 percent of the functions of buildings in research location is a low hazard of building damage, where residential/commercial type and educational/religious facilities majority is in moderate to high hazard zone of building damage. The direct economic loss due to building damages caused by earthquake in Banda Aceh city Indonesia is estimated around 1,518,831,150,000 in Indonesia rupiah (168,759,016 in US Dollars).

E. Irwansyah; Sri Hartati

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that workers who are performing activities associated with characterizing, handling, processing, storing or transporting hazardous wastes are adequately protected. The surveillance also evaluates the effectiveness of programs implemented to protect the health and safety of emergency response personnel who may be called upon to mitigate upset conditions at a facility where hazardous waste operations are conducted. Finally, the surveillance includes evaluations of the contractor's compliance with specific requirements regarding hazardous waste operations and emergency response. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5483.1A, Occupational Safety and Health Program

254

Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification of Hazards Identification of Hazards 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety basis documentation (SARs, ISBs, BIOs, JCOs, HASPs etc) as well as activity level hazards identification via JHAs, AJHAs, JSAs etc.) 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions 2.4 DOE O 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance verifies implementation of guiding principle #5 and core value #2 as specified in 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 (b) (5) and (c) (2) respectively. Additionally, it verifies implementation of

255

Portable sensor for hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

Objective was to develop a field-portable monitor for sensitive hazardous waste detection using active nitrogen energy transfer (ANET) excitation of atomic and molecular fluorescence (active nitrogen is made in a dielectric-barrier discharge in nitrogen). It should provide rapid field screening of hazardous waste sites to map areas of greatest contamination. Results indicate that ANET is very sensitive for monitoring heavy metals (Hg, Se) and hydrocarbons; furthermore, chlorinated hydrocarbons can be distinguished from nonchlorinated ones. Sensitivity is at ppB levels for sampling in air. ANET appears ideal for on-line monitoring of toxic heavy metal levels at building sites, hazardous waste land fills, in combustor flues, and of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels at building sites and hazardous waste dumps.

Piper, L.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION Huiying Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION by Huiying Sun Ph.D, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, CHINA, 1991 .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1999 c flHuiying Sun, 1999 #12; Abstract We propose using

Heckman, Nancy E.

257

Independent Oversight Review, DOE Headquarters Facilities - March 2002 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Headquarters Facilities - March DOE Headquarters Facilities - March 2002 Independent Oversight Review, DOE Headquarters Facilities - March 2002 March 2002 Review of the Headquarters Facilities Emergency Response Plans The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance conducted a review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters facilities emergency response plans in February 2002. The purpose of this review was to assess the Department's readiness to respond to emergency events, such as fires and hazardous material releases (inside and outside the building), that occur at any of the following facilities: the two primary DOE Headquarters facilities, namely, the James V. Forrestal building, which is located in Washington, D.C., and the main Germantown, Maryland, facility; and the 270 Corporate Center and Cloverleaf

258

Independent Oversight Review, DOE/NNSA Nuclear Facilities - April 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/NNSA Nuclear Facilities - April DOE/NNSA Nuclear Facilities - April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, DOE/NNSA Nuclear Facilities - April 2013 April 2013 Lessons Learned from the 2012 Targeted Reviews of Emergency Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at Select DOE/NNSA Nuclear Facilities This report provides lessons learned from the 2012 reviews performed by Independent Oversight. The reviews performed during the fall of 2011 and throughout 2012 were at DOE/NNSA sites with hazard category 1 and 2 nuclear facilities, some of which also have significant quantities of hazardous chemicals on site. The purpose of the Independent Oversight review was to determine the state of emergency preparedness of selected sites by examining the sites' processes for evaluating plausible severe NPEs;

259

SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

260

ARM - SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years.

DAVIS, W.E.

2000-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

262

Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July, 2004 Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated Posture Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated it is possible for these injuries to heal themselves when the ergonomic hazard is removed, cases do exist where;PAGE 2 ERGONOMIC HAZARDS of the SEATED POSTURE BULLETIN NO. 233 Ergonomic interventions to reduce

Martin, Jeff

264

NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Facility Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Design Throughout the Energy Systems Integration Facility design process, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory hosted workshops in which stakeholders from across the...

265

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, liquid effluent retention facility and 200 area effluent treatment facility  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to 10 be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document 11 number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the 12 Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation 13 submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal 14 units, such as the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 15 Treatment Facility (this document, DOE/RL-97-03). 16 17 Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford 18 Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B 19 permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of 20 Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 21 (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs 22 defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of 23 Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington 24 State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit 25 application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the 26 chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is 27 contained in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 28 Treatment Facility permit application documentation, in relation to the 29 Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents 30 Section. 31 32 Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in 33 nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units 34 (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever 35 appropriate, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 36 Treatment Facility permit application documentation makes cross-reference to 37 the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. 38 39 Information provided in this Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 40 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility permit application documentation is 41 current as of June 1, 1997.

Coenenberg, J.G.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

4858 recreation facility [n  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

plan. recr. (Installation and equipment provided for recreation; ? simply-provided recreation facility , ? well-provided recreation facility ...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Research Facility Distributed Energy Research Center Engine Research Facility Heat Transfer Laboratory Tribology Laboratory Transportation Beamline at the Advanced...

269

Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Design Guide for use with DOE O 420.1C, Facility Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Guide provides an acceptable approach for safety design of DOE hazard category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities for satisfying the requirements of DOE O 420.1C. Cancels DOE G 420.1-1.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

270

Order Module--DOE O 420.1B, FACILITY SAFETY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To ensure that new DOE hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities are designed and constructed in a manner that ensures adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment from...

271

Process hazards analysis (PrHA) program, bridging accident analyses and operational safety  

SciTech Connect

Recently the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55 (TA-55) was revised and submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE). As a part of this effort, over seventy Process Hazards Analyses (PrHAs) were written and/or revised over the six years prior to the FSAR revision. TA-55 is a research, development, and production nuclear facility that primarily supports US. defense and space programs. Nuclear fuels and material research; material recovery, refining and analyses; and the casting, machining and fabrication of plutonium components are some of the activities conducted at TA-35. These operations involve a wide variety of industrial, chemical and nuclear hazards. Operational personnel along with safety analysts work as a team to prepare the PrHA. PrHAs describe the process; identi fy the hazards; and analyze hazards including determining hazard scenarios, their likelihood, and consequences. In addition, the interaction of the process to facility systems, structures and operational specific protective features are part of the PrHA. This information is rolled-up to determine bounding accidents and mitigating systems and structures. Further detailed accident analysis is performed for the bounding accidents and included in the FSAR. The FSAR is part of the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) that defines the safety envelope for all facility operations in order to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. The DSA is in compliance with the US. Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management and is approved by DOE. The DSA sets forth the bounding conditions necessary for the safe operation for the facility and is essentially a 'license to operate.' Safely of day-to-day operations is based on Hazard Control Plans (HCPs). Hazards are initially identified in the PrI-IA for the specific operation and act as input to the HCP. Specific protective features important to worker safety are incorporated so the worker can readily identify the safety parameters of the their work. System safety tools such as Preliminary Hazard Analysis, What-If Analysis, Hazard and Operability Analysis as well as other techniques as necessary provide the groundwork for both determining bounding conditions for facility safety, operational safety, and day-to-clay worker safety.

Richardson, J. A. (Jeanne A.); McKernan, S. A. (Stuart A.); Vigil, M. J. (Michael J.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Secondary plant succession on disturbed sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of secondary plant succession on disturbed sites created during initial site investigations in the late 1970s and early 1980s at Yucca Mountain, NV. Specific study objectives were to determine the rate and success of secondary plant succession, identify plant species found in disturbances that may be suitable for site-specific reclamation, and to identify environmental variables that influence succession on disturbed sites. During 1991 and 1992, fifty seven disturbed sites were located. Vegetation parameters, disturbance characteristics and environmental variables were measured at each site. Disturbed site vegetation parameters were compared to that of undisturbed sites to determine the status of disturbed site plant succession. Vegetation on disturbed sites, after an average of ten years, was different from undisturbed areas. Ambrosia dumosa, Chrysothamnus teretifolius, Hymenoclea salsola, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, Atriplex canescens, and Stephanomeria pauciflora were the most dominant species across all disturbed sites. With the exception of A. dumosa, these species were generally minor components of the undisturbed vegetation. Elevation, soil compaction, soil potassium, and amounts of sand and gravel in the soil were found to be significant environmental variables influencing the species composition and abundance of perennial plants on disturbed sites. The recovery rate for disturbed site secondary succession was estimated. Using a linear function (which would represent optimal conditions), the recovery rate for perennial plant cover, regardless of which species comprised the cover, was estimated to be 20 years. However, when a logarithmic function (which would represent probable conditions) was used, the recovery rate was estimated to be 845 years. Recommendations for future studies and site-specific reclamation of disturbances are presented.

Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.; Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Maintenance Management Program for DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order defines the safety management program required by 10 CFR 830.204(b)(5) for maintenance and the reliable performance of Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs) that are part of the safety basis required by 10 CFR 830.202.1 at hazard category 1, 2 and 3 Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 433.1. Canceled by DOE O 433.1B.

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

Maintenance Management Program for DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order defines the safety management program required by 10 CFR 830.204(b)(5) for maintenance and the reliable performance of structures, systems and components that are part of the safety basis required by 10 CFR 830.202 at hazard category 1, 2 and 3 DOE nuclear facilities. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-12-2013. Cancels DOE O 433.1A.

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

275

Maintenance Management Program for DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order defines the safety management program required by 10 CFR 830.204(b)(5) for maintenance and the reliable performance of structures, systems and components that are part of the safety basis required by 10 CFR 830.202 at hazard category 1, 2 and 3 DOE nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 433.1A. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-12-2013, cancels DOE O 433.1B.

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

276

FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representative Representative FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-FacilityRepresentative.docx Description Facility Representative Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Facility Representative

277

Sediment Transport in Shallow Subcritical Flow Disturbed by Simulated Rainfall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR-14 1968 Sediment Transport in Shallow Subcritical Flow Disturbed by Simulated Rainfall J.L. Machemehl Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

Machemehl, J. L.

278

LISA Science Results in the Presence of Data Disturbances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Each spacecraft in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna houses a proof mass which follows a geodesic through spacetime. Disturbances which change the proof mass position, momentum, and/or acceleration will appear in the LISA data stream as additive quadratic functions. These data disturbances inhibit signal extraction and must be removed. In this paper we discuss the identification and fitting of monochromatic signals in the data set in the presence of data disturbances. We also present a preliminary analysis of the extent of science result limitations with respect to the frequency of data disturbances.

Scott E Pollack

2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

279

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

063-2011 063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations,

280

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Facility Type!  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ITY: ITY: --&L~ ----------- srct-r~ -----------~------~------- if yee, date contacted ------------- cl Facility Type! i I 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis ] Production 1 Diepasal/Storage 'YPE OF CONTRACT .--------------- 1 Prime J Subcontract&- 1 Purchase Order rl i '1 ! Other information (i.e., ---------~---~--~-------- :ontrait/Pirchaee Order # , I C -qXlJ- --~-------~~-------~~~~~~ I I ~~~---~~~~~~~T~~~ FONTRACTING PERIODi IWNERSHIP: ,I 1 AECIMED AECMED GOVT GOUT &NTtiAC+OR GUN-I OWNED ----- LEEE!? M!s LE!Ps2 -LdJG?- ---L .ANDS ILJILDINGS X2UIPilENT IRE OR RAW HA-I-L :INAL PRODUCT IASTE Z. RESIDUE I I kility l pt I ,-- 7- ,+- &!d,, ' IN&"E~:EW AT SITE -' ---------------- , . Control 0 AEC/tlED managed operations

282

Research Facility,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collecting and Delivering the Data Collecting and Delivering the Data As a general condition for use of the ARM Climate Research Facility, users are required to include their data in the ARM Data Archive. All data acquired must be of sufficient quality to be useful and must be documented such that users will be able to clearly understand the meaning and organization of the data. Final, quality-assured data sets are stored in the Data Archive and are freely accessible to the general scientific community. Preliminary data may be shared among field campaign participants during and shortly following the campaign. To facilitate sharing of preliminary data, the ARM Data Archive establishes restricted access capability, limited to participants and data managers.

283

Electrical Sitchgear Building No. 5010-ESF Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Fire Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event; (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of the employees, the public, and the environment; (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related event.

N.M. Ruonavaara

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

284

Thoughts on Hazard Assessment (Oct)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences J.M. Logue, T.E. McKone, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2010 Funding was provided by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Building Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231; by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through Interagency Agreement I-PHI-01070, and by the California Energy Commission through Contract 500-08-06. LBNL Report Number 3650-E 1 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States

285

Subsurface Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The results from this report are preliminary and cannot be used as input into documents supporting procurement, fabrication, or construction. This technical report identifies fire hazards and proposes their mitigation for the subsurface repository fire protection system. The proposed mitigation establishes the minimum level of fire protection to meet NRC regulations, DOE fire protection orders, that ensure fire containment, adequate life safety provisions, and minimize property loss. Equipment requiring automatic fire suppression systems is identified. The subsurface fire hazards that are identified can be adequately mitigated.

Logan, R.C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Role of Disturbance in Dry Tropical Forest Landscapes  

SciTech Connect

Disturbance can be defined as 'any relatively discrete event in time that disrupts ecosystem, community, or population structure and changes resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment'. This definition requires that the spatial and temporal scales of the system and disturbance be determined. Disturbances are typically characterized by their size, spatial distribution, frequency or return time, predictability, and magnitude (which includes both intensity and severity). These disturbance attributes set the parameters for the suite of species, both plant and animal, that can persist within a given system. As such, an understanding of seasonally dry tropical forests in Asia requires an understanding of disturbance within the region. However, disturbances are relatively poorly understood in dry tropical forests, partly because of the weak seasonality in temperature and high tree species diversity of these forests relative to most forest systems of the world. There are about 1,048,700 km{sup 2} of dry tropical forests worldwide and that only 3% of this land is in conservation status. In other words, 97% of the world's seasonally dry tropical forest is at risk of human disturbance. About half of this forest occurs in South America, where most of the conservation lands are located. Satellite imagery based on MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data shows that only about 3.8% of the world's dry tropical forests are in Australia and South east Asia. The susceptibility of these forests to human disturbances is of great concern and is largely unstudied. Because natural disturbance regimes shape the ecosystem structure and are in many ways integral to these forest systems, it is critical to know how natural disturbance affects dry forest in order to understand the effects of human activities on these forests. Even basic information about disturbances in dry tropical forests is only recently available. Therefore this chapter brings together much of the available information from dry tropical forest throughout the world with the goal of developing an understanding of the role of disturbance in Asian dry forests. Most ecologists now recognize that disturbances, rather than being catastrophic agents of destruction, are a normal, perhaps even an integral, part of long-term system dynamics. The composition, structure, organization, and development and trophic dynamics of most forest systems are the products of disturbances. As an example, the forest composition for two disturbances in the Anaikatty Hills of Western Ghats were compared, where the low disturbance was from past logging followed by cutting and illicit felling and grazing and the high disturbance was due to human presence, past logging, and fuelwood collection. They found higher species richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity index for the low-disturbance forest (98 and 3.9, respectively) compared to the high-disturbance stand (45 and 2.71, respectively) as well as significant differences in mean basal area of trees, density of seedlings, number of species, density and diversity of shrubs, and number of species and diversity of herbs. Some ecological systems contain species that have evolved in response to disturbances. Adaptations typical of dry tropical forest plants are drought tolerance, seed dispersal mechanisms, and the ability to sprout subsequent to disturbance. In contrast, evidence was found that human disturbance in Kakamega Forest of western Kenya has significantly reduced allelic richness and heterozygosity, increased inbreeding, and slightly reduced gene flow in Prunus africana in the past century.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hazardous-environment problems: Mobile robots to the rescue  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a rationale for employing a spectrum of similar mobile robots to conduct appropriate common missions for the following five hazardous-environment issues: (1) dismantlement of nuclear weapons; (2) environmental restoration and waste management of US Department of Energy weapons sites; (3) operations in nuclear power plants and other facilities; (4) waste chemical site remediation and cleanup activities; and (5) assistance in handling toxic chemical/radiation accidents. Mobile robots have been developed for several hazardous-environment industries, the most visible ones being construction/excavation/tunneling, explosive ordnance/bomb disposal (EOD), fire-fighting, military operations, mining, nuclear, and security. A summary of the range of functions that mobile robots are currently capable of conducting is presented.

Meieran, H.B. (PHD Technologies, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, Subpart B, Safety Basis Requirements.

Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum Products and Hazardous Materials (Rhode Island) Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum Products and Hazardous Materials (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations apply to underground storage facilities for petroleum and

290

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

291

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Facility Harrisburg Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dauphin County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.2734277°, -76.7336521° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2734277,"lon":-76.7336521,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

292

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Facility Brookhaven Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

293

Fire hazard analysis for Plutonium Finishing Plant complex  

SciTech Connect

A fire hazards analysis (FHA) was performed for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The scope of the FHA focuses on the nuclear facilities/structures in the Complex. The analysis was conducted in accordance with RLID 5480.7, [DOE Directive RLID 5480.7, 1/17/94] and DOE Order 5480.7A, ''Fire Protection'' [DOE Order 5480.7A, 2/17/93] and addresses each of the sixteen principle elements outlined in paragraph 9.a(3) of the Order. The elements are addressed in terms of the fire protection objectives stated in paragraph 4 of DOE 5480.7A. In addition, the FHA also complies with WHC-CM-4-41, Fire Protection Program Manual, Section 3.4 [1994] and WHC-SD-GN-FHA-30001, Rev. 0 [WHC, 1994]. Objectives of the FHA are to determine: (1) the fire hazards that expose the PFP facilities, or that are inherent in the building operations, (2) the adequacy of the fire safety features currently located in the PFP Complex, and (3) the degree of compliance of the facility with specific fire safety provisions in DOE orders, related engineering codes, and standards.

MCKINNIS, D.L.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

294

No energetic cost of anthropogenic disturbance in a songbird  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...disturbance, and diverting energy towards survival...they should redirect energy allocation to activities...extent than other sources of human disturbance...recently, measures of energy expenditure were...estimates of energy consumption. Although comparative...training sites for the US military troops...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Geologic factors controlling patterns of small-volume basaltic volcanism: Application to a volcanic hazards assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hazards assessment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Charles B. Connor,1 John A. Stamatakos,1 David A. Ferrill,1 are often required for facilities, such as nuclear power plants and high-level radioactive waste ­105 years [e.g., Krauskopf, 1988; U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, 1994; U.S. National

Connor, Charles

296

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICALITY SAFETY CRITICALITY SAFETY OBJECTIVE CS.1 Facility safety documentation that describes the "safety envelope" for the AR Project II activities is in place and has been implemented and administrative and engineering controls to prevent and mitigate hazards associated with commencing the AR Project II activities are tailored to the work being performed and the associated hazards to meet the following criteria: CRITERIA: CS. 1.1 Criticality safety requirements are current, approved, and properly controlled. CS. 1.2 Facility safety and criticality requirements have been incorporated into applicable procedures and documents. REVIEW APPROACH: Document Reviews: * Review applicable CSEs for identification of facility hazards and development

297

Active disturbance rejection control for the ALSTOM gasifier benchmark problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new control solution based on a unique active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) paradigm is proposed for the ALSTOM gasifier control problem. In the new control method, the disturbances, including unknown dynamics and external disturbances to the system, are treated as an augmented state that is estimated and then eliminated in real-time. A first-order ADRC scheme for the ALSTOM gasifier is designed. The simulation results show that the new control method is superior to the PI solution by Simm and Xue in terms of the integral of the absolute error of gas pressure disturbance tests at 0% load, the no-overshoot peak value of the gas temperature and the short time for the bed mass to return to the set point during a ramping test, and the ability to reject large coal quality disturbances.

Chun-E Huang; Donghai Li; Yali Xue

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment Ahmed Jemie Dababneh, Ph.D., P.E. and Jeffrey Oskamp, E.I.T. Presentation for U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 22, 2014

299

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

300

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. PTS13-01.doc More Documents & Publications Order Module--DOE O 460.1C, PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION SAFETY, DOE O

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

GRR/Section 18-OR-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OR-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process OR-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-OR-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process 18ORBHazardousWastePermitProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Oregon Public Health Division Oregon Public Utility Commission Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Oregon Water Resources Department Regulations & Policies OAR 340-105: Management Facility Permits OAR 340-120: Hazardous Waste Management ORS 466: Storage, Treatment, and Disposal Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18ORBHazardousWastePermitProcess (1).pdf

302

International Facility Management Association Strategic Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Management Association Facility Management Association Strategic Facility Planning: A WhIte PAPer Strategic Facility Planning: A White Paper on Strategic Facility Planning © 2009 | International Facility Management Association For additional information, contact: 1 e. Greenway Plaza, Suite 1100 houston, tX 77046-0104 USA P: + 1-713-623-4362 F: + 1-713-623-6124 www.ifma.org taBle OF cOntentS PreFace ......................................................... 2 executive Summary .................................... 3 Overview ....................................................... 4 DeFinitiOn OF Strategic Facility Planning within the Overall cOntext OF Facility Planning ................. 5 SPecializeD analySeS ................................ 9 OrganizatiOnal aPPrOacheS tO SFP ... 10 the SFP PrOceSS .......................................

303

CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on or near any system that produces, uses, or stores hazardous energy, a hazardous energy control program by the contractor-managed HECP (e.g., QA's on construction sites, etc.), they shall comply with the contractor and implementation of these activities. Each shall inform the other of their HECPs and Hazardous Energy Control (HEC

US Army Corps of Engineers

304

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 11, 2011 Facility News ARM Mobile Facility Completes Extended Campaign in the Azores; Next Stop-India Bookmark and Share The ARM Mobile Facility obtained data on Graciosa...

305

Facilities Services Overview & Discussion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Finance Facilities Services Director: Jeff Butler Human Resources Administrative Services Engineering) Environmental Services Morrison (3) Admin Services Evans (1) Human Resources Engineering (4) ·EngineeringFacilities Services Overview & Discussion Jeff Butler Director ­ Facilities Services November 2011

Maxwell, Bruce D.

306

Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Guide provides U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) line management organizations with guidance that may be useful to them in effectively and efficiently implementing the requirements of DOE O 226.1B, Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy, dated April 25, 2011, as applied to Federal line management of hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities.

307

Safe electrical design practices for coal-handling facilities  

SciTech Connect

Today's electrical designer must be aware of the latest changes in both codes and regulatory requirements. These regulations now make classification for coal-handling facilities as hazardous areas, a mandatory requirement for both utility and industrial plants. Safe electrical systems can be provided with proper selection, application and installation of material and equipment.

Baggs, G.; Tyles, G.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application  

SciTech Connect

This document, Set 2, the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part B Permit Application, consists of 15 chapters that address the content of the Part B checklists prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 270), with additional information requirements mandated by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 and revisions of WAC 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology checklist section numbers, in brackets, follow the chapter headings and subheadings. This permit application contains umbrella- type'' documentation with overall application to the Hanford Facility. This documentation is broad in nature and applies to all TSD units that have final status under the Hanford Facility Permit.

none,

1991-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

309

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fuel Fabrication Facility  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

311

Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center in Vermont Achieves Milestone Installation On September 23, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News &...

312

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News ARM Mobile Facility Completes Field Campaign in Germany Bookmark and Share Researchers will study severe precipitation events that occurred in...

313

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

314

Programs & User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Programs & User Facilities Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy...

315

Facility Data Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Data Policy About ESnet Our Mission The Network ESnet History Governance & Policies ESnet Policy Board ESCC Acceptable Use Policy Facility Data Policy Career Opportunities...

316

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 15, 2005 Facility News More Server Power Improves Performance at the ARM Data Management Facility Bookmark and Share Recently, several new Sun servers joined the...

317

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

approximately 22,500 square kilometers, or the approximate area of a modern climate model grid cell. Centered around the SGP Central Facility, these extended facilities are...

318

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From Coastal Clouds to Desert Dust: ARM Mobile Facility Headed to Africa Bookmark and Share ARM operations staff prepare the ARM Mobile Facility in Point Reyes, California, for...

319

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals ACETALDEHYDE ACETAMIDE ACETIC ACID ACETIC ANHYDRIDE ACETONE ACETONItr ILE ACETYLAMINOFLUORENE, 2- ACETYLENE ACETYLENE DICHLORIDE ACETYLENE TETRABROMIDE ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID (ASPIRIN) ACROLEIN ACRYLAMIDE ACRYLIC ACID ACRYLONITRILE ACTINOMYCIN D ADRIAMYCIN AFLATOXINS ALDRIN ALLYL ALCOHOL ALLYL CHLORIDE ALLYL GLYCIDYL ETHER (AGE) ALLYL PROPYL DISULFIDE ALUMINA ALUMINUM, METAL DUST, AS AL ALUMINUM, PYRO POWDERS, AS AL ALUMINUM, SOLUBLE SALTS, AS AL ALUMINUM, WELDING FUMES, AS AL ALUMINUM, ALKYLS, NOT OTHERWISE CLASSIFIED, AS AL ALUMINUM OXIDE, AS AL AMINOANTHRAQUINONE (AAQ), AMINOAZOTOLUENE, O- AMINOBIPHENYL, 4- AMINOETHANOL, 2- AMINO-2-METHYLANTHRAQUINONE, 1- AMINO-5-(5-NITRO-2-FURYL)- -1, 3,4-THIADIADIAZOLE, 2- AMINOPYRIDINE, 2- AMINO-1,2,4-TRIAZOLE, 3-

320

Nuclear Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Facilities Locator Map Numerical map data points indicate two or more nuclear facilities in the same geographic location. Nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report The following information represents a partial sequence of events based upon Reliability Coordinator information available to NERC. It is not clear if these events caused the event or were a consequence of other events. NERC is establishing teams to study the event and will coordinate with FERC, DOE, the industry and others. NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report More Documents & Publications North American Electric Reliability Council Power Outage Update Blackout 2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and Recommendations

322

NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report The following information represents a partial sequence of events based upon Reliability Coordinator information available to NERC. It is not clear if these events caused the event or were a consequence of other events. NERC is establishing teams to study the event and will coordinate with FERC, DOE, the industry and others. NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance Report More Documents & Publications North American Electric Reliability Council Power Outage Update North American Electric Reliability Council Outage Announcement U.S. - Canada Power System Outage Task Force: Final Report on the

323

Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting The law requires installation and maintenance of sufficient erosion control

324

The mixed waste management facility  

SciTech Connect

During FY96, the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Project has the following major objectives: (1) Complete Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR). (2) Complete final design (Title II) of MWMF major systems. (3) Coordinate all final interfaces with the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) for facility utilities and facility integration. (4) Begin long-lead procurements. (5) Issue Project Baseline Revision 2-Preliminary Design (PB2), modifying previous baselines per DOE-requested budget profiles and cost reduction. Delete Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO) as a treatment process for initial demonstration. (6) Complete submittal of, and ongoing support for, applications for air permit. (7) Begin detailed planning for start-up, activation, and operational interfaces with the Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Division (HWM). In achieving these objectives during FY96, the Project will incorporate and implement recent DOE directives to maximize the cost savings associated with the DWTF/MWMF integration (initiated in PB1.2); to reduce FY96 new Budget Authority to {approximately}$10M (reduced from FY97 Validation of $15.3M); and to keep Project fiscal year funding requirements largely uniform at {approximately}$10M/yr. A revised Project Baseline (i.e., PB2), to be issued during the second quarter of FY96, will address the implementation and impact of this guidance from an overall Project viewpoint. For FY96, the impact of this guidance is that completion of final design has been delayed relative to previous baselines (resulting from the delay in the completion of preliminary design); ramp-up in staffing has been essentially eliminated; and procurements have been balanced through the Project to help balance budget needs to funding availability.

Streit, R.D.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations - EM Statement - November 24, 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex High Hazard Nuclear Operations Statement of Dr. Ines Triay Assistant Secretary, DOE Office of Environmental Management November 24, 2009 Good morning Mr. Vice Chairman and Members of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. I appreciate the opportunity to be here today to represent the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM) and address the actions our office has taken regarding oversight of complex high hazard nuclear operations. My remarks cover the six topics you provided to the Secretary in your letter dated August 25, 2009. Expectations of the senior Department of Energy (DOE) leadership with respect to safety philosophy and safety management approach.

326

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

327

NREL: Research Facilities - Test and User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities NREL has test and user facilities available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here you'll find an alphabetical listing and brief descriptions of NREL's test and user facilities. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Advanced Research Turbines At our wind testing facilities, we have turbines available to test new control schemes and equipment for reducing loads on wind turbine components. Learn more about the Advanced Research Turbines on our Wind Research website. Back to Top D Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility This facility was designed to assist the distributed power industry in the

328

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Facility Representative Workshop 0 Facility Representative Workshop May 16-18, 2000 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Tuesday, May 16, 2000 Theme for Day 1: Sustaining the Success of the Facility Representative Program 8:00 a.m. - Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:05 a.m. - Welcome - Kenneth Powers, Deputy Manager Nevada Operations Office 8:15 a.m. - Deputy Secretary Remarks - T. J. Glauthier, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Jerry Lyle, Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, Idaho Operations Office 9:00 a.m. - Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Departmental Representative 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Results and Goals - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager

329

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding DOE Order 420.1C, Facility Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding DOE Order 420.1C, Facility Safety, and its supporting directives, DOE?STD?1020?2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities, and DOE?STD?1066?2012, Fire Protection

330

Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6.

Laycak, D T

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

332

Recommissioning the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Center of Natural Phenomena Engineering (CNPE) was established under the technical direction of Dr. James E. Beavers with a mandate to assess, by analyses and testing, the seismic capacity of building structures that house sensitive processes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This mandate resulted in a need to recommission the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility (STF) at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, which had been shutdown for 6 years. This paper documents the history of the facility and fives some salient construction, operation, and performance details of its 8-ton, 20-foot center of gravity payload bi-axial seismic simulator. A log of activities involved in the restart of this valuable resource is included as Table 1. Some of problems and solutions associated with recommissioning the facility under a relatively limited budget are included. The unique attributes of the shake table are discussed. The original mission and performance requirements are compared to current expanded mission and performance capabilities. Potential upgrades to further improve the capabilities of the test facility as an adjunct to the CNPE are considered. Additional uses for the facility are proposed, including seismic qualification testing of devices unique to enrichment technologies and associated hazardous waste treatment and disposal processes. In summary, the STF restart in conjunction with CNPE has added a vital, and unique facility to the list of current national resources utilized for earthquake engineering research and development. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Wynn, C.C. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Brewer, D.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

334

Scanning probe microscopy with inherent disturbance suppression using micromechanical systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) are affected by disturbances, or mechanical noise, in their environments which can limit their imaging resolution. This thesis introduces a general approach for suppressing out-of-plane ...

Sparks, Andrew William, 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Information-Disturbance Theorem for Mutually Unbiased Observables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive a novel version of information-disturbance theorems for mutually unbiased observables. We show that the information gain by Eve inevitably makes the outcomes by Bob in the conjugate basis not only erroneous but random.

Takayuki Miyadera; Hideki Imai

2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

336

Diversitydisturbance relationships: frequency and intensity interact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...relationship depended on the frequency of disturbances by the...diversity as the response variable and frequency and intensity as factors...unequivocally that the frequency-intensity interaction drives the coexistence of ecologically...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Transmission line routing for reduced external field disturbance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When immersed in a disturbing electromagnetic field, electronic systems are subject to interference due to the energy injected by the external field into the system through the electronic units and, especially, t...

Giuseppe Vecchi; Sergio Pignari; Flavio G. Canavero

338

State of Practice Approaches in Geomorphology, Geochronology and Probabilistic Analyses for Addressing Fault Capability at Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State of Practice Approaches in Geomorphology, Geochronology and Probabilistic Analyses for Addressing Fault Capability at Nuclear Facilities Rizzo Associates Presentation to Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21-22, 2014

339

Commissioning for Federal Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes building commissioning, recommissioning, retrocommissioning, and continuous commissioning for federal facilities.

340

Realtime controller tuning for periodic disturbance rejection with application to active noise control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

de Callafon. Scheduling control for periodic disturbance at-de Callafon, Scheduling Control for Periodic DisturbanceR.A. de Callafon, Scheduling Control for Periodic Distur-

Kinney, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

342

Facility Representative Program: 2007 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Facility Representative Workshop 7 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2007 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks Joanne Lorence, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office Gerald Talbot, Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:45 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight Perspective and Expectations Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Office of Health, Safety and Security 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board,

343

Facility Representative Program: 2001 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Facility Representative Workshop 1 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2001 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. - Logistics Announcements & Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. - Welcome - Debbie Monette, Assistant Manager for National Security, Nevada Operations Office 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Ralph Erickson, National Nuclear Security Administration 9:00 a.m.- DOE Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Summary - Joe Arango 10:10 a.m. - Management Panel/Questions and Answers

344

MRAP MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MRAP MRAP MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT May/June 2005 Report Period: May 1 -June 30, 2005 DOE Project Coordinator: Art Kleinrath HIGHLIGHTS DOE constmction, as identified in the Millsite Restoration Plan, was substantially completed on June 3. Seeding of disturbed areas was completed on June 15. MSG DOE completed constmction of the permeable reactive treatment cell and initiated operations in June. The cell is an enhancement to the existing pe1meable reactive ban·ier and was designed to alleviate ground water mounding. MVP Approximately one cubic yard of contaminated material was identified in a City of Monticello excavation near the golf course. This material was transferred to the Temporary Storage Facility located at the DOE Monticello Office.

345

BNL | CFN: Transport of Hazardous Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials The following contains guidance for transporting materials to and from BNL and for on-site transfers. All staff and users must adhere to Laboratory guidelines when making plans to move materials either by commercial carrier or in rented or personal vehicles. BNL hazardous material transport guidelines apply for products that meet the definition of hazardous materials according to 49 CFR 171.8 and any nanomaterial that has known hazardous properties (toxic, flammable, reactive). BNL guidelines are also provided for all other nanomaterials even if they have not been identified as hazardous materials. Some materials may be transported in personal vehicles as per "Materials of Trade" (MOT) guidance. The regulations for transporting MOT are much

346

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7-202.) The Hazardous Waste Program is based off of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act set forth in 40 CFR parts 260-279. Due to the great similarity to the

347

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Independent Oversight Review, DOE Nuclear Facilities - May 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, DOE Nuclear Facilities - May 2013 Review, DOE Nuclear Facilities - May 2013 Independent Oversight Review, DOE Nuclear Facilities - May 2013 May 2013 Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of Implementation Verification Review Processes at Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities This report summarizes and analyzes the results of independent reviews of IVR and associated processes at eight DOE sites conducted by Independent Oversight from August 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of the Independent Oversight review was to evaluate the processes and methods used for verifying the implementation of safety basis hazard controls and periodically re-verifying that the controls remain in place. Independent Oversight Review, DOE Nuclear Facilities - May 2013 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation

349

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance .Employees shall be encouraged to become involved in the identification and control of hazards in the workplace. (DOE O 440.1A CRD) Workers shall have the right, without reprisal, to accompany DOE worker

350

Idaho waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system response Idaho waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system response June 20, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Brad Bugger 208-526-0833 Danielle Miller 208-526-5709 IDAHO FALLS, ID- On Saturday, June 16, startup testing was suspended at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) located at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho Site. Testing and plant heat-up was suspended to allow detailed evaluation of a system pressure event observed during testing on Saturday. Facility startup testing has been ongoing for the past month, evaluating system and component operation and response during operating conditions. No radioactive or hazardous waste has been introduced into the facility,

351

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL's world-class research facilities provide the venue for innovative advances in photovoltaic technologies and applications. These facilities within the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) serve both multi-use and dedicated-use functions. We encourage our research colleagues in industry, universities, and other laboratories to pursue opportunities in working with our staff in these facilities. Dedicated-Use Facilities Photo of a red-hot coil glowing inside a round machine. Research within these facilities focuses on targeted areas of interest that require specific tools, techniques, or unique capabilities. Our two main dedicated-use facilities are the following: Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) OTF researchers study and evaluate advanced or emerging PV technologies

352

Freeze Concentration Applied to Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steps to remove or destroy the hazardous components prior to discharge. Incineration is widely used to destroy a broad range of these hazardous components. Its disposal efficiency is often used when defining the Best Available Technology for EPA... standards. However, high water content streams are expensive to incinerate since the incinerator must be designed to handle the feed volume even though the water in the feed is in itself harmless. Some hazardous components require operating temperatures...

Ruemekorf, R.

353

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Name: Paul Status: other Grade: 12+ Location: IL Country: USA Date: May 2, 2011 Question: What is a Computer Virus? What do viruses do? How do viruses Spread? How do I prevent a virus? What are Trojan Horse programs? Malware? Phishing? Replies: Paul From National Institute of Science and Technology Which is the US government office in charge of this problem and should be your reference for this subject At this URL: http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-61-rev1/SP800-61rev1.pdf Please find the following definitions from paragraph 5: 5.1.1 Virus: A virus is designed to self-replicate-make copies of itself-and distribute the copies to other files, programs, or computers. Viruses insert themselves into host programs and propagate when the infected program is executed, generally by user interaction (e.g., opening a file, running a program, clicking on a file attachment). Viruses have many purposes-some are designed to play annoying tricks, whereas others have destructive intent. Some viruses present themselves as jokes while performing secret destructive functions. There two major types of viruses are compiled viruses, which are executed by the operating system, and interpreted viruses, which are executed by an application.

354

Hazard of intermittent noise exposures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chief shortcoming of the equal energy hypothesisthe notion that equal products of time and intensity provide equal hazardis that the recuperative powers of the auditory system are essentially ignored. A single sustained stimulus is regarded as no more dangerous than an intermittent one of the same total energy. A two?year study of the effect of intermittency on the TTS produced in normal young adults by 6? or 8?h exposures to octave bands of noise whose center frequencies ranged from 250 to 4000 Hz indicates that even for the most hazardous noise (the 4000?Hz OB) cutting the cumulative exposure time in half by interjecting regular quiet periods will permit an increase in level of 5 dB for constant TTS at least up to about 100 dB SPL. At 1000 Hz the trading relation is 67 dB for halving time and at 250 Hz is even greater. Thus the 5?dBA?per?halving?time relation employed by the present OSHA standard is essentially correct for intermittent noise except perhaps above 100 to 105 dBA where the equal?energy hypothesis may be more appropriate for spectra with high?frequency dominance. A single 5?dBA correction for intermittency is an oversimplification. [Research supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Public Health Service.

W. D. Ward

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Safety Basis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis.

356

Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law and the regulations created under that law.

357

Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the...

358

Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

359

Mission Support Alliance, LLC Volpentest Hazardous Materials...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization (FERO) roles and responsibilities, training requirements and the conduct of operations. Each project is responsible for developing and maintaining EP Hazards...

360

Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

363

User Facilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USER PORTAL USER PORTAL BTRICBuilding Technologies Research Integration Center CNMSCenter for Nanophase Materials Sciences CSMBCenter for Structural Molecular Biology CFTFCarbon Fiber Technology Facility HFIRHigh Flux Isotope Reactor MDF Manufacturing Demonstration Facility NTRCNational Transportation Research Center OLCFOak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility SNSSpallation Neutron Source Keeping it fresh at the Spallation Neutron Source Nanophase material sciences' nanotech toolbox Home | User Facilities SHARE ORNL User Facilities ORNL is home to a number of highly sophisticated experimental user facilities that provide unmatched capabilities to the broader scientific community, including a growing user community from universities, industry, and other laboratories research institutions, as well as to ORNL

364

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

365

Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research is to understand how changes in climate may affect the structure of landscapes that are subject to periodic disturbances. A general model useful for examining the linkage between climatic change and landscape change has been developed. The model makes use of synoptic climatic data, a geographical information system (GRASS), field data on the location of disturbance patches, simulation code written in the SIMSCRIPT language, and a set of landscape structure analysis programs written specifically for this research project. A simplified version of the model, lacking the climatic driver, has been used to analyze how changes in disturbance regimes (in this case settlement and fire suppression) affect landscape change. Landscape change lagged in its response to changes in the disturbance regime, but the lags differed depending upon the character of the change and the particular measure considered. The model will now be modified for use in a specific setting to analyze the effects of changes in climate on the structure of flood-disturbed patches along the Animas River, Colorado.

Baker, W.L.

1993-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

366

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

367

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 222-S Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable Federal, State, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

Nickels, J.M.; Warwick, G.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NREL: Wind Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Our facilities are designed to meet the wind industry's critical research needs with state-of-the-art design and testing facilities. NREL's unique and highly versatile facilities at the National Wind Technology Center offer research and analysis of wind turbine components and prototypes rated from 400 watts to 3 megawatts. Satellite facilities support the growth of wind energy development across the United States. National Wind Technology Center Facilities Our facilities are contained within a 305-acre area that comprises field test sites, test laboratories, industrial high-bay work areas, machine shops, electronics and instrumentation laboratories, and office areas. In addition, there are hundreds of test articles and supporting components such as turbines, meteorological towers, custom test apparatus, test sheds,

369

FACET User Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

AD SLACPortal > Accelerator Research Division > FACET User Facility AD SLACPortal > Accelerator Research Division > FACET User Facility Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content

370

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 15, 2005 [Facility News] October 15, 2005 [Facility News] Room to Share-New Guest Facility Ready for Users at North Slope of Alaska Bookmark and Share In September, installation was completed on the new Guest Instrument Facility in Barrow to provide additional space and ease crowded conditions. In September, installation was completed on the new Guest Instrument Facility in Barrow to provide additional space and ease crowded conditions. To alleviate crowded conditions at its research facilities on the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, ARM operations staff recently completed the installation of a new Guest Instrument Facility. Similar to the platform at the Atqasuk site, the facility consists of two insulated shipping containers mounted on pilings, with a mezzanine to accommodate

371

Jupiter Laser Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jupiter Laser Facility The commissioning of the Titan Petawatt-Class laser to LLNL's Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) has provided a unique platform for the use of petawatt (PW)-class...

372

Facilities | Jefferson Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JLab Buildings Facilities Management & Logistics is responsible for performing or specifying performance of all Jefferson Lab facility maintenance. A D D I T I O N A L L I N K S:...

373

The Great Plains Wind Power Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This multi-year, multi-faceted project was focused on the continued development of a nationally-recognized facility for the testing, characterization, and improvement of grid-connected wind turbines, integrated wind-water desalination systems, and related educational and outreach topics. The project involved numerous faculty and graduate students from various engineering departments, as well as others from the departments of Geosciences (in particular the Atmospheric Science Group) and Economics. It was organized through the National Wind Institute (NWI), which serves as an intellectual hub for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, commercialization and education related to wind science, wind energy, wind engineering and wind hazard mitigation at Texas Tech University (TTU). Largely executed by an academic based team, the project resulted in approximately 38 peer-reviewed publications, 99 conference presentations, the development/expansion of several experimental facilities, and two provisional patents.

Schroeder, John

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

The digital preservation facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Critical listening should be an essential part of all archiving and restoration facilities quality control. We review the priorities and requirements for listening spaces ranging from the individual collector and small community archives to large?scale facilities. Examples discussed include the Library of Congress Culpepper facility university libraries and commercial facilities. Adapting listening rooms to the requirements of n?channel audio are discussed. Public recommendations of the Sound Preservation Board of the Library of Congress will be reviewed.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DETL, Energy, Facilities, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Solar, Solar Newsletter, Systems Analysis Sandia...

376

ORAU South Campus Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document explains the cleanup activities and any use limitations for the land surrounding the ORAU South Campus Facility.

377

DOE Designated Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) Center for Nanoscale Materials Leadership Computing Facility* Brookhaven National...

378

Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards For many Americans, working outdoors on the lawn and in the garden is a great way to exercise and relax. However, safety experts warn that, if caution is not employed with lawn and garden tools, you could wind up spending more time indoors, starting with a trip to a hospital emergency room. "The most frequent injuries are from lawn mowers, which are unforgiving machines," cautions John Drengenberg, manager of Consumer Affairs for Underwriters Laboratories Inc., Northbrook, Ill., a not-for-profit product safety testing organization. "Statistics tell us that each year lawn mower accidents send close to 85,000 people to emergency rooms. But that's not all. Nearly 15,000 others need medical treatment for injuries from trimmers and other power garden

379

Surveillance Guides - PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. 2.0 References DOE O 460.1A, Packaging and Transportation Safety DOE O 460.2, Chg1, Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging

380

DOE Order Self Study Modules - 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29 CFR 1910.120 29 CFR 1910.120 HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SERVICE CENTER Change No: 0 29 CFR 1910.120 Level: Familiar Date: 3/14/05 1 29 CFR 1910.120 HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE FAMILIAR LEVEL _________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources, you will be able to perform the following: 1. Discuss clean-up operations required by the regulation. 2. Discuss corrective actions during clean-up operations covered by the resource conservation and recovery act (RCRA). 3. Discuss operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hazardous Waste Management: The Role of Journalists in Decision Making Process  

SciTech Connect

The journalists are crucial for informing and education of general public about facts related to hazardous and radioactive waste management. Radio programs, TV and newspapers are daily reporting on relevant facts and news. In general, it is true that the majority of journalists are interested more in so called daily politics than in educating general public on certain technical or scientific topics. Therefore, hazardous and radioactive waste management was introduced to Croatian general public in last ten years mainly through various news on site selection of radioactive waste disposal facilities and some problems related to hazardous waste management. This paper presents APO's experience with journalists in last ten years includes program and activities referring informing and educating of journalists from all media.

Eerskov-Klika, M.; Lokner, V.; Subasiae, D.; Schaller, A.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hanford Site Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring Data Report for Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

Near-facility environmental monitoring is defined as monitoring near facilities that have the potential to discharge or have discharged, stored, or disposed of radioactive or hazardous materials. Monitoring locations are associated with nuclear facilities such as the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Canister Storage Building, and the K Basins; inactive nuclear facilities such as N Reactor and the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility; and waste storage or disposal facilities such as burial grounds, cribs, ditches, ponds, tank farms, and trenches. Much of the monitoring consists of collecting and analyzing environmental samples and methodically surveying areas near facilities. The program is also designed to evaluate acquired analytical data, determine the effectiveness of facility effluent monitoring and controls, assess the adequacy of containment at waste disposal units, and detect and monitor unusual conditions.

Perkins, Craig J.; Dorsey, Michael C.; Mckinney, Stephen M.; Wilde, Justin W.; Poston, Ted M.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Homes built the destruction of fire-tolerant trees if a wildfire moves through the area. Creating fuel breaks (such ignite it. · When ERC grows in forests and wood- lands, it acts as a ladder fuel to allow fire to climb

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

384

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT Offered by The College of Architecture and The Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University #12;2 THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL..................................................................................3 C. Approved Courses in the College of Architecture .............................4 D. Approved

387

Wheelabrator Bridgeport Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheelabrator Bridgeport Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Bridgeport Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Bridgeport Sector Biomass Facility Type...

388

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHSS EHSS Industrial Hygiene Group HazMat Transport/Shipping Home Biological & Infectious Substances Chemicals Compressed Gas Cryogens Dry Ice Engineered Nanomaterials Gasoline Lithium Betteries Radioactive Materials Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Mixed Hazardous Materials Personal/Rental Vehicles HazMat Transport/Shipping Transporting and shipping hazardous materials can be dangerous, but both activities can be done safely - much of it by the researchers themselves. Each of the items below is subject to some transportation or shipping restrictions. Click on the applicable hazardous material icon below to learn how you can safely (and legally) transport that hazardous material and to learn what laboratory resources are available to you for your shipping needs.

389

Facility Representative Program: 2004 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Facility Representative Workshop 4 Facility Representative Workshop May 18 - 20, 2004 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 18, 2004 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathy Carlson, Nevada Site Office Manager 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy Deputy Secretary's Remarks 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - NNSA Evaluation of Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report Brigadier General Ronald J. Haeckel, Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Applications, NNSA Other Information: NASA’S Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report

390

Facility Representative Program: 2006 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Facility Representative Workshop 6 Facility Representative Workshop May 16 - 19, 2006 Knoxville, Tennessee Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final To view Pictures, scroll the mouse over the Picture icon To view Presentations, Picture Slideshows and Video, click on the icon Day 1: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from Oak Ridge Office Gerald Boyd, Manager, Oak Ridge Office 8:25 a.m. Welcome from Y-12 Site Office Theodore Sherry, Manager, Y-12 Site Office 8:35 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight at Environmental Management Activities Dr. Inés Triay, Chief Operating Officer, Office of Environmental Management

391

NREL: Buildings Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL provides industry, government, and university researchers with access to state-of-the-art and unique equipment for analyzing a wide spectrum of building energy efficiency technologies and innovations. NREL engineers and researchers work closely with industry partners to research and develop advanced technologies. NREL's existing facilities have been used to test and develop many award-winning building technologies and innovations that deliver significant energy savings in buildings, and the new facilities further extend those capabilities. In addition, the NREL campus includes living laboratories, buildings that researchers and other NREL staff use every day. Researchers monitor real-time building performance data in these facilities to study energy use

392

Facility Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Place GeneratingCapacity NumberOfUnits CommercialOnlineDate WindTurbineManufacturer FacilityStatus Coordinates D Metals D Metals D Metals Definition Small Scale Wind Valley City OH MW Northern Power Systems In Service AB Tehachapi Wind Farm AB Tehachapi Wind Farm AB Tehachapi Definition Commercial Scale Wind Coram Energy AB Energy Southern California Edison Co Tehachapi CA MW Vestas In Service AFCEE MMR Turbines AFCEE MMR Turbines AFCEE MMR Turbines Definition Commercial Scale Wind AFCEE Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment Distributed generation net metered Camp Edwards Sandwich MA MW GE Energy In Service AG Land AG Land AG Land Definition Community Wind AG Land Energy LLC

393

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 22, 2007 [Facility News] March 22, 2007 [Facility News] GEWEX News Features Dust Data from ARM Mobile Facility Deployment Bookmark and Share Data from the recent deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility are featured in the February issue of GEWEX News. Data from the recent deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility are featured in the February issue of GEWEX News. The February 2007 issue (Vol. 17, No. 1) of GEWEX News features early results from special observing periods of the African Monsoon Mutidisciplinary Analysis, including data obtained by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF). The AMF was stationed in the central Sahel from January through December 2006, with the primary facility at the Niamey airport, and an ancillary site in Banizoumbou. The AMF recorded a major dust storm that passed through the area in March, and combined with simultaneous satellite

394

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 16, 2005 [Facility News] February 16, 2005 [Facility News] Mobile Facility Arrives Safe and Sound in Point Reyes Bookmark and Share Image - The ARM Mobile Facility in Point Reyes, California Image - The ARM Mobile Facility in Point Reyes, California Safe and sound at Point Reyes, the ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is set up on the roof of a shelter until a fence is installed to keep out the curious local cattle. On February 9, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) withstood an accident on the way to its deployment location at Point Reyes, California. About an hour from its destination, the truck carrying the two AMF shelters packed with instrumentation and associated equipment swerved to avoid another vehicle and slid off the road and down a steep embankment. Emergency personnel soon

395

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22, 2011 [Facility News] 22, 2011 [Facility News] Request for Proposals Now Open Bookmark and Share The ARM Climate Research Facility is now accepting applications for use of an ARM mobile facility (AMF), the ARM aerial facility (AAF), and fixed sites. Proposals are welcome from all members of the scientific community for conducting field campaigns and scientific research using the ARM Facility, with availability as follows: AMF2 available December 2013 AMF1 available March 2015 AAF available between June and October 2013 Fixed sites available FY2013 Priority will be given to proposals that make comprehensive use of the ARM facilities and focus on long-term goals of the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Successful proposals will be supplied all operational and logistical resources (provided at no cost to the principal

396

Assesment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite Imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31(5) real-time assessments of natural hazards have beenAssessment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite459470 Assessment and prediction of natural hazards from

Gillespie, Thomas; Chu, Jasmine; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Thomas, Duncan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Lessons learned from the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste subcontract and ESH&Q liability assessment process  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and disposal contracts were first consolidated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1992 by EG&G Idaho, Inc. At that time, disposition of Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste, Toxic Substance Control Act waste, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act hazardous substances and contaminated media, and recyclable hazardous materials was consolidated under five subcontracts. The wastes were generated by five different INEL M&O contractors, under the direction of three different Department of Energy field offices. The consolidated contract reduced the number of facilities handling INEL waste from 27 to 8 qualified treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, with brokers specifically prohibited. This reduced associated transportation costs, amount and cost of contractual paperwork, and environmental liability exposure. EG&G reviewed this approach and proposed a consolidated hazardous waste subcontract be formed for the major EG&G managed DOE sites: INEL, Mound, Rocky Flats, Nevada Test Site, and 10 satellite facilities. After obtaining concurrence from DOE Headquarters, this effort began in March 1992 and was completed with the award of two master task subcontracts in October and November 1993. In addition, the effort included a team to evaluate the apparent awardee`s facilities for environment, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q) and financial liability status. This report documents the evaluation of the process used to prepare, bid, and award the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and/or disposal subcontracts and associated ESH&Q and financial liability assessments; document the strengths and weaknesses of the process; and propose improvements that would expedite and enhance the process for other DOE installations that used the process and for the re-bid of the consolidated subcontract, scheduled for 1997.

Fix, N.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual Progress Report for 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress during 1989 of 16 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 25 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility. Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 40 refs., 75 figs., 6 tabs.

Smith, R.M.; Gorst, W.R. (eds.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

HYTEST Phase I Facility Commissioning and Modeling  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to report the first year accomplishments of two coordinated Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects that utilize a hybrid energy testing laboratory that couples various reactors to investigate system reactance behavior. This work is the first phase of a series of hybrid energy research and testing stations - referred to hereafter as HYTEST facilities that are planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A HYTEST Phase I facility was set up and commissioned in Bay 9 of the Bonneville County Technology Center (BCTC). The purpose of this facility is to utilize the hydrogen and oxygen that is produced by the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis test reactors operating in Bay 9 to support the investigation of kinetic phenomena and transient response of integrated reactor components. This facility provides a convenient scale for conducting scoping tests of new reaction concepts, materials performance, new instruments, and real-time data collection and manipulation for advance process controls. An enclosed reactor module was assembled and connected to a new ventilation system equipped with a variable-speed exhaust blower to mitigate hazardous gas exposures, as well as contract with hot surfaces. The module was equipped with a hydrogen gas pump and receiver tank to supply high quality hydrogen to chemical reactors located in the hood.

Lee P. Shunn; Richard D. Boardman; Shane J. Cherry; Craig G. Rieger

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Disturbance Rejection Control of an Electromagnetic Bearing Spindle  

SciTech Connect

The force exerted on the rotor by an active magnetic bearing (AMB) is determined by the current flow in the magnet coils. This force can be controlled very precisely, making magnetic bearings a potential benefit for grinding, where cutting forces act as external disturbances on the shaft, resulting in degraded part finish. It is possible to achieve precise shaft positioning, reduce vibration of the shaft caused by external disturbances, and even damp out resonant modes. Adaptive control is an appealing approach for these systems because the controller can tune itself to account for an unknown periodic disturbance, such as cutting or grinding forces, injected into the system. In this paper the authors show how one adaptive control algorithm can be applied to an AMB system with a periodic disturbance applied to the rotor. An adaptive algorithm was developed and implemented in both simulation and hardware, yielding significant reductions in rotor displacement in the presence of an external excitation. Ultimately, this type of algorithm could be applied to a magnetic bearing grinder to reduce unwanted motion of the spindle which leads to poor part finish and chatter.

PETTEYS,REBECCA; PARKER,GORDON

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change  

SciTech Connect

Altering the natural disturbance regime of a landscape produces changes in the structure of that landscape as the landscape adjusts to the new disturbance regime. A computer simulation model was designed to enable analyses of the longterm changes to be expected in landscapes as their disturbance regime changes. The model, DISPATCH, is the first dynamic spatial simulation model built around a geographical information system (GIS). The model also includes a new set of programs, the r.le programs, that is the first set of programs designed for calculating landscape structure measures within a GIS. The DISPATCH model was used, to analyze the effects of human alterations of disturbance regimes and global change on landscape structure. Landscapes do not adjust quickly to these alterations based on available data. Landscapes subjected to warming or to longterm fire suppression experience a decline in patch richness, Shannon diversity, the amount of edge and contrast, but an increase in distance between patches, angular second moment (texture measure) and patch size. In contrast, landscapes subjected to cooling, the short-term effects of fire suppression, fragmentation, or traditional prescribed burning tend to respond with increasing richness, Shannon diversity, edge, and contrast, but declining distance, angular second moment, and size. The pattern of response is different at different scales, with important implications for species.

Baker, W.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine Frank Jepsen, Anders Søborg brake in a wind turbine. Brake torque is determined by friction coefficient and clamp force; the latter brake is one1 of the two independent brake systems in a wind turbine. As a consequence of the gearing

Yang, Zhenyu

403

Sensitivity of climate mitigation strategies to natural disturbances  

SciTech Connect

The present and future concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide depends on both anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks of carbon. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on a progressive transition to carbon12 efficient technologies to reduce industrial emissions, substantially supported by policies to maintain or enhance the terrestrial carbon stock in forests and other ecosystems. This strategy may be challenged if terrestrial sequestration capacity is affected by future climate feedbacks, but how and to what extent is little understood. Here, we show that climate mitigation strategies are highly sensitive to future natural disturbance rates (e.g. fires, hurricanes, droughts), because of potential effect of disturbances on the terrestrial carbon balance. Generally, altered disturbance rates affect the pace of societal and technological transitions required to achieve the mitigation target, with substantial consequences on the energy sector and on the global economy. Understanding the future dynamics and consequences of natural disturbances on terrestrial carbon balance is thus essential for developing robust climate mitigation strategies and policies

Le Page, Yannick LB; Hurtt, George; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

224-T Facility - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T Facility Projects & Facilities 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory 222-S Laboratory 224-B Facility 224-T Facility 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324...

405

Cold Test Facility - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects & Facilities > Cold Test Facility Projects & Facilities 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory 222-S Laboratory 224-B Facility 224-T...

406

DOE standard guidelines for use of probabilistic seismic hazard curves at Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect

This Standard is intended to provide guidance in the use of the seismic hazard curves developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Experience to-date has shown that application of these methodologies can yield significantly different results. In response to this issue, a Seismic Working Group (SWG) has been formed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters to coordinate the application of these methodologies within DOE in a consistent manner. The position developed by the SWG and contained in this Standard is intended for immediate use in developing seismic hazard estimates at DOE sites for the evaluation of new and existing, nuclear and non-nuclear DOE facilities. This Standard is needed not only to address the LLNL/EPRI issue but also to assure that state-of-the-art seismic hazard methods are incorporated into DOE standards as soon as possible. The DOE is currently involved in a joint program with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and EPRI to evaluate these existing probabilistic seismic hazard methodologies and to develop recommendations for an improved methodology for the 1990`s. The final product of this effort is expected to result in more stable hazard estimates and will supersede this Standard in approximately two years.

Not Available

1992-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Uranium Processing Facility Finite Element Meshing Discussion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion ...Need picture of Building... October 25, 2011 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop 1 Loring Wyllie Arne Halterman Degenkolb Engineers, San Francisco Purpose of Presentation * Design vs. Analysis * Discuss the mesh criteria * Discuss the evolution of the mesh of the UPF main building model * Discuss how the mesh affects the analysis process October 25, 2011 2 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop FEM Modeling * GTStrudl typically used for DOE projects. * Mesh size is important * What is to be captured? * How complex is the system? * Current criteria set to capture in-plane and out-of-plane response. October 25, 2011 3

408

D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 CFR Ch. X (1-1-12 Edition) Pt. 1022 D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE Siting, construction or expansion, and op- eration of disposal facilities for transuranic (TRU) waste and TRU mixed waste (TRU waste also containing hazardous waste as designated in 40 CFR part 261). D12 INCINERATORS Siting, construction, and operation of in- cinerators, other than research and develop- ment incinerators or incinerators for non- hazardous solid waste (as designated in 40 CFR 261.4(b)). PART 1022-COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND EN- VIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIRE- MENTS Subpart A-General Sec. 1022.1 Background. 1022.2 Purpose and scope. 1022.3 Policy. 1022.4 Definitions. 1022.5 Applicability. 1022.6 Public inquiries. Subpart B-Procedures for Floodplain and

409

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE's Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site's waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE`s Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site`s waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, 0: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate two mixed (both radioactive and hazardous) waste storage facilities (Buildings 7668 and 7669) in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. Site preparation and construction activities would take place at the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 16, 1994 EA-0820: Finding of No Significant Impact

412

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and

413

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 The objective of this surveillance is to...

414

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Fluorescent are hazardous waste, so take care to ensure the tubes remain intact during removal and storage. Fluorescent

Wilcock, William

415

Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment Permit by Rule | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment by Rule. Authors Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Published...

416

Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

417

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar...

418

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for...

419

RMOTCTrainingFacilityNEW.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Field Laboratory with surface outcrops of Cretaceous fluvial and marine units * Gas Processing Facilities * Production Facilities * Tanks & Pipelines * Aquaculture &...

420

Hazard Categorization Reduction via Nature of the Process Argument  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the Hazard Categorization (HC) and Critical Safety Evaluation (CSE) for activities performed using an Inspection Object (IO) in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit of 700 g of U-235. By virtue of exceeding the single parameter subcritical limit and the subsequent potential for criticality, the IO HC is initially categorized as HC2. However, a novel application of the nature of the process argument was employed to reduce the IO HC from HC2 to less than HC3 (LTHC3). The IO is composed of five separate uranium metal plates that total no greater than 3.82 kg of U-235 (U(20)). The IO is planned to be arranged in various configurations. As the IO serves as a standard for experimentation aimed at establishing techniques for detection of fissionable materials, it may be placed in close proximity to various reflectors, moderators, or both. The most reactive configurations of the IO were systematically evaluated and shown that despite the mass of U-235 and potential positioning near various reflectors and moderators, the IO cannot be assembled into a critical configuration. Therefore, the potential for criticality does not exist. With Department of Energy approval, a Hazards Assessment Document with high-level (facility-level) controls on the plates negates the potential for criticality and satisfies the nature of the process argument to reduce the HC from HC2 to LTHC3.

Chelise A. Van De Graaff; Dr. Chad Pope; J. Todd Taylor

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building throughput study  

SciTech Connect

The hazardous waste/mixed waste HW/MW Treatment Building (TB) is the specified treatment location for solid hazardous waste/mixed waste at SRS. This report provides throughput information on the facility based on known and projected waste generation rates. The HW/MW TB will have an annual waste input for the first four years of approximately 38,000 ft{sup 3} and have an annual treated waste output of approximately 50,000 ft{sup 3}. After the first four years of operation it will have an annual waste input of approximately 16,000 ft{sup 3} and an annual waste output of approximately 18,000 ft. There are several waste streams that cannot be accurately predicted (e.g. environmental restoration, decommissioning, and decontamination). The equipment and process area sizing for the initial four years should allow excess processing capability for these poorly defined waste streams. A treatment process description and process flow of the waste is included to aid in understanding the computations of the throughput. A description of the treated wastes is also included.

England, J.L.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

1991-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Notice of Intent to Revise DOE G 226.1-2, Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This revision will incorporate new content devoted to Federal oversight and evaluation of effectiveness of activity-level work planning and control (WP&C) at Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities.

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

423

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infectious waste is weighed and recorded on a log prior to burning. The log must include the date and time MEDICAL WASTE 1.0 Purpose: This procedure outlines handling of hazardous waste. 2.0 Scope: This procedure disposal of their hazardous waste. 3.0 Procedure: 3.1 Hazardous wastes are disposed of according

Krovi, Venkat

424

Developing a model lifeline protection program for DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

A National Lifeline Standard Development Program is currently being conducted by FEMA and NIST. The Department of Energy is following these developments and supplementing them to meet Life-Safety and mission requirements for all DOE facilities as part of the Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Plan. The task will be overseen by a DOE management team with technical guidance provided by a Steering Group of management and operating contractor representatives. The DOE will participate in the federal program by conducting a workshop on lifeline protection issues, developing an overall plan, organizing a Steering Group, and conducting a pilot study at a DOE facility.

Lowing, A.N.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987  

SciTech Connect

This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J. (eds.)

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance

429

WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units  

SciTech Connect

This 2001 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a), and incorporates comments from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2001 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. The permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the newest guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, the permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facilitys Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

430

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 31, 2009 [Facility News] July 31, 2009 [Facility News] President of the Regional Government Speaks at Opening Ceremony for Mobile Facility in the Azores Bookmark and Share Highlighting the opening ceremony for the ARM Mobile Facility on Graciosa Island, Carlos César, President of the Regional Government of the Azores, signs a weather balloon while local media record the event. Photo by Mike Alsop. Highlighting the opening ceremony for the ARM Mobile Facility on Graciosa Island, Carlos César, President of the Regional Government of the Azores, signs a weather balloon while local media record the event. Photo by Mike Alsop. On June 30, officials from the Regional Government of the Azores recognized the deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility on Graciosa Island during an official opening ceremony held at the site. Notable among the participants

431

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2012 [Facility News] 6, 2012 [Facility News] News Tips from 2012 EGU General Assembly Bookmark and Share The ARM Facility is attending the 2012 European Geophysical Union General Assembly at the Austria Center in Vienna for the first time. The ARM Facility is attending the 2012 European Geophysical Union General Assembly at the Austria Center in Vienna for the first time. VIENNA - The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is the world's most comprehensive outdoor laboratory and data archive for research related to atmospheric processes that affect Earth's climate. At the European Geophysical Union (EGU) General Assembly 2012 in Vienna, find out how scientists use the ARM Facility to study the interactions between clouds,

432

BNL | Accelerator Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Test Facility Accelerator Test Facility Home Core Capabilities Photoinjector S-Band Linac Laser Systems CO2 Laser Nd:Yag Laser Beamlines Beamline Simulation Data Beamline Parameters Beam Diagnostics Detectors Beam Schedule Operations Resources Fact Sheet (.pdf) Image Library Upgrade Proposal (.pdf) Publications ES&H Experiment Start-up ATF Handbook Laser Safety Collider-Accelerator Dept. C-AD ES&H Resources Staff Users' Place Apply for Access ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo A user facility for advanced accelerator research The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is a proposal driven, steering committee reviewed facility that provides users with high-brightness electron- and laser-beams. The ATF pioneered the concept of a user facility for studying complex properties of modern accelerators and

433

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2011 [Facility News, Publications] 8, 2011 [Facility News, Publications] Journal Special Issue Includes Mobile Facility Data from Germany Bookmark and Share The ARM Mobile Facility operated in Heselbach, Germany, as part of the COPS surface network. The ARM Mobile Facility operated in Heselbach, Germany, as part of the COPS surface network. In 2007, the ARM Mobile Facility participated in one of the most ambitious field studies ever conducted in Europe-the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Now, 21 papers published in a special issue of the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society demonstrate that the data collected during COPS are providing new insight into: the key chemical and physical processes leading to convection initiation and to the modification of precipitation by orography;

434

WIPP - Public Reading Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Reading Facilities/Electronic Reading Facilities The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Electronic FOIA (E-FOIA) require that various specific types of records, as well as various other records, be maintained in public reading facilities. Before you submit a FOIA request, we recommend you contact or visit the appropriate public reading facility to determine if the records you are seeking have already been released. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as other related DOE sites, have established home pages on the Internet with links to other web sites. If you determine a specific facility might have records in which you are interested, requests for those records can be made directly to the public reading rooms identified below. Copying of records located in the public reading rooms must be made by the staff of those facilities.

435

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15, 2005 [Facility News] 15, 2005 [Facility News] Aging, Overworked Computer Network at SGP Gets Overhauled Bookmark and Share This aerial map of instruments deployed at the SGP Central Facility provides an indication of the computer resources needed to manage data at the site, let alone communicate with other ARM sites. This aerial map of instruments deployed at the SGP Central Facility provides an indication of the computer resources needed to manage data at the site, let alone communicate with other ARM sites. Established as the first ARM research facility in 1992, the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma is the "old man on the block" when it comes to infrastructure. Though significant improvements have been made to facilities and equipment throughout the years, the computer network at the

436

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 7, 2011 [Facility News] April 7, 2011 [Facility News] Review Panel States ARM Facility "Without Peer" Bookmark and Share Every three years, DOE Office of Science user facilities undergo a review to evaluate their effectiveness in contributing to their respective science areas. The latest ARM Facility review was conducted in mid-February by a six-member review panel led by Minghua Zhang of Stony Brook University. Notably, in a debriefing following the review, the panel stated that ARM was a "world class facility without peer." The panel convened in Ponca City, Oklahoma, near ARM's Southern Great Plains site to conduct their review. Their first agenda item was an SGP site tour, which provided a realtime example of the scope and expertise of site operations and included a demonstration of the site's newly

437

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2010 [Facility News] 8, 2010 [Facility News] Europeans Keen to Hear About Effects of Dust Using Data from Africa Bookmark and Share In 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility joined the AMMA project to obtain data for scientists to study the impact that airborne Saharan dust has on incoming solar radiation. This photo shows the sun setting through a dusty atmosphere near Niamey, Niger, where the mobile facility was deployed for one year. In 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility joined the AMMA project to obtain data for scientists to study the impact that airborne Saharan dust has on incoming solar radiation. This photo shows the sun setting through a dusty atmosphere near Niamey, Niger, where the mobile facility was deployed for one year. Researcher Xiaohong Liu from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was

438

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 30, 2008 [Facility News] April 30, 2008 [Facility News] Team Scouts Graciosa Island for 2009 Mobile Facility Deployment Site Bookmark and Share A location near the airport on the northern end of Graciosa Island was identified as an excellent location for operating the ARM Mobile Facility. Image source: Luis Miguens A location near the airport on the northern end of Graciosa Island was identified as an excellent location for operating the ARM Mobile Facility. Image source: Luis Miguens Indications from a scouting trip by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) science and operations management team are that an excellent site for the 2009 deployment may have been found. From April 8 through April 16, the team traveled to Graciosa Island in the Azores to scout sites for the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) field

439

Integrated Facilities Disposition Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Facilities Disposition Program Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting at ORNL Sharon Robinson Dirk Van Hoesen Robert Jubin Brad Patton July 29, 2009 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy The Integrated Facility Disposition Program (IFDP) addresses the remaining EM Scope at both ORNL and Y-12 Cost Range: $7 - $14B Schedule: 26 Years 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Scope of work * Treatment and disposition of legacy materials and waste * D&D 327 (1.5 M ft 2 ) excess facilities generating >2 M yd 3 debris * Soil and groundwater remedial actions generating >1 M yd 3 soils * Facilities surveillance and maintenance * Reconfiguration of waste management facilities * Ongoing waste management operations * Project management

440

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2013 [Facility News] 4, 2013 [Facility News] Work Cut Out for ARM Science Board Bookmark and Share With a new fixed site on the horizon in the Azores, a third ARM Mobile Facility gearing up for action in the Arctic, and more aircraft probes and sensors than scientists can shake a stick at, the ARM Facility continues to expand its considerable suite of assets for conducting climate research. Along with this impressive inventory comes the responsibility to ensure the Facility is supporting the highest-value science possible. Enter the ARM Science Board. This eleven-member group annually reviews complex proposals for use of the ARM mobile and aerial facilities. To maintain excellence and integrity in the review process, each member serves a renewable term of two years, with membership updated annually.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Poultry Facility Biosecurity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of organic materials on tires and shoes. Design features should include a one-way traff_ic system for all poultry facilities. The system should route personnel, vehicles and poultry from youngest birds to oldest birds, from ?clean? areas to ?dirty? areas... from waterways used by migra - tory waterfowl. Locate new facilities as far as possible from roads handling high volumes of poultry vehicles such as feed trucks or live-haul vehicles. Poultry facilities also need adequate amounts of potable water...

Carey, John B.; Prochaska, J. Fred; Jeffrey, Joan S.

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

banner banner Home | People | Site Index Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility US Department of Energy About Science Campaigns Sites Instruments Measurements Data News Publications Education Become a User Recovery Act Mission FAQ Outreach Displays History Organization Participants Facility Statistics Forms Contacts Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings Propose a Campaign Submitting Proposals: Guidelines Featured Campaigns Campaign Data List of Campaigns Aerial Facility Eastern North Atlantic Mobile Facilities North Slope of Alaska Southern Great Plains Tropical Western Pacific Location Table Contacts Instrument Datastreams Value-Added Products PI Data Products Field Campaign Data Related Data

443

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20, 2008 Facility News ARM Scientists Lead International Radiation Symposium in Brazil Bookmark and Share The ARM Science Team showed up in force at the 2008 International...

444

Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Sandian Presents on PV Failure Analysis at European PV Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition (EU PVSC) On December 15, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation,...

445

Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Method Could Lead to Better Lights, Lenses, Solar Cells On July 1, 2014, in Capabilities, CINT, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Facilities, Materials Science,...

446

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 30, 2007 Facility News New Radar Wind Profiler Joins AMF Instrument Suite in Germany Bookmark and Share The 1290 MHz wind profiler (foreground) joins the eddy correlation...

447

ARM Mobile Facilities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

AMF ARM Mobile FAcility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AMF ARM Mobile FAcility Details on the AMF proposal process can be found at http:www.arm.govacrfsubmitproposals.stm. For more information, contact: Mark Miller Mary Jane...

449

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2007 Facility News Field Campaigns Generate Interest from Aviation Aficionados in Oklahoma Bookmark and Share Dr. Pete Lamb On November 13, Dr. Pete Lamb attended a meeting of...

450

Lighting Test Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Custom Projects Lighting Test Facilities SSL Guidelines Industrial Federal Agriculture LED Street and Area Lighting Field Test of Exterior LED Down Lights Abstract Outdoor...

451

ARM Mobile Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

452

Facility Survey & Transfer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

453

Neutron Scattering Facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The past history, present performance and future prospects for neutron scattering facilities will be discussed. Special features of neutron scattering techniques applicable to biological problems will be ... . Th...

D. L. Price

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 31, 2014, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable...

455

Science and Technology Facility  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

IBRF Project Lessons Learned Report Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Lessons Learned - Stage I Acquisition through Stage II Construction Completion August 2011 This...

456

Supercomputing | Facilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

facilities, and authorization checks for physical access. An integrated cyber security plan encompasses all aspects of computing. Cyber security plans are risk-based....

457

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the website still features the familiar faces of Professor Polar Bear, Teacher Turtle, and PI Prairie Dog (each representing an ARM Climate Research Facility site), but now...

458

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(left) and 2-channel (right) NFOV radiometers are collocated with the infrared thermometer (green stripe) at the SGP Central Facility. Numerous other instruments are situated...

459

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Railroad Hazardous g Railroad Hazardous g Materials Transportation Safety Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials Program Manager Radioactive Materials Program Manager H d M t i l Di i i H d M t i l Di i i Hazmat Hazardous Materials Division Hazardous Materials Division Federal Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration Presentation for the Presentation for the DOE NTSF Meeting DOE NTSF Meeting May 10 May 10- -12, 2011 12, 2011 Our Regulated Community * More than 550 l d railroads * 170,000 miles of track * 220,000 employees * 1.3 million railcars * 20,000 locomotives Hazmat * 3,500 chemical shippers * Roughly 2 Million Roughly 2 Million annual HM shipments HM-232E Introduction * Notice of Proposed Rulemaking d b * Issued December 21, 2006 * Interim Final Rule

460

All Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide produced by Emergency Services Program For emergencies dial x7911 911 from cell phones berkeley lab Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 Emergency Preparedness Response FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Pocket Guide 3 FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Emergency Response Expectations Before an emergency: * Accept personal responsibility for your own safety. * Prepare your personal/family emergency plan. * Review your Building Emergency Plan (BEP) or Emergency Response Guide. * Know the location of all your building's exits and Assembly Areas. * Know the specific hazards in your area and the response procedures for each hazard. * Understand how to report an emergency.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

CONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

working practice and will encourage the evolution of a positive health and safety culture within the orgCONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH) Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment HEALTH & SAFETY............................................................................................................9 2.6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS

462

Hazards Control Department 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the Hazards Control Department activities in 1995 is part of the department`s efforts to foster a working environment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where every person desire to work safely.

Campbell, G.W.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

463

Owning Hazard, A Tragedy Barbara Young Welke*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Minnesota. This play is part of her ongoing research on the history of products liability. In addition in the ownership of hazard from the individuals who suffered injury, to the enterprises involved in manufacturing

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

464

Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security  

SciTech Connect

Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

465

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps in term of Modified Mercalli (MM) intensity are derived by applying the Cornell-McGuire method to four earthquake source zones in Panama and adjacent areas. The maps contain es...

Aristoteles Vergara Muoz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Gis Technology in Mapping Landslide Hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the recent years, the ever-increasing diffusion of GIS technology has facilitated the application of quantitative ... potential of such technological advancements, landslide hazard mapping remains a major, lar...

Alberto Carrara; Mauro Cardinali

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Home insulation may increase radiation hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... pose a potential health hazard, by increasing exposure to low levels of the radioactive gas radon. ... .Radon-222 is produced as part of the decay chain of uranium-238. Both the ...

David Dickson

1978-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

Restoration of areas disturbed by site studies for a mined commercial radioactive waste repository: The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP)  

SciTech Connect

The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) was undertaken to environmentally characterize a portion of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State as a potential host for the nation's first mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Studies were terminated by Congress in 1987. Between 1976 and 1987, 72 areas located across the Hanford Site were disturbed by the BWIP. These areas include borehole pads, a large Exploratory Shaft Facility, and the Near Surface Test Facility. Most boreholes were cleared of vegetation, leveled, and stabilized with a thick layer of compacted pit-run gravel and sand. The Near Surface Test Facility consists of three mined adits, a rock-spoils bench, and numerous support facilities. Restoration began in 1988 with the objective of returning sites to pre-existing conditions using native species. The Hanford Site retains some of the last remnants of the shrub-steppe ecosystem in Washington. The primary constraints to restoring native vegetation at Hanford are low precipitation and the presence of cheatgrass, an extremely capable alien competitor. 5 figs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Biehert, R.W.; Newell, R.L.; Page, T.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

WIPP air-intake shaft disturbed-rock zone study  

SciTech Connect

The disturbed-rock zone surrounding the air-intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site was investigated to determine the extent and the permeability of the disturbed-rock zone as a function of radial distance from the 6.1 m diameter shaft, at different elevations within the Salado. Gas- and brine-permeability tests were performed in the bedded halite of the Salado formation at two levels within the air-intake shaft. The gas- and brine-permeability test results demonstrated that the radial distance to an undisturbed formation permeability of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2} was less than 3.0 m.

Dale, T. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Hurtado, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Enhancement factors for resuspended aerosol radioactivity: Effects of topsoil disturbance  

SciTech Connect

The enhancement factor for airborne radionuclides resuspended by wind is defined as the ratio of the activity density (Bq g{sup {minus}1}) in the aerosol to the activity density in the underlying surface of contaminated soil. Enhancement factors are useful for assessment of worst-case exposure scenarios and transport conditions, and are one of the criteria for setting environmental standards for radioactivity in soil. This paper presents results of experimental studies where resuspension of {sup 239}Pu was measured when air concentrations were equilibrated to the soil surface. Enhancement factors were observed for several types of man-made disturbances (bulldozer-blading, soil raking, vacuum-cleaning) and natural disturbances (springtime thaw, soil-drying, wildfire). For some cases, enhancement factors are compared over range of geographical locations (Bikini Atoll, California, Nevada, and South Carolina). The particle-size distributions of aerosol activity are compared to particle-size distributions of the underlying soil.

Shinn, J.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Information-disturbance tradeoff in estimating a unitary transformation  

SciTech Connect

We address the problem of the information-disturbance tradeoff associated to the estimation of a quantum transformation and show how the extraction of information about a black box causes a perturbation of the corresponding input-output evolution. In the case of a black box performing a unitary transformation, randomly distributed according to the invariant measure, we give a complete solution of the problem, deriving the optimal tradeoff curve and presenting an explicit construction of the optimal quantum network.

Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo [QUIT Group, Dipartimento di Fisica 'A. Volta', INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Chiribella, Giulio [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. North, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Hazards and controls at the Sandia National Laboratories microelectronics development laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) contains 3,000 m{sup 2}, Which includes 1,000 m{sup 2}of Class I clean room space. There are 20 laminar flow Class I clean room bays. The MDL supplies several, full-flow process technologies which produce complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits using 150 nun diameter silicon wafers. All gases, chemicals and physical hazards used in the fabrication processes are controlled to levels well below regulatory requirements. Facility engineering controls in the MDL include toxic and pyrophoric gas monitoring, interlocks, ventilation, substitution and chemical segregation. Toxic and pyrophoric gases are monitored continuously inside processing tools as well as through the exhaust lines, gas cabinets, the valve boxes, and in general work areas. The toxic gas monitoring systems are interlocked to gas shutoff valves and have both low and high level alarms. In-use process gases are stored in exhausted cabinets. All chemicals and gases are segregated by chemical type. The processes are organized into eight sector areas that consist of photolithography, wet processes, dry etch, ion implant, metals, diffusion, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chemical mechanical polishing (CW). Each morning, engineering, safety and facilities personnel meet to review the equipment and wafer lot status and discuss processing issues. Hazards are assessed in the MDL with periodic walkthroughs, continuous toxic and pyrophoric gas monitoring and personal monitoring. All chemicals and gases proposed for use in the MDL are reviewed by the industrial hygienist and must be approved by a manager before they are purchased. All new equipment and processes are reviewed by a hazard and barrier committee and cannot be used in the MDL without the committee`s approval and an IH hazard assessment. Overall risk of operating the MDL has been reduced to a level that is as low as reasonable achievable for this research facility.

Benton, M.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Science &Technology Facilities Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Science & Technology Facilities Council invite you to The ESA Technology Transfer Network SpaceTech2012Science &Technology Facilities Council Innovations Issue 31 October 2012 This issue: 1 STFC International prize for `no needles' breast cancer diagnosis technique 6 CEOI Challenge Workshop ­ Current

474

Nanotechnology User Facility for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A National Nanotechnology User Facility for Industry Academia Government #12;The National Institute of Commerce's nanotechnology user facility. The CNST enables innovation by providing rapid access to the tools new measurement and fabrication methods in response to national nanotechnology needs. www

475

Facilities Management CAD Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facilities Management CAD Standards 2011 #12;Facilities Management CAD Standards Providing: Layering Standards 2.1 Layer Name Format 2.2 Layer Name Modifiers 2.3 Layer Attributes 2.4 Special Layer of PDF and DWG Files APPENDIX A: DAL FM CAD Standard Layers APPENDIX B: DAL FM CAD Special Layers

Brownstone, Rob

476

Cornell University Facilities Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements, building code, and sustainability objectives. This plan takes a long- term view, projecting workCornell University Facilities Services Contract Colleges Facilities Fernow and Rice Hall in Fernow, Rice, Bruckner, Bradfield and Plant Science buildings. It includes a surging and phasing plan

Manning, Sturt

477

Emergency Facilities and Equipment  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

478

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers, cabinets

Boynton, Walter R.

479

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communication umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers

Boynton, Walter R.

480

No detectable impact of small-scale disturbances on blue carbon within seagrass beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seagrass meadows are among the most efficient and long-term carbon sinks on earth, but disturbances could threaten this capacity, so understanding the impacts of disturbance on carbon stored within seagrass m...

Peter I. Macreadie; Paul H. York; Craig D. H. Sherman; Michael J. Keough

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "facilities disturb hazardous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

A Multisatellite Investigation of the Convective Properties of Developing and Nondeveloping Tropical Disturbances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive passive microwave satellite dataset is analyzed to quantify and compare the time evolution of convective properties of the pregenesis stage of developing disturbances (12 cases) and nondeveloping disturbances (3 cases), to ...

Jonathan Zawislak; Edward J. Zipser

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Shift of Conifer Boreal Forest to LichenHeath Parkland Caused by Successive Stand Disturbances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the southern boreal forest (Qubec, Canada), tree harvesting is a major disturbance affecting the dominant black spruce (Picea mariana) stands already suffering from naturally recurrent insect and fire disturb...

Serge Payette; Ann Delwaide

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System Facilities Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System ­ Facilities Center I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: Facilities Management System - FacilityCenter 2. IT System Sponsor: Office. IT System Manager: Michelle T. Gooch, Facilities Management Systems Manager 5. PIA Author: Michelle T. Gooch

Mathis, Wayne N.

484

1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2007 [Facility News] 30, 2007 [Facility News] High-Speed Internet Deflects Information Overload Bookmark and Share Covering approximately 143,000 square kilometers in Oklahoma and Kansas, instruments at the various facilities throughout the SGP site generate approximately 27 gigabytes of data every day. Covering approximately 143,000 square kilometers in Oklahoma and Kansas, instruments at the various facilities throughout the SGP site generate approximately 27 gigabytes of data every day. A little more room in the internet link at the ARM Southern Great Plains site is providing needed relief to the crowded lines that keep data flowing from the site. In July 2007, the internet service from the SGP Central Facility was switched to a higher speed (6 megabits) link, increasing the

486

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, 2009 [Facility News] , 2009 [Facility News] Mobile Facility Begins Marine Cloud Study in the Azores Bookmark and Share Located next to the airport on Graciosa Island, the ARM Mobile Facility's comprehensive and sophisticated instrument suite will obtain atmospheric measurements from the marine boundary layer. Located next to the airport on Graciosa Island, the ARM Mobile Facility's comprehensive and sophisticated instrument suite will obtain atmospheric measurements from the marine boundary layer. Extended deployment will obtain seasonal statistics to improve climate models Today marks the beginning of a 20-month field campaign on Graciosa Island in the Azores to study the seasonal life cycle of marine clouds and how they modulate the global climate system. Sponsored by the U.S. Department

487

BNL | Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven's Research Facilities Brookhaven's Research Facilities Tools of Discovery Brookhaven National Lab excels at the design, construction, and operation of large-scale, cutting-edge research facilities-some available nowhere else in the world. Each year, thousands of scientists from laboratories, universities, and industries around the world use these facilities to delve into the basic mysteries of physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, energy, and the environment-and develop innovative applications that arise, sometimes at the intersections of these disciplines. construction Brookhaven Lab is noted for the design, construction and operation of large-scale, cutting-edge research facilities that support thousands of scientists worldwide. RHIC tunnel Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

488

ARM Aerial Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govSitesAerial Facility govSitesAerial Facility AAF Information Proposal Process Science (PDF) Baseline Instruments Campaign Instruments Instrumentation Workshop 2008 AAF Fact Sheet G-1 Fact Sheet Images Field Campaigns AAF Campaigns 2007 - UAV Campaigns 1993 - 2006, 2015 Other Aircraft Campaigns 1993 - 2010 AAF Contacts Rickey Petty DOE AAF Program Director Beat Schmid Technical Director ARM Aerial Facility Numerous instrumented aircraft participated in CLASIC, a cross-disciplinary interagency research effort. Numerous instrumented aircraft participated in CLASIC, a cross-disciplinary interagency research effort. As an integral measurement capability of the ARM Climate Research Facility, the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) provides airborne measurements required to answer science questions proposed by the ARM Science Team and the external

489

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15, 2010 [Facility News] 15, 2010 [Facility News] Water Vapor Network at SGP Site Goes Offline Bookmark and Share Each of the 24 solar-powered GPS stations streamed data via a wireless network to the SGP Central Facility for data collection and storage. Each of the 24 solar-powered GPS stations streamed data via a wireless network to the SGP Central Facility for data collection and storage. After nearly eleven years, the Single Frequency GPS Water Vapor Network field campaign at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site came to a close on July 1, 2010. Installed between 1999 and 2000, this network consisted of 24 GPS stations operating within an 8-kilometer radius around the SGP Central Facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. Developed to function as a single instrument, the network simultaneously measured "slant water vapor" in

490

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2005 [Facility News] 30, 2005 [Facility News] Coastal Clouds Field Campaign Takes Off in July Bookmark and Share The 2-channel NFOV gets careful attention as it joins the suite of instruments collecting data for the ARM Mobile Facility field campaign at Point Reyes National Seashore. The 2-channel NFOV gets careful attention as it joins the suite of instruments collecting data for the ARM Mobile Facility field campaign at Point Reyes National Seashore. Since March 2005, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) has been at Point Reyes National Seashore in northern California for the Marine Stratus Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle Intensive Operational Period. The goals of this 6-month field campaign are to collect data from cloud/aerosol interactions and to improve understanding of cloud organization that is often associated

491

NSA Barrow Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barrow Facility Barrow Facility NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Barrow Facility Location: 71° 19' 23.73" N, 156° 36' 56.70" W Altitude: 8 meters The Barrow facility was dedicated in July 1997 and chosen because the Arctic is particularly sensitive to climate changes. Barrow is located at the northernmost point in the United States, 330 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Also known as the Top of the World, Barrow is Alaska's largest Eskimo village (home to 4,581 people). Tax revenue from the Slope's oil fields pay for services borough wide, and natural gas is used to heat homes and generate electricity in Barrow. Many residents, however, maintain

492

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

25, 2013 [Education, Facility News] 25, 2013 [Education, Facility News] Junior Rangers Enjoy Science Education at ARM Facility on Cape Cod Bookmark and Share Children and adults join in the balloon launch countdown at the ARM Mobile Facility site at Cape Cod National Seashore. Weather balloons are launched at regular intervals four times per day throughout the one-year campaign. Children and adults join in the balloon launch countdown at the ARM Mobile Facility site at Cape Cod National Seashore. Weather balloons are launched at regular intervals four times per day throughout the one-year campaign. School break means vacation, and around Cape Cod, that often means a trip to the seashore. On April 17, families looking for fun and educational outdoor activities spent several hours at Cape Cod National Seashore's

493

ARM - NSA Barrow Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barrow Facility Barrow Facility NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Barrow Facility Location: 71° 19' 23.73" N, 156° 36' 56.70" W Altitude: 8 meters The Barrow facility was dedicated in July 1997 and chosen because the Arctic is particularly sensitive to climate changes. Barrow is located at the northernmost point in the United States, 330 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Also known as the Top of the World, Barrow is Alaska's largest Eskimo village (home to 4,581 people). Tax revenue from the Slope's oil fields pay for services borough wide, and natural gas is used to heat homes and generate electricity in Barrow. Many residents, however, maintain

494

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 15, 2004 [Facility News] May 15, 2004 [Facility News] Mid-latitude Cirrus Cloud Experiment Underway Bookmark and Share NASA's WB-57F research aircraft can carry an instrument payload up to 6,000 lbs. NASA's WB-57F research aircraft can carry an instrument payload up to 6,000 lbs. In late April, scientific collaborators at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) carried out two high-altitude flights over the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility. The purpose of these flights was to use a new suite of cloud property probes on the WB-57F aircraft to more accurately characterize the properties of mid-latitude cirrus clouds-which are composed solely of ice crystals-than has previously been possible. Eight flights over the SGP central facility were originally planned, but the expected cirrus clouds

495

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2009 [Facility News] 7, 2009 [Facility News] Town Hall Meeting at AGU 2009 Fall Meeting Bookmark and Share ARM Climate Research Facility - New Measurement Capabilities for Climate Research Thursday, December 17, 6:15-7:15 pm, Moscone West Room 2002 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Scientists from around the world use data from the ARM Climate Research Facility to study the interactions between clouds, aerosol and radiation. Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the DOE Office of Science received $1.2 billion, with $60 million allocated to the ARM Climate Research Facility. With these funds, ARM will purchase and deploy dual-frequency scanning cloud radars to all the ARM sites, enhance several sites with precipitation radars and energy flux measurement capabilities,

496

Experiment Hazard Class 15.2 - USDA Soil Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - USDA Regulated Soil 2 - USDA Regulated Soil Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving soils regulated by the United States Department of Agricultute (USDA). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving this hazard class categorized as low risk experiments unless other hazard classes apply. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - None required. Procedural Controls - All work with regulated soils must be performed in compliance with the APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil and Regulated Domestic Soil. The APS protocols state the requirements for handling, storage, shipment, and disposal of regulated

497

Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL  

SciTech Connect

In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL's Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste.