Sample records for facilitate uniform calculation

  1. Particle in cell calculation of plasma force on a small grain in a non-uniform collisional sheath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Ian H.

    The plasma force on grains of specified charge and height in a collisional DC plasma sheath is calculated using the multidimensional particle in cell code COPTIC. The background ion velocity distribution functions for the ...

  2. Methods and computer executable instructions for rapidly calculating simulated particle transport through geometrically modeled treatment volumes having uniform volume elements for use in radiotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Michael W. (Helena, MT); Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and computer executable instructions are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume targeted for irradiation during cancer therapy. The dosimetry plan is available in "real-time" which especially enhances clinical use for in vivo applications. The real-time is achieved because of the novel geometric model constructed for the planned treatment volume which, in turn, allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks there through. The particles are exemplary representations of neutrons emanating from a neutron source during BNCT. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image having a plurality of pixels of information representative of a treatment volume is obtained. The pixels are: (i) converted into a plurality of substantially uniform volume elements having substantially the same shape and volume of the pixels; and (ii) arranged into a geometric model of the treatment volume. An anatomical material associated with each uniform volume element is defined and stored. Thereafter, a movement of a particle along a particle track is defined through the geometric model along a primary direction of movement that begins in a starting element of the uniform volume elements and traverses to a next element of the uniform volume elements. The particle movement along the particle track is effectuated in integer based increments along the primary direction of movement until a position of intersection occurs that represents a condition where the anatomical material of the next element is substantially different from the anatomical material of the starting element. This position of intersection is then useful for indicating whether a neutron has been captured, scattered or exited from the geometric model. From this intersection, a distribution of radiation doses can be computed for use in the cancer therapy. The foregoing represents an advance in computational times by multiple factors of time magnitudes.

  3. Uniform Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    randomly and equally likely a point in that interval), the uniform distribution ... Roughly speaking, this means that from any distribution we can create the uniform.

  4. Animal mortality resulting from uniform exposures to photon radiations: Calculated LD/sub 50/s and a compilation of experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Wells, S.M.; Young, R.W.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies conducted during the 1950s and 1960s of radiation-induced mortality to diverse animal species under various exposure protocols were compiled into a mortality data base. Some 24 variables were extracted and recomputed from each of the published studies, which were collected from a variety of available sources, primarily journal articles. Two features of this compilation effort are (1) an attempt to give an estimate of the uniform dose received by the bone marrow in each treatment so that interspecies differences due to body size were minimized and (2) a recomputation of the LD/sub 50/ where sufficient experimental data are available. Exposure rates varied in magnitude from about 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup 3/ R/min. This report describes the data base, the sources of data, and the data-handling techniques; presents a bibliography of studies compiled; and tabulates data from each study. 103 refs., 44 tabs.

  5. Facilitating Forgiveness 1 Running head: FACILITATING FORGIVENESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Facilitating Forgiveness 1 Running head: FACILITATING FORGIVENESS FACILITATING FORGIVENESS. Infidelity causes significant damage for couples and results in a loss of trust and relationship stability undermine a relationship's stability and security, resulting in confusion, loss of trust, and tremendous

  6. UNIFORM POLICY Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    as determined by a specific course: · Navy blue uniform pants · Navy blue uniform skirt · Navy blue scrub top · Navy blue hose or navy sock with navy uniform shoes · Long white lab coat that includes School patch sewn on the left upper sleeve. A navy blue fleece with the school name embroidered on left breast

  7. Co-Facilitator Learning Community (CFLC) Facilitator Benchmarking Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 Co-Facilitator Learning Community (CFLC) Facilitator Benchmarking Survey Office for Equity & Diversity (OED), University of Wisconsin-Madison Greetings! We invite you to join the Co-Facilitator Learning Community. This survey is designed for self-"benchmarking" of your co-facilitation understandings

  8. Spin flip probability of electron in a uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, Richard T. [Department of Physics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27703 (United States)

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The probability that an electromagnetic wave can flip the spin of an electron is calculated. It is assumed that the electron resides in a uniform magnetic field and interacts with an incoming electromagnetic pulse. The scattering matrix is constructed and the time needed to flip the spin is calculated.

  9. UNIFORM ELECTRONIC TRANSACTIONS ACT (1999)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , MN 55402-1609, Business Law Section AMELIA H. BOSS, Tmple University, School of Law, 1719 N. Broad ON UNIFORM STATE LAWS and by it APPROVED AND RECOMMENDED FOR ENACTMENT IN ALL THE STATES at its ANNUAL NOTE AND COMMENTS Copyright© 1999 By NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF COMMISSIONERS ON UNIFORM STATE LAWS 1

  10. Uniform asymptotic approximations of integrals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khwaja, Sarah Farid

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis uniform asymptotic approximations of integrals are discussed. In order to derive these approximations, two well-known methods are used i.e., the saddle point method and the Bleistein method. To start with ...

  11. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 16010 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

  12. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15800 – Calculators – GOOD AND BAD. ONLY ONE-LINE scientific calculators are permitted. *RECOMMENDED CALCULATOR: TI-30XA(See Below).

  13. Facilitated Strontium Transport by Remobilization of Strontium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilitated Strontium Transport by Remobilization of Strontium-Containing Secondary Precipitates in Hanford Site Subsurface. Facilitated Strontium Transport by Remobilization of...

  14. Method for uniformly bending conduits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dekanich, S.J.

    1984-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method for bending metal tubing through various radii while maintaining uniform cross section of the tubing. The present invention is practical by filling the tubing to a sufficient level with water, freezing the water to ice and bending the ice-filled tubing in a cooled die to the desired radius. The use of the ice as a filler material provides uniform cross-sectional bends of the tubing and upon removal of the ice provides an uncontaminated interior of the tubing which will enable it to be used in its intended application without encountering residual contaminants in the tubing due to the presence of the filler material.

  15. Facilitation Guide Forging the Link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Facilitation Guide Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Incentives of Low Impact Development of the economic incentives as well as how LID plays a role in helping communities adapt to changes in climate. Now heard? What about inconsistent? #12;Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Benefits of Low Impact

  16. Calculation of tunneling rates across a barrier with continuous potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sina Khorasani

    2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, approximate, but accurate expressions for calculation of wavefunctions and tunneling rates are obtained using the method of uniform asymptotic expansion.

  17. Thomas Precession by Uniform Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Pardy

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the nonlinear transformations between coordinate systems which are mutually in a constant symmetrical accelerated motion. The maximal acceleration limit follows from the kinematical origin and it is an analogue of the maximal velocity in special relativity. We derive the dependence of mass, length, time, Doppler effect, Cherenkov effect and transition radiation angle on acceleration as an analogue phenomena in special theory of relativity. The last application of our method is the Thomas precession by uniform acceleration with the possible role in the modern physics and cosmology. The comparison of derived results with other relativistic methods is necessary.

  18. Thomas Precession by Uniform Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardy, Miroslav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the nonlinear transformations between coordinate systems which are mutually in a constant symmetrical accelerated motion. The maximal acceleration limit follows from the kinematical origin and it is an analogue of the maximal velocity in special relativity. We derive the dependence of mass, length, time, Doppler effect, Cherenkov effect and transition radiation angle on acceleration as an analogue phenomena in special theory of relativity. The last application of our method is the Thomas precession by uniform acceleration with the possible role in the modern physics and cosmology. The comparison of derived results with other relativistic methods is necessary.

  19. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15300 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

  20. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15910 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

  1. WHAT'S AHEAD IN 2014 Female Uniforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Lightweight Navy Working Uniforms Also this spring, the Navy Uniform Matters office and the Navy Clothing uniforms made of different fabrics. If the evaluations are successful, Navy leadership will determine which served as CMC. I have 22 years of continuous Navy service that includes nine ships of various platforms

  2. Uniformly dense polymeric foam body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whinnery Jr., Leroy

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.5 g/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microsphere material wherein some of the microspheres are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  3. Designing Reactors to Facilitate Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard H. Meservey

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critics of nuclear power often cite issues with tail-end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities as reasons to oppose the building of new reactors. In fact, waste disposal and the decommissioning of large nuclear reactors have proven more challenging than anticipated. In the early days of the nuclear power industry the design and operation of various reactor systems was given a great deal of attention. Little effort, however, was expended on end-of-the-cycle activities, such as decommissioning and disposal of wastes. As early power and test reactors have been decommissioned difficulties with end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities have become evident. Even the small test reactors common at the INEEL were not designed to facilitate their eventual decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement. The results are that decommissioning of these facilities is expensive, time consuming, relatively hazardous, and generates large volumes of waste. This situation clearly supports critics concerns about building a new generation of power reactors.

  4. Uniform-burning matrix burner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

  5. About uniform regularity of collections of sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    About uniform regularity of collections of sets. Alexander Y. Kruger · Nguyen H. Thao. Dedicated to Asen Dontchev on the occasion of his 65th birthday and.

  6. Team Facilitator: Urban Garden Youth Employment 7 team facilitator positions open for summer 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janssen, Michel

    Team Facilitator: Urban Garden Youth Employment 7 team facilitator positions open for summer 2012 team of 6 urban teenagers. The Team Facilitator creates and maintains a dynamic garden work experience for their teams. Facilitators are responsible for setting the stage for their team to build successful

  7. Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

  8. Brachistochrone of a Spherical Uniform Mass Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David R. Mitchell

    2008-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We solve the brachistochrone problem for a particle travelling through a spherical mass distribution of uniform density. We examine the connection between this problem and the popular "gravity elevator" result. The solution is compared to the well known brachistochrone problem of a particle in a uniform gravitational field.

  9. Uniformity: uncovering the frontier of parallelism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Damien

    fruitfully explored using polynomial time (semi-)uniform families of membrane systems. However, when(logi n)) time when using a poly- nomial number of processors, that is they are efficiently parallelisable current results for active membrane sys- tems using uniformity below P. Many of the systems we consider

  10. Energy Savings Performance Contract Project Facilitators | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    developing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects are required to work with a qualified project facilitator. Project...

  11. Uniform flux dish concentrators for photovoltaic application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G; Wendelin, T

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have designed a unique and innovative molded dish concentrator capable of producing a uniform flux profile on a flat target plane. Concentration levels of 100--200 suns, which are uniform over an area of several square inches, can be directly achieved for collection apertures of a reasonable size ({approximately}1.5-m diameter). Such performance would be immediately applicable to photovoltaic (PV) use. Economic concerns have shown that the proposed approach would be less expensive thatn Fresnel lens concepts or other dish concentrator designs that require complicated and costly receivers to mix the flux to obtain a uniform distribution. 12 refs.

  12. Coulomb energy of uniformly-charged spheroidal shell systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vikram Jadhao; Zhenwei Yao; Creighton K. Thomas; Monica Olvera de la Cruz

    2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide exact expressions for the electrostatic energy of uniformly-charged prolate and oblate spheroidal shells. We find that uniformly-charged prolate spheroids of eccentricity greater than 0.9 have lower Coulomb energy than a sphere of the same area. For the volume-constrained case, we find that a sphere has the highest Coulomb energy among all spheroidal shells. Further, we derive the change in the Coulomb energy of a uniformly-charged shell due to small, area-conserving perturbations on the spherical shape. Our perturbation calculations show that buckling-type deformations on a sphere can lower the Coulomb energy. Finally, we consider the possibility of counterion condensation on the spheroidal shell surface. We employ a Manning-Oosawa two-state model approximation to evaluate the renormalized charge and analyze the behavior of the equilibrium free energy as a function of the shell's aspect ratio for both area-constrained and volume-constrained cases. Counterion condensation is seen to favor the formation of spheroidal structures over a sphere of equal area for high values of shell volume fractions.

  13. Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model - Facilitator Guide ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the nation's electric grid and reducing the risk of energy disruptions due to cyber attack, visit the Cybersecurity page. C2M2 Facilitator Guide (February 2014) More Documents &...

  14. LOCH: Open Access Facilitator Job Description (DRAFT) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, Jacqueline

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    DRAFT Job Description for an Open Access Facilitator job in the University of Edinburgh's College of Humanities and Social Sciences. This draft job description is being made available as part of the Jisc-funded LOCH Project....

  15. Method and system for producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A. (2262 Hampton Rd., Livermore, CA 94550); Montcalm, Claude (14 Jami St., Livermore, CA 94550); Walton, Christopher (2927 Lorina St., #2, Berkeley, CA 94705-1852)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for producing a thin film with highly uniform (or highly accurate custom graded) thickness on a flat or graded substrate (such as concave or convex optics), by sweeping the substrate across a vapor deposition source with controlled (and generally, time-varying) velocity. In preferred embodiments, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece that is held stationary while exposed to the source), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of sweep velocity modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a sweep velocity modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a practical method of accurately measuring source flux distribution, and a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal sweep velocity modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. Preferably, the computer implements an algorithm in which many sweep velocity function parameters (for example, the speed at which each substrate spins about its center as it sweeps across the source) can be varied or set to zero.

  16. Carbon dioxide-assisted fabrication of highly uniform submicron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dioxide-assisted fabrication of highly uniform submicron-sized colloidal carbon spheres via hydrothermal carbonization Carbon dioxide-assisted fabrication of highly uniform...

  17. Bubbling Reactor Technology for Rapid Synthesis of Uniform, Small...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bubbling Reactor Technology for Rapid Synthesis of Uniform, Small MFI-Type Zeolite Crystals . Bubbling Reactor Technology for Rapid Synthesis of Uniform, Small MFI-Type Zeolite...

  18. Non-Uniform Entropy Compression for Uniform Energy Distribution in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    -non-homogeneity in the network. Bottleneck nodes trade computation energy for transmission energy, which extends and normalizesNon-Uniform Entropy Compression for Uniform Energy Distribution in Wireless Sensor Networks to increase the network's lifetime and to normalize the energy use per unit time, but they each have

  19. Semiconductor lasers with uniform longitudinal intensity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrans, T.; Yariv, A. (Department of Applied Physics 128-95, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (USA))

    1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Power-dependent nonuniform longitudinal intensity distribution leading to spectral and spatial instabilities is a major problem in semiconductor lasers. It is shown theoretically that a proper choice of the longitudinal distribution of the gain as well as that of the magnitude of the grating coupling coefficient will lead to a uniform intensity distribution in distributed feedback lasers. We also show that the widely used phase, rather than magnitude, control of the coupling coefficient cannot lead to a uniform intensity distribution when the facet reflectivities are zero.

  20. Apparatus and method for controlling plating uniformity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hachman Jr., John T.; Kelly, James J.; West, Alan C.

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of an insulating shield for improving the current distribution in an electrochemical plating bath is disclosed. Numerical analysis is used to evaluate the influence of shield shape and position on plating uniformity. Simulation results are compared to experimental data for nickel deposition from a nickel--sulfamate bath. The shield is shown to improve the average current density at a plating surface.

  1. Uniform bulk material processing using multimode microwave radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varma, Ravi (Los Alamos, NM); Vaughn, Worth E. (Madison, WI)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for generating uniform heating in material contained in a cylindrical vessel is described. TE.sub.10 -mode microwave radiation is coupled into a cylindrical microwave transition such that microwave radiation having TE.sub.11 -, TE.sub.01 - and TM.sub.01 -cylindrical modes is excited therein. By adjusting the intensities of these modes, substantially uniform heating of materials contained in a cylindrical drum which is coupled to the microwave transition through a rotatable choke can be achieved. The use of a poor microwave absorbing insulating cylindrical insert, such as aluminum oxide, for separating the material in the container from the container walls and for providing a volume through which air is circulated is expected to maintain the container walls at room temperature. The use of layer of highly microwave absorbing material, such as SiC, inside of the insulating insert and facing the material to be heated is calculated to improve the heating pattern of the present apparatus.

  2. T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection Attacks T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection...

  3. Argonne Facilitation of PHEV Standard Testing Procedure (SAE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Argonne Facilitation of PHEV Standard Testing Procedure (SAE J1711) Argonne Facilitation of PHEV Standard Testing Procedure (SAE J1711) 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  4. Candidate Performance 2013 Uniform CPA Examination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    San Marcos 47 55.8% 13 West Texas A&M University 20 55.3% 14 Sam Houston State University 32 46.7% 15 of Texas - Arlington 67 77.8 5 Texas Christian University 30 75.5 6 West Texas A&M University 20 75.3 7Candidate Performance 2013 Uniform CPA Examination First-Time Texas Candidates with Advanced

  5. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pam, Lawrence S. (Pleasanton, CA); Felter, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA); Talin, Alec (Livermore, CA); Ohlberg, Douglas (Mountain View, CA); Fox, Ciaran (Stanford, CA); Han, Sung (Pojoaque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/.mu.m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 .mu.m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceeded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material.

  6. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pam, L.S.; Felter, T.E.; Talin, A.; Ohlberg, D.; Fox, C.; Han, S.

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/{micro}m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 {micro}m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material. 2 figs.

  7. MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OwenDavis

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

  8. Uniform Methods Project Contacts | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries | DepartmentResources Program |» Uniform

  9. Uniform System of Accounts for Gas Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes a uniform system of accounts and annual report filing requirements for natural gas utilities operating in Maine.

  10. Method and system using power modulation and velocity modulation producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montcalm, Claude (Livermore, CA); Folta, James Allen (Livermore, CA); Walton, Christopher Charles (Berkeley, CA)

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for determining a source flux modulation recipe for achieving a selected thickness profile of a film to be deposited (e.g., with highly uniform or highly accurate custom graded thickness) over a flat or curved substrate (such as concave or convex optics) by exposing the substrate to a vapor deposition source operated with time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the source is operated with time-varying power applied thereto during each sweep of the substrate to achieve the time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece held stationary while exposed to the source with the source operated at each of a number of different applied power levels), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of source flux modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a source flux modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal source flux modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. The method enables precise modulation of the deposition flux to which a substrate is exposed to provide a desired coating thickness distribution.

  11. Spatially resolvable optical emission spectrometer for analyzing density uniformity of semiconductor process plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Changhoon; Ryoo, Hoonchul; Lee, Hyungwoo; Hahn, Jae W. [Nano Photonics Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Yeon; Yi, Hun-Jung [Manufacturing Technology Team, Memory Division, Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-do 445-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We proposed a spatially resolved optical emission spectrometer (SROES) for analyzing the uniformity of plasma density for semiconductor processes. To enhance the spatial resolution of the SROES, we constructed a SROES system using a series of lenses, apertures, and pinholes. We calculated the spatial resolution of the SROES for the variation of pinhole size, and our calculated results were in good agreement with the measured spatial variation of the constructed SROES. The performance of the SROES was also verified by detecting the correlation between the distribution of a fluorine radical in inductively coupled plasma etch process and the etch rate of a SiO{sub 2} film on a silicon wafer.

  12. LI Co-Facilitator Position Information & Application Leadership Institute (LI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 LI Co-Facilitator Position Information & Application Leadership Institute (LI) Office for Equity for the Co-Facilitator Position in the Leadership Institute. What follows is an overview of LI, a description of LI Co-Facilitator role, and the application. What is the Leadership Institute (LI)? The LI

  13. Component with inspection-facilitating features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; Zombo, Paul J

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine airfoil can be formed with features to facilitate measurement of its wall thickness. An outer wall of the airfoil can include an outer surface and an inner surface. The outer surface of the airfoil can have an outer inspection target surface, and the inner surface of the airfoil can have an inner inspection target surface. The inner and outer target surfaces can define substantially flat regions in surfaces that are otherwise highly contoured. The inner and outer inspection target surfaces can be substantially aligned with each other. The inner and outer target surfaces can be substantially parallel to each other. As a result of these arrangements, a highly accurate measurement of wall thickness can be obtained. In one embodiment, the outer inspection target surface can be defined by an innermost surface of a groove formed in the outer surface of the outer wall of the airfoil.

  14. Uniform Fin Sizes versus Uniform Fin Root Temperatures for Unsymmetrically Obstructed Solar Probe RTGs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T; Noravian, Heros

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper presented at the 26th IECEC, August 4-9, 1991 in Boston, MA. The Solar Probe will approach the sun within four solar radii or 0.02 AU. Because of that proximity, the spacecraft must be protected by a thermal shield. The protected umbra is a cone of 4 m diameter and 7.5 m height, and all temperature-sensitive flight components must fit within that cone. Therefore, the RTGs which power the Solar probe cannot be separated from each other and from other payload components by deploying them on long booms. They must be located near and thermally isolated from the spacecraft's paylod. This paper compares the performance of such variable-fin RTGs with that of uniform-fin RTGs. It derives the fin dimensions required for circumferential isothermicity, identifies a design that maximizes the RTGs specific power, and proves the practicality of that design option. However, detailed thermal and electrical analyses led to the somewhat surprising conclusion that (for a given thermal power) the non-uniform-fin design results in the same power output, at a higher maximum hot-junction temperature, as the standard uniform-fin design, despite the latter's nonuniform cold-junction temperatures. There are three copies in the file.

  15. Foundations for Uniform Interpolation and Forgetting in Expressive Description Logics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Carsten

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study uniform interpolation and forgetting in the description logic ALC. Our main results are model-theoretic characterizations of uniform inter- polants and their existence in terms of bisimula- tions, tight complexity bounds for deciding the existence of uniform interpolants, an approach to computing interpolants when they exist, and tight bounds on their size. We use a mix of model- theoretic and automata-theoretic methods that, as a by-product, also provides characterizations of and decision procedures for conservative extensions.

  16. Commissioning of output factors for uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Ramirez, Eric; Mascia, Anthony; Ding Xiaoning; Okoth, Benny; Zeidan, Omar; Hsi Wen; Harris, Ben; Schreuder, Andries N.; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Current commercial treatment planning systems are not able to accurately predict output factors and calculate monitor units for proton fields. Patient-specific field output factors are thus determined by either measurements or empirical modeling based on commissioning data. The objective of this study is to commission output factors for uniform scanning beams utilized at the ProCure proton therapy centers. Methods: Using water phantoms and a plane parallel ionization chamber, the authors first measured output factors with a fixed 10 cm diameter aperture as a function of proton range and modulation width for clinically available proton beams with ranges between 4 and 31.5 cm and modulation widths between 2 and 15 cm. The authors then measured the output factor as a function of collimated field size at various calibration depths for proton beams of various ranges and modulation widths. The authors further examined the dependence of the output factor on the scanning area (i.e., uncollimated proton field), snout position, and phantom material. An empirical model was developed to calculate the output factor for patient-specific fields and the model-predicted output factors were compared to measurements. Results: The output factor increased with proton range and field size, and decreased with modulation width. The scanning area and snout position have a small but non-negligible effect on the output factors. The predicted output factors based on the empirical modeling agreed within 2% of measurements for all prostate treatment fields and within 3% for 98.5% of all treatment fields. Conclusions: Comprehensive measurements at a large subset of available beam conditions are needed to commission output factors for proton therapy beams. The empirical modeling agrees well with the measured output factor data. This investigation indicates that it is possible to accurately predict output factors and thus eliminate or reduce time-consuming patient-specific output measurements for proton treatments.

  17. No quantum friction between uniformly moving plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. G. Philbin; U. Leonhardt

    2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Casimir forces between two plates moving parallel to each other are found by calculating the vacuum electromagnetic stress tensor. The perpendicular force between the plates is modified by the motion but there is no lateral force on the plates. Electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations do not therefore give rise to "quantum friction" in this case, contrary to previous assertions. The result shows that the Casimir-Polder force on a particle moving at constant speed parallel to a plate also has no lateral component.

  18. Wavelet Estimation For Samples With Random Uniform Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Lawrence D.

    Wavelet Estimation For Samples With Random Uniform Design T. Tony Cai Department of Statistics that for nonparametric regression if the samples have random uniform design, the wavelet method with universal. Simulation result is also discussed. Keywords: wavelets, nonparametric regression, minimax, adaptivity

  19. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on how OE provides unbiased policy assistance and analysis to States and regions on State electricity policies, programs, laws, and regulations that facilitate electricity...

  20. Uniform Trade Secrets Act (Drafted by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws, as amended 1985)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    Uniform Trade Secrets Act (Drafted by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State) acquisition of a trade secret of another by a person who knows or has reason to know that the trade secret was acquired by improper means; or (ii) disclosure or use of a trade secret of another without express

  1. arousal facilitates collision: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 128 Facilitating Consensus,...

  2. arrest facilitating caspase: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 147 Facilitating Consensus,...

  3. aav5 vector facilitates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 169 Facilitating Consensus,...

  4. a3 facilitates lysosomal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 94 Facilitating Consensus,...

  5. analysis facilitates mutation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 153 Facilitating Consensus,...

  6. activity facilitates microtubule: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 398 Facilitating Consensus,...

  7. aspergillus niger facilitates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 102 Facilitating Consensus,...

  8. abolish response facilitation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 57 Facilitating Consensus,...

  9. a2 domain facilitate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 76 Facilitating Consensus,...

  10. abandoned parses facilitate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 457 Facilitating Consensus,...

  11. auditory noise facilitates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 464 Facilitating Consensus,...

  12. Original Impact Calculations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  13. Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bray, Kathryn L.; Conover, David R.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Viswanathan, Vijayganesh; Ferreira, Summer; Rose, David; Schoenwald, David

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program, through the support of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), facilitated the development of the protocol provided in this report. The focus of the protocol is to provide a uniform way of measuring, quantifying, and reporting the performance of EESs in various applications; something that does not exist today and, as such, is hampering the consideration and use of this technology in the market. The availability of an application-specific protocol for use in measuring and expressing performance-related metrics of ESSs will allow technology developers, power-grid operators and other end-users to evaluate the performance of energy storage technologies on a uniform and comparable basis. This will help differentiate technologies and products for specific application(s) and provide transparency in how performance is measured. It also will assist utilities and other consumers of ESSs make more informed decisions as they consider the potential application and use of ESSs, as well as form the basis for documentation that might be required to justify utility investment in such technologies.

  14. Protocol for uniformly measuring and expressing the performance of energy storage systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin; Schoenwald, David Alan; Bray, Kathy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA; Conover, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA; Kintner-Meyer, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA; Viswanathan, Vilayanur [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program, through the support of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), facilitated the development of the protocol provided in this report. The focus of the protocol is to provide a uniform way of measuring, quantifying, and reporting the performance of ESSs in various applications; something that does not exist today and, as such, is hampering the consideration and use of this technology in the market. The availability of an application-specific protocol for use in measuring and expressing performance-related metrics of ESSs will allow technology developers, power-grid operators and other end-users to evaluate the performance of energy storage technologies on a uniform and comparable basis. This will help differentiate technologies and products for specific application(s) and provide transparency in how performance is measured. It also will assist utilities and other consumers of ESSs to make more informed decisions as they consider the potential application and use of ESSs, as well as form the basis for documentation that might be required to justify utility investment in such technologies.

  15. On uniform continuity of Cauchy's function and uniform convergence of Cauchy's integral formula with applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodore Yaotsu Wu

    2007-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is on Cauchy's function $f(z)$ and its integral, $J[f(z)]\\equiv (2\\pi i)^{-1}\\oint_C f(t)dt/(t-z)$ taken along a closed simple contour $C$, in regard to their comprehensive properties over the entire $z=x+iy$ plane consisted of the open domain ${\\cal D}^+$ bounded by $C$ and the open domain ${\\cal D}^-$ outside $C$. (i) With $f(z)$ assumed to be $C^n$ ($n$ times continuously differentiable) $\\forall z\\in {\\cal D}^+$ and in a neighborhood of $C$, $f(z)$ and its derivatives $f^{(n)}(z)$ are proved uniformly continuous in the closed domain $\\bar{{\\cal D}^+}=[\\cal D^++C]$. (ii) Under this new assumption, integral $J[f(z)]$ and its derivatives $J_n[f(z)]=d^n J[f(z)]/dz^n$ are proved to converge uniformly in $\\bar{{\\cal D}^+}$, thereby rendering the integral formula valid over the entire $z$-plane. (iii) The same claims (as for $f(z)$ and $J[f(z)]$) are shown extended to hold for the complement function $F(z)$, defined to be $C^n \\forall z\\in \\bar{{\\cal D}^-}=[\\cal D^-+C]$, in $\\bar{{\\cal D}^-}$. (iv) Further, the singularity distribution of $f(z)$ in ${\\cal D}^-$ (existing unless $f(z)\\equiv$ const.in the $z$-plane) is elucidated by considering the direct problem exemplified with several typical singularities prescribed in ${\\cal D}^-$. (v) The uniform convergence theorems for $f(z)$ and $F(z)$ shown for contour $C$ of arbitrary shape are adapted to apply to special domains in the upper or lower half $z$-planes and those inside and outside the unit circle $|z|=1$ to achieve the generalized Hilbert transforms for these cases. (vi) Finally, an unsolved inverse problem to determine all the singularities of Cauchy function $f(z)$ in domain ${\\cal D}^-$ is presented for resolution as a conjecture.

  16. Top-down facilitation of visual recognition , K. S. Kassam*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar, Moshe

    Top-down facilitation of visual recognition M. Bar* , K. S. Kassam*§ , A. S. Ghuman*§¶ , J. Boshyan gradually promote the role of top-down processing in recognition, but how such facilitation is triggered object recognition by initiating top-down processes projected from orbitofrontal to visual cortex

  17. The LBNL's Health Care Facilitator Role and Responsibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LBNL's Health Care Facilitator Role and Responsibilities The University of California Office of the President (UCOP) administers the Health Care Facilitator (HCF) program, but the HCF works under and health plan practices/policy. · HCF provides UCOP's Health and Welfare Administration (HWA

  18. alignment uniformity analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    190 A Uniform Analysis of 118 Stars with High-Contrast Imaging: Long Period Extrasolar Giant Planets are Rare around Sun-like Stars CERN Preprints Summary: We expand on the...

  19. Sufficient Conditions for Uniform Stability of Regularization Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the stability and generalization properties of penalized empirical-risk minimization algorithms. We propose a set of properties of the penalty term that is sufficient to ensure uniform ?-stability: ...

  20. Structural Response Evaluation Using Non-Uniform Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Maopeng

    2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    and buoyancy elements. With laboratory data, the study demonstrated that airfoil fairings, ribbon fairings and helical strakes can all effectively suppress the undesired vibrations in a uniform current; however, the first two devices were not quite effective...

  1. Uniform Gauge for D1-brane in General Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluson, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct uniform gauge D1-brane action in general background. We also discuss how this action transforms under double Wick rotation and determine transformation properties of background fields.

  2. Uniform Diffusion of Acetonitrile inside Carbon Nanotubes Favors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials. Nanoporous carbon exhibits excellent charge-discharge properties and a stable cyclic life. Moreover, activated composite carbon films generate high specific capacitance, laying the foundationUniform Diffusion of Acetonitrile inside Carbon Nanotubes Favors Supercapacitor Performance Oleg N

  3. Ferrofluid surface and volume flows in uniform rotating magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elborai, Shihab M. (Shihab Mahmoud), 1977-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferrofluid surface and volume effects in uniform dc and rotating magnetic fields are studied. Theory and corroborating measurements are presented for meniscus shapes and resulting surface driven flows, spin-up flows, and ...

  4. Fitness Uniform Deletion: A Simple Way to Preserve Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutter, Marcus

    is the gradual decline in population diversity that tends to occur over time. This can slow a system's progress. In this paper we present the Fitness Uniform Deletion Scheme (FUDS), a simple but somewhat unconventional ap

  5. EGR Spatial Uniformity & Cylinder-Resolved Transients-Measurements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an EGR probe for assessing steady-state spatial uniformity and cylinder-resolved EGR dynamics. p-27yoo.pdf More Documents & Publications CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control &...

  6. Uniformity of fuel target implosion in Heavy Ion Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, S; Suzuki, T; Karino, T; Barada, D; Ogoyski, A I; Ma, Y Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In inertial confinement fusion the target implosion non-uniformity is introduced by a driver beams' illumination non-uniformity, a fuel target alignment error in a fusion reactor, the target fabrication defect, et al. For a steady operation of a fusion power plant the target implosion should be robust against the implosion non-uniformities. In this paper the requirement for the implosion uniformity is first discussed. The implosion uniformity should be less than a few percent. A study on the fuel hotspot dynamics is also presented and shows that the stagnating plasma fluid provides a significant enhancement of vorticity at the final stage of the fuel stagnation. Then non-uniformity mitigation mechanisms of the heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination are also briefly discussed in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). A density valley appears in the energy absorber, and the large-scale density valley also works as a radiation energy confinement layer, which contributes to a radiation energy smoothing. In HIF a wobbling he...

  7. activation facilitates memory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Fractal Consistency: Architecting the Memory System to Facilitate Verification Computer...

  8. Facilitating Opportunistic Communication by Tracking the Documents People Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Facilitating Opportunistic Communication by Tracking the Documents People Use Jay Budzik, Xiaobin. Evanston, IL 60201 USA +1 847 467 1265 {budzik, fu, hammond}@infolab.nwu.edu ABSTRACT Many of our

  9. Surface electromyography of facilitated versus free arm activation after stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Mina

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study is to determine if the amount of volitional muscle activation in a stroke affected arm is altered by facilitation. An experiment was designed in which surface EMG was recorded from the biceps brachii ...

  10. Using Process Mapping to Facilitate Positive Library Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    Using Process Mapping to Facilitate Positive Library Change Emily Campbell Special Projects Librarian for Collections University of Michigan #12;What is Process Mapping? "Business process mapping organization's objectives to make sure that all processes are aligned with the company's values

  11. Optimization, Characterization and Commissioning of a Novel Uniform Scanning Proton Beam Delivery System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascia, Anthony Edward

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K, Smith A, Zhu X. “Commissioning of the discrete spotCharacterization and Commissioning of a Novel UniformCharacterization and Commissioning of a Novel Uniform

  12. Dynamical facilitation governs glassy dynamics in suspensions of colloidal ellipsoids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandan K. Mishra; K. Hima Nagamanasa; Rajesh Ganapathy; A. K. Sood; Shreyas Gokhale

    2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest challenges in contemporary condensed matter physics is to ascertain whether the formation of glasses from liquids is fundamentally thermodynamic or dynamic in origin. While the thermodynamic paradigm has dominated theoretical research for decades, the purely kinetic perspective of the dynamical facilitation (DF) theory has attained prominence in recent times. In particular, recent experiments and simulations have highlighted the importance of facilitation using simple model systems composed of spherical particles. However, an overwhelming majority of liquids possess anisotropy in particle shape and interactions and it is therefore imperative to examine facilitation in complex glass-formers. Here, we apply the DF theory to systems with orientational degrees of freedom as well as anisotropic attractive interactions. By analyzing data from experiments on colloidal ellipsoids, we show that facilitation plays a pivotal role in translational as well as orientational relaxation. Further, we demonstrate that the introduction of attractive interactions leads to spatial decoupling of translational and rotational facilitation, which subsequently results in the decoupling of dynamical heterogeneities. Most strikingly, the DF theory can predict the existence of reentrant glass transitions based on the statistics of localized dynamical events, called excitations, whose duration is substantially smaller than the structural relaxation time. Our findings pave the way for systematically testing the DF approach in complex glass-formers and also establish the significance of facilitation in governing structural relaxation in supercooled liquids.

  13. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  14. Method to produce large, uniform hollow spherical shells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a method to produce large uniform hollow spherical shells by (1) forming uniform size drops of heat decomposable or vaporizable material, (2) evaporating the drops to form dried particles, (3) coating the dried particles with a layer of shell forming material and (4) heating the composite particles to melt the outer layer and to decompose or vaporize the inner particle to form an expanding inner gas bubble. The expanding gas bubble forms the molten outer layer into a shell of relatively large diameter. By cycling the temperature and pressure on the molten shell, nonuniformities in wall thickness can be reduced. The method of the invention is utilized to produce large uniform spherical shells, in the millimeter to centimeter diameter size range, from a variety of materials and of high quality, including sphericity, concentricity and surface smoothness, for use as laser fusion or other inertial confinement fusion targets as well as other applications.

  15. Augmented down-up algebras and uniform posets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, Paul

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the structure of the uniform posets we introduce the notion of an augmented down-up (or ADU) algebra. We discuss how ADU algebras are related to the down-up algebras defined by Benkart and Roby. For each ADU algebra we give two presentations by generators and relations. We also display a $Z$-grading and a linear basis. In addition we show that the center is isomorphic to a polynomial algebra in two variables. We display seven families of uniform posets and show that each gives an ADU algebra module in a natural way. The main inspiration for the ADU algebra concept comes from the second author's thesis concerning a type of uniform poset constructed using a dual polar graph.

  16. A demonstration of variance and covariance calculations using MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlich, G.L.; Nasseri, S.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Good decision-making in materials accounting requires a valid calculation of control limits and detection sensitivity for facilities handling special nuclear materials (SNM). A difficult aspect of this calculation is determining the appropriate variance and covariance values for the terms in the materials balance (MB) equation. Computer software such as MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator) can efficiently select and combine variance terms. These programs determine the variance and covariance of an MB equation by first obtaining relations for the variance and covariance of each term in the MB equation through propagating instrument errors and then substituting the measured quantities and their uncertainties into these relations. MAVARIC is a custom spreadsheet used with the second release of LOTUS 1-2-3.** PROFF is a stand-alone menu-driven program requiring no commercial software. Programs such as MAVARIC and PROFF facilitate the complex calculations required to determine the detection sensitivity of an SNM facility. These programs can also be used to analyze materials accounting systems.

  17. Polyelectrolytes polarization in non-uniform electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnoush Farahpour; Fathollah Varnik; Mohammad Reza Ejtehadi

    2014-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Stretching dynamics of polymers in microfluidics is of particular interest for polymer scientists. As a charged polymer, a polyelectrolyte can be deformed from its coiled equilibrium configuration to an extended chain by applying uniform or non-uniform electric fields. By means of hybrid lattice Boltzmann-molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate how the condensed counterions around the polyelectrolyte contribute to the polymer stretching in inhomogeneous fields. As an application, we discuss the translocation phenomena and entropic traps, when the driving force is an applied external electric field.

  18. Evaluation of the application uniformity of subsurface drip distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weynand, Vance Leo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Methods of comparison of statistical uniformity (ASAE, 1999). Method Acceptability Statistical Uniformity, Us (%) Excellent 100-95 Good 90-85 Fair 80-75 Poor 70-65 Unacceptable <60 ASAE (1983) also represents flow variation through... configured to run up and down slopes of 0, 1, 2, and 4% and were also oriented on contours of 1 and 2%. The test system was constructed of 2.54 cm (1 in) square tubing frame 2.74 m long by 66 cm wide (9 ft by 26 in) with adjustable 2.54 cm (1 in) square...

  19. The Power of Non-Uniform Wireless Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Power of Non-Uniform Wireless Power ETH Zurich ­ Distributed Computing Group Magnus M-To-Interference-Plus-Noise Ratio (SINR) Formula Minimum signal- to-interference ratio Power level of sender u Path-loss exponent Noise Distance between two nodes Received signal power from sender Received signal power from all other

  20. A Resources Virtualization Approach Supporting Uniform Access to Heterogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    A Resources Virtualization Approach Supporting Uniform Access to Heterogeneous Grid Resources1 of resources such as computing resources, storage resources, instrument resources, data resources, etc. However, because of the differences of formats, descriptions, structures, and access modes of these resources, grid

  1. A Uniform Type Structure for Secure Information KOHEI HONDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, Simon

    A Uniform Type Structure for Secure Information Flow KOHEI HONDA Queen Mary, University of London . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Author's address: K. Honda, Department of Computer Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile, Vol. TBD, No. TDB, Month Year, Pages 1--83. #12; 2 · Kohei Honda and Nobuko Yoshida 2.5 Linear

  2. A Uniform Type Structure for Secure Information KOHEI HONDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honda, Kohei

    A Uniform Type Structure for Secure Information Flow KOHEI HONDA Queen Mary, University of London . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Author's address: K. Honda, Department of Computer Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile. TBD, No. TDB, Month Year, Pages 1­83. #12;2 · Kohei Honda and Nobuko Yoshida 2.5 Linear/Affine Typing

  3. Demand and Production Management with Uniform Guaranteed Lead Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Jayashankar M.

    Demand and Production Management with Uniform Guaranteed Lead Time Uday S. Rao Jayashankar M Recently, innovation-oriented firms have been competing along dimensions other than price - lead time being one such dimension. Increasingly, customers are favoring lead time guarantees as a means to hedge

  4. Boosting Data Center Performance Through Non-Uniform Power Allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    Data center power management is evolving from ad hoc methods based on maximum node power usage capacity. A conservative power management ap- proach is to ensure the maximum power consumption of all, dynamic algorithm to manage power globally in server clusters with non-uniform workloads. #12;This

  5. OVERWEIGHT DEFORMATIONS OF AFFINE TORIC VARIETIES AND LOCAL UNIFORMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uniformization for Abhyankar valuations of algebraic function fields and also uses toroidal methods and phrases. Toric geometry, Valuations, Key polynomials. 1 hal-00933721,version2-31Mar2014 #12;2 Abstract. A valuation of a local domain (R, m) is the datum of a valuation ring (R , m ) of the fraction field K of R

  6. Vacuum polarization induced by a uniformly accelerated charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Linet

    1995-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a point charge fixed in the Rindler coordinates which describe a uniformly accelerated frame. We determine an integral expression of the induced charge density due to the vacuum polarization at the first order in the fine structure constant. In the case where the acceleration is weak, we give explicitly the induced electrostatic potential.

  7. Lyapunov Exponents and Uniform Weak Normally Repelling Invariant Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hal

    Lyapunov Exponents and Uniform Weak Normally Repelling Invariant Sets Paul Leonard Salceanu and Hal repelling in directions normal to the boundary in which M resides provided all normal Lyapunov exponents that Lyapunov exponents can be used to establish the requisite repelling properties for both discrete

  8. Uniformity of wastewater dispersal using subsurface drip emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persyn, Russell Alan

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An on-site wastewater treatment project site with two separate drip fields produced data on emitter flow rates and uniformity after 6 years of operation. The site served a two-bedroom residence in Weslaco, Texas, with treatment through a septic...

  9. Solar radiation intensity calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Randolph Steven

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

  10. Calorimetric glass transition explained by hierarchical dynamic facilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrahan, Juan P.

    Calorimetric glass transition explained by hierarchical dynamic facilitation Aaron S. Keysa Contributed by David Chandler, February 11, 2013 (sent for review November 15, 2012) The glass transition different on cooling than on heating, and the response to melting a glass depends markedly on the cooling

  11. Key ornamental innovations facilitate diversification in an avian radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Dustin R.

    Key ornamental innovations facilitate diversification in an avian radiation Rafael Maiaa,1 , Dustin novel ways of interacting with the en- vironment (key innovations) play a fundamental role in promoting evolution of orna- mental traits. Because selection can operate only on existing vari- ation, the tendency

  12. Facilitating Document Annotation using Content and Querying Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hristidis, Vagelis

    content management software (e.g., Microsoft SharePoint), allow users to share documents and annotate1 Facilitating Document Annotation using Content and Querying Value Eduardo J. Ruiz #1 , Vagelis the generation of the structured metadata by identifying documents that are likely to contain informa- tion

  13. Networked Innovation: Using Roadmapping to Facilitate Coordination, Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Networked Innovation: Using Roadmapping to Facilitate Coordination, Collaboration and Cooperation, as are the resulting uncertainties. Roadmapping is a method that at its core is used to buy down uncertainty (linking activity to value creation across an ecosystem or platform). Ultimately, the way that roadmapping

  14. Phenotypic plasticity facilitates recurrent rapid adaptation to introduced predators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfrender, Michael

    Phenotypic plasticity facilitates recurrent rapid adaptation to introduced predators Alison G) A central role for phenotypic plasticity in adaptive evolution is often posited yet lacks empirical support of preexisting developmental pathways, producing rapid adaptive change. We examined the role of plasticity

  15. Energy and contact of one-dimensional fermions in a harmonic trap via non-uniform lattice Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Berger; E. R. Anderson; J. E. Drut

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the ground-state energy and Tan's contact of attractively interacting few-fermion systems in a one-dimensional harmonic trap, for a range of couplings and particle numbers. To this end, we implement a new lattice Monte Carlo approach based on a non-uniform discretization of space, defined via Gauss-Hermite quadrature points and weights. This particular coordinate basis is natural for systems in harmonic traps, and it yields a position-dependent coupling and a corresponding non-uniform Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. The resulting path integral is performed with hybrid Monte Carlo as a proof of principle for calculations at finite temperature and in higher dimensions.

  16. Effect of non-uniform exchange field in ferromagnetic graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debashree Chowdhury; B. Basu

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We have presented here the consequences of the non-uniform exchange field on the spin transport issues in spin chiral configuration of ferromagnetic graphene. Taking resort to the spin orbit coupling (SOC) term and non-uniform exchange coupling term we are successful to express the expression of Hall conductivity in terms of the exchange field and SOC parameters through the Kubo formula approach. However, for a specific configuration of the exchange parameter we have evaluated the Berry curvature of the system. We also have paid attention to the study of SU(2) gauge theory of ferromagnetic graphene. The generation of anti damping spin orbit torque in spin chiral magnetic graphene is also briefly discussed.

  17. A RICH with aerogel: a study of refractive index uniformity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemi, M; Calvi, M; Matteuzzi, C; Musy, M; Perego, D L; Easo, S

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of aerogel as a radiator in the RICH detectors of LHCb is a challenge due to the hot environment of the hadron collider LHC. Large size tiles of silica aerogel were recently produced with unprecedented optical quality for such dimensions. Results of laboratory measurements and beam tests are briefly reported. A description of a method to measure the uniformity of the index of refraction within the tile is given.

  18. One-way Ponderomotive Barrier in a Uniform Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch

    2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of an asymmetric ponderomotive barrier in a nonuniform dc magnetic field by high-frequency radiation near the cyclotron resonance for selected plasma species was contemplated in Physics of Plasmas 11 (November 2004) 5046-5064. Here we show that a similar one-way barrier, which reflects particles incident from one side while transmitting those incident from the opposite side, can be produced also in a uniform magnetic field, entirely due to inhomogeneity of high-frequency drive.

  19. Uniform electron gases. II. The generalized local density approximation in one dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loos, Pierre-François, E-mail: pf.loos@anu.edu.au; Ball, Caleb J.; Gill, Peter M. W., E-mail: peter.gill@anu.edu.au [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a generalization (gLDA) of the traditional Local Density Approximation (LDA) within density functional theory. The gLDA uses both the one-electron Seitz radius r{sub s} and a two-electron hole curvature parameter ? at each point in space. The gLDA reduces to the LDA when applied to the infinite homogeneous electron gas but, unlike the LDA, it is also exact for finite uniform electron gases on spheres. We present an explicit gLDA functional for the correlation energy of electrons that are confined to a one-dimensional space and compare its accuracy with LDA, second- and third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation energies, and exact calculations for a variety of inhomogeneous systems.

  20. Gravitational lensing in a non-uniform plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. S. Bisnovatyi-Kogan; O. Yu. Tsupko

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a model of gravitational lensing in a non-uniform plasma. When a gravitating body is surrounded by a plasma, the lensing angle depends on the frequency of the electromagnetic wave, due to dispersion properties of plasma, in presence of a plasma inhomogeneity, and of a gravity. The second effect leads, even in a uniform plasma, to a difference of the gravitational photon deflection angle from the vacuum case, and to its dependence on the photon frequency. We take into account both effects, and derive the expression for the lensing angle in the case of a strongly nonuniform plasma in presence of the gravitation. Dependence of the lensing angle on the photon frequency in a homogeneous plasma resembles the properties of a refractive prism spectrometer, which strongest action is for very long radiowaves. We discuss the observational appearances of this effect for the gravitational lens with a Schwarzschild metric, surrounded by a uniform plasma. We obtain formulae for the lensing angle and the magnification factors in this case and discuss a possibility of observation of this effect by the planned VLBI space project Radioastron. We also consider models with a nonuniform plasma distribution. For different gravitational lens models we compare the corrections to the vacuum lensing due to the gravitational effect in plasma, and due to the plasma inhomogeneity. We have shown that the gravitational effect could be detected in the case of a hot gas in the gravitational field of a galaxy cluster.

  1. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  2. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  3. Carbon Footprint Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

  4. PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION MANUAL (ACM) APPROVAL METHOD for the 2013 2012 CEC400201200715DAY #12;201308 Residential ACM Approval Manual 2-2 1. Overview Minimum Modeling Capabilities 1. Overview This Manual explains the requirements for approval of residential Alternative

  5. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  6. Polarization operator in the 2+1 dimensional quantum electrodynamics with a nonzero fermion density in a constant uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. R. Khalilov; I. V. Mamsurov

    2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarization operator (tensor) for planar charged fermions in constant uniform magnetic field is calculated in the one-loop approximation of the 2+1 dimensional quantum electrodynamics (QED$_{2+1}$) with a nonzero fermion density. We construct the Green function of the Dirac equation with a constant uniform external magnetic field in the QED$_{2+1}$ at the finite chemical potential, find the imaginary part of this Green function and then obtain the polarization tensor related to the combined contribution from real particles occupying the finite number of energy levels and magnetic field. We expect that some physical effects under consideration seem to be likely to be revealed in a monolayer graphene sample in the presence of external constant uniform magnetic field $B$ perpendicular to it.

  7. Polarization operator in the 2+1 dimensional quantum electrodynamics with a nonzero fermion density in a constant uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. R. Khalilov; I. V. Mamsurov

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarization operator (tensor) for planar charged fermions in constant uniform magnetic field is calculated in the one-loop approximation of the 2+1 dimensional quantum electrodynamics (QED$_{2+1}$) with a nonzero fermion density. We construct the Green function of the Dirac equation with a constant uniform external magnetic field in the QED$_{2+1}$ at the finite chemical potential, find the imaginary part of this Green function and then obtain the polarization tensor related to the combined contribution from real particles occupying the finite number of energy levels and magnetic field. We expect that some physical effects under consideration seem to be likely to be revealed in a monolayer graphene sample in the presence of external constant uniform magnetic field $B$ perpendicular to it.

  8. Steep Slope Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep Slope Calculator Estimates Cooling and Heating

  9. A two-phase spherical electric machine for generating rotating uniform magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawler, Clinton T. (Clinton Thomas)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design and construction of a novel two-phase spherical electric machine that generates rotating uniform magnetic fields, known as a fluxball machine. Alternative methods for producing uniform ...

  10. CO Oxidation Facilitated by Robust Surface States on Au-Covered Topological Insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hua [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhu, Wenguang [ORNL; Xiao, Di [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [University of Science and Technology, Beijing, China

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface states the electronic states emerging as a solid material terminates at a surface are usually vulnerable to contaminations and defects. The robust topological surface state(s) (TSS) on the three-dimensional topological insulators provide a perfect platform for exploiting surface states in less stringent environments. Employing first-principles density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that the TSS can play a vital role in facilitating surface reactions by serving as an effective electron bath. We use CO oxidation on gold-covered Bi2Se3 as a prototype example, and show that the robust TSS can significantly enhance the adsorption energy of both CO and O2 molecules, by promoting different directions of electron transfer. The concept of TSS as an electron bath may lead to new design principles beyond the conventional d-band theory of heterogeneous catalysis.

  11. Models of Synthesis of Uniform Colloids and Nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyacheslav Gorshkov; Vladimir Privman

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present modeling approaches to explain mechanisms of control of uniformity (narrow distribution) of sizes and shapes in synthesis of nanosize crystals and micron-size colloids. We consider those situations when the nanocrystals are formed by burst nucleation. The colloids are then self-assembled by aggregation of nanocrystals. The coupled kinetic processes are both controlled by diffusional transport, yielding well-defined colloid dispersions used in many applications. We address aspects of modeling of particle structure selection, ranging from nucleation to growth by aggregation and to mechanisms of emergence of particle shapes.

  12. Coded aperture imaging with self-supporting uniformly redundant arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, Edward E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-supporting uniformly redundant array pattern for coded aperture imaging. The present invention utilizes holes which are an integer times smaller in each direction than holes in conventional URA patterns. A balance correlation function is generated where holes are represented by 1's, nonholes are represented by -1's, and supporting area is represented by 0's. The self-supporting array can be used for low energy applications where substrates would greatly reduce throughput. The balance correlation response function for the self-supporting array pattern provides an accurate representation of the source of nonfocusable radiation.

  13. Generate Uniform Transverse Distributed Electron Beam along a Beam Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been reported that transverse distribution shaping can help to further enhance the energy extraction efficiency in a terawatt, tapered X-ray free-electron laser. Thus, methods of creating and keeping almost uniform transverse distributed (UTD) beam within undulators are required. This study shows that a UTD electron beam can be generated within evenly distributed drift sections where undulators can be placed, by means of octupoles and particular optics. A concrete design is presented, and numerical simulations are done to verify the proposed method.

  14. Pairs Emission in a Uniform Background Field: an Algebraic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Soldati

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully algebraic general approach is developed to treat the pairs emission and absorption in the presence of some uniform external background field. In particular, it is shown that the pairs production and annihilation operators, together with the pairs number operator, do actually fulfill the SU(2) functional Lie algebra. As an example of application, the celebrated Schwinger formula is consistently and nicely recovered, within this novel approach, for a Dirac spinor field in the presence of a constant and homogeneous electric field in four spacetime dimensions.

  15. Effect on Non-Uniform Heat Generation on Thermionic Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The penalty resulting from non-uniform heat generation in a thermionic reactor is examined. Operation at sub-optimum cesium pressure is shown to reduce this penalty, but at the risk of a condition analogous to burnout. For high pressure diodes, a simple empirical correlation between current, voltage and heat flux is developed and used to analyze the performance penalty associated with two different heat flux profiles, for series-and parallel-connected converters. The results demonstrate that series-connected converters require much finer power flattening than parallel converters. For example, a ±10% variation in heat generation across a series array can result in a 25 to 50% power penalty.

  16. About the Uniform Methods Project | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJune 17, 2015EnergyThe Office ofAdministrationAboutUniform

  17. Rural electrification, climate change, and local economies: Facilitating communication in development policy and practice on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casillas, Christian E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change, and local economies:  Facilitating communication climate change, and local economies:  Facilitating communication 

  18. Strong and uniform equivalence of nonmonotonic theories --an algebraic Miroslaw Truszczynski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truszczynski, Miroslaw

    Strong and uniform equivalence of nonmonotonic theories -- an algebraic approach Miroslaw Truszczy We show that the concepts of strong and uniform equivalence of logic programs can be generalized and uniform equivalence for sev- eral nonmonotonic logics including logic programming with aggregates, default

  19. Strong and uniform equivalence of nonmonotonic theories ---an algebraic Mirosl/aw Truszczy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truszczynski, Miroslaw

    Strong and uniform equivalence of nonmonotonic theories --- an algebraic approach # Mirosl mirekcs.uky.edu Abstract We show that the concepts of strong and uniform equivalence of logic programs can characterizations of strong and uniform equivalence for sev­ eral nonmonotonic logics including logic programming

  20. Facilitating Sound, Cost-Effective Federal Energy Management (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Federal Government, as the nation's largest energy consumer, has a tremendous opportunity and acknowledged responsibility to lead by example. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) plays a critical role in this effort. FEMP facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP does this by focusing on the needs of its Federal customers, delivering an array of services across a variety of program areas.

  1. Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model - Facilitator Guide (February 2014)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30,Crafty Gifts| Department of Energy Facilitator

  2. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  3. Method for forming a uniformly dense polymer foam body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy (Danville, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 to about 0.5 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microballoon material wherein some of the microballoons are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  4. Uniformly wound superconducting coil and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mookerjee, S.; Weijun, S.; Yager, B.

    1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A coil of superconducting wire for a superconducting magnet is described having a relatively dense and uniformly spaced winding to enhance the homogeneity and strength of the magnetic field surrounding the coil and a method of winding the same wherein the mandrel used to wind said coil comprises removable spacers and retainers forming a plurality of outwardly opening slots, each of said slots extending generally about the periphery of the mandrel and being sized to receive and outwardly align and retain successive turns of the superconducting wire within each slot as the wire is wound around and laterally across the mandrel to form a plurality of wire ribbons of a predetermined thickness laterally across the mandrel. 8 figures.

  5. Uniformly wound superconducting coil and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mookerjee, Sumit (Cedar Hill, TX); Weijun, Shen (Beijun, CN); Yager, Billy (Waxahachie, TX)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coil of superconducting wire for a superconducting magnet having a relaely dense and uniformly spaced winding to enhance the homogeneity and strength of the magnetic field surrounding the coil and a method of winding the same wherein the mandrel used to wind said coil comprises removable spacers and retainers forming a plurality of outwardly opening slots, each of said slots extending generally about the periphery of the mandrel and being sized to receive and outwardly align and retain successive turns of the superconducting wire within each slot as the wire is wound around and laterally across the mandrel to form a plurality of wire ribbons of a predetermined thickness laterally across the mandrel.

  6. A Uniform Framework of Global Nuclear Materials Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupree, S.A.; Mangan, D.L.; Sanders, T.L; Sellers, T.A.

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Nuclear Materials Management (GNMM) anticipates and supports a growing international recognition of the importance of uniform, effective management of civilian, excess defense, and nuclear weapons materials. We expect thereto be a continuing increase in both the number of international agreements and conventions on safety, security, and transparency of nuclear materials, and the number of U.S.-Russian agreements for the safety, protection, and transparency of weapons and excess defense materials. This inventory of agreements and conventions may soon expand into broad, mandatory, international programs that will include provisions for inspection, verification, and transparency, To meet such demand the community must build on the resources we have, including State agencies, the IAEA and regional organizations. By these measures we will meet the future expectations for monitoring and inspection of materials, maintenance of safety and security, and implementation of transparency measures.

  7. Transuranic Transmutation and Criticality Calculation Sensitivity to Heterogeneous Lattice Effects - 12391

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbaras, Sean A. [United States Military Academy, West Point, New York 10996 (United States); Knight, Travis W. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel in traditional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies has been researched at length and has shown to provide the benefit of transmutation and targets the amount and toxicity of high level waste needed to be managed. Advanced MOX concepts using enriched Uranium Dioxide (UO{sub 2}) are required for multiple recycling of plutonium. The use of MOX and ordinary UO{sub 2} fuel in the same assembly as well as unfueled rods and assembly edge effects contrasts with the unit cell computational assumption of a uniform infinite array of rods. While a deterministic method of calculating the Dancoff factor has traditionally been employed in fuel assembly analysis due to the lighter computational and modeling requirements, this research seeks to determine the validity of the uniform, infinite lattice assumption with respect to Dancoff factor and determine the magnitude of the impact of nonuniform lattice effects on fuel assembly criticality calculations as well as transuranic isotope production and transmutation. This research explored the pin-to-pin interaction in a non-uniform lattice of MOX fuel rods and UO{sub 2} fuel rods through the impact of the calculated Dancoff factors from the deterministic method used in SCALE versus the Monte Carlo method used in the code DANCOFF-MC. Using the Monte Carlo method takes into account the non-uniform lattice effects of having neighboring fuel rods with different cross-sectional spectra whereas the Dancoff factor calculated by SCALE assumes a uniform, infinite lattice of one fuel rod type. Differences in eigenvalue calculations as a function of burnup are present between the two methods of Dancoff factor calculation. The percent difference is greatest at low burnup and then becomes smaller throughout the cycle. Differences in the transmutation rate of transuranic isotopes in the MOX fuel are also present between the Dancoff factor calculation methods. The largest difference is in Pu-239, Pu-242, and Am-241 composition whereas U-238, Pu-242, and Pu-238 composition was not changed by taking into account the non-homogenous lattice effects. Heterogeneous lattice effects do change the calculated eigenvalue and transmutation rate in a non-uniform lattice of MOX fuel rods and UO{sub 2} fuel. However, the uncertainty in the ENDF data used by SCALE in these calculations is large enough that the infinite lattice assumption remains valid. (authors)

  8. Threat Facilitates Subsequent Executive Control During Anxious Mood Jeffrey L. Birk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Aniruddh D.

    Threat Facilitates Subsequent Executive Control During Anxious Mood Jeffrey L. Birk Tufts) posits that low-level threat may facilitate behavioral performance by influencing executive control functions. Anxiety is thought to strengthen this effect by enhancing threat's affective significance

  9. COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE By ZIRU LIU support, and endless love. iv #12;COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI for colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides is from indirect field observations, models, and laboratory

  10. Co-Facilitator Professional Development Learning Community Office for Equity and Diversity (OED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Co-Facilitator Professional Development Learning Community (CFPDLC) Office for Equity and Diversity 2012 through May 2013, for continued learning. * If you serve as a co-facilitator for any OED Learning Communities, you will decide with your co-facilitator team the length and frequency of planning meeting time

  11. Facilitated diffusion framework for transcription factor search with conformational changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jérôme Cartailler; Jürgen Reingruber

    2015-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellular responses often require the fast activation or repression of specific genes, which depends on Transcription Factors (TFs) that have to quickly find the promoters of these genes within a large genome. Transcription Factors (TFs) search for their DNA promoter target by alternating between bulk diffusion and sliding along the DNA, a mechanism known as facilitated diffusion. We study a facilitated diffusion framework with switching between three search modes: a bulk mode and two sliding modes triggered by conformational changes between two protein conformations. In one conformation (search mode) the TF interacts unspecifically with the DNA backbone resulting in fast sliding. In the other conformation (recognition mode) it interacts specifically and strongly with DNA base pairs leading to slow displacement. From the bulk, a TF associates with the DNA at a random position that is correlated with the previous dissociation point, which implicitly is a function of the DNA structure. The target affinity depends on the conformation. We derive exact expressions for the mean first passage time (MFPT) to bind to the promoter and the conditional probability to bind before detaching when arriving at the promoter site. We systematically explore the parameter space and compare various search scenarios. We compare our results with experimental data for the dimeric Lac repressor search in E.Coli bacteria. We find that a coiled DNA conformation is absolutely necessary for a fast MFPT. With frequent spontaneous conformational changes, a fast search time is achieved even when a TF becomes immobilized in the recognition state due to the specific bindings. We find a MFPT compatible with experimental data in presence of a specific TF-DNA interaction energy that has a Gaussian distribution with a large variance.

  12. Sealable stagnation flow geometries for the uniform deposition of materials and heat

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarty, Kevin F. (Livermore, CA); Kee, Robert J. (Livermore, CA); Lutz, Andrew E. (Alamo, CA); Meeks, Ellen (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention employs a constrained stagnation flow geometry apparatus to achieve the uniform deposition of materials or heat. The present invention maximizes uniform fluxes of reactant gases to flat surfaces while minimizing the use of reagents and finite dimension edge effects. This results, among other things, in large area continuous films that are uniform in thickness, composition and structure which is important in chemical vapor deposition processes such as would be used for the fabrication of semiconductors.

  13. Gamma-ray burst jets: uniform or structured?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salafia, O S; Nappo, F; Ghisellini, G; Ghirlanda, G; Salvaterra, R; Tagliaferri, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) jets impacts on their prompt and afterglow emission properties. Insights into the still unknown structure of GRBs can be achieved by studying how different structures impact on the luminosity function (LF): i) we show that low ($10^{46} 10^{50}$ erg/s) luminosity GRBs can be described by a unique LF; ii) we find that a uniform jet (seen on- and off-axis) as well as a very steep structured jet (i.e. $\\epsilon(\\theta) \\propto \\theta^{-s}$ with $s > 4$) can reproduce the current LF data; iii) taking into account the emission from the whole jet (i.e. including contributions from mildly relativistic, off-axis jet elements) we find that $E_{\\rm iso}(\\theta_{\\rm v})$ (we dub this quantity "apparent structure") can be very different from the intrinsic structure $\\epsilon(\\theta)$: in particular, a jet with a Gaussian intrinsic structure has an apparent structure which is more similar to a power law. This opens a new viewpoint on the quasi-universal structured jet hypothesis.

  14. Nuclear reactor control rod with uniformly changeable axial worth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, T.R.

    1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In combination with a fuel assembly having at least one hollow guide thimble, means to compensate for a reduction in reactivity occurring generally uniformly in a transverse direction and symmetric in the axial direction is described, comprising: (a) a control rod inserted in the guide thimble including (i) an elongated inner cylindrical member having a lower end, (ii) an elongated outer cylindrical member surrounding the inner member and having a lower end with concentrically-arranged lower inner and outer edge portions defined thereon, (iii) each of the members being composed of alternating poison and nonpoison regions, (iv) the inner member being axially movable relative to the outer member, (v) an outwardly projecting ledge adapted to support in a rest relationship the lower end of the outer member; and (b) means for retaining the outer member in a stationary position in the guide thimble while the inner member is movable axially relative thereto to adjust the degree to which the poison regions of the members overlap with the nonpoison regions and thereby change the overall worth of the rod. (c) The retaining means are in a lower portion of the guide thimble and sized to support the lower end of the outer member at its lower outer edge portion. The retaining means have a central hole sized to allow passage of the lower end and ledge of the inner member therethrough.

  15. A key factor to the spin parameter of uniformly rotating compact stars: crust structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, B; Sun, B Y; Wang, S Y; Gao, J H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the key factor to determine the dimensionless spin parameter $j\\equiv cJ/(GM^2)$ of different kinds of uniformly rotating compact stars, including the traditional neutron stars, hyperonic neutron stars, and hybrid stars, and check the reliability of the results on various types of equations of state of dense matter. The equations of state from the relativistic mean field theory and the MIT bag model are adopted to simulate compact stars. Numerical calculations of rigidly rotating neutron stars are performed using the RNS code in the framework of general relativity by solving the Einstein equations for stationary axis-symmetric spacetime. The crust structure of compact stars is found to be a key factor to determine the maximum value of the spin parameter $j_{\\rm max}$. For the stars with inclusion of the crust, $j_{\\rm max}\\sim 0.7$ is sustained for various kinds of compact stars with $M>0.5 M_{\\odot}$, and is found to be insensitive to the mass of star and selected equations of state. For the traditi...

  16. CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Harvey J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International RecommendationsCalculation of Natural Daylight," CIE PUBLICATION No. 16,Committee E-3.2, "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

  17. CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Harvey J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International Recommendationsthe Calculation of Natural Daylight, 11 CIE PUBLICATION No.Committee E-3.2 1 "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

  18. Calculations of dynamic stresses in the envelopes of pulsed Xe flashlamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdener, F.R.; Platt, E.A.; Erlandson, A.C.; Frank, D.N.; Gelinas, R.J.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Larson, D.W.; Sinz, K.H.

    1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have modeled dynamic stresses in the envelopes of pulsed xenon flashlamps, treating stresses produced by three different sources: the heating of the envelope by the plasma; the pressure rise of the xenon gas; and magnetic forces, due to currents flowing in nearby lamps. The heat-induced stresses were calculated by the finite element method, using uniform heating rates for the inside surface of the envelope that were inferred from flashlamp radiant efficiency measurements. Pressure-induced stresses were calculated analytically, using empirical relationships for temperature and pressure in terms of current density. Magnetically-induced stresses were also calculated analytically, for flashlamps packed parallel to each other in linear arrays.

  19. Control and diagnosis of temperature, density, and uniformity in x-ray heated iron/magnesium samples for opacity measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Hansen, S. B.; Rochau, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Mancini, R. C. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States)] [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental tests are in progress to evaluate the accuracy of the modeled iron opacity at solar interior conditions, in particular to better constrain the solar abundance problem [S. Basu and H. M. Antia, Phys. Rep. 457, 217 (2008)]. Here, we describe measurements addressing three of the key requirements for reliable opacity experiments: control of sample conditions, independent sample condition diagnostics, and verification of sample condition uniformity. The opacity samples consist of iron/magnesium layers tamped by plastic. By changing the plastic thicknesses, we have controlled the iron plasma conditions to reach (1) T{sub e}?=?167?±?3?eV and n{sub e}?=?(7.1?±?1.5)×?10{sup 21}?cm{sup ?3}, (2) T{sub e}?=?170?±?2?eV and n{sub e}?=?(2.0?±?0.2)?×?10{sup 22}?cm{sup ?3}, and (3) T{sub e}?=?196?±?6?eV and n{sub e}?=?(3.8?±?0.8)?×?10{sup 22}?cm{sup ?3}, which were measured by magnesium tracer K-shell spectroscopy. The opacity sample non-uniformity was directly measured by a separate experiment where Al is mixed into the side of the sample facing the radiation source and Mg into the other side. The iron condition was confirmed to be uniform within their measurement uncertainties by Al and Mg K-shell spectroscopy. The conditions are suitable for testing opacity calculations needed for modeling the solar interior, other stars, and high energy density plasmas.

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring spatial uniformity of radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, Halden (Boulder, CO)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for measuring the spatial uniformity of the intensity of a radiation beam from a radiation source based on a single sampling time and/or a single pulse of radiation. The measuring apparatus includes a plurality of radiation detectors positioned on planar mounting plate to form a radiation receiving area that has a shape and size approximating the size and shape of the cross section of the radiation beam. The detectors concurrently receive portions of the radiation beam and transmit electrical signals representative of the intensity of impinging radiation to a signal processor circuit connected to each of the detectors and adapted to concurrently receive the electrical signals from the detectors and process with a central processing unit (CPU) the signals to determine intensities of the radiation impinging at each detector location. The CPU displays the determined intensities and relative intensity values corresponding to each detector location to an operator of the measuring apparatus on an included data display device. Concurrent sampling of each detector is achieved by connecting to each detector a sample and hold circuit that is configured to track the signal and store it upon receipt of a "capture" signal. A switching device then selectively retrieves the signals and transmits the signals to the CPU through a single analog to digital (A/D) converter. The "capture" signal. is then removed from the sample-and-hold circuits. Alternatively, concurrent sampling is achieved by providing an A/D converter for each detector, each of which transmits a corresponding digital signal to the CPU. The sampling or reading of the detector signals can be controlled by the CPU or level-detection and timing circuit.

  1. On the Sensitivity of ?/? Prediction to Dose Calculation Methodology in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afsharpour, Hossein [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada); Centre Intégré de Cancérologie de la Montérégie, Hôpital Charles-LeMoyne, Greenfield Park, QC (Canada); Walsh, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, The University of Oxford, The United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Collins Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Vigneault, Eric [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC (Canada)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To study the relationship between the accuracy of the dose calculation in brachytherapy and the estimations of the radiosensitivity parameter, ?/?, for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this study, Monte Carlo methods and more specifically the code ALGEBRA was used to produce accurate dose calculations in the case of prostate brachytherapy. Equivalent uniform biologically effective dose was calculated for these dose distributions and was used in an iso-effectiveness relationship with external beam radiation therapy. Results: By considering different levels of detail in the calculations, the estimation for the ?/? parameter varied from 1.9 to 6.3 Gy, compared with a value of 3.0 Gy suggested by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 137. Conclusions: Large variations of the ?/? show the sensitivity of this parameter to dose calculation modality. The use of accurate dose calculation engines is critical for better evaluating the biological outcomes of treatments.

  2. Method for facilitating the introduction of material into cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method for creating a localized disruption within a boundary of a cell or structure by exposing a boundary of a cell or structure to a set of energetically charged particles while regulating the energy of the charged particles so that the charged particles have an amount of kinetic energy sufficient to create a localized disruption within an area of the boundary of the cell or structure, then upon creation of the localized disruption, the amount of kinetic energy decreases to an amount insufficient to create further damage within the cell or structure beyond the boundary. The present invention is also a method for facilitating the introduction of a material into a cell or structure using the same methodology then further exciting the area of the boundary of the cell or structure where the localized disruption was created so to create a localized temporary opening within the boundary then further introducing the material through the temporary opening into the cell or structure.

  3. TEMPORARILY ALLOYING TITANIUM TO FACILITATE FRICTION STIR WELDING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanski, Yuri

    2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

  4. Online Blind Calibration of Non-Uniform Photodetectors: Application to Endomicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Online Blind Calibration of Non-Uniform Photodetectors: Application to Endomicroscopy Nicolas an original method for the online blind calibra- tion of non-uniform photodetectors. The disparity of a system akin to gradient- based surface recovery. From our blind calibration procedure, we design

  5. Classification of instability modes in a model of aluminium reduction cells with a uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (sodium aluminium fluoride) by an electric current of 350-500kA, which passes vertically down fromClassification of instability modes in a model of aluminium reduction cells with a uniform magnetic reduction cells in the presence of a uniform, vertical, background magnetic field is presented

  6. DISSERTATION EFFECTS OF CONTACT-BASED NON-UNIFORMITIES IN CDS/CDTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    DISSERTATION EFFECTS OF CONTACT-BASED NON-UNIFORMITIES IN CDS/CDTE THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS Submitted University April 25, 2008 We hereby recommend that the dissertation prepared under our supervision by Alan R Department Head ii #12;ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION Effects of contact-based non-uniformities in CdS/CdTe thin

  7. Using workspace information as a guide to non-uniform sampling in probabilistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Using workspace information as a guide to non-uniform sampling in probabilistic roadmap planners-uniform sampling in probabilistic roadmap planners Jur P. van den Berg Mark H. Overmars November 2003 Abstract The probabilistic roadmap (PRM) planner is a popular method for robot motion planning problems with many degrees

  8. DISSERTATION ANALYSIS OF IMPACT OF NON-UNIFORMITIES ON THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    DISSERTATION ANALYSIS OF IMPACT OF NON-UNIFORMITIES ON THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS AND MODULES WITH 2-D-FILM SOLAR CELLS AND MODULES WITH 2-D SIMULATIONS BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS-UNIFORMITIES ON THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS AND MODULES WITH 2-D SIMULATIONS Clean and environmentally friendly photovoltaic

  9. Dynamics of uniform Si/SiGe uniaxial strain generation on compliant insulating substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamics of uniform Si/SiGe uniaxial strain generation on compliant insulating substrates R. L on the relaxation of Si/SiGe bilayers of different geometries to obtain up to 1.0% uniaxial tensile strain in silicon and 1.5 GPa uniaxial compressive stress in SiGe [1,2]. The process generates uniform uniaxially

  10. Uniform Stability of Switched Linear Systems: Extensions of LaSalle's Invariance Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    1 Uniform Stability of Switched Linear Systems: Extensions of LaSalle's Invariance Principle Jo linear systems, where uniformity refers to the con- vergence rate of the multiple solutions that one be viewed as extensions of LaSalle's Invariance Principle to certain classes of switched linear systems

  11. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface movement were stronger than during the receding movement. Theory indicates that, for hydrophilic colloids, the advancing interface movement generally exerts a stronger detachment force than the receding, except when the hysteresis of the colloid-air-water contact angle is small. These results of our study are particularly relevant for colloid mobilization and transport related to three process in the vadose zone at Hanford: (1) water infiltration into sediments during rainfall or snowmelt events, (2) groundwater fluctuations as caused by river stage fluctuations, and (3) steady-state, low-flow recharge in deep vadose zone sediments. Transient water flow, like during infiltration or groundwater level fluctuations, are most conducive for colloid mobilization, but even during steady-state, low-flow recharge, colloids can be mobile, although to a much lesser extent. The results of this project have led to a comprehensive and fundamental understanding of colloid transport and mobilization under unsaturated flow conditions at the Hanford site.

  12. X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Tabata; Yoshikiyo Hatakeyama; Ichiro Adachi; Takeshi Morita; Keiko Nishikawa

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a new X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogels used as radiator in proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov detectors. To obtain high performance in a large-area detector, a key characteristic of radiator is the density (i.e. refractive index) uniformity of an individual aerogel monolith. At a refractive index of n = 1.05, our requirement for the refractive index uniformity in the transverse plane direction of an aerogel tile is |\\delta (n - 1)/(n - 1)| aerogels from a trial production and that of Panasonic products (SP-50) as a reference, and to confirm they have sufficient density uniformity within \\pm 1% along the transverse plane direction. The measurement results show that the proposed technique can quantitatively estimate the density uniformity of aerogels.

  13. X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabata, Makoto; Adachi, Ichiro; Morita, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Keiko; 10.1016/j.nima.2012.09.001

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a new X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogels used as radiator in proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov detectors. To obtain high performance in a large-area detector, a key characteristic of radiator is the density (i.e. refractive index) uniformity of an individual aerogel monolith. At a refractive index of n = 1.05, our requirement for the refractive index uniformity in the transverse plane direction of an aerogel tile is |\\delta (n - 1)/(n - 1)| aerogels from a trial production and that of Panasonic products (SP-50) as a reference, and to confirm they have sufficient density uniformity within \\pm 1% along the transverse plane direction. The measurement results show that the proposed technique can quantitatively estimate the density uniformity of aerogels.

  14. Computational Tools for Supersymmetry Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Baer

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    I present a brief overview of a variety of computational tools for supersymmetry calculations, including: spectrum generators, cross section and branching fraction calculators, low energy constraints, general purpose event generators, matrix element event generators, SUSY dark matter codes, parameter extraction codes and Les Houches interface tools.

  15. analog fret-pair facilitating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 183 Facilitating Consensus,...

  16. BIRC6 promotes hepatocellular carcinogenesis: Interaction of BIRC6 with p53 facilitating p53 degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that BIRC6 could regulate the degradation of p53 rather thanp53 and facilitated its degradation by ubiquitination incantly promoted the degradation of p53 by ubiquitination (

  17. Efficient Execution of Electronic Structure Calculations on SMP Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurzhan Ustemirov

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications augmented with adaptive capabilities are becoming common in parallel computing environments. For large-scale scientific applications, dynamic adjustments to a computationally-intensive part may lead to a large pay-off in facilitating efficient execution of the entire application while aiming at avoiding resource contention. Application-specific knowledge, often best revealed during the run-time, is required to initiate and time these adjustments. In particular, General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System (GAMESS) is a program for ab initio quantum chemistry that places significant demands on the high-performance computing platforms. Certain electronic structure calculations are characterized by high consumption of a particular resource, such as CPU, main memory, or disk I/O. This may lead to resource contention among concurrent GAMESS jobs and other programs in the dynamically changing environment. Thus, it is desirable to improve GAMESS calculations by means of dynamic adaptations. In this thesis, we show how an application- or algorithm-specific knowledge may play a significant role in achieving this goal. The choice of implementation is facilitated by a module-driven middleware easily integrated with GAMESS that assesses resource consumption and invokes GAMESS adaptations to the system environment. We show that the throughput of GAMESS jobs may be improved greatly as a result of such adaptations.

  18. Calculation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r8.0

  19. Perfect Computational Equivalence between Quantum Turing Machines and Finitely Generated Uniform Quantum Circuit Families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harumichi Nishimura; Masanao Ozawa

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to establish the computational equivalence between quantum Turing machines (QTMs) and quantum circuit families (QCFs) using Yao's quantum circuit simulation of QTMs, we previously introduced the class of uniform QCFs based on an infinite set of elementary gates, which has been shown to be computationally equivalent to the polynomial-time QTMs (with appropriate restriction of amplitudes) up to bounded error simulation. This result implies that the complexity class BQP introduced by Bernstein and Vazirani for QTMs equals its counterpart for uniform QCFs. However, the complexity classes ZQP and EQP for QTMs do not appear to equal their counterparts for uniform QCFs. In this paper, we introduce a subclass of uniform QCFs, the finitely generated uniform QCFs, based on finite number of elementary gates and show that the class of finitely generated uniform QCFs is perfectly equivalent to the class of polynomial-time QTMs; they can exactly simulate each other. This naturally implies that BQP as well as ZQP and EQP equal the corresponding complexity classes of the finitely generated uniform QCFs.

  20. Spherical Shell Cosmological Model and Uniformity of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Considered is spherical shell as a model for visible universe and parameters that such model must have to comply with the observable data. The topology of the model requires that motion of all galaxies and light must be confined inside a spherical shell. Consequently the observable universe cannot be defined as a sphere centered on the observer, rather it is an arc length within the volume of the spherical shell. The radius of the shell is 4.46 $\\pm$ 0.06 Gpc, which is for factor $\\pi$ smaller than radius of a corresponding 3-sphere. However the event horizon, defined as the arc length inside the shell, has the size of 14.0 $\\pm$ 0.2 Gpc, which is in agreement with the observable data. The model predicts, without inflation theory, the isotropy and uniformity of the CMB. It predicts the correct value for the Hubble constant $H_0$ = 67.26 $\\pm$ 0.90 km/s/Mpc, the cosmic expansion rate $H(z)$, and the speed of the event horizon in agreement with observations. The theoretical suport for shell model comes from general relativity, curvature of space by mass, and from holographic principle. The model explains the reason for the established discrepancy between the non-covariant version of the holographic principle and the calculated dimensionless entropy $(S/k)$ for the visible universe, which exceeds the entropy of a black hole. The model is in accordance with the distribution of radio sources in space, type Ia data, and data from the Hubble Ultra Deep Field optical and near-infrared survey.

  1. Electromagnetic Energy, Absorption, and Casimir Forces. I. Uniform Dielectric Media in Thermal Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. S. S. Rosa; D. A. R. Dalvit; P. W. Milonni

    2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The derivation of Casimir forces between dielectrics can be simplified by ignoring absorption, calculating energy changes due to displacements of the dielectrics, and only then admitting absorption by allowing permittivities to be complex. As a first step towards a better understanding of this situation we consider in this paper the model of a dielectric as a collection of oscillators, each of which is coupled to a reservoir giving rise to damping and Langevin forces on the oscillators and a noise polarization acting as a source of a fluctuating electromagnetic (EM) field in the dielectric. The model leads naturally to expressions for the quantized EM fields that are consistent with those obtained by different approaches, and also results in a fluctuation-dissipation relation between the noise polarization and the imaginary part of the permittivity; comparison with the Rytov fluctuation-dissipation relation employed in the well-known Lifshitz theory for the van der Waals (or Casimir) force shows that the Lifshitz theory is actually a classical stochastic electrodynamical theory. The approximate classical expression for the energy density in a band of frequencies at which absorption in a dielectric is negligible is shown to be exact as a spectral thermal equilibrium expectation value in the quantum-electrodynamical theory. Our main result is the derivation of an expression for the QED energy density of a uniform dispersive, absorbing media in thermal equilibrium. The spectral density of the energy is found to have the same form with or without absorption. We also show how the fluctuation-dissipation theorem ensures a detailed balance of energy exchange between the (absorbing) medium, the reservoir and the EM field in thermal equilibrium.

  2. SB EE Calculator | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculator Energy Efficiency Decision Support Calculator Argonne's Energy Efficiency Decision Support Calculator is a simple tool that small business owners can use to quickly...

  3. Apparatus and process to enhance the uniform formation of hollow glass microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schumacher, Ray F

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus is provided for enhancing the formation of a uniform population of hollow glass microspheres. A burner head is used which directs incoming glass particles away from the cooler perimeter of the flame cone of the gas burner and distributes the glass particles in a uniform manner throughout the more evenly heated portions of the flame zone. As a result, as the glass particles are softened and expand by a released nucleating gas so as to form a hollow glass microsphere, the resulting hollow glass microspheres have a more uniform size and property distribution as a result of experiencing a more homogenous heat treatment process.

  4. Electrode with transparent series resistance for uniform switching of optical modulation devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tench, D. Morgan (Camarillo, CA); Cunningham, Michael A. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Kobrin, Paul H. (Newbury Park, CA)

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Switching uniformity of an optical modulation device for controlling the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is improved by use of an electrode comprising an electrically resistive layer that is transparent to the radiation. The resistive layer is preferably an innerlayer of a wide-bandgap oxide sandwiched between layers of indium tin oxide or another transparent conductor, and may be of uniform thickness, or may be graded so as to provide further improvement in the switching uniformity. The electrode may be used with electrochromic and reversible electrochemical mirror (REM) smart window devices, as well as display devices based on various technologies.

  5. Boronic Acids Facilitate the Transport of Ribonucleosides through Lipid PAMELA R. WESTMARK AND BRADLEY D. SMITHX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Boronic Acids Facilitate the Transport of Ribonucleosides through Lipid Bilayers PAMELA R. WESTMARK for publication November 14, 1995X. Abstract 0 Boronic acids were found to facilitate the transport of various and influx experiments with mixtures of nucleosides and sucrose showed virtually complete transport

  6. BiP Clustering Facilitates Protein Folding in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petzold, Linda R.

    BiP Clustering Facilitates Protein Folding in the Endoplasmic Reticulum Marc Griesemer1. *, Carissa (ER): translocation, protein folding, and ER-associated degradation. To facilitate protein folding may enhance protein folding and maturation. Scenarios were simulated to gauge the effectiveness

  7. USING CORIOLIS FORCE TO FACILITATE MOLECULAR TRANSPORTATION AND FLUID MIXING IN CD MICROFLUIDICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    e. USING CORIOLIS FORCE TO FACILITATE MOLECULAR TRANSPORTATION AND FLUID MIXING IN CD MICROFLUIDICS Coriolis Force to Facilitate Molecular Transportation and Fluid Mixing in CD Microfluidics Platform and Fluid mixing in compact disk (CD) microfluidic platform where centrifugal force is used as the driving

  8. WINS: Market Simulation Tool for Facilitating Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad [Illinois Institute of Technology

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating 20% or more wind energy into the system and transmitting large sums of wind energy over long distances will require a decision making capability that can handle very large scale power systems with tens of thousands of buses and lines. There is a need to explore innovative analytical and implementation solutions for continuing reliable operations with the most economical integration of additional wind energy in power systems. A number of wind integration solution paths involve the adoption of new operating policies, dynamic scheduling of wind power across interties, pooling integration services, and adopting new transmission scheduling practices. Such practices can be examined by the decision tool developed by this project. This project developed a very efficient decision tool called Wind INtegration Simulator (WINS) and applied WINS to facilitate wind energy integration studies. WINS focused on augmenting the existing power utility capabilities to support collaborative planning, analysis, and wind integration project implementations. WINS also had the capability of simulating energy storage facilities so that feasibility studies of integrated wind energy system applications can be performed for systems with high wind energy penetrations. The development of WINS represents a major expansion of a very efficient decision tool called POwer Market Simulator (POMS), which was developed by IIT and has been used extensively for power system studies for decades. Specifically, WINS provides the following superiorities: (1) An integrated framework is included in WINS for the comprehensive modeling of DC transmission configurations, including mono-pole, bi-pole, tri-pole, back-to-back, and multi-terminal connection, as well as AC/DC converter models including current source converters (CSC) and voltage source converters (VSC). (2) An existing shortcoming of traditional decision tools for wind integration is the limited availability of user interface, i.e., decision results are often text-based demonstrations. WINS includes a powerful visualization tool and user interface capability for transmission analyses, planning, and assessment, which will be of great interest to power market participants, power system planners and operators, and state and federal regulatory entities. (3) WINS can handle extended transmission models for wind integration studies. WINS models include limitations on transmission flow as well as bus voltage for analyzing power system states. The existing decision tools often consider transmission flow constraints (dc power flow) alone which could result in the over-utilization of existing resources when analyzing wind integration. WINS can be used to assist power market participants including transmission companies, independent system operators, power system operators in vertically integrated utilities, wind energy developers, and regulatory agencies to analyze economics, security, and reliability of various options for wind integration including transmission upgrades and the planning of new transmission facilities. WINS can also be used by industry for the offline training of reliability and operation personnel when analyzing wind integration uncertainties, identifying critical spots in power system operation, analyzing power system vulnerabilities, and providing credible decisions for examining operation and planning options for wind integration. Researches in this project on wind integration included (1) Development of WINS; (2) Transmission Congestion Analysis in the Eastern Interconnection; (3) Analysis of 2030 Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern Interconnection; (4) Large-scale Analysis of 2018 Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern U.S. Interconnection. The research resulted in 33 papers, 9 presentations, 9 PhD degrees, 4 MS degrees, and 7 awards. The education activities in this project on wind energy included (1) Wind Energy Training Facility Development; (2) Wind Energy Course Development.

  9. Braking index of isolated uniformly rotating magnetized pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamil, Oliver; Urbanec, Martin; Urbancova, Gabriela

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isolated pulsars are rotating neutron stars with accurately measured angular velocities $\\Omega$, and their time derivatives which show unambiguously that the pulsars are slowing down. Although the exact mechanism of the spin-down is a question of debate in detail, the commonly accepted view is that it arises through emission of magnetic dipole radiation (MDR) from a rotating magnetized body. Other processes, including the emission of gravitational radiation, and of relativistic particles (pulsar wind), are also being considered. The calculated energy loss by a rotating pulsar with a constant moment of inertia is assumed proportional to a model dependent power of $\\Omega$. This relation leads to the power law $\\dot{\\Omega}$ = -K $\\Omega^{\\rm n}$ where $n$ is called the braking index. The MDR model predicts $n$ exactly equal to 3. Selected observations of isolated pulsars provide rather precise values of $n$, individually accurate to a few percent or better, in the range 1$ <$ n $ < $ 2.8, which is consi...

  10. Effects of demagnetizing factors on transient motion of ferrofluid in a uniform rotating magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snively, Michael John

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms that lead to bulk flow within a ferrofluid-filled container subjected to a rotating uniform magnetic field are experimentally studied. There are two prevailing theories: spin diffusion theory and flow due ...

  11. Design and construction of uniform glow discharge plasma system operating under atmospheric condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocum, C.; Ayhan, H. [Biomedical Engineering Department, Baskent University, Ankara 06530 (Turkey); Chemistry Department, Biochemistry Division, Mugla University, Faculty of Science, Koetekli, 48170 Mugla (Turkey)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a uniform glow discharge plasma system operating without vacuum is presented. A full-bridge switching circuit was used to switch the transformers. The primary windings of transformers were connected in parallel, but in opposite phase to double the output voltage. Theoretically, 20 000 V{sub pp} was obtained. Rectangle copper electrodes were used, and placed parallel to each other. To prevent the spark production that is, to obtain uniformity, two 2 mm Teflon sheets were glued to the electrodes. However, it was observed that the operating frequency also affected the uniformity. For the system presented here, the frequency at which more uniformity was obtained was found to be 14 kHz.

  12. Microfluidic device incorporating closed loop feedback control for uniform and tunable production of micro-droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    Microfluidic device incorporating closed loop feedback control for uniform and tunable production, we have designed a microfluidic-based technology utilizing elementary microchannel geometries initial development using flow-focusing microfluidic geometry for droplet formation, computer

  13. Communication in Federal Politics: Universalism, Policy Uniformity, and the Optimal Allocation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communication in Federal Politics: Universalism, Policy Uniformity, and the Optimal Allocation model of communication in federal legislatures to study the incentives of members to engage under consideration, communication between delegates generally suffers from a bias that make truthful

  14. Vibration control in plates by uniformly distributed PZT actuators interconnected via electric networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    improve the performances of piezoelectric actuation. internal resonance / equivalent circuits 1Vibration control in plates by uniformly distributed PZT actuators interconnected via electric vibrations of plates by means of a set of electrically-interconnected piezoelectric actuators is described

  15. The effects of deposit thermal history on microstructure produced by uniform droplet spray forming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherng, Jean-Pei Jeanie

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform droplet spray forming is a process aimed at producing near-net-shape parts directly from the liquid melt by spraying micron-sized droplets onto a movable target. In spray forming, the solidification rate of the ...

  16. Speech synthesis using non-uniform units in the Verbmobil project. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Simon; Portele, Thomas; Höfer, Florian

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a concatenative speech synthesiser for British English which uses the HADIFIX inventory structure originally developed for German by Portele. An inventory of non-uniform units was investigated with the aim of ...

  17. Bipartite Q-polynomial distance-regular graphs and uniform posets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miklavic, Stefko

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $\\G$ denote a bipartite distance-regular graph with vertex set $X$ and diameter $D \\ge 3$. Fix $x \\in X$ and let $L$ (resp. $R$) denote the corresponding lowering (resp. raising) matrix. We show that each $Q$-polynomial structure for $\\G$ yields a certain linear dependency among $RL^2$, $LRL$, $L^2R$, $L$. Define a partial order $\\le$ on $X$ as follows. For $y,z \\in X$ let $y \\le z$ whenever $\\partial(x,y)+\\partial(y,z)=\\partial(x,z)$, where $\\partial$ denotes path-length distance. We determine whether the above linear dependency gives this poset a uniform or strongly uniform structure. We show that except for one special case a uniform structure is attained, and except for three special cases a strongly uniform structure is attained.

  18. Development of a uniform-droplet spray apparatus for high melting temperature metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joumaa, Hady K

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The building and operation of a high-temperature uniform droplet spraying (UDS) apparatus extend the performance and capabilities of powder based manufacturing processes. Although the main concepts of operation of the ...

  19. Dynamics of long flexible cylinders at high-mode number in uniform and sheared flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swithenbank, Susan B. (Susan Brenda)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this thesis is to characterize the response of risers at high-mode numbers in sheared and uniform ocean currents. As part of this thesis work, three separate experiments have been planned and ...

  20. Subsolutions That Are Close in the Uniform Norm Are Close in the Sobolev Norm as Well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleem, Muhammad Shoaib, E-mail: shaby455@yahoo.com; Shashiashvili, Malkhaz, E-mail: mshashiashvili@yahoo.com [GC University, Abdus Salam School of Mathematical Sciences (Pakistan)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type weighted reverse Poincare inequality is established for a difference of two continuous weak subsolutions of a linear second order uniformly elliptic partial differential equation in the ball.This result is the key to deriving the error estimate for the gradient of the analytically unknown value function of the optimal stochastic control problem from the uniform error of the value function itself in the related numerical approximation problems.

  1. Dielectrophoresis device and method having non-uniform arrays for manipulating particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cummings, Eric B. (Livermore, CA); Fintschenko, Yolanda (Livermore, CA); Simmons, Blake (San Francisco, CA)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidic devices according to embodiments of the present invention include an inlet port, an outlet port, and a channel or chamber having a non-uniform array of insulating features on one or more surfaces. Electrodes are provided for generation of a spatially non-uniform electric field across the array. A voltage source, which may be an A.C. and/or a D.C. voltage source may be coupled to the electrodes for the generation of the electric field.

  2. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall.

  3. Formal Management Review of the Safety Basis Calculations Noncompliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altenbach, T J

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In Reference 1, LLNL identified a failure to adequately implement an institutional commitment concerning administrative requirements governing the documentation of Safety Basis calculations supporting the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) process for LLNL Hazard Category 2 and Category 3 nuclear facilities. The AB Section has discovered that the administrative requirements of AB procedure AB-006, 'Safety Basis Calculation Procedure for Category 2 and 3 Nuclear Facilities', have not been uniformly or consistently applied in the preparation of Safety Basis calculations for LLNL Hazard Category 2 and 3 Nuclear Facilities. The SEP Associated Director has directed the AB Section to initiate a formal management review of the issue that includes, but is not necessarily limited to the following topics: (1) the basis establishing Ab-006 as a required internal procedure for Safety Basis calculations; (2) how requirements for Safety Basis calculations flow down in the institutional DSA process; (3) the extent to which affected Laboratory organizations have explicitly complied with the requirements of Procedure AB-006; (4) what alternative approaches LLNL organizations has used for Safety Basis calculations and how these alternate approaches compare with Procedure AB-006 requirements; and (5) how to reconcile Safety Basis calculations that were performed before Procedure AB-006 came into existence (i.e., August 2001). The management review2 also includes an extent-of-condition evaluation to determine how widespread the discovered issue is throughout Laboratory organizations responsible for operating nuclear facilities, and to determine if implementation of AB procedures other than AB-006 has been similarly affected. In Reference 2, Corrective Action 1 was established whereby the SEP Directorate will develop a plan for performing a formal management review of the discovered condition, including an extent-of condition evaluation. In Reference 3, a plan was provided to prepare a formal management review, satisfying Corrective Action 1. An AB-006 Working Group was formed,led by the AB Section, with representatives from the Nuclear Materials Technology Program (NMTP), the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Division, and the Packaging and Transportation Safety (PATS) Program. The key action of this management review was for Working Group members to conduct an assessment of all safety basis calculations referenced in their respective DSAs. Those assessments were tasked to provide the following information: (1) list which safety basis calculations correctly follow AB-006 and therefore require no additional documentation; (2) identify and list which safety basis calculations do not strictly follow AB-006, these include NMTP Engineering Notes, Engineering Safety Notes, and calculations by organizations external to the nuclear facilities (such as Plant Engineering), subcontractor calculations, and other internally generated calculations. Each of these will be reviewed and listed on a memorandum with the facility manager's (or designee's) signature accepting that calculation for use in the DSA. If any of these calculations are lacking the signature of a technical reviewer, they must also be reviewed for technical content and that review documented per AB-006.

  4. Monte Carlo calculations of nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pieper, S.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear many-body calculations have the complication of strong spin- and isospin-dependent potentials. In these lectures the author discusses the variational and Green`s function Monte Carlo techniques that have been developed to address this complication, and presents a few results.

  5. EWB Facilitator Position Descriptions Facilitators will manage a group of 3-5 Vice-Presidents. They will run bi-weekly meetings with these Vice-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    and communication aspects of the Chapter's ventures and projects. Strong communication and networking skills would-Presidents. They will also be responsible for guiding the entire Enabling Facilitation Group in organization of the large at Queen's, which will involve networking with administration and catering services as well as the Canadian

  6. Roles of Major Facilitator Superfamily Transporters in Phosphate Response in Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Matthew D.

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter Pho84 and the type III transporter Pho89 are responsible for metabolic effects of inorganic phosphate in yeast. While the Pho89 ortholog Pit1 was also shown to be involved ...

  7. The Dangerous Policy of Weakening Security to Facilitate Surveillance Jon M. Peha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peha, Jon M.

    The Dangerous Policy of Weakening Security to Facilitate Surveillance Jon M. Peha peha@cmu.edu, www. If the security features of these widely available products and services are weak, everyone is in greater danger

  8. Design for an invertible water bottle to facilitate cleaning and promote sustainable water bottle usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlitz, Matthew S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to explore the design of a reusable water bottle that can be inverted to expose the inside. Being able to directly touch the entire inside of the product could facilitate cleaning and consequently ...

  9. MaGKeyS : a haptic guidance keyboard system for facilitating sensorimotor training and rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewiston, Craig Edwin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Magnetic Guidance Keyboard System (MaGKeyS) embodies a new haptic guidance technology designed to facilitate sensorimotor training and rehabilitation. MaGKeyS works by employing active magnetic force to guide finger ...

  10. Using an electronic lab notebook to facilitate Research Data Management at the University of Edinburgh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard, Nigel

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines how adoption of an electronic lab notebook can facilitate a research data management programme, using the design and integration of the RSpace electronic lab notebook at the University of Edinburgh ...

  11. A Bayesian statistical analysis of behavioral facilitation associated with deep brain stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Anne C.

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for Parkinson's Disease and is being investigated as a treatment for chronic depression, obsessive compulsive disorder and for facilitating functional recovery of ...

  12. 1/12-Scale scoping experiments to characterize double-shell tank slurry uniformity: Test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Liljegren, L.M.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Million gallon double-shell tanks (DSTs) at Hanford are used to store transuranic, high-level, and low-level wastes. These wastes generally consist of a large volume of salt-laden solution covering a smaller volume of settled sludge primarily containing metal hydroxides. These wastes will be retrieved and processed into immobile waste forms suitable for permanent disposal. The current retrieval concept is to use submerged dual-nozzle pumps to mobilize the settled solids by creating jets of fluid that are directed at the tank solids. The pumps oscillate, creating arcs of high-velocity fluid jets that sweep the floor of the tank. After the solids are mobilized, the pumps will continue to operate at a reduced flow rate sufficient to maintain the particles in a uniform suspension. The objectives of these 1/12-scale scoping experiments are to determine how Reynolds number, Froude number, and gravitational settling parameter affect the degree of uniformity achieved during jet mixer pump operation in the full-scale double-shell tanks; develop linear models to predict the degree of uniformity achieved by jet mixer pumps operating in the full-scale double-shell tanks; apply linear models to predict the degree of uniformity that will be achieved in tank 241-AZ-101 and determine whether contents of that tank will be uniform to within {+-} 10% of the mean concentration; and obtain experimental concentration and jet velocity data to compared with the TEMPEST computational and modeling predictions to guide further code development.

  13. Facilitating conceptual change through instructional strategies: an experimental study using the Karplus Learning Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Rebecca Janet

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facilitating Conceptual Change Through Instructional Strategies: An Experimental Study Using the Karplus Learning Cycle A Thesis by REBECCA JANET POLLARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... by REBECCA JANET POLLARD Approved as to style and content by: Carol L Stuessy (Chair of Committee) Stephanie L. Kmg t (Member) William H. Peters (Department Head) Donald Barker (Member) August 1990 ABSTRACT Facilitating Conceptual Change Through...

  14. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Saiers

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

  15. Dose monitoring and output correction for the effects of scanning field changes with uniform scanning proton beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Qingya [IU Health Proton Therapy Center (IUHPTC, formerly known as Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indianapolis, Indiana 47907 (United States); Wu, Huanmei [Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States); Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J. [IU Health Proton Therapy Center (IUHPTC, formerly known as Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The output of a proton beam is affected by proton energy, Spread-Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) width, aperture size, dose rate, and the point of measurement. In a uniform scanning proton beam (USPB), the scanning field size is adjusted (including the vertical length and the horizontal width) according to the treatment field size with appropriate margins to reduce secondary neutron production. Different scanning field settings result in beam output variations that are investigated in this study. Methods: The measurements are performed with a parallel plate Markus chamber at the center of SOBP under the reference condition with 16 cm range, 10 cm SOBP, and 5 cm air gap. The effect of dose rate on field output is studied by varying proton beam current from 0.5 to 7 nA. The effects of scanning field settings are studied by varying independently the field width and length from 12 x 12 to 30 x 30 cm{sup 2}. Results: The results demonstrate that scanning field variations can produce output variation up to 3.80%. In addition, larger output variation is observed with scanning field changes along the stem direction of the patient dose monitor (PDM). By investigating the underlying physics of incomplete charge collection and the stem effects of the PDM, an analytical model is proposed to calculate USPB output with consideration of the scanning field area and the PDM stem length that is irradiated. The average absolute difference between the measured output and calculated output using our new correction model are within 0.13 and 0.08% for the 20 and 30 cm snouts, respectively. Conclusions: This study proposes a correction model for accurate USPB output calculation, which takes account of scanning field settings and the PDM stem effects. This model may be used to extend the existing output calculation model from one snout size to other snout sizes with customized scanning field settings. The study is especially useful for calculating field output for treatment without individualized patient specific measurements.

  16. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall. All of the other model elements (conduction through wall board, sheathing, and siding; convection from siding and wallboard to ambients; and radiation across the wall cavity) are required to accurately predict the heat transfer through a wall. Addition of a foil liner on one inner surface of the wall cavity reduces the total heat transferred by almost 50%.

  17. Analytical calculation of neutral transport and its effect on ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, M.D.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Valanju, P.M.; Solano, E.R. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA). Inst. for Fusion Studies Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA). Fusion Research Center)

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analytically calculate the neutral particle distribution and its effects on ion heat and momentum transport in three-dimensional plasmas with arbitrary temperature and density profiles. A general variational principle taking advantage of the simplicity of the charge-exchange (CX) operator is derived to solve self-consistently the neutral-plasma interaction problem. To facilitate an extremal solution, we use the short CX mean-free-path ({lambda}{sub x}) ordering. Further, a non-variational, analytical solution providing a full set of transport coefficient is derived by making the realistic assumption that the product of the CX cross section with relative velocity is constant. The effects of neutrals on plasma energy loss and rotation appear in simple, sensible forms. We find that neutral viscosity dominates ion viscosity everywhere, and in the edge region by a large factor. 13 refs.

  18. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, J. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Department of 702, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, L. H., E-mail: liliuhe@buaa.edu.cn, E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F. [Department of 702, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yu, K. M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K., E-mail: liliuhe@buaa.edu.cn, E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  19. A Family of Uniform Strain Tetrahedral Elements and a Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Jung, J.; Key, S.W.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a collection of papers on a family of uniform strain tetrahedral finite elements and their connection to different element types. Also included in the report are two papers which address the general problem of connecting dissimilar meshes in two and three dimensions. Much of the work presented here was motivated by the development of the tetrahedral element described in the report "A Suitable Low-Order, Eight-Node Tetrahedral Finite Element For Solids," by S. W. Key {ital et al.}, SAND98-0756, March 1998. Two basic issues addressed by the papers are: (1) the performance of alternative tetrahedral elements with uniform strain and enhanced uniform strain formulations, and (2) the proper connection of tetrahedral and other element types when two meshes are "tied" together to represent a single continuous domain.

  20. The Unreasonable Success of Quantum Probability I: Quantum Measurements as Uniform Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diederik Aerts; Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a 'uniform tension-reduction' (UTR) model, which allows to represent the probabilities associated with an arbitrary measurement situation and use it to explain the emergence of quantum probabilities (the Born rule) as 'uniform' fluctuations on this measurement situation. The model exploits the geometry of simplexes to represent the states, in a way that the measurement probabilities can be derived as the 'Lebesgue measure' of suitably defined convex subregions of the simplexes. We consider a very simple and evocative physical realization of the abstract model, using a material point particle which is acted upon by elastic membranes, which by breaking and collapsing produce the different possible outcomes. This easy to visualize mechanical realization allows one to gain considerable insight into the possible hidden structure of an arbitrary measurement process. We also show that the UTR-model can be further generalized into a 'general tension-reduction' (GTR) model, describing conditions of lack of knowledge generated by 'non-uniform' fluctuations. In this ampler framework, particularly suitable to describe experiments in cognitive science, we define and motivate a notion of 'universal measurement', describing the most general possible condition of lack of knowledge in a measurement, emphasizing that the uniform fluctuations characterizing quantum measurements can also be understood as an average over all possible forms of non-uniform fluctuations which can be actualized in a measurement context. This means that the Born rule of quantum mechanics can be understood as a first order approximation of a more general non-uniform theory, thus explaining part of the great success of quantum probability in the description of different domains of reality. This is the first part of a two-part article.

  1. Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to reduce the harmonic field calculation errors. A conformal transfor- mation of a multipole magnet into a dipole reduces these errors. Dipole Magnet Calculations A triangular...

  2. Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Table Updated: March 20, 2015 FY 2016 February 2015 CRC Calculation Table (pdf) Final FY 2015 CRC Letter & Table (pdf) Note: The Cost...

  3. NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9,...

  4. Geometry of the Uniform Spanning Forest: Transitions in Dimensions 4, 8, 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itai Benjamini; Harry Kesten; Yuval Peres; Oded Schramm

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The uniform spanning forest (USF) in Z^d is the weak limit of random, uniformly chosen, spanning trees in [-n,n]^d. Pemantle proved that the USF consists a.s. of a single tree if and only if d = 9. More generally, let N(x,y) be the minimum number of edges outside the USF in a path joining x and y in Z^d. Then a.s. max{N(x,y) : x,y in Z^d} is the integer part of (d-1)/4. The notion of stochastic dimension for random relations in the lattice is introduced and used in the proof.

  5. The first and second monotone integral principles for fundamental solutions of uniformly elliptic equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two optimal monotone integral principles (equivalently for the Laplacian, two sharp iso-weighted-volume inequalities) are established through extending the first and second integral bounds of H. Weinberger for the Green functions (i.e., fundamental solutions) of uniformly elliptic equations in terms of the layer-cake formula, a one-dimensional monotone integral principle, and the isoperimetric and Jenson's inequalities with sharp constants. Surprisingly, a special setting of the first principle can be used to not only verify the low-dimensional P\\'olya conjecture for the principal eigenvalue of the Laplacian but also to characterize the geometry of the Nash inequality for a strong uniform elliptic equation.

  6. Gravitational waves interacting with a spinning charged particle in the presence of a uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Papadopoulos

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The equations which determine the response of a spinning charged particle moving in a uniform magnetic field to an incident gravitational wave are derived in the linearized approximation to general relativity. We verify that 1) the components of the 4-momentum, 4-velocity and the components of the spinning tensor, both electric and magnetic moments, exhibit resonances and 2) the co-existence of the uniform magnetic field and the GW are responsible for the resonances appearing in our equations. In the absence of the GW, the magnetic field and the components of the spin tensor decouple and the magnetic resonances disappear.

  7. Calculate viscosities for 355 liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Lin, Xiaoyan; Li Bu (Lamar Univ., TX (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid viscosities are important factors in process design and operation. The viscosity of a liquid determines its flow properties, such as velocity and pressure drop. In addition, the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of a liquid are affected by its viscosity. An equation can be used to calculate liquid viscosities as a function of temperature. In the accompanying table, regression coefficients are included for 355 compounds with five, six or seven carbon atoms--generally the most-widely used in the chemical and petroleum industries. To calculate the viscosity of a liquid at any temperature between its melting and critical points (T[sub min] and T[sub max]), use the following equation: log[sub 10] [eta][sub liq] = A + B/T + CT + DT[sup 2] where [eta][sub liq] = viscosity, cP, A,B,C and D = regression coefficients, and T = liquid temperature, K. Insert the temperature into the equation along with the corresponding regression coefficients from the table. The chemical formulae are listed by the number of carbon atoms.

  8. OPTIMIZATION OF TRANSIENT HEATER SETTINGS TO PROVIDE SPATIALLY UNIFORM HEATING IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, David

    in foundries, baking ovens that cook food, infrared heating systems that cure painted surfaces, and rapidOPTIMIZATION OF TRANSIENT HEATER SETTINGS TO PROVIDE SPATIALLY UNIFORM HEATING IN MANUFACTURING PROCESSES INVOLVING RADIANT HEATING K. J. Daun, J. R. Howell, and D. P. Morton Department of Mechanical

  9. Training for Emergencies Need for some uniformity of training across airlines. Concern is especially about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Training for Emergencies · Need for some uniformity of training across airlines. Concern is especially about variability in amount of training for emergencies. Not enough training in general for emergencies. · What are the criteria for training for success. · Try a "hypertext" approach to simulator

  10. Non-uniform Heat Generation in Micro Catalytic Combustor Takashi Okamasa*, Yuji Suzuki, and Nobuhide Kasagi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    Non-uniform Heat Generation in Micro Catalytic Combustor Takashi Okamasa*, Yuji Suzuki@thtlab.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Abstract We developed a micro catalytic combustor using high-precision ceramic tape-casting technology and nano-porous alumina catalyst layer. It is found that failure of the ceramic combustor occurs due

  11. The Power of Non-Uniform Wireless Power Magnus M. Halldorsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Power of Non-Uniform Wireless Power Magn´us M. Halld´orsson Stephan Holzer Pradipta Mitra Roger model when power control is available. This measure characterizes the effectiveness of using oblivious power -- when the power used by a transmitter only depends on the distance to the receiver

  12. Numerical Modelling of Unsaturated Flow in Uniform and Heterogeneous Waste Rock Piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    Numerical Modelling of Unsaturated Flow in Uniform and Heterogeneous Waste Rock Piles O Fala1 , M Aubertin1,3 , J Molson1 , B Bussière2,3 , G W Wilson4 , R Chapuis1 and V Martin1 ABSTRACT Waste rock piles these piles, many physical, geochemical and biological processes can contribute to the production of AMD

  13. Uniform basin growth over the last 500 ka, North Anatolian Fault, Marmara Sea, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shillington, Donna J.

    Uniform basin growth over the last 500 ka, North Anatolian Fault, Marmara Sea, Turkey Christopher C, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey c Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY, USA d Department of Geophysics, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey e Department of Earth

  14. Uniform Sampling for Directed P2P Networks Cyrus Hall and Antonio Carzaniga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carzaniga, Antonio

    for unstructured search, data replication, and monitoring algorithms. Such uniform sam- pling is supported no assumptions about the underlying P2P network. This al- gorithm, called doubly stochastic converge (DSC, such that the resulting transition matrix is doubly stochastic. DSC is fully decentralized and is designed to work on both

  15. EFFECT OF GEOMETRY AND OPERATING PARAMETERS ON SIMULATED SOFC STACK TEMPERATURE UNIFORMITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Lai, Canhai; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniform temperature field is desirable in the solid oxide fuel cell stack to avoid local hot regions that contribute to material degradation, thermal stresses, and differences in electrochemical performance. Various geometric and operational design changes were simulated by numerical modeling of co-flow and counter-flow multi-cell stacks, and the effects on stack maximum temperature, stack temperature difference, and maximum cell temperature difference were characterized. The results showed that 40-60% on-cell steam reforming of methane and a reduced reforming rate of 25-50% of the nominal rate was beneficial for a more uniform temperature field. Fuel exhaust recycling up to 30% was shown to be advantageous for reforming fuels and co-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel, but counter-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel showed higher temperature differences. Cells with large aspect ratios showed a more uniform temperature response due to either the strong influence of the inlet gas temperatures or the greater thermal exchange with the furnace boundary condition. Improved lateral heat spreading with thicker interconnects was demonstrated, but greater improvements towards a uniform thermal field for the same amount of interconnect mass could be achieved using thicker heat spreader plates appropriately distributed along the stack height.

  16. Boston University Computer Science Technical Report No. 2005027 Computing a Uniform Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parameter for 3D Registration of Lung Surfaces Vladimir Rodeski 1 , William Mullally 1 , Carissa Bellardine of Biomedical Engineering Boston University Abstract. A di#culty in lung image registration is accounting for chang­ es in the size of the lungs due to inspiration. We propose two methods for computing a uniform

  17. Boston University Computer Science Technical Report No. 2005-027 Computing a Uniform Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parameter for 3D Registration of Lung Surfaces Vladimir Rodeski1 , William Mullally1 , Carissa Bellardine2 Engineering Boston University Abstract. A difficulty in lung image registration is accounting for chang- es in the size of the lungs due to inspiration. We propose two methods for computing a uniform scale parameter

  18. SYNCHRONIZATION AND TRANSIENT STABILITY IN POWER NETWORKS AND NON-UNIFORM KURAMOTO OSCILLATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bullo, Francesco

    between the power network model and a first-order model of coupled oscillators. Assuming overdamped will rely increasingly on renewables such as wind and solar power. Since these renewable power sourcesSYNCHRONIZATION AND TRANSIENT STABILITY IN POWER NETWORKS AND NON-UNIFORM KURAMOTO OSCILLATORS

  19. Synchronization and Transient Stability in Power Networks and Non-Uniform Kuramoto Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bullo, Francesco

    between the power network model and a first-order model of coupled oscillators. Assuming overdamped increasingly on renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, which cause stochastic disturbancesSynchronization and Transient Stability in Power Networks and Non-Uniform Kuramoto Oscillators

  20. A novel lithography technique for formation of large areas of uniform nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    such as plasmonics, sensors, storage devices, solar cells, nano-filtration and artificial kidneys require applications such as surface plasmonics[1] , data storage[2] , optoelectronic devices[3] , and nanoA novel lithography technique for formation of large areas of uniform nanostructures Wei Wu

  1. Optimal Hlderian functional central limit theorems for uniform empirical and quantile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suquet, Charles

    Fn between its consecutive jumps). Denote by Gpg n the polygonal uniform sample quantile function) - t , pg n (t) := n Gpg n (t) - t , t [0, 1]. It is well known that pg n and pg n converge in law to B

  2. Effects of Highly Non-uniform Illumination Distribution on Electrical Performance of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of Highly Non-uniform Illumination Distribution on Electrical Performance of Solar Cells E.T.Franklin, J.S Coventry Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA Telephone: +61 02 6125 3976 Facsimile: +61 02 6125 0506 E-mail: evan@faceng.anu.edu.au Abstract

  3. Moment-based Uniform Deviation Bounds for k-means and Friends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    Moment-based Uniform Deviation Bounds for k-means and Friends Matus Telgarsky Sanjoy Dasgupta are fit to m points by heuristically minimizing the k-means cost; what is the corresponding fit over this mechanism, a soft clustering variant of k-means cost is also considered, namely the log likelihood of a Gaus

  4. A uniform price auction with locational price adjustments for competitive electricity markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    b School of Electrical Engineering, Phillips Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA cA uniform price auction with locational price adjustments for competitive electricity markets of Agricultural, Resource and Managerial Economics (ARME), Warren Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA

  5. Self-Folding Origami: Shape Memory Composites Activated by Uniform Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Self-Folding Origami: Shape Memory Composites Activated by Uniform Heating Michael T. Tolley1 systems. Here, self- folding origami are presented, which consist of shape memory composites materials and tools. The folding mechanism based on the in-plane contraction of a sheet of shape memory

  6. Uniform Directional Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Viscous Polymer Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    of the carbon nanotubes on their ability to enhance the mechanical properties of the composites that they form of carbon nanotube dispersion on composite properties, their degree of alignment in the respective matrixUniform Directional Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Viscous Polymer Flow Erin

  7. Ponderomotive ratchet in a uniform magnetic field I. Y. Dodin and N. J. Fisch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponderomotive ratchet in a uniform magnetic field I. Y. Dodin and N. J. Fisch Princeton Plasma 21 July 2005; published 5 October 2005 We show how a ratchet effect, generally used in systems in a preferred direction, even without a biased field. These phenomena, also called ratchet effects

  8. Method and apparatus for uniformly concentrating solar flux for photovoltaic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Carasso, Meir (Lakewood, CO); Wendelin, Timothy J. (Golden, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dish reflector and method for concentrating moderate solar flux uniformly on a target plane on a solar cell array, the dish having a stepped reflective surface that is characterized by a plurality of ring-like segments arranged about a common axis, and each segment having a concave spherical configuration.

  9. Saha Equation in an Uniformly Accelerated Reference Frame and Some of Its Physical Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchari De; Somenath Chakrabarty

    2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saha equations for the photo-ionization of hydrogen atoms and the electron positron pair production at high temperature are obtained in a reference frame undergoing a uniform accelerated motion in an otherwise flat Minkowski space-time geometry. Some of the physical implications of our findings are discussed.

  10. Synthesis method based on optimization techniques for designing piecewise-uniform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Namkyoo

    Science, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Kusong-dong, Yusong-gu, Taejon 305-descent optimization techniques. We describe how a piecewise-uniform LPFG can be constructed by utilizing the inverted the LPFG with thermal changes, we propose the kernel function17 used to calcu- late the coupling

  11. API Blender: A Uniform Interface to Social Platform APIs Georges Gouriten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senellart, Pierre

    Web, API, REST, data integration 1. INTRODUCTION Interacting with platforms like Facebook, YoutubeAPI Blender: A Uniform Interface to Social Platform APIs Georges Gouriten Institut Télécom; Télécom one social Web platform, which implies studying the related API specifications. These are often only

  12. Largest-area Photonic Crystal LED Fabricated Demonstrates Uniform Light Emission

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumileds Lighting, the University of New Mexico, and Sandia National Laboratories teamed to demonstrate uniform light emission from the largest-area III-Nitride photonic crystal LED (1 x 1 mm2) ever fabricated. Most previous photonic crystal LED research has relied on small-area patterns written by slow, serial-writing electron-beam lithography.

  13. Clinical characterization of a proton beam continuous uniform scanning system with dose layer stacking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farr, J. B.; Mascia, A. E.; Hsi, W.-C.; Allgower, C. E.; Jesseph, F.; Schreuder, A. N.; Wolanski, M.; Nichiporov, D. F.; Anferov, V. [Indiana University, Department of Physics, Swain Hall West, Room 117, 727 E. Third St., Bloomington, Indiana 47405 and Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, 2425 Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, 2425 Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, 2401 N. Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton beam delivery system on a gantry with continuous uniform scanning and dose layer stacking at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute has been commissioned and accepted for clinical use. This paper was motivated by a lack of guidance on the testing and characterization for clinical uniform scanning systems. As such, it describes how these tasks were performed with a uniform scanning beam delivery system. This paper reports the methods used and important dosimetric characteristics of radiation fields produced by the system. The commissioning data include the transverse and longitudinal dose distributions, penumbra, and absolute dose values. Using a 208 MeV cyclotron's proton beam, the system provides field sizes up to 20 and 30 cm in diameter for proton ranges in water up to 27 and 20 cm, respectively. The dose layer stacking method allows for the flexible construction of spread-out Bragg peaks with uniform modulation of up to 15 cm in water, at typical dose rates of 1-3 Gy/min. For measuring relative dose distributions, multielement ion chamber arrays, small-volume ion chambers, and radiographic films were employed. Measurements during the clinical commissioning of the system have shown that the lateral and longitudinal dose uniformity of 2.5% or better can be achieved for all clinically important field sizes and ranges. The measured transverse penumbra widths offer a slight improvement in comparison to those achieved with a double scattering beam spreading technique at the facility. Absolute dose measurements were done using calibrated ion chambers, thermoluminescent and alanine detectors. Dose intercomparisons conducted using various types of detectors traceable to a national standards laboratory indicate that the measured dosimetry data agree with each other within 5%.

  14. FLAG-SGH Sedov calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schofield, Sam [LLNL; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We did not run with a 'cylindrically painted region'. However, we did compute two general variants of the original problem. Refinement studies where a single zone at each level of refinement contains the entire internal energy at t=0 or A 'finite' energy source which has the same physical dimensions as that for the 91 x 46 mesh, but consisting of increasing numbers of zones with refinement. Nominal mesh resolution: 91 x 46. Other mesh resolutions: 181 x 92 and 361 x 184. Note, not identical to the original specification. To maintain symmetry for the 'fixed' energy source, the mesh resolution was adjusted slightly. FLAG Lagrange or full (Eulerian) ALE was used with various options for each simulation. Observation - for either Lagrange or ALE, point or 'fixed' source, calculations converge on density and pressure with mesh resolution, but not energy, (not vorticity either).

  15. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Stetcu, I; Barrett, B R

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  16. Measurements of lateral penumbra for uniform scanning proton beams under various beam delivery conditions and comparison to the XiO treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, Suresh; Zeidan, Omar; Ramirez, Eric; Rains, Michael; Gao, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanshui [Department of Medical Physics, ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The main purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the dependency of lateral penumbra (80%–20% distance) of uniform scanning proton beams on various factors such as air gap, proton range, modulation width, compensator thickness, and depth, and (2) compare the lateral penumbra calculated by a treatment planning system (TPS) with measurements.Methods: First, lateral penumbra was measured using solid–water phantom and radiographic films for (a) air gap, ranged from 0 to 35 cm, (b) proton range, ranged from 8 to 30 cm, (c) modulation, ranged from 2 to 10 cm, (d) compensator thickness, ranged from 0 to 20 cm, and (e) depth, ranged from 7 to 15 cm. Second, dose calculations were computed in a virtual water phantom using the XiO TPS with pencil beam algorithm for identical beam conditions and geometrical configurations that were used for the measurements. The calculated lateral penumbra was then compared with the measured one for both the horizontal and vertical scanning magnets of our uniform scanning proton beam delivery system.Results: The results in the current study showed that the lateral penumbra of horizontal scanning magnet was larger (up to 1.4 mm for measurement and up to 1.0 mm for TPS) compared to that of vertical scanning magnet. Both the TPS and measurements showed an almost linear increase in lateral penumbra with increasing air gap as it produced the greatest effect on lateral penumbra. Lateral penumbra was dependent on the depth and proton range. Specifically, the width of lateral penumbra was found to be always lower at shallower depth than at deeper depth within the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. The lateral penumbra results were less sensitive to the variation in the thickness of compensator, whereas lateral penumbra was independent of modulation. Overall, the comparison between the results of TPS with that of measurements indicates a good agreement for lateral penumbra, with TPS predicting higher values compared to measurements.Conclusions: Lateral penumbra of uniform scanning proton beams depends on air gap, proton range, compensator thickness, and depth, whereas lateral penumbra is not dependent on modulation. The XiO TPS typically overpredicted lateral penumbra compared to measurements, within 1 mm for most cases, but the difference could be up to 2.5 mm at a deep depth and large air gap.

  17. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P., E-mail: ppapagi@phys.uoa.gr [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 11527 Athens (Greece); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain)] [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel 24105 (Germany)] [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel 24105 (Germany)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 20–1090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (20–1090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [“Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation,” Health Phys. 44, 507–517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [“Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities,” Med. Phys. 34, 1398–1404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions: The data of this work allow for the accurate calculation of structural shielding thickness, taking into account the spectral variation with shield thickness, and broad beam conditions, in a realistic geometry. The simplicity of calculations also obviates the need for the use of crude transmission data estimates such as the half and tenth value layer indices. Although this study was primarily designed for brachytherapy, results might also be useful for radiology and nuclear medicine facility design, provided broad beam conditions apply.

  18. Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); INTEGRIS Cancer Insititute, 5911 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment conditions, the H/D value per uncollimated beam size for uniform scanning beams was slightly lower than that from a passive scattering beam and higher than that from a pencil beam scanning beam, within a factor of 2. Minimizing beam scanning area could effectively reduce neutron dose equivalent for uniform scanning beams, down to the level close to pencil beam scanning.

  19. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  20. THE DYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTING FLOW. I. UNIFORMLY BUOYANT HORIZONTAL TUBES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbett, Bill

    THE DYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTING FLOW. I. UNIFORMLY BUOYANT HORIZONTAL TUBES Y. Fan High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric-dimensional numerical simulations of the dynamic evolution of uniformly buoyant, twisted horizontal magnetic flux tubes

  1. Synthesis of Nearly Uniform Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Identical Metal-Containing Molecular Nanoclusters as Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -known that the physical and chemical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) vary stronglySynthesis of Nearly Uniform Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Identical Metal extremely small but uniform SWNTs on silicon dioxide surfaces using the CVD method. With a standard

  2. Numerical methods for computing the ground state of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates in a uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Weizhu

    Numerical methods for computing the ground state of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates in a uniform for computing the ground-state solution of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates subjected to a uniform magnetic to compute the condensate ground state in a harmonic plus optical lattice potential, and the effect

  3. Microfluidic System for Facilitated Quantification of Nanoparticle Accumulation to Cells Under Laminar Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Scott I.

    Microfluidic System for Facilitated Quantification of Nanoparticle Accumulation to Cells Under to endothelial receptors has led to the rapid devel- opment of targeted nanoparticles for drug, gene and imaging nanoparticle accumulation under phys- iologically-relevant laminar flow. We designed reversibly vacuum

  4. Self-assembly of resins and asphaltenes facilitates asphaltene dissolution by an organic acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Self-assembly of resins and asphaltenes facilitates asphaltene dissolution by an organic acid Sara Accepted 28 November 2012 Available online 28 December 2012 Keywords: Asphaltenes Self-assembly Colloidal stability Non-polar electrostatics a b s t r a c t Asphaltene precipitation occurs in petroleum fluids under

  5. Use of Physical Models to Facilitate Transfer of Physics Learning to Understand Positron Emission Tomography*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    interactive learning with the aid of physical models. Three different types of non-scaffolded transfer haveUse of Physical Models to Facilitate Transfer of Physics Learning to Understand Positron Emission, positron emission tomography, transfer of learning PACS: 01.40Fk Supported by the National Science

  6. Brazil Should Facilitate Research Brazil is home to more species of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letters Brazil Should Facilitate Research Permits Brazil is home to more species of plants 2009). Given Brazil's expanding in- vestments in meat and ethanol pro- duction and industrial in Brazil is particularly prob- lematic. To further assess this prob- lem, we launched a survey among

  7. Modeling suggests that oblique extension facilitates rifting and continental break-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaus, Boris

    Modeling suggests that oblique extension facilitates rifting and continental break-up Sascha Brune; accepted 5 June 2012; published 2 August 2012. [1] In many cases the initial stage of continental break-up was and is associated with oblique rifting. That includes break-up in the Southern and Equatorial Atlantic, separation

  8. Three Cell Wall Mannoproteins Facilitate the Uptake of Iron in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botstein, David

    for publication, September 24, 2001, and in revised form, October 19, 2001 Published, JBC Papers in Press, October-dependent transcrip- tion factor in yeast. FIT1, FIT2, and FIT3 (for facilitator of iron transport) were more highly active allele of AFT1, was expressed. Northern blot analysis confirmed that FIT1, FIT2, and FIT3 m

  9. Katz et al. 2009 Fish induced sediment focusing Sediment resuspension by groundfish facilitates the transport and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yahel, Gitai

    Katz et al. 2009 Fish induced sediment focusing 1| P a g e Sediment resuspension by groundfish focusing Key words: sediment resuspension, sediment transport, fish, Saanich Inlet #12;Katz et al. 2009 to the base of the fish distribution zone. This resuspension by fish facilitates the transport of large

  10. Facilitating Navigation and Information Access with CANOES: Collaborative Agents and Natural Operations in Enhanced Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheyer, Adam

    the global system. This process is continually iterated to produce a bootstrap effect. Collaborative Agents and flexibility in the makeup of agent communities. Distinguishing features of the OAA include facilitator- based delegation of complex goals, temporal control and data management facilities that may be used consistently

  11. Wang et al. 1 Ethanol-Mediated Facilitation of AMPA Receptor Function in the Dorsomedial Striatum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wang et al. 1 Ethanol-Mediated Facilitation of AMPA Receptor Function in the Dorsomedial Striatum, California 94608 Running Title: Ethanol and AMPA receptors in the dorsomedial striatum # To whom as well as repeated cycles of in vivo ethanol exposure and withdrawal, including excessive voluntary

  12. Building Technologies Office: 179D DOE Calculator

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    179D DOE Calculator EERE Building Technologies Office 179D DOE Calculator Printable Version Bookmark and Share What is the 179D federal tax deduction? Section 179D of the...

  13. Calculator Tips for TI-30XA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen Davis

    2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    TI-30XA Calculator Tips. Calculator Memory. - To use the memory function, hit the STO key to store a number in either memory 1, 2, or 3. o To store the product of ...

  14. Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.; Crawford, Aladsair J.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Ferreira, Summer; Schoenwald, David

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems (PNNL-22010) was first issued in November 2012 as a first step toward providing a foundational basis for developing an initial standard for the uniform measurement and expression of energy storage system (ESS) performance. Its subsequent use in the field and review by the protocol working group and most importantly the users’ subgroup and the thermal subgroup has led to the fundamental modifications reflected in this update of the 2012 Protocol. As an update of the 2012 Protocol, this document (the June 2014 Protocol) is intended to supersede its predecessor and be used as the basis for measuring and expressing ESS performance. The foreword provides general and specific details about what additions, revisions, and enhancements have been made to the 2012 Protocol and the rationale for them in arriving at the June 2014 Protocol.

  15. Metric structure and dimensionality over a Borel set via uniform spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. M. Stuckey

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a pregeometry that provides a metric and dimensionality over a Borel set (Wheeler's "bucket of dust") without assuming probability amplitudes for adjacency. Rather, a non-trivial metric is produced over a Borel set X per a uniformity base generated via the discrete topological group structures over X. We show that entourage multiplication in this uniformity base mirrors the underlying group structure. One may exploit this fact to create an entourage sequence of maximal length whence a fine metric structure. Unlike the statistical approaches of graph theory, this method can suggest dimensionality over low-order sets. An example over Z2 x Z4 produces 3-dimensional polyhedra embedded in E4.

  16. Quantum Ratchets on Maximally Uniform States in Phase Space: Semiclassical Full-Chaos Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhack Dana

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A generic kind of quantum chaotic ratchet is introduced, based on initial states that are \\emph{uniform} in phase space with the \\emph{maximal possible} resolution of one Planck cell. Unlike a classical phase-space uniform density, such a state usually carries a \\emph{nonzero} ratchet current, even in \\emph{symmetric} systems. This quantum ratchet effect basically emerges from the generic asymmetry of the state quasicoordinates in the Planck cell. It is shown, on the basis of exact results, general arguments, and extensive numerical evidence, that in a semiclassical full-chaos regime the variance of the current over all the states is nearly proportional to the chaotic-diffusion rate and to the square of the scaled Planck constant. Experimental realizations are suggested.

  17. Radar echo, Doppler Effect and Radar detection in the uniformly accelerated reference frame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Rothenstein; Stefan Popescu

    2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The uniformly accelerated reference frame described by Hamilton, Desloge and Philpott involves the observers who perform the hyperbolic motion with constant proper acceleration gi. They start to move from different distances measured from the origin O of the inertial reference frame K(XOY), along its OX axis with zero initial velocity. Equipped with clocks and light sources they are engaged with each other in Radar echo, Doppler Effect and Radar detection experiments. They are also engaged in the same experiments with an inertial observer at rest in K(XOY) and located at its origin O. We derive formulas that account for the experiments mentioned above. We study also the landing conditions of the accelerating observers on a uniformly moving platform.

  18. The effective geometry of the $n=1$ uniformly rotating self-gravitating polytrope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Christian Cherubini; Simonetta Filippi; Andrea Geralico

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The \\lq\\lq effective geometry" formalism is used to study the perturbations of a perfect barotropic Newtonian self-gravitating rotating and compressible fluid coupled with gravitational backreaction. The case of a uniformly rotating polytrope with index $n=1$ is investigated, due to its analytical tractability. Special attention is devoted to the geometrical properties of the underlying background acoustic metric, focusing in particular on null geodesics as well as on the analog light cone structure.

  19. Coded aperture imaging with self-supporting uniformly redundant arrays. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-supporting uniformly redundant array pattern for coded aperture imaging. The invention utilizes holes which are an integer times smaller in each direction than holes in conventional URA patterns. A balance correlation function is generated where holes are represented by 1's, nonholes are represented by -1's, and supporting area is represented by 0's. The self-supporting array can be used for low energy applications where substrates would greatly reduce throughput.

  20. Do Inertial Electric Charges Radiate with Respect to Uniformly Accelerated Observers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George E. A. Matsas

    1994-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the long standing problem of analyzing an inertial electric charge from the point of view of uniformly accelerated observers in the context of semi-classical gravity. We choose a suitable set of accelerated observers with respect to which there is no photon emission coming from the inertial charge. We discuss this result against previous claims [F. Rohrlich, Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) vol: 22, 169 (1963)]. (This Essay was awarded a Honorable Mention for 1994 by the Gravity Research Foundation.)

  1. Monte Carlo Studies of the CALICE AHCAL Tiles Gaps and Non-uniformities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Sefkow; Angela Lucaci-Timoce

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The CALICE analog HCAL is a highly granular calorimeter, proposed for the International Linear Collider. It is based on scintillator tiles, read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). The effects of gaps between the calorimeter tiles, as well as the non-uniform response of the tiles, in view of the impact on the energy resolution, are studied in Monte Carlo events. It is shown that these type of effects do not have a significant influence on the measurement of hadron showers.

  2. Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  3. Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations Charles G. Nathanson1. , Corina E. Here we provide a general formula for calculating evolutionary dynamics in a wide class of structured) Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations. PLoS Comput Biol 5(12): e1000615. doi:10

  4. Upscaling of Solute Transport in Heterogeneous Media with Non-uniform Flow and Dispersion Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical and computational model for non-reactive solute transport in periodic heterogeneous media with arbitrary non-uniform flow and dispersion fields within the unit cell of length ? is described. The model lumps the effect of non-uniform flow and dispersion into an effective advection velocity Ve and an effective dispersion coefficient De. It is shown that both Ve and De are scale-dependent (dependent on the length scale of the microscopic heterogeneity, ?), dependent on the Péclet number Pe, and on a dimensionless parameter ? that represents the effects of microscopic heterogeneity. The parameter ?, confined to the range of [-0.5, 0.5] for the numerical example presented, depends on the flow direction and non-uniform flow and dispersion fields. Effective advection velocity Ve and dispersion coefficient De can be derived for any given flow and dispersion fields, and . Homogenized solutions describing the macroscopic variations can be obtained from the effective model. Solutions with sub-unit-cell accuracy can be constructed by homogenized solutions and its spatial derivatives. A numerical implementation of the model compared with direct numerical solutions using a fine grid, demonstrated that the new method was in good agreement with direct solutions, but with significant computational savings.

  5. Generation of uniform plasmas by crossed internal oscillating current sheets: Key concepts and experimental verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsakadze, E.L.; Ostrikov, K.; Tsakadze, Z.L.; Xu, S. [Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, 637616 Singapore and Optics and Plasma Research Department, Risoe National Laboratory, P.O. Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, 637616 Singapore (Singapore)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of comprehensive experimental studies of the operation, stability, and plasma parameters of the low-frequency (0.46 MHz) inductively coupled plasmas sustained by the internal oscillating rf current are reported. The rf plasma is generated by using a custom-designed configuration of the internal rf coil that comprises two perpendicular sets of eight currents in each direction. Various diagnostic tools, such as magnetic probes, optical emission spectroscopy, and an rf-compensated Langmuir probe were used to investigate the electromagnetic, optical, and global properties of the argon plasma in wide ranges of the applied rf power and gas feedstock pressure. It is found that the uniformity of the electromagnetic field inside the plasma reactor is improved as compared to the conventional sources of inductively coupled plasmas with the external flat coil configuration. A reasonable agreement between the experimental data and computed electromagnetic field topography inside the chamber is reported. The Langmuir probe measurements reveal that the spatial profiles of the electron density, the effective electron temperature, plasma potential, and electron energy distribution/probability functions feature a high degree of the radial and axial uniformity and a weak azimuthal dependence, which is consistent with the earlier theoretical predictions. As the input rf power increases, the azimuthal dependence of the global plasma parameters vanishes. The obtained results demonstrate that by introducing the internal oscillated rf currents one can noticeably improve the uniformity of electromagnetic field topography, rf power deposition, and the plasma density in the reactor.

  6. Device to facilitate moving an electrical cable of an electric vehicle charging station and method of providing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karner, Donald B

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Some embodiments include a device to facilitate moving an electrical cable of an electric vehicle charging station. Other embodiments of related systems and methods are also disclosed.

  7. A general end point free energy calculation method based on microscopic configurational space coarse-graining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Pu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free energy is arguably the most important thermodynamic property for physical systems. Despite the fact that free energy is a state function, presently available rigorous methodologies, such as those based on thermodynamic integration (TI) or non-equilibrium work (NEW) analysis, involve energetic calculations on path(s) connecting the starting and the end macrostates. Meanwhile, presently widely utilized approximate end-point free energy methods lack rigorous treatment of conformational variation within end macrostates, and are consequently not sufficiently reliable. Here we present an alternative and rigorous end point free energy calculation formulation based on microscopic configurational space coarse graining, where the configurational space of a high dimensional system is divided into a large number of sufficiently fine and uniform elements, which were termed conformers. It was found that change of free energy is essentially decided by change of the number of conformers, with an error term that accounts...

  8. Calculations of reactor-accident consequences, Version 2. CRAC2: computer code user's guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, L.T.; Johnson, J.D.; Blond, R.M.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CRAC2 computer code is a revision of the Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences computer code, CRAC, developed for the Reactor Safety Study. The CRAC2 computer code incorporates significant modeling improvements in the areas of weather sequence sampling and emergency response, and refinements to the plume rise, atmospheric dispersion, and wet deposition models. New output capabilities have also been added. This guide is to facilitate the informed and intelligent use of CRAC2. It includes descriptions of the input data, the output results, the file structures, control information, and five sample problems.

  9. A Calculation on the Self-field of a Point Charge and the Unruh Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Hirayama; T. Hara

    2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the context of quantum field theory in curved spacetimes, Hacyan and Sarmiento defined the vacuum stress-energy tensor with respect to the accelerated observer. They calculated it for uniform acceleration and circular motion, and derived that the rotating observer perceives a flux. Mane related the flux to synchrotron radiation. In order to investigate the relation between the vacuum stress and bremsstrahlung, we estimate the stress-energy tensor of the electromagnetic field generated by a point charge, at the position of the charge. We use the retarded field as a self-field of the point charge. Therefore the tensor diverges if we evaluate it as it is. Hence we remove the divergent contributions by using the expansion of the tensor in powers of the distance from the point charge. Finally, we take an average for the angular dependence of the expansion. We calculate it for the case of uniform acceleration and circular motion, and it is found that the order of the vacuum stress multiplied by $\\pi\\alpha$ ($\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c$ is the fine structure constant) is equal to that of the self-stress. In the Appendix, we give another trial approach with a similar result.

  10. Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, X H; Ning, P Z

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

  11. Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. H. Zhong; L. Li; P. Z. Ning

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

  12. Electron lone pair distortion facilitated metal-insulator transition in ?-Pb{sub 0.33}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wangoh, L.; Quackenbush, N. F. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Marley, P. M.; Banerjee, S. [Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Sallis, S. [Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Fischer, D. A.; Woicik, J. C. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Piper, L. F. J., E-mail: lpiper@binghamton.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure of ?-Pb{sub 0.33}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanowires has been studied with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The recent synthesis of defect-free ?-Pb{sub 0.33}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanowires resulted in the discovery of an abrupt voltage-induced metal insulator transition. First principle calculations predicted an additional V-O-Pb hybridized “in-gap” state unique to this vanadium bronze playing a significant role in facilitating the transition. We confirm the existence, energetic position, and orbital character of the “in-gap” state. Moreover, we reveal that this state is a hybridized Pb 6s–O 2p antibonding lone pair state resulting from the asymmetric coordination of the Pb{sup 2+} ions.

  13. What is the GREET Fleet Footprint Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    fuels and advanced vehicles (AFVs). The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emis- sions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) Fleet Foot- print Calculator can help fleets decide on...

  14. Cooling airflow design calculations for UFAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom; Benedek, Corinne

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    written permission. Cooling Airflow Design Calculations form) height. Table 2: Design cooling airflow performance fortool predictions of UFAD cooling airflow rates and associ-

  15. Calculators and Science and Engineering Calculus Occasionally ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-10-51T23:59:59.000Z

    on examinations and quizzes. These courses do spend some class time discussing the use of graphing calculators, and some of the pitfalls into which graphing ...

  16. Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Evaluation Of Chemical...

  17. Filter diagonalization of shell-model calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro [Institute of Natural Sciences, Senshu University, Tokyo 101-8425 (Japan); Kaneko, Kazunari [Department of Physics, Kyushu Sangyo University, Fukuoka 813-8503 (Japan); Honma, Michio [Center for Mathematical Sciences, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, 965-8580 (Japan); Sakurai, Tetsuya [Department of Computer Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method of filter diagonalization for shell-model calculations. This method is based on the Sakurai and Sugiura (SS) method, but extended with the help of the shifted complex orthogonal conjugate gradient (COCG) method. A salient feature of this method is that it can calculate eigenvalues and eigenstates in a given energy interval. We show that this method can be an alternative to the Lanczos method for calculating ground and excited states, as well as spectral strength functions. With an application to the M-scheme shell-model calculations we demonstrate that several inherent problems in the widely used Lanczos method can be removed or reduced.

  18. SPREADSHEET DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT FOR SATURATION TEMPERATURE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JO J

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the methodology for determining the saturation temperature in waste tanks. The saturation temperature is used to calculate neutral buoyancy ratio.

  19. Calculating Plutonium and Praseodymium Structural Transformations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculating Plutonium and Praseodymium Structural Transformations A newly-developed hybrid computational method has computed, for the first time, plutonium's exotic crystal...

  20. Reactor design for uniform chemical vapor deposition-grown films without substrate rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, Mark (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quartz reactor vessel for growth of uniform semiconductor films includes a vertical, cylindrical reaction chamber in which a substrate-supporting pedestal provides a horizontal substrate-supporting surface spaced on its perimeter from the chamber wall. A cylindrical confinement chamber of smaller diameter is disposed coaxially above the reaction chamber and receives reaction gas injected at a tangent to the inside chamber wall, forming a helical gas stream that descends into the reaction chamber. In the reaction chamber, the edge of the substrate-supporting pedestal is a separation point for the helical flow, diverting part of the flow over the horizontal surface of the substrate in an inwardly spiraling vortex.

  1. Detecting Weld Zone Over Anticorrosion Painting by Rotating Uniform Eddy Current Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoshikawa, H.; Koyama, K.; Naruse, Y. [Nihon University, Izumicho Narashino Chiba 275-8575 (Japan)

    2005-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have studied application of rotating uniform eddy current probe to detecting weld zone in steed material over anticorrosion painting. The probe detects not only weld position by the signal level but also weld direction by the signal phase. The experimental results have indicated that the probe provides a signal almost linear to its position with respect to weld zone center over the full width of weld. The signal of the probe is much less influenced by the painting thickness variation than that of the conventional differential pancake-coils probe.

  2. Piping benchmark problems. Volume 1. Dynamic analysis uniform support motion response spectrum method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezler, P.; Hartzman, M.; Reich, M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of benchmark problems and solutions have been developed for verifying the adequacy of computer programs used for dynamic analysis and design of nuclear piping systems by the Response Spectrum Method. The problems range from simple to complex configurations which are assumed to experience linear elastic behavior. The dynamic loading is represented by uniform support motion, assumed to be induced by seismic excitation in three spatial directions. The solutions consist of frequencies, participation factors, nodal displacement components and internal force and moment components. Solutions to associated anchor point motion static problems are not included.

  3. An Investigation of the Stresses in Uniformly Loaded Continuous Deep Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shubinski, Robert Parker

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Page Continuous Beam with Uniform Load T-2 T-3 T-4 Bending Stresses: a X Ve r tie al Stre s s as: a y Shearing Stresses: T 18 19 20 E-1 Forces Involved in Shear Difference Analysis of Photoelastic Data 24 E 2 Machining Models of Epon... Plastic 28 E-3 Loading Frame Used Unsuccessfully in First Series of Tests 29 E-4 Loading Frame Used in Second and Third Series of Tests 31 E-4a Loading Frame and Polariscope 32 E-5 Application of the Principle of Superposition 34 E-6 Full Order...

  4. Reactor design for uniform chemical vapor deposition-grown films without substrate rotation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.

    1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A quartz reactor vessel for growth of uniform semiconductor films includes a vertical, cylindrical reaction chamber in which a substrate-supporting pedestal provides a horizontal substrate-supporting surface spaced on its perimeter from the chamber wall. A cylindrical confinement chamber of smaller diameter is disposed coaxially above the reaction chamber and receives reaction gas injected at a tangent to the inside chamber wall, forming a helical gas stream that descends into the reaction chamber. In the reaction chamber, the edge of the substrate-supporting pedestal is a separation point for the helical flow, diverting part of the flow over the horizontal surface of the substrate in an inwardly spiraling vortex.

  5. Phase Transition in Ferromagnetic Ising Models with Non-Uniform External Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Bissacot; Leandro Cioletti

    2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we study the phase transition phenomenon for the Ising model under the action of a non-uniform external magnetic field. We show that the Ising model on the hypercubic lattice with a summable magnetic field has a first-order phase transition and, for any positive (resp. negative) and bounded magnetic field, the model does not present the phase transition phenomenon whenever $\\liminf h_i> 0$, where ${\\bf h} = (h_i)_{i \\in \\Z^d}$ is the external magnetic field.

  6. High Throughput Synthesis of Uniform Biocompatible Polymer Beads with High Quantum Dot Loading Using Microfluidic Jet-Mode Breakup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung-Kon

    Uniform polymer microbeads with highly loaded quantum dots (QDs) are produced using high-throughput coherent jet breakup of a biocompatible poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) prepolymer resin, followed by in-line ...

  7. Adaptations of Trabecular Bone to Low Magnitude Vibrations Result in More Uniform Stress and Strain Under Load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    magnitude mechanical stimuli 10 microstrain induced at high frequencies are anabolic to trabe- cular bone strain or stress , the resultant stresses and strains within trabe- culae were more uniformly distributed

  8. Uniform Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings and Increasing Electric Utility Confidence in Reported Savings Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has published protocols for estimating energy savings for residential and commercial energy efficiency programs and measures through the recently released “The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures.”

  9. The effects of unconfined slow uniform heating on the mechanical and transport properties of the westerly and charcoal granites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Stephen Joseph

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF UNCONFINED SLOW UNIFORM HEATING ON THE MECHANICAL AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF THE WESTERLY AND CHARCOAL GRANITES A Thesis L by STEPHEN '-JOSEPH BAUER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... JOSEPH BAUER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairs of Committee) iember) (Member) (Hea f Department) May 1980 111 ABSTRACT The Effects of Unconfined Slow Uniform Heating on the Mechanical and Transport Properties of the Westerly...

  10. Verification of the Accuracy of Sample-Size Equation Calculations for Visual Sample Plan Version 0.9C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, James R.

    2001-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual Sample Plan (VSP) is a software tool being developed to facilitate the design of environmental sampling plans using a site-map visual interface, standard sample-size equations, a variety of sampling grids and random sampling plans, and graphs to visually depict the results to the user. This document provides comparisons between sample sizes calculated by VSP Version 0.9C, and sample sizes calculated by test code written in the S-Plus language. All sample sizes calculated by VSP matched the independently calculated sample sizes. Also the VSP implementation of the ELIGPRID-PC algorithm for hot spot probabilities is shown to match previous results for 100 standard test cases. The Conclusions and Limitations section of this document lists some aspects of VSP that were not tested by this suite of tests and recommends simulation-based enhancements for future versions of VSP.

  11. Nonlinear electron acoustic cyclotron waves in presence of uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Manjistha; Khan, Manoranjan [Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Ghosh, Samiran [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta, 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata 700 108 (India); Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear electron acoustic cyclotron waves (EACW) are studied in a quasineutral plasma in presence of uniform magnetic field. The fluid model is used to describe the dynamics of two temperature electron species in a stationary charge neutral inhomogeneous background. In long wavelength limit, it is shown that the linear electron acoustic wave is modified by the uniform magnetic field similar to that of electrostatic ion cyclotron wave. Nonlinear equations for these waves are solved by using Lagrangian variables. Results show that the spatial solitary wave-like structures are formed due to nonlinearities and dispersions. These structures transiently grow to larger amplitude unless dispersive effect is actively operative and able to arrest this growth. We have found that the wave dispersion originated from the equilibrium inhomogeneity through collective effect and is responsible for spatiotemporal structures. Weak dispersion is not able to stop the wave collapse and singular structures of EACW are formed. Relevance of the results in the context of laboratory and space plasmas is discussed.

  12. Effect of a uniform electric field on soot in laminar premixed ethylene/air flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.; Yao, Q. [Key Laboratory of Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Nathan, G.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, S.A. 5005 (Australia); Alwahabi, Z.T.; King, K.D.; Ho, K. [School of Chemical Engineering, Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, S.A. 5005 (Australia)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of a nominally uniform electric field on the initially uniform distribution of soot has been assessed for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames from a McKenna burner. An electrophoretic influence on charged soot particles was measured through changes to the deposition rate of soot on the McKenna plug, using laser extinction (LE). Soot volume fraction was measured in situ using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Particle size and morphologies were assessed through ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using thermophoretic sampling particle diagnostics (TSPD). The results show that the majority of these soot particles are positively charged. The presence of a negatively charged plug was found to decrease the particle residence times in the flame and to influence the formation and oxidation progress. A positively charged plug has the opposite effect. The effect on soot volume fraction, particles size and morphology with electric field strength is also reported. Flame stability was also found to be affected by the presence of the electric field, with the balance of the electrophoretic force and drag force controlling the transition to unstable flame flicker. The presence of charged species generated by the flame was found to reduce the dielectric field strength to one seventh that of air. (author)

  13. Improvements in serial femtosecond crystallography of photosystem II by optimizing crystal uniformity using microseeding procedures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Bommer, Martin; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) is the multi-subunit membrane protein complex that catalyzes photo-oxidation of water into dioxygen through the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). To understand the water oxidation reaction, it is important to get structural information about the transient and intermediate states of the OEC in the dimeric PSII core complex (dPSIIcc). In recent times, femtosecond X-ray pulses from the free electron laser (XFEL) are being used to obtain X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of dPSIIcc microcrystals at room temperature that are free of radiation damage. In our experiments at the XFEL, we used an electrospun liquid microjet setup thatmore »requires microcrystals less than 40 ?m in size. In this study, we explored various microseeding techniques to get a high yield of monodisperse uniform-sized microcrystals. Monodisperse microcrystals of dPSIIcc of uniform size were a key to improve the stability of the jet and the quality of XRD data obtained at the XFEL. This was evident by an improvement of the quality of the datasets obtained, from 6.5 Å, using crystals grown without the micro seeding approach, to 4.5 Å using crystals generated with the new method.« less

  14. Computational Complexity of Uniform Quantum Circuit Families and Quantum Turing Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harumichi Nishimura; Masanao Ozawa

    2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Deutsch proposed two sorts of models of quantum computers, quantum Turing machines (QTMs) and quantum circuit families (QCFs). In this paper we explore the computational powers of these models and re-examine the claim of the computational equivalence of these models often made in the literature without detailed investigations. For this purpose, we formulate the notion of the codes of QCFs and the uniformity of QCFs by the computability of the codes. Various complexity classes are introduced for QTMs and QCFs according to constraints on the error probability of algorithms or transition amplitudes. Their interrelations are examined in detail. For Monte Carlo algorithms, it is proved that the complexity classes based on uniform QCFs are identical with the corresponding classes based on QTMs. However, for Las Vegas algorithms, it is still open whether the two models are equivalent. We indicate the possibility that they are not equivalent. In addition, we give a complete proof of the existence of a universal QTM simulating multi-tape QTMs efficiently. We also examine the simulation of various types of QTMs such as multi-tape QTMs, single tape QTMs, stationary, normal form QTMs (SNQTMs), and QTMs with the binary tapes. As a result, we show that these QTMs are computationally equivalent one another as computing models implementing not only Monte Carlo algorithms but exact (or error-free) ones.

  15. Application of Positron Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy to the Measurement of the Uniformity of Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quarles, C. A.; Sheffield, Thomas; Stacy, Scott; Yang, Chun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth TX 76129 (United States)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The uniformity of rubber-carbon black composite materials has been investigated with positron Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (DBS). The number of grams of carbon black (CB) mixed into one hundred grams of rubber, phr, is used to characterize a sample. A typical concentration for rubber in tires is 50 phr. The S parameter measured by DBS has been found to depend on the phr of the sample as well as the type of rubber and carbon black. The variation in carbon black concentration within a surface area of about 5 mm diameter can be measured by moving a standard Na-22 or Ge-68 positron source over an extended sample. The precision of the concentration measurement depends on the dwell time at a point on the sample. The time required to determine uniformity over an extended sample can be reduced by running with much higher counting rate than is typical in DBS and correcting for the systematic variation of S parameter with counting rate. Variation in CB concentration with mixing time at the level of about 0.5% has been observed.

  16. A novel approach to particle production in an uniform electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Srinivasan; T. Padmanabhan

    1999-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline a different method of describing scalar field particle production in a uniform electric field. In the standard approach, the (analytically continued) harmonic oscillator paradigm is important in describing particle production. However, there is another gauge in which the particle production process has striking similarities with the one used to describe Hawking radiation in black holes. The gauge we use to describe the electric field in is the lightcone gauge, so named because the mode functions for a scalar field are found to be singular on the lightcone. We use these modes in evaluating the effective Lagrangian using the proper time technique. The key feature of this analysis is that these modes can be explicitly "normalized" by using the criterion that they reduce to the usual flat space modes in the limit of the electric field tending to zero. We find that the proper time kernel is not the same as the analytically continued oscillator kernel though the effective Lagrangian is the standard result as it should be. We also consider an example of a confined electric field system using the lightcone gauge modes. Our analysis indicates that the Bogolubov coefficients, in taking the limit to the uniform electric field case, are multiplied by energy dependent boundary factors that have not been taken into account before.

  17. Multipole and field uniformity tailoring of a 750 MHz rf dipole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delayen, Jean R. [JLAB, Old Dominion University; Castillo, Alejandro [JLAB, Old Dominion University

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years great interest has been shown in developing rf structures for beam separation, correction of geometrical degradation on luminosity, and diagnostic applications in both lepton and hadron machines. The rf dipole being a very promising one among all of them. The rf dipole has been tested and proven to have attractive properties that include high shunt impedance, low and balance surface fields, absence of lower order modes and far-spaced higher order modes that simplify their damping scheme. As well as to be a compact and versatile design in a considerable range of frequencies, its fairly simple geometry dependency is suitable both for fabrication and surface treatment. The rf dipole geometry can also be optimized for lowering multipacting risk and multipole tailoring to meet machine specific field uniformity tolerances. In the present work a survey of field uniformities, and multipole contents for a set of 750 MHz rf dipole designs is presented as both a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the inherent flexibility of the structure and its limitations.

  18. Beam halo formation from space-charge dominated beams in uniform focusing channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, J.S. (Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)); Wangler, T.P.; Mills, R.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Crandall, K.R. (AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and an outer halo. The halo is very prominent in mismatched beams, and the potential for accelerator activation is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied for intense neutron generators to process nuclear materials. We present new results about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams from multiparticle simulation of initial laminar beams in a uniform linear focusing channel, and from a model consisting of single particle interactions with a uniform-density beam core. We study the energy gain from particle interactions with the space-charge field of the core, and we identify the resonant characteristic of this interaction as the basic cause of the separation of the beam into the two components. We identify three different particle-trajectory types, and we suggest that one of these types may lead to continuous halo growth, even after the halo is removed by collimators.

  19. Beam halo formation from space-charge dominated beams in uniform focusing channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connell, J.S. [Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Wangler, T.P.; Mills, R.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Crandall, K.R. [AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and an outer halo. The halo is very prominent in mismatched beams, and the potential for accelerator activation is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied for intense neutron generators to process nuclear materials. We present new results about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams from multiparticle simulation of initial laminar beams in a uniform linear focusing channel, and from a model consisting of single particle interactions with a uniform-density beam core. We study the energy gain from particle interactions with the space-charge field of the core, and we identify the resonant characteristic of this interaction as the basic cause of the separation of the beam into the two components. We identify three different particle-trajectory types, and we suggest that one of these types may lead to continuous halo growth, even after the halo is removed by collimators.

  20. System for producing a uniform rubble bed for in situ processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galloway, T.R.

    1983-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and a cutter are disclosed for producing a large cavity filled with a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale or other material, for in situ processing. A raise drill head has a hollow body with a generally circular base and sloping upper surface. A hollow shaft extends from the hollow body. Cutter teeth are mounted on the upper surface of the body and relatively small holes are formed in the body between the cutter teeth. Relatively large peripheral flutes around the body allow material to drop below the drill head. A pilot hole is drilled into the oil shale deposit. The pilot hole is reamed into a large diameter hole by means of a large diameter raise drill head or cutter to produce a cavity filled with rubble. A flushing fluid, such as air, is circulated through the pilot hole during the reaming operation to remove fines through the raise drill, thereby removing sufficient material to create sufficient void space, and allowing the larger particles to fill the cavity and provide a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale. 4 figs.

  1. System for producing a uniform rubble bed for in situ processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galloway, Terry R. (Berkeley, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and a cutter for producing a large cavity filled with a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale or other material, for in situ processing. A raise drill head (72) has a hollow body (76) with a generally circular base and sloping upper surface. A hollow shaft (74) extends from the hollow body (76). Cutter teeth (78) are mounted on the upper surface of the body (76) and relatively small holes (77) are formed in the body (76) between the cutter teeth (78). Relatively large peripheral flutes (80) around the body (76) allow material to drop below the drill head (72). A pilot hole is drilled into the oil shale deposit. The pilot hole is reamed into a large diameter hole by means of a large diameter raise drill head or cutter to produce a cavity filled with rubble. A flushing fluid, such as air, is circulated through the pilot hole during the reaming operation to remove fines through the raise drill, thereby removing sufficient material to create sufficient void space, and allowing the larger particles to fill the cavity and provide a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale.

  2. Critical thickness of an optimum extended surface characterized by uniform heat transfer coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leontiou, Theodoros

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the heat transfer problem associated with a periodic array of extended surfaces (fins) subjected to convection heat transfer with a uniform heat transfer coefficient. Our analysis differs from the classical approach as (i) we consider two-dimensional heat conduction and (ii) the base of the fin is included in the heat transfer process. The problem is modeled as an arbitrary two-dimensional channel whose upper surface is flat and isothermal, while the lower surface has a periodic array of extensions/fins which are subjected to heat convection with a uniform heat transfer coefficient. Using the generalized Schwarz-Christoffel transformation the domain is mapped onto a straight channel where the heat conduction problem is solved using the boundary element method. The boundary element solution is subsequently used to pose a shape optimization problem, i.e. an inverse problem, where the objective function is the normalized Shape Factor and the variables of the optimization are the parameters of the Sch...

  3. Lack of uniform trends but increasing spatial variability in observed Indian rainfall extremes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Subimal [ORNL; Das, Debasish [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies disagree on how rainfall extremes over India have changed in space and time over the past half century, as well as on whether the changes observed are due to global warming or regional urbanization. Although a uniform and consistent decrease in moderate rainfall has been reported, a lack of agreement about trends in heavy rainfall may be due in part to differences in the characterization and spatial averaging of extremes. Here we use extreme value theory to examine trends in Indian rainfall over the past half century in the context of long-term, low-frequency variability.We show that when generalized extreme value theory is applied to annual maximum rainfall over India, no statistically significant spatially uniform trends are observed, in agreement with previous studies using different approaches. Furthermore, our space time regression analysis of the return levels points to increasing spatial variability of rainfall extremes over India. Our findings highlight the need for systematic examination of global versus regional drivers of trends in Indian rainfall extremes, and may help to inform flood hazard preparedness and water resource management in the region.

  4. A Review on Biomass Densification Systems to Develop Uniform Feedstock Commodities for Bioenergy Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Christopher T. Wright; J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing uniformly formatted, densified feedstock from lignocellulosic biomass is of interest to achieve consistent physical properties like size and shape, bulk and unit density, and durability, which significantly influence storage, transportation and handling characteristics, and, by extension, feedstock cost and quality. A variety of densification systems are considered for producing a uniform format feedstock commodity for bioenergy applications, including (a) baler, (b) pellet mill, (c) cuber, (d) screw extruder, (e) briquette press, (f) roller press, (g) tablet press, and (g) agglomerator. Each of these systems has varying impacts on feedstock chemical and physical properties, and energy consumption. This review discusses the suitability of these densification systems for biomass feedstocks and the impact these systems have on specific energy consumption and end product quality. For example, a briquette press is more flexible in terms of feedstock variables where higher moisture content and larger particles are acceptable for making good quality briquettes; or among different densification systems, a screw press consumes the most energy because it not only compresses but also shears and mixes the material. Pretreatment options like preheating, grinding, steam explosion, torrefaction, and ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) can also help to reduce specific energy consumption during densification and improve binding characteristics. Binding behavior can also be improved by adding natural binders, such as proteins, or commercial binders, such as lignosulphonates. The quality of the densified biomass for both domestic and international markets is evaluated using PFI (United States Standard) or CEN (European Standard).

  5. Multipole Electrostatics in Hydration Free Energy Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    Multipole Electrostatics in Hydration Free Energy Calculations YUE SHI,1 CHUANJIE WU,2 JAY W Acceptance Ratio method. We have compared two approaches to derive the atomic multipoles from quantum mechanical calculations: one directly from the new distributed multipole analysis and the other involving

  6. Calculating Highly Oscillatory Integrals by Quadrature Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thapa, Krishna 1989-

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    are found by requiring Z b a m (x) sin(!x)dx = 2 +2X i= wim (xi) The calculation of the wi therefore hinges on calculating the moments R b a x nei!g(x)dx. Unlike traditional approximation methods, the accuracy of the function increases...

  7. PVWatts (R) Calculator India (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PVWatts (R) Calculator for India was released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2013. The online tool estimates electricity production and the monetary value of that production of grid-connected roof- or ground-mounted crystalline silicon photovoltaics systems based on a few simple inputs. This factsheet provides a broad overview of the PVWatts (R) Calculator for India.

  8. First principles calculations for analysis martensitic transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, B.N.; Zhao, G.L.; Ho, K.M.; Chan, C.T.; Ye, Y.Y.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, B.L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The change in crystal energy is calculated for atomic displacements corresponding to phonons, elastic shears, and lattice transformations. Anomalies in the phonon dispersion curves of NiAl and NiTi are analyzed and recent calculations for TiPd alloys are presented.

  9. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

  10. Quark model calculation of the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benesh, C.J.; Goldman, T.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a potential model, we calculate quark distributions for a six-quark quasi-deuteron, including the effects of the Pauli Principle and quark tunneling between nuclei. Using a phenomenological sea distribution, the EMC ratio is calculated and found to be in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  11. AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office #12;AGENDA Guiding Principles Rate Proposal Building Office supplies for budget manager reconciliationOffice supplies for budget manager reconciliation: Equipment Compensated Leave #12;CALCULATING A RATE Budgeted Expenses Budgeted Usage BaseBudgeted Usage Base

  12. Relativistic QRPA calculation of muon capture rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Marketin; N. Paar; T. Niksic; D. Vretenar

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from $^{12}$C to $^{244}$Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the PN-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the PN-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value $g_A = 1.262$ by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.

  13. Benchmark data for validating irradiated fuel compositions used in criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, S.R.; Talbert, R.J.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish criticality safety margins utilizing burnup credit in the storage and transport of spent reactor fuels requires a knowledge of the uncertainty in the calculated fuel composition used in making the reactivity assessment. To provide data for validating such calculated burnup fuel compositions, radiochemical assays have been obtained as part of the United States Department of Energy From-Reactor Cask Development Program. Assay results and associated operating histories on the initial three samples analyzed in this effort are presented. The three samples were taken from different axial regions of a Pressurized Water Reactor fuel rod and represent radiation exposures of about 37, 27, and 44 GWd/MTU. The data are presented in a benchmark type format to facilitate identification/referencing and computer code input.

  14. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, William P. (Tracy, CA); Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L. (San Ramon, CA); Rathkopf, James A. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

  15. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

  16. VESPA: Software to Facilitate Genomic Annotation of Prokaryotic Organisms Through Integration of Proteomic and Transcriptomic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Elena S.; McCue, Lee Ann; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Walker, Julia; Kobold, Mark A.; Webb, Samantha R.; Payne, Samuel H.; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N.; Cannon, William R.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual Exploration and Statistics to Promote Annotation (VESPA) is an interactive visual analysis software tool that facilitates the discovery of structural mis-annotations in prokaryotic genomes. VESPA integrates high-throughput peptide-centric proteomics data and oligo-centric or RNA-Seq transcriptomics data into a genomic context. The data may be interrogated via visual analysis across multiple levels of genomic resolution, linked searches, exports and interaction with BLAST to rapidly identify location of interest within the genome and evaluate potential mis-annotations.

  17. ROMP-Facilitated Methodologies and Automated Library Development of Thiadiazepin-1,1-dioxide-4-ones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Toby R.

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    for cell growth and proliferation. 12 Scheme 1.9 highlights the use of an oligomeric coupling reagent (OACC100) for the synthesis of various substituted furans, thiophenes, and pyridines (not shown). Scheme 1.9 Facilitated amide formation via OACC100... of bound reagents, catalysts, or scavengers including the use of micro-scale reactors for performing homogeneous chemistry.46 BBB B B B BBB B B B BBB B B B C A Heterogeneous Flow-through A B C D Homogeneous Flow-through m i c ro re a c to r Co lu m n w...

  18. Lessons learned from facilitating the state and tribal government working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirteen lessons learned from my experience in facilitating the State and Tribal Government Working Group for the U.S. Department of Energy have been identified. The conceptual base for supporting the veracity of each lesson has been developed and the lessons are believed to be transferable to any stakeholder group. The crux of stakeholder group success if the two-directional, two-mode empowerment required in this case. Most of the lessons learned deal with the scope of that empowerment. A few of the lessons learned deal with the operations of the group.

  19. Guide for licensing evaluations using CRAC2: A computer program for calculating reactor accident consequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J.E.; Roussin, R.W.; Gilpin, H.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A version of the CRAC2 computer code applicable for use in analyses of consequences and risks of reactor accidents in case work for environmental statements has been implemented for use on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Data General MV/8000 computer system. Input preparation is facilitated through the use of an interactive computer program which operates on an IBM personal computer. The resulting CRAC2 input deck is transmitted to the MV/8000 by using an error-free file transfer mechanism. To facilitate the use of CRAC2 at NRC, relevant background material on input requirements and model descriptions has been extracted from four reports - ''Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences,'' Version 2, NUREG/CR-2326 (SAND81-1994) and ''CRAC2 Model Descriptions,'' NUREG/CR-2552 (SAND82-0342), ''CRAC Calculations for Accident Sections of Environmental Statements, '' NUREG/CR-2901 (SAND82-1693), and ''Sensitivity and Uncertainty Studies of the CRAC2 Computer Code,'' NUREG/CR-4038 (ORNL-6114). When this background information is combined with instructions on the input processor, this report provides a self-contained guide for preparing CRAC2 input data with a specific orientation toward applications on the MV/8000. 8 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Use of computers for multicomponent distillation calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Samuel Lane

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrected values for the b 's are best cal- i culated by multiplying (b. /d ) by (d. ) The compositions for each component in the vapor and liquid streams leaving plate j are calculated by use of the following equations. ('i/ i)ca ( i)co y. ji c Z (v... . . /b. ) (b. ) ji i ca i co i=1 , f a j x N+1 C (47-b) A temperature profile may be calculated by making either bubble or dew point calculations based on the compositions obtained by use of Equations (46) and (47). The specified distillate rate must...

  1. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Calculated structures and fluoride affinities for fluorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keeffe, M.

    1986-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that SCF-MO calculations provide good estimates of the energies of the processes MF/sub n/ ..-->.. M/sup n+/ + nF/sup -/ where M/sup n+/ is an ion of a first- or second-row element in a closed-shell or s/sup 2/ configuration. The fluoride ion affinities are then calculated for a number of molecules and ions. Where comparison with experiment is possible, the agreement is generally good when allowance is made for experimental uncertainties. In favorable cases, accurate heats of formation may be calculated from fluoride affinities.

  3. Calculation of external dose from distributed source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a relatively simple calculational method, called the point kernel method (Fo68), for estimating external dose from distributed sources that emit photon or electron radiations. The principles of the point kernel method are emphasized, rather than the presentation of extensive sets of calculations or tables of numerical results. A few calculations are presented for simple source geometries as illustrations of the method, and references and descriptions are provided for other caluclations in the literature. This paper also describes exposure situations for which the point kernel method is not appropriate and other, more complex, methods must be used, but these methods are not discussed in any detail.

  4. Modeling Acid Transport and Non-Uniform Etching in a Stochastic Domain in Acid Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Jianye

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    distributions and do not consider the contribution of channels to the conductivity. An acid fracture conductivity correlation needs the average fracture width at zero closure stress. Existing correlations calculate average fracture width using dissolved rock...

  5. INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS YOU KNOW WHAT THE TUITION, STIPEND AND EQUIPMENT COSTS ARE YOU KNOW WHAT THE TOTAL COST IS CALCULATION IS USING THE 2010 FED F&A RATE FOR WSU OF 52% (.52) [ DIRECT COST ­ TUITION ­ STIPEND ­ EQUIPMENT] (.52 ) + DIRECT

  6. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY07 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In FY07, EOS project accomplishments included 1) subgroup meetings; 2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; 3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; 4) quarterly project status reports; and 5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version September 2007) based on comments by EOS members and invited reviewers.

  7. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring and Evaluation - FY07 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort of the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In FY07, EOS project accomplishments included (1) subgroup meetings; (2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; (3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; (4) quarterly project status reports; and (5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version September 2007) based on comments by EOS members and invited reviewers.

  8. Exploiting the Use of Social Networking to Facilitate Collaboration in the Scientific Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppock, Edrick G. [Information International Associates, Inc.

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to exploit social networking to facilitate scientific collaboration. The project objective was to research and identify scientific collaboration styles that are best served by social networking applications and to model the most effective social networking applications to substantiate how social networking can support scientific collaboration. To achieve this goal and objective, the project was to develop an understanding of the types of collaborations conducted by scientific researchers, through classification, data analysis and identification of unique collaboration requirements. Another technical objective in support of this goal was to understand the current state of technology in collaboration tools. In order to test hypotheses about which social networking applications effectively support scientific collaboration the project was to create a prototype scientific collaboration system. The ultimate goal for testing the hypotheses and research of the project was to refine the prototype into a functional application that could effectively facilitate and grow collaboration within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research community.

  9. Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures; January 2012 - March 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayaweera, T.; Haeri, H.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Uniform Methods Project, DOE is developing a framework and a set of protocols for determining the energy savings from specific energy efficiency measures and programs. The protocols provide a straightforward method for evaluating gross energy savings for common residential and commercial measures offered in ratepayer-funded initiatives in the United States. They represent a refinement of the body of knowledge supporting energy efficiency evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) activities. This document deals with savings from the following measures: commercial and industrial lighting, commercial and industrial lighting controls, small commercial and residential unitary and split system HVAC cooling equipment, residential furnaces and boilers, residential lighting, refrigerator recycling, whole-building retrofit using billing analysis, metering, peak demand and time-differentiated energy savings, sample design, survey design and implementation, and assessing persistence and other evaluation issues.

  10. A Possible Anisotropy in Blackbody Radiation Viewed through Non-uniform Gaseous Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray-Dastidar, T K

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-local gauge symmetry of a complex scalar field, which can be trivially extended to spinor fields, was demonstrated in a recent paper (Mod.Phys.Lett. A13, 1265 (1998) ; hep-th/9902020). The corresponding covariant Lagrangian density yielded a new, non-local Quantum Electrodynamics. In the present paper it is shown that as a consequence of this new QED, a blackbody radiation viewed through gaseous matter appears to show a slight deviation from the Planck formula, and we propose an experimental test to check this effect. We also show that a non-uniformity in this gaseous matter distribution leads to an (apparent) spatial anisotropy in the blackbody radiation.

  11. Improvements in Mixing Time and Mixing Uniformity in Devices Designed for Studies of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Shuhuai [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bakajin, Olgica [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a microfluidic laminar flow mixer designed for studies of protein folding kinetics, we demonstrate a mixing time of 1 +/- 1 micros with sample consumption on the order of femtomoles. We recognize two limitations of previously proposed designs: (1) size and shape of the mixing region, which limits mixing uniformity and (2) the formation of Dean vortices at high flow rates, which limits the mixing time. We address these limitations by using a narrow shape-optimized nozzle and by reducing the bend of the side channel streamlines. The final design, which combines both of these features, achieves the best performance. We quantified the mixing performance of the different designs by numerical simulation of coupled Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations and experiments using fluorescence resonance energy-transfer (FRET)-labeled DNA.

  12. Uniform Hyperbolicity for Szeg? Cocycles and Applications to Random CMV Matrices and the Ising Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Damanik; Jake Fillman; Milivoje Lukic; William Yessen

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider products of the matrices associated with the Szeg\\H{o} recursion from the theory of orthogonal polynomials on the unit circle and show that under suitable assumptions, their norms grow exponentially in the number of factors. In the language of dynamical systems, this result expresses a uniform hyperbolicity statement. We present two applications of this result. On the one hand, we identify explicitly the almost sure spectrum of extended CMV matrices with non-negative random Verblunsky coefficients. On the other hand, we show that no Ising model in one dimension exhibits a phase transition. Also, in the case of dynamically generated interaction couplings, we describe a gap labeling theorem for the Lee-Yang zeros in the thermodynamic limit.

  13. Emergence of coherence in a uniform quasi-two-dimensional Bose gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauriane Chomaz; Laura Corman; Tom Bienaimé; Rémi Desbuquois; Christof Weitenberg; Sylvain Nascimbène; Jérôme Beugnon; Jean Dalibard

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase transitions are ubiquitous in our three-dimensional world. By contrast most conventional transitions do not occur in infinite uniform two-dimensional systems because of the increased role of thermal fluctuations. Here we explore the dimensional crossover of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) for a weakly interacting atomic gas confined in a novel quasi-two-dimensional geometry, with a flat in-plane trap bottom. We detect the onset of an extended phase coherence, using velocity distribution measurements and matter-wave interferometry. We relate this coherence to the transverse condensation phenomenon, in which a significant fraction of atoms accumulate in the ground state of the motion perpendicular to the atom plane. We also investigate the dynamical aspects of the transition through the detection of topological defects that are nucleated in a quench cooling of the gas, and we compare our results to the predictions of the Kibble-Zurek theory for the conventional BEC second-order phase transition.

  14. Use of Uniformly Distributed Concentrated Sunlight for Highly Accelerated Testing of Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Bingham, C.; King, D.; Lewandowski, A.; Netter, J.; Terwilliger, K.; Adamsons, K.

    2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has developed a new ultraviolet (UV) light concentrator that allows material samples to be subjected to uniform intensity levels of 50-100X solar UV at closely controlled sample exposure temperatures. In collaboration with industry, representative coating systems have been exposed without introducing unrealistic degradation mechanisms. Furthermore, correlations have been derived between these highly accelerated test conditions and results obtained at 1-2 suns. Such information is used to predict the degradation of materials in real-world applications. These predictions are compared with measured in-service performance losses to validate the approach. This allows valuable information to be obtained in greatly reduced timeframes, which can provide tremendous competitive advantage in the commercial marketplace.

  15. A Common View on Strong, Uniform, and Other Notions of Equivalence in Answer-Set Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woltran, Stefan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Logic programming under the answer-set semantics nowadays deals with numerous different notions of program equivalence. This is due to the fact that equivalence for substitution (known as strong equivalence) and ordinary equivalence are different concepts. The former holds, given programs P and Q, iff P can be faithfully replaced by Q within any context R, while the latter holds iff P and Q provide the same output, that is, they have the same answer sets. Notions in between strong and ordinary equivalence have been introduced as theoretical tools to compare incomplete programs and are defined by either restricting the syntactic structure of the considered context programs R or by bounding the set A of atoms allowed to occur in R (relativized equivalence).For the latter approach, different A yield properly different equivalence notions, in general. For the former approach, however, it turned out that any ``reasonable'' syntactic restriction to R coincides with either ordinary, strong, or uniform equivalence. I...

  16. An efficient plate heater with uniform surface temperature engineered with effective thermal materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yichao; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extended from its electromagnetic counterpart, transformation thermodynamics applied to thermal conduction equations can map a virtual geometry into a physical thermal medium, realizing the manipulation of heat flux with almost arbitrarily desired diffusion paths, which provides unprecedented opportunities to create thermal devices unconceivable or deemed impossible before. In this work we employ this technique to design an efficient plate heater that can transiently achieve a large surface of uniform temperature powered by a small thermal source. As opposed to the traditional approach of relying on the deployment of a resistor network, our approach fully takes advantage of an advanced functional material system to guide the heat flux to achieve the desired temperature heating profile. A different set of material parameters for the transformed device has been developed, offering the parametric freedom for practical applications. As a proof of concept, the proposed devices are implemented with engineered therm...

  17. Sensitivity analysis and study of the mixing uniformity of a microfluidic mixer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivorra, Benjamin; Ramos, Ángel M; Santiago, Juan G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a microfluidic mixer based on hydrodynamic focusing, which is used to initiate the folding process of individual proteins. The folding process is initiated by quickly diluting a local denaturant concentration, and we define mixing time as the time advecting proteins experience a specified to achieve a local drop in denaturant concentration. In previous work, we presented a minimization of mixing time which considered optimal geometry and flow conditions, and achieved a design with a predicted mixing time of 0.10 $\\mu$s. The aim of the current paper is twofold. First, we explore the sensitivity of mixing time to key geometric and flow parameters. In particular, we study the angle between inlets, the shape of the channel intersections, channel widths, mixer depth, mixer symmetry, inlet velocities, working fluid physical properties, and denaturant concentration thresholds. Second, we analyze the uniformity of mixing times as a function of inlet flow streamlines. We find the shape of the intersection,...

  18. Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazarine, Alexis D

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values using the ORNL MIRD phantom, x-ray phototherapy effectiveness, prostate brachytherapy lifetime dose calculations, and a radiograph of the head using the Zubal head phantom. Also...

  19. Essential Value, Pmax, and Omax Automated Calculator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Brent A.; Reed, Derek D.

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Behavioral economic measures of demand are often calculated in sophisticated spreadsheet programs. Unfortunately, no closed form models for exact pmax (point of unit elasticity) and omax (response output at pmax) can be ...

  20. Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazarine, Alexis D

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values using the ORNL MIRD phantom, x-ray phototherapy effectiveness, prostate brachytherapy lifetime dose calculations, and a radiograph of the head using the Zubal head phantom. Also...

  1. Historical river flow rates for dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, W.H.

    1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

  2. Available Energy Calculations for Process Engineers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, A. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief reviews of available energy and of the application of available energy analysis to chemical processes are given. Two alternative methods for performing available energy calculations are discussed and contrasted. The first method relies...

  3. Signal probability calculations using partial functional manipulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kodavarti, Ravishankar

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALCULATIONS IV THE CUTTING ALGORITHM 14 V RESULTS 17 VI CONCLUSIONS . . REFERENCES APPENDIX A 32 35 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page I Characteristic table of all ISCAS combinational benchmarks II Number of ambiguous lines using the single best ordering... heuristics can be used to generate orderings, in a few cpu seconds [17]. These heuristics have a very low cost of generation, as compared to that of the best ordering. Iterative OPDD calculations with difFerent variable orderings were made, and the best...

  4. Calculator programs for pipe stress engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, K.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains a collection of programs for solving a wide variety of stress problems using both the TI-59 and HP-41CV calculators. Each program is prefaced with a description of the problem to be solved, nomenclature, code restrictions and program limitations. Solutions are explained analytically and then followed by the complete program listing, documentation and checklists. Topics include calculations for pipewall thickness, pressure vessel analysis, reinforcement pads, allowable span, vibration, stress, and two-anchor piping systems.

  5. Calculator program speeds rod pump design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engineer, R.; Davis, C.L.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Matching sucker rod pump characteristics to a specific application is greatly simplified with this program, intended for use with an HP-41CV hand-held computer. The user inputs application data and the program calculates all necessary design criteria, including Mill's acceleration factor, peak and minimum polish rod loads and horsepower required. Sample calculations are provided, together with a thorough discussion of special design considerations involved in huff-and-puff applications.

  6. Calculation of rotordynamic forces on labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensel, Steve John

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALCULATION OF ROTORDYNAMIC FORCES ON LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis STEVE JOHN HENSEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major... Subject: Mechanical Engineering CALCULATION OF ROTORDYNAMIC FORCES ON LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by STEVE JOHN HENSEL Approved as to style snd content by: David Rhode (Chairman of Committee) Erian Baskharone Leel and Garison (Member) +, gg, W. D...

  7. Effect of non-uniform slow wave structure in a relativistic backward wave oscillator with a resonant reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Changhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Sun, Jun; Song, Zhimin; Huo, Shaofei; Bai, Xianchen; Shi, Yanchao; Liu, Guozhi [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)] [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a fresh insight into the effect of non-uniform slow wave structure (SWS) used in a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) with a resonant reflector. Compared with the uniform SWS, the reflection coefficient of the non-uniform SWS is higher, leading to a lower modulating electric field in the resonant reflector and a larger distance to maximize the modulation current. Moreover, for both types of RBWOs, stronger standing-wave field takes place at the rear part of the SWS. In addition, besides Cerenkov effects, the energy conversion process in the RBWO strongly depends on transit time effects. Thus, the matching condition between the distributions of harmonic current and standing wave field provides a profound influence on the beam-wave interaction. In the non-uniform RBWO, the region with a stronger standing wave field corresponds to a higher fundamental harmonic current distribution. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with a diode voltage of 1.02 MV and beam current of 13.2 kA, a microwave power of 4 GW has been obtained, compared to that of 3 GW in the uniform RBWO.

  8. Simulated combined abnormal environment fire calculations for aviation impacts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Alexander L.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aircraft impacts at flight speeds are relevant environments for aircraft safety studies. This type of environment pertains to normal environments such as wildlife impacts and rough landings, but also the abnormal environment that has more recently been evidenced in cases such as the Pentagon and World Trade Center events of September 11, 2001, and the FBI building impact in Austin. For more severe impacts, the environment is combined because it involves not just the structural mechanics, but also the release of the fuel and the subsequent fire. Impacts normally last on the order of milliseconds to seconds, whereas the fire dynamics may last for minutes to hours, or longer. This presents a serious challenge for physical models that employ discrete time stepping to model the dynamics with accuracy. Another challenge is that the capabilities to model the fire and structural impact are seldom found in a common simulation tool. Sandia National Labs maintains two codes under a common architecture that have been used to model the dynamics of aircraft impact and fire scenarios. Only recently have these codes been coupled directly to provide a fire prediction that is better informed on the basis of a detailed structural calculation. To enable this technology, several facilitating models are necessary, as is a methodology for determining and executing the transfer of information from the structural code to the fire code. A methodology has been developed and implemented. Previous test programs at the Sandia National Labs sled track provide unique data for the dynamic response of an aluminum tank of liquid water impacting a barricade at flight speeds. These data are used to validate the modeling effort, and suggest reasonable accuracy for the dispersion of a non-combustible fluid in an impact environment. The capability is also demonstrated with a notional impact of a fuel-filled container at flight speed. Both of these scenarios are used to evaluate numeric approximations, and help provide an understanding of the quantitative accuracy of the modeling methods.

  9. Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans; , Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Some or all of the needs above can be addressed by embodiments of the invention. According to embodiments of the invention, systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies can be implemented. In one embodiment, a method for storing hydrogen can be provided. The method can include providing diatoms comprising diatomaceous earth or diatoms from a predefined culture. In addition, the method can include heating the diatoms in a sealed environment in the presence of at least one of titanium, a transition metal, or a noble metal to provide a porous hydrogen storage medium. Furthermore, the method can include exposing the porous hydrogen storage medium to hydrogen. In addition, the method can include storing at least a portion of the hydrogen in the porous hydrogen storage medium.

  10. A Dynamic Algorithm for Facilitated Charging of Plug-In Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taheri, Nicole; Ye, Yinyu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) are a rapidly developing technology that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and change the way vehicles obtain power. PEV charging stations will most likely be available at home and at work, and occasionally be publicly available, offering flexible charging options. Ideally, each vehicle will charge during periods when electricity prices are relatively low, to minimize the cost to the consumer and maximize societal benefits. A Demand Response (DR) service for a fleet of PEVs could yield such charging schedules by regulating consumer electricity use during certain time periods, in order to meet an obligation to the market. We construct an automated DR mechanism for a fleet of PEVs that facilitates vehicle charging to ensure the demands of the vehicles and the market are met. Our dynamic algorithm depends only on the knowledge of a few hundred driving behaviors from a previous similar day, and uses a simple adjusted pricing scheme to instantly assign feasible and satisfactory c...

  11. Characterization of host lymphoid cells in antibody-facilitated bone marrow chimeras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, S.A.; Griffith, I.J.; Gambel, P.; Francescutti, L.H.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have produced stable murine antibody-facilitated (AF) chimeras by the simultaneous injection of P1 bone marrow cells and anti-P2 monoclonal antibody into normal (unirradiated) adult (P1 X P2)F1 recipients. These AF chimeras are healthy, long-lived, and exhibit no overt signs of graft-versus-host disease. They are immunocompetent and tolerant of host, P2-encoded alloantigens. Donor cell engraftment and takeover, monitored by glucosephosphate isomerase isozyme patterns, is usually complete (greater than 95%) in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and hemopoietic stem cell compartments of long-term (greater than 3 months posttransplantation) AF chimeras. The authors report here, however, that splenic, lymph node, and thymic leukocytes of AF chimeras represent donor/host chimeric populations. Spleen cell populations of AF chimeras exhibit substantial chimera-to-chimera variation in the preponderant residual host cell type(s) present. Interpretations of the implications of these findings are discussed.

  12. High Temperature Separation of Carbon Dioxide/Hydrogen Mixtures Using Facilitated Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Dixon, J.K. (Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN); Maginn, E.J. (Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN); Brennecke, J.F. (Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN)

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiently separating CO2 from H2 is one of the key steps in the environmentally responsible uses of fossil fuel for energy production. A wide variety of resources, including petroleum coke, coal, and even biomass, can be gasified to produce syngas (a mixture of COand H2). This gas stream can be further reacted with water to produce CO2 and more H2. Once separated, the CO2 can be stored in a variety of geological formations or sequestered by other means. The H2 can be combusted to operate a turbine, producing electricity, or used to power hydrogen fuel cells. In both cases, onlywater is produced as waste. An amine functionalized ionic liquid encapsulated in a supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) can separate CO2 from H2 with a higher permeability and selectivity than any known membrane system. This separation is accomplished at elevated temperatures using facilitated transport supported ionic liquid membranes.

  13. Facilitation of polymer looping and giant polymer diffusivity in crowded solutions of active particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, J; Kim, W K; Metzler, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of polymer chains in a bath of self-propelled particles (SPP) by extensive Langevin dynamics simulations in a two dimensional system. Specifically, we analyse the polymer looping properties versus the SPP activity and investigate how the presence of the active particles alters the chain conformational statistics. We find that SPPs tend to extend flexible polymer chains while they rather compactify stiffer semiflexible polymers, in agreement with previous results. Here we show that larger activities of SPPs yield a higher effective temperature of the bath and thus facilitate looping kinetics of a passive polymer chain. We explicitly compute the looping probability and looping time in a wide range of the model parameters. We also analyse the motion of a monomeric tracer particle and the polymer's centre of mass in the presence of the active particles in terms of the time averaged mean squared displacement, revealing a giant diffusivity enhancement for the polymer chain via SPP pooling. Our...

  14. Bursty communication patterns facilitate spreading in a threshold-based epidemic dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takaguchi, Taro; Holme, Petter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Records of social interactions provide us with new sources of data for understanding how interaction patterns affect collective dynamics. Such human activity patterns are often bursty, i.e., they consist of short periods of intense activity followed by long periods of silence. This burstiness has been shown to affect spreading phenomena; it accelerates epidemic spreading in some cases and slows it down in other cases. We investigate a model of history-dependent contagion. In our model, repeated interactions between susceptible and infected individuals in a short period of time is needed for a susceptible individual to contract infection. We carry out numerical simulations on real temporal network data to find that bursty activity patterns facilitate epidemic spreading in our model.

  15. Crystallographic Structure of SurA, a Molecular Chaperone that Facilitates Folding of Outer Membrane Porins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitto, E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SurA protein facilitates correct folding of outer membrane proteins in gram-negative bacteria. The sequence of Escherichia coli SurA presents four segments, two of which are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIases); the crystal structure reveals an asymmetric dumbbell, in which the amino-terminal, carboxy-terminal, and first PPIase segments of the sequence form a core structural module, and the second PPIase segment is a satellite domain tethered approximately 30 A from this module. The core module, which is implicated in membrane protein folding, has a novel fold that includes an extended crevice. Crystal contacts show that peptides bind within the crevice, suggesting a model for chaperone activity whereby segments of polypeptide may be repetitively sequestered and released during the membrane protein-folding process.

  16. Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, X B; Wang, L Z; Chen, Y X; Cao, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel iso-topes, with improvements on two aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. The other, which is unprecedented, is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.33%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 30% smaller.

  17. Dose calculations for severe LWR accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margulies, T.S.; Martin, J.A. Jr.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a set of precalculated doses based on a set of postulated accident releases and intended for use in emergency planning and emergency response. Doses were calculated for the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) accident categories of the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) using the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) code. Whole body and thyroid doses are presented for a selected set of weather cases. For each weather case these calculations were performed for various times and distances including three different dose pathways - cloud (plume) shine, ground shine and inhalation. During an emergency this information can be useful since it is immediately available for projecting offsite radiological doses based on reactor accident sequence information in the absence of plant measurements of emission rates (source terms). It can be used for emergency drill scenario development as well.

  18. LCEs for Naval Reactor Benchmark Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.J. Anderson

    1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this engineering calculation is to document the MCNP4B2LV evaluations of Laboratory Critical Experiments (LCEs) performed as part of the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology program. LCE evaluations documented in this report were performed for 22 different cases with varied design parameters. Some of these LCEs (10) are documented in existing references (Ref. 7.1 and 7.2), but were re-run for this calculation file using more neutron histories. The objective of this analysis is to quantify the MCNP4B2LV code system's ability to accurately calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for various critical configurations. These LCE evaluations support the development and validation of the neutronics methodology used for criticality analyses involving Naval reactor spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository.

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for light nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiringa, R.B.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground and low-lying excited states for nuclei with A {le} 8 are made using a realistic Hamiltonian that fits NN scattering data. Results for more than 30 different (j{sup {prime}}, T) states, plus isobaric analogs, are obtained and the known excitation spectra are reproduced reasonably well. Various density and momentum distributions and electromagnetic form factors and moments have also been computed. These are the first microscopic calculations that directly produce nuclear shell structure from realistic NN interactions.

  20. Giant magnetoresistance calculated from first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, W.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); MacLaren, J.M. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Zhang, X.G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Computational Sciences

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Layer Korringa Kohn Rostoker-Coherent Potential Approximation technique was used to calculate the low temperature Giant Magnetoresistance from first principles for Co{vert_bar}Cu and permalloy{vert_bar}Cu superlattices. Our calculations predict large giant magnetoresistance ratios for Co{vert_bar}Cu and extremely large ratios for permalloy{vert_bar}Cu for current perpendicular to the layers. Mechanisms such as spin-orbit coupling which mix spin channels are expected to greatly reduce the GMR effect for permalloy{vert_bar}Cu.

  1. Calculation method for safe ?* in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, R; Herr, W; Wollmann, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One way of increasing the peak luminosity in the LHC is to decrease the beam size at the interaction points by squeezing to smaller values of ?*. The LHC is now in a regime where safety and stability determines the limit on ?*, as opposed to traditional optics limits. In this paper, we derive a calculation model to determine the safe ?*-values based on collimator settings and operational stability of the LHC. This model was used to calculate the settings for the LHC run in 2011. It was found that ?* could be decreased from 3.5 m to 1.5 m, which has now successfully been put into operation.

  2. Nonperturbative calculations in light-front QED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chabysheva, Sophia S. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota-Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota 55812 (United States)

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods of light-front quantization and Pauli-Villars regularization are applied to a nonperturbative calculation of the dressed-electron state in quantum electrodynamics. This is intended as a test of the methods in a gauge theory, as a precursor to possible methods for the nonperturbative solution of quantum chromodynamics. The electron state is truncated to include at most two photons and no positrons in the Fock basis, and the wave functions of the dressed state are used to compute the electrons's anomalous magnetic moment. A choice of regularization that preserves the chiral symmetry of the massless limit is critical for the success of the calculation.

  3. Fully Automated Calculations in the complex MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Hahn; S. Heinemeyer; F. von der Pahlen; H. Rzehak; C. Schappacher

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent progress towards automated higher-order calculations in the MSSM with complex parameters (cMSSM). The consistent renormalization of all relevant sectors of the cMSSM and the inclusion into the FeynArts/FormCalc framework has recently been completed. Some example calculations applying this framework are briefly discussed. These include two-loop corrections to cMSSM Higgs boson masses as well as partial decay widths of electroweak supersymmetric particles decaying into a Higgs boson and another supersymmetric particle.

  4. Heat Exchanger Support Bracket Design Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1995-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering note documents the design of the heat exchanger support brackets. The heat exchanger is roughly 40 feet long, 22 inches in diameter and weighs 6750 pounds. It will be mounted on two identical support brackets that are anchored to a concrete wall. The design calculations were done for one bracket supporting the full weight of the heat exchanger, rounded up to 6800 pounds. The design follows the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of steel construction, Eighth edition. All calculated stresses and loads on welds were below allowables.

  5. CUDI A Model for Calculation of Electrodynamic and Thermal Behaviour of Superconducting Rutherford Cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verweij, A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CUDI is the extended Fortran code to calculate the electrodynamic and thermal behaviour of any type of Rutherford cable subject to global and/or local variations in field, transport current, and external heat release. The internal parameters of the cable can be freely varied along the length and across the width, such as contact resistances, critical current, cooling rates etc. In this way, all the typical non-uniformities occurring in a cable, e.g. broken filaments, strand welds, cable joints, and edge degradation can be simulated. Also the characteristics of the strands in the cable can be varied from strand to strand. Heat flows through the matrix, through the interstrand contacts, and to the helium are incorporated, as well as the self-field and self- and mutual inductances between the strands. The main features and structure of the program will be discussed.

  6. A PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, H.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH ACommittee E-3.2, "Daylight: International RecommendationsCalcula- tion of Natural Daylight," CIE PUBLICATION No. 16,

  7. Effects of Non-uniform Substrate Temperature on the Clock Signal Integrity in High Performance Designs*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    to higher power dissipation and increasing die and interconnect temperature. Management of thermally related- performance microprocessor chips [2]. Dynamic power management (DPM) and functional block clock gating can performance, i.e. signal delay and clock skew. A systematic way of calculating the thermal profile

  8. Reactor design for uniform chemical vapor deposition-grown films without substrate rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.

    1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor vessel is described for chemical vapor deposition of a uniform semiconductor film on a substrate, comprising: a generally cylindrical reaction chamber for receiving a substrate and a flow of reaction gas capable of depositing a film on the substrate under the conditions of the chamber, the chamber having upper and lower portion and being oriented about a vertical axis; a supporting means having a substrate support surface generally perpendicular to the vertical axis for carrying the substrate within the lower portion of the reaction chamber in a predetermined relative position with respect to the upper portion of the reaction chamber, the upper portion including a cylindrically shaped confinement chamber. The confinement chamber has a smaller diameter than the lower portion of the reaction chamber and is positioned above the substrate support surface; and a means for introducing a reaction gas into the confinement chamber in a nonaxial direction so as to direct the reaction gas into the lower portion of the reaction chamber with a non-axial flow having a rotational component with respect to the vertical axis. In this way the reaction gas defines an inward vortex flow pattern with respect to the substrate surface.

  9. Free-fall in a uniform gravitational field in non-commutative quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. H. C. Castello-Branco; A. G. Martins

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the free-fall of a quantum particle in the context of noncommutative quantum mechanics (NCQM). Assuming noncommutativity of the canonical type between the coordinates of a two-dimensional configuration space, we consider a neutral particle trapped in a gravitational well and exactly solve the energy eigenvalue problem. By resorting to experimental data from the GRANIT experiment, in which the first energy levels of freely falling quantum ultracold neutrons were determined, we impose an upper-bound on the noncommutativity parameter. We also investigate the time of flight of a quantum particle moving in a uniform gravitational field in NCQM. This is related to the weak equivalence principle. As we consider stationary, energy eigenstates, i.e., delocalized states, the time of flight must be measured by a quantum clock, suitably coupled to the particle. By considering the clock as a small perturbation, we solve the (stationary) scattering problem associated and show that the time of flight is equal to the classical result, when the measurement is made far from the turning point. This result is interpreted as an extension of the equivalence principle to the realm of NCQM.

  10. Method and apparatus for jetting, manufacturing and attaching uniform solder balls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, Frederick G. (Cedar Crest, NM); Frear, Darrel R. (Albuquerque, NM); Schmale, David T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process for jetting molten solder in the form of balls directly onto all the metallized interconnects lands for a ball grid array package in one step with no solder paste required. Molten solder is jetted out of a grid of holes using a piston attached to a piezoelectric crystal. When voltage is applied to the crystal it expands forcing the piston to extrude a desired volume of solder through holes in the aperture plate. When the voltage is decreased the piston reverses motion creating an instability in the molten solder at the aperture plate surface and thereby forming spherical solder balls that fall onto a metallized substrate. The molten solder balls land on the substrate and form a metallurgical bond with the metallized lands. The size of the solder balls is determined by a combination of the size of the holes in the aperture plate, the duration of the piston pulse, and the displacement of the piston. The layout of the balls is dictated by the location of the hooks in the grid. Changes in ball size and layout can be easily accomplished by changing the grid plate. This invention also allows simple preparation of uniform balls for subsequent supply to BGA users.

  11. Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  12. DEFLECTION OF A HETEROGENEOUS WIDE-BEAM UNDER UNIFORM PRESSURE LOAD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. V. Holschuh; T. K. Howard; W. R. Marcum

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon State University (OSU) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are currently collaborating on a test program which entails hydro-mechanical testing of a generic plate type fuel element, or generic test plate assembly (GTPA), for the purpose of qualitatively demonstrating mechanical integrity of uranium-molybdenum monolithic plates as compared to that of uranium aluminum dispersion, and aluminum fuel plates onset by hydraulic forces. This test program supports ongoing work conducted for/by the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Fuels Development Program. This study’s focus supports the ongoing collaborative effort by detailing the derivation of an analytic solution for deflection of a heterogeneous plate under a uniform, distributed load in order to predict the deflection of test plates in the GTPA. The resulting analytical solutions for three specific boundary condition sets are then presented against several test cases of a homogeneous plate. In all test cases considered, the results for both homogeneous and heterogeneous plates are numerically identical to one another, demonstrating correct derivation of the heterogeneous solution. Two additional problems are presents herein that provide a representative deflection profile for the plates under consideration within the GTPA. Furthermore, qualitative observations are made about the influence of a more-rigid internal fuel-meat region and its influence on the overall deflection profile of a plate. Present work is being directed to experimentally confirm the analytical solution’s results using select materials.

  13. Uniform hierarchical SnS microspheres: Solvothermal synthesis and lithium ion storage performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Zhen, E-mail: fzfscn@mail.ahnu.edu.cn; Wang, Qin; Wang, Xiaoqing; Fan, Fan; Wang, Chenyan; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Uniform hierarchical SnS microspheres via solvothermal reaction. • The formation process was investigated in detail. • The obtained hierarchical SnS microspheres exhibit superior capacity (1650 mAh g{sup ?1}) when used as lithium battery for the hierarchical microsphere structure. - Abstract: Hierarchical SnS microspheres have been successfully synthesized by a mild solvothermal process using poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as surfactant in this work. The morphology and composition of the microspheres were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The influence of reaction parameters, such as sulfur sources, reaction temperature and the concentration of PVP, on the final morphology of the products are investigated. On the basis of time-dependent experiments, the growth mechanism has also been proposed. The specific surface area of the 3D hierarchitectured SnS microspheres were investigated by using nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. Lithium ion storage performances of the synthesized materials as anodes for Lithium-ion battery were investigated in detail and it exhibits excellent electrochemical properties.

  14. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stockel, I.H.

    1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity. 5 figs.

  15. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stockel, Ivar H. (Bangor, ME)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity.

  16. Free-fall in a uniform gravitational field in noncommutative quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castello-Branco, K. H. C. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-Carlense, 400, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo 13560-970 (Brazil); Martins, A. G. [Departamento de Ciencias Naturais, Universidade do Estado do Para, Av. Djalma Dutra, s/n, Belem, Para 66113-200 (Brazil)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the free-fall of a quantum particle in the context of noncommutative quantum mechanics (NCQM). Assuming noncommutativity of the canonical type between the coordinates of a two-dimensional configuration space, we consider a neutral particle trapped in a gravitational well and exactly solve the energy eigenvalue problem. By resorting to experimental data from the GRANIT experiment, in which the first energy levels of freely falling quantum ultracold neutrons were determined, we impose an upper-bound on the noncommutativity parameter. We also investigate the time of flight of a quantum particle moving in a uniform gravitational field in NCQM. This is related to the weak equivalence principle. As we consider stationary, energy eigenstates, i.e., delocalized states, the time of flight must be measured by a quantum clock, suitably coupled to the particle. By considering the clock as a small perturbation, we solve the (stationary) scattering problem associated and show that the time of flight is equal to the classical result, when the measurement is made far from the turning point. This result is interpreted as an extension of the equivalence principle to the realm of NCQM.

  17. Electrochemical deposition of uniform lithium on an Ni substrate in a nonaqueous electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanamura, Kiyoshi; Shiraishi, Soshi; Takehara, Zenichiro (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Division of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrochemical deposition of lithium on an Ni substrate was conducted in propylene carbonate (PC) containing 1.0 mol dm[sup [minus]3] LiClO[sub 4] (LiClO[sub 4]/PC). The morphology of the lithium deposited on the Ni substrate had the typical dendrite form. The electrodeposition of lithium was then performed in LiClO[sub 4]/PC containing 5 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] HF. The lithium deposited on the Ni substrate in this electrolyte had a hemispherical form, and irregular shapes were not observed. The color of the Ni electrodes surface turned to brilliant blue during the electrodeposition of lithium. This indicates that the lithium surface is very smooth and uniform. After five discharge and charge cycles, there were no lithium dendrites on the electrode surface. From these results, it can be concluded that the addition of a small amount of HF to the electrolyte is significantly effective for the suppression to the lithium dendrite formation.

  18. Method and apparatus for jetting, manufacturing and attaching uniform solder balls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, F.G.; Frear, D.R.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for jetting molten solder in the form of balls directly onto all the metallized interconnects lands for a ball grid array package in one step with no solder paste required. Molten solder is jetted out of a grid of holes using a piston attached to a piezoelectric crystal. When voltage is applied to the crystal it expands forcing the piston to extrude a desired volume of solder through holes in the aperture plate. When the voltage is decreased the piston reverses motion creating an instability in the molten solder at the aperture plate surface and thereby forming spherical solder balls that fall onto a metallized substrate. The molten solder balls land on the substrate and form a metallurgical bond with the metallized lands. The size of the solder balls is determined by a combination of the size of the holes in the aperture plate, the duration of the piston pulse, and the displacement of the piston. The layout of the balls is dictated by the location of the hooks in the grid. Changes in ball size and layout can be easily accomplished by changing the grid plate. This invention also allows simple preparation of uniform balls for subsequent supply to BGA users. 7 figs.

  19. A UNIFORM CORRELATION BETWEEN SYNCHROTRON LUMINOSITY AND DOPPLER FACTOR IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND BLAZARS: A HINT OF SIMILAR INTRINSIC LUMINOSITIES?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Qingwen; Zou Yuanchuan; Wang Dingxiong [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cao Xinwu; Chen Liang, E-mail: qwwu@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: zouyc@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: dxwang@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: cxw@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: chenliangew@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We compile 23 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and 21 blazars with estimated Doppler factors, and the Doppler factors of GRBs are estimated from their Lorentz factors by assuming their jet viewing angles {theta} {yields} 0{sup 0}. Using the conventional assumption that the prompt emission of GRBs is dominated by the synchrotron radiation, we calculate the synchrotron luminosity of GRBs from their total isotropic energy and burst duration. Intriguingly, we discover a uniform correlation between the synchrotron luminosity and Doppler factor, L{sub syn}{proportional_to}D{sup 3.1}, for GRBs and blazars, which suggests that they may share some similar jet physics. One possible reason is that GRBs and blazars have, more or less, similar intrinsic synchrotron luminosities and both of them are strongly enhanced by the beaming effect. After Doppler and redshift correction, we find that the intrinsic peak energy of the GRBs ranges from 0.1 to 3 keV with a typical value of 1 keV. We further correct the beaming effect for the observed luminosity of GRBs and find that a positive correlation exists between the intrinsic synchrotron luminosity and peak energy for GRBs, which is similar to that of blazars. Our results suggest that both the intrinsic positive correlation and the beaming effect may be responsible for the observed tight correlation between the isotropic energy and the peak energy in GRBs (the so-called Amati relation).

  20. Oberseminar -ICP Temperature Calculation for Tribological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harting, Jens

    and passing to third parties. 0 #12;Overview Where to calculate the heat: diesel injection pump First focus: journal bearings DS/ETI2 Vortrag 24.01.05.tex 24.01.05 c Robert Bosch GmbH reserves all rights even;Approach Some assessments: Heat diffuses 30µm in diesel in the time of one rotation of the shaft

  1. New correlation calculates reliable paraffin solubilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Pan, X. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (US))

    1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A new correlation based on boiling point has been developed which accurately calculates paraffin solubilities in water. The correlation provides reliable solubility values down to very low concentrations (parts per million and less), for which the API correlation is not accurate. It can be used for initial engineering studies, including those involving health, safety, and environmental considerations.

  2. Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    R EVISED PAG E PR O O FS ia617 Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations Jason L . In such cases, 0 is said to be spin contaminated owing to incorporation of higher spin state character of Iron­Sulfur ia618 Clusters). It is important to note that while spin-contaminated and broken

  3. Calculation of a coaxial microwave torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Kossyi, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation); Kulumbaev, E. B.; Lelevkin, V. M. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters of an equilibrium microwave discharge in an atmospheric-pressure argon flow in a coaxial waveguide with a truncated inner electrode are calculated numerically by using a self-consistent two-dimensional MHD model. The results obtained agree satisfactorily with the experimental data.

  4. Damien Allain Ingnieur recherche, dveloppement, calcul scientifique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 5 articles publiés. · Administration du parc de machines de calculs Linux. 01/2003­03/2003 Ingénieur données, la réparation de code source en C/C++, de téléchargement de patch et de conversion d'image pour

  5. CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY By: Yasser Dessouky #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply chain for a single

  6. 2004 NET SYSTEM POWER CALCULATION COMMISSIONREPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 2004 NET SYSTEM POWER CALCULATION COMMISSIONREPORT April 2005 CEC-300 on net system power [Senate Bill 1305, (Sher), Chapter 796, Statute of 1997]1 . Net system power in California. Net system power plays a role in California's retail disclosure program, which requires every

  7. Consanguine Calculations Input File: blood.in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    1 of 20 Problem A+ Consanguine Calculations Input File: blood.in Every person's blood has 2 markers in a particular ABO blood type for that person. Combination ABO Blood Type AA A AB AB AO A BB B BO B OO O Likewise, every person has two alleles for the blood Rh factor, represented by the characters + and -. Someone who

  8. Program performs vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, V.L.

    1982-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A program designed for the Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV or 41C calculators solves basic vapor-liquid equilibrium problems, including figuring the dewpoint, bubblepoint, and equilibrium flash. The algorithm uses W.C. Edmister's method for predicting ideal-solution K values.

  9. FIRST PRINCIPLES CALCULATIONS OF TOKAMAK ENERGY TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammett, Greg

    energy losses have prevented the experimental demonstration of net fusion energy production fromFIRST PRINCIPLES CALCULATIONS OF TOKAMAK ENERGY TRANSPORT M. KOTSCHENREUTHER, W. DORLAND, Q.P. LIU Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, United States of America G.W. HAMMETT, M

  10. A simple template-based transfer method to fabricate Bradbury–Nielsen gates with uniform tension for ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kai, Ni, E-mail: ni.kai@sz.tsinghua.edu.cn; Jingran, Guo; Guangli, Ou; Yu, Lei; Quan, Yu; Xiang, Qian; Xiaohao, Wang [Division of Advanced Manufacturing, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Bradbury–Nielsen gate (BNG) consists of two interleaved and electrically isolated sets of wires. It is usually used to gate or modulate ion beams. Uniformly tense wires can remain parallel, equidistant, and coplanar over a wide working temperature range, which is critical to reliable BNG performance. Hence, this study analyzes the non-uniform tension of wires wound using traditional sequential winding methods in which the elastic modulus of the metal wire is much larger than that of the insulation substrate. To address this problem, a simple and reliable template-based transfer method is developed. First, a template with large elastic modulus is used to fabricate a wire mesh with uniform tension. The mesh is then transferred to the substrate. Theoretically, this method reduces the non-uniformity of the tension in wires to less than 2%; therefore, it is used to construct a BNG with stainless steel wire, a stainless steel template, and a printed circuit board substrate. The BNG was installed in our homebuilt ion mobility spectrometer. To confirm that the performance of the BNG meets the requirements of portable ion mobility spectrometry, signal intensity and resolution (approximately 30) were experimentally determined.

  11. Some exact controllability results for the linear KdV equation and uniform controllability in the zero-dispersion limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Some exact controllability results for the linear KdV equation and uniform controllability with controllability properties of linear and nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries equations in a bounded interval. First, we establish the null controllability of the linear equation via the left Dirichlet boundary condition, and its

  12. Regularity criteria and uniform estimates for the Boussinesq system with the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal diffusivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jishan Fan; Fucai Li; Gen Nakamura

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we establish some regularity criteria for the 3D Boussinesq system with the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal diffusivity. We also obtain some uniform estimates for the corresponding 2D case when the fluid viscosity coefficient is a positive constant.

  13. Shielding, Levitation, Propulsion G. W. Jewell, Chariman Method for expanding the uniformly shielded area in a short-length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paperno, Eugene

    Shielding, Levitation, Propulsion G. W. Jewell, Chariman Method for expanding the uniformly shielded area in a short-length open-ended cylindrical magnetic shield K. Oshita, I. Sasada,a) H. Naka shielded area of the axial magnetic field in a relatively short, open-structure axial magnetic shield can

  14. Archival Journals: 1. "Ship Bottom Structure under Uniform Lateral and Inplane Loads," Schiff und Hafen, Heft 5, May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    Archival Journals: 1. "Ship Bottom Structure under Uniform Lateral and Inplane Loads," Schiff und Research, Vol. 16, No. 2, June 1972, pp. 113-123 (also M.I.T. Report No. 70-15, Sept. 1970). 4. "Post-buckling

  15. Calculation of Kinetics Parameters for the NBSR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime have been calculated at different times in the fuel cycle for the NBSR when fueled with both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The best-estimate values for both the delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron lifetime are the result of calculations using MCNP5-1.60 with the most recent ENDFB-VII evaluations. The best-estimate values for the total delayed neutron fraction from fission products are 0.00665 and 0.00661 for the HEU fueled core at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. For the LEU fuel the best estimate values are 0.00650 and 0.00648 at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. The present recommendations for the delayed neutron fractions from fission products are smaller than the value reported previously of 0.00726 for the HEU fuel. The best-estimate values for the contribution from photoneutrons will remain as 0.000316, independent of the fuel or time in the cycle.The values of the prompt neutron lifetime as calculated with MCNP5-1.60 are compared to values calculated with two other independent methods and the results are in reasonable agreement with each other. The recommended, conservative values of the neutron lifetime for the HEU fuel are 650 {micro}s and 750 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. For LEU fuel the recommended, conservative values are 600 {micro}s and 700 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. In all three calculations, the prompt neutron lifetime was determined to be longer for the end-of-cycle equilibrium condition when compared to the startup condition. The results of the three analyses were in agreement that the LEU fuel will exhibit a shorter prompt neutron lifetime when compared to the HEU fuel.

  16. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

  17. Instability in a uniform impurity distribution in a melt-grown silicon crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, S.M.; Vasilevskii, M.I.; Golemshtok, G.M.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Defect-distribution inhomogeneities occur in semiconductors even during crystal growth. The authors show that these can arise from instability in the dopant-semiconductor system. Many minor components enter silicon not only by substitution but also interstitially. They consider the scope for unstable states for a two-component impurity in a solid solution. Numerical stability calculations for inhomogeneous structures with various forms of impurity distribution are plotted.

  18. Thermal rate constant calculation using flux–flux autocorrelation functions: Application to Cl+H2?HCl+H reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Haobin; Thompson, Ward H.; Miller, William H.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H em m t er re r oy th si This aFˆ ~ b!5e2bH ˆ /2Fˆ e2bH ˆ /2 , ~1.2! which facilitates the evaluation of the trace in Eq. ~1.1b!, and ~2! the fact that the correlation function decays rapidly to zero so that quantum time evolution is required only... for short time. More specifically, ‘‘low rank’’ means that Fˆ (b) has only a relatively small number of eigenvalues that are sig- nificantly different from zero, and the first step of the proce- dure ~vide infra! is a Lanczos iteration calculation to find...

  19. Toward a Data Scalable Solution for Facilitating Discovery of Science Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Jesse R.; Castellana, Vito G.; Morari, Alessandro; Tumeo, Antonino; Purohit, Sumit; Chappell, Alan R.; Haglin, David J.; Villa, Oreste; Choudhury, Sutanay; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Feo, John T.

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Science is increasingly motivated by the need to process larger quantities of data. It is facing severe challenges in data collection, management, and processing, so much so that the computational demands of “data scaling” are competing with, and in many fields surpassing, the traditional objective of decreasing processing time. Example domains with large datasets include astronomy, biology, genomics, climate/weather, and material sciences. This paper presents a real-world use case in which we wish to answer queries pro- vided by domain scientists in order to facilitate discovery of relevant science resources. The problem is that the metadata for these science resources is very large and is growing quickly, rapidly increasing the need for a data scaling solution. We propose a system – SGEM – designed for answering graph-based queries over large datasets on cluster architectures, and we re- port performance results for queries on the current RDESC dataset of nearly 1.4 billion triples, and on the well-known BSBM SPARQL query benchmark.

  20. Argument structure hierarchy system and method for facilitating analysis and decision-making processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janssen, Terry (9840 Faust Dr., Vienna, VA 22182)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for facilitating decision-making comprising a computer program causing linkage of data representing a plurality of argument structure units into a hierarchical argument structure. Each argument structure unit comprises data corresponding to a hypothesis and its corresponding counter-hypothesis, data corresponding to grounds that provide a basis for inference of the hypothesis or its corresponding counter-hypothesis, data corresponding to a warrant linking the grounds to the hypothesis or its corresponding counter-hypothesis, and data corresponding to backing that certifies the warrant. The hierarchical argument structure comprises a top level argument structure unit and a plurality of subordinate level argument structure units. Each of the plurality of subordinate argument structure units comprises at least a portion of the grounds of the argument structure unit to which it is subordinate. Program code located on each of a plurality of remote computers accepts input from one of a plurality of contributors. Each input comprises data corresponding to an argument structure unit in the hierarchical argument structure and supports the hypothesis or its corresponding counter-hypothesis. A second programming code is adapted to combine the inputs into a single hierarchical argument structure. A third computer program code is responsive to the second computer program code and is adapted to represent a degree of support for the hypothesis and its corresponding counter-hypothesis in the single hierarchical argument structure.

  1. Facilitating the improved management of waste in South Africa through a national waste information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfrey, Linda [CSIR, Natural Resources and the Environment, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)], E-mail: lgodfrey@csir.co.za

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a waste information system (WIS) for a country is more than just about collecting routine data on waste; it is about facilitating the improved management of waste by providing timely, reliable information to the relevant role-players. It is a means of supporting the waste governance challenges facing South Africa - challenges ranging from strategic waste management issues at national government to basic operational challenges at local government. The paper addresses two hypotheses. The first is that the identified needs of government can provide a platform from which to design a national WIS framework for a developing country such as South Africa, and the second is that the needs for waste information reflect greater, currently unfulfilled challenges in the sustainable management of waste. Through a participatory needs analysis process, it is shown that waste information is needed by the three spheres of government, to support amongst others, informed planning and decision-making, compliance monitoring and enforcement, community participation through public access to information, human, infrastructure and financial resource management and policy development. These needs for waste information correspond closely with key waste management challenges currently facing the country. A shift in governments approach to waste, in line with national and international policy, is evident from identified current and future waste information needs. However, the need for information on landfilling remains entrenched within government, possibly due to the poor compliance of landfill sites in South Africa and the problems around the illegal disposal of both general and hazardous waste.

  2. Scaling Laws and Temperature Profiles for Solar and Stellar Coronal Loops with Non-uniform Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. H. Martens

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulk of solar coronal radiative loss consists of soft X-ray emission from quasi-static loops at the cores of Active Regions. In order to develop diagnostics for determining the heating mechanism of these loops from observations by coronal imaging instruments, I have developed analytical solutions for the temperature structure and scaling laws of loop strands for a wide range of heating functions, including footpoint heating, uniform heating, and heating concentrated at the loop apex. Key results are that the temperature profile depends only weakly on the heating distribution -- not sufficiently to be of significant diagnostic value -- and that the scaling laws survive for this wide range of heating distributions, but with the constant of proportionality in the RTV scaling law ($P_{0}L \\thicksim T_{max}^3$) depending on the specific heating function. Furthermore, quasi-static analytical solutions do not exist for an excessive concentration of heating near the loop footpoints, a result in agreement with recent numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that a generalization of the solutions to the case of a strand with a variable diameter leads to only relatively small correction factors in the scaling laws and temperature profiles for constant diameter loop strands. A quintet of leading theoretical coronal heating mechanisms is shown to be captured by the formalism of this paper, and the differences in thermal structure between them may be verified through observations. Preliminary results from full numerical simulations demonstrate that, despite the simplifying assumptions, the analytical solutions from this paper are stable and accurate.

  3. A UNIFORM ASTEROSEISMIC ANALYSIS OF 22 SOLAR-TYPE STARS OBSERVED BY KEPLER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, S.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Dogan, G. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Woitaszek, M. [Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Bruntt, H.; Karoff, C.; Campante, T. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Verner, G. A.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Creevey, O. L. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Basu, S.; Deheuvels, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Stello, D.; Bedding, T. R.; Benomar, O. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Appourchaux, T. [Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR8617, Universite Paris XI, Batiment 121, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Garcia, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bonanno, A. [INAF Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy); and others

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Asteroseismology with the Kepler space telescope is providing not only an improved characterization of exoplanets and their host stars, but also a new window on stellar structure and evolution for the large sample of solar-type stars in the field. We perform a uniform analysis of 22 of the brightest asteroseismic targets with the highest signal-to-noise ratio observed for 1 month each during the first year of the mission, and we quantify the precision and relative accuracy of asteroseismic determinations of the stellar radius, mass, and age that are possible using various methods. We present the properties of each star in the sample derived from an automated analysis of the individual oscillation frequencies and other observational constraints using the Asteroseismic Modeling Portal (AMP), and we compare them to the results of model-grid-based methods that fit the global oscillation properties. We find that fitting the individual frequencies typically yields asteroseismic radii and masses to {approx}1% precision, and ages to {approx}2.5% precision (respectively, 2, 5, and 8 times better than fitting the global oscillation properties). The absolute level of agreement between the results from different approaches is also encouraging, with model-grid-based methods yielding slightly smaller estimates of the radius and mass and slightly older values for the stellar age relative to AMP, which computes a large number of dedicated models for each star. The sample of targets for which this type of analysis is possible will grow as longer data sets are obtained during the remainder of the mission.

  4. SU-E-T-304: Study of Secondary Neutrons From Uniform Scanning Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, M [Lawrence Cancer Center, KS (United States); Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Benton, E [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are unwanted byproducts from proton therapy and exposure from secondary radiation during treatment could increase risk of developing a secondary cancer later in a patient's lifetime. The purpose of this study is to investigate secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams under various beam conditions using both measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: CR-39 Plastic Track Nuclear Detectors (PNTD) were used for the measurement. CR-39 PNTD has tissue like sensitivity to the secondary neutrons but insensitive to the therapeutic protons. In this study, we devised two experimental conditions: a) hollow-phantom; phantom is bored with a hollow cylinder along the direction of the beam so that the primary proton passes through the phantom without interacting with the phantom material, b) cylindrical-phantom; a solid cylinder of diameter close to the beam diameter is placed along the beam path. CR-39 PNTDs were placed laterally inside a 60X20X35 cm3 phantom (hollow-phantom) and in air (cylindrical-phantom) at various angles with respect to the primary beam axis. We studied for three different proton energies (78 MeV, 162 MeV and 226 MeV), using a 4 cm modulation width and 5cm diameter brass aperture for the entire experiment and simulation. A comparison of the experiment was performed using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Results: The measured secondary neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranges from 2.1 ± 0.2 to 25.42 ± 2.3 mSv/Gy for the hollow phantom study, and 2.7 ± 0.3 to 46.4 ± 3.4 mSv/Gy for the cylindrical phantom study. Monte Carlo simulations predicated neutron dose equivalent from measurements within a factor of 5. Conclusion: The study suggests that the production of external neutrons is significantly higher than the production of internal neutrons.

  5. The Role of Cohesive Particle Interactions on Solids Uniformity and Mobilization During Jet Mixing: Testing Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Fort, James A.; Chun, Jaehun; Jenks, Jeromy WJ

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste that is currently stored in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site will be staged in selected double-shell tanks (DSTs) and then transferred to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Before being transferred, the waste will be mixed, sampled, and characterized to determine if the waste composition and meets the waste feed specifications. Washington River Protection Solutions is conducting a Tank Mixing and Sampling Demonstration Program to determine the mixing effectiveness of the current baseline mixing system that uses two jet mixer pumps and the adequacy of the planned sampling method. The overall purpose of the demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risk associated with the mixing and sampling systems meeting the feed certification requirements for transferring waste to the WTP.The purpose of this report is to analyze existing data and evaluate whether scaled mixing tests with cohesive simulants are needed to meet the overall objectives of the small-scale mixing demonstration program. This evaluation will focus on estimating the role of cohesive particle interactions on various physical phenomena that occur in parts of the mixing process. A specific focus of the evaluation will be on the uniformity of suspended solids in the mixed region. Based on the evaluation presented in this report and the absence of definitive studies, the recommendation is to conduct scaled mixing tests with cohesive particles and augment the initial testing with non-cohesive particles. In addition, planning for the quantitative tests would benefit from having test results from some scoping experiments that would provide results on the general behavior when cohesive inter-particle forces are important.

  6. Validation of Dose Calculation Codes for Clearance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, S.; Wirendal, B.; Bjerler, J.; Studsvik; Teunckens, L.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Various international and national bodies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency, the European Commission, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have put forward proposals or guidance documents to regulate the ''clearance'' from regulatory control of very low level radioactive material, in order to allow its recycling as a material management practice. All these proposals are based on predicted scenarios for subsequent utilization of the released materials. The calculation models used in these scenarios tend to utilize conservative data regarding exposure times and dose uptake as well as other assumptions as a safeguard against uncertainties. None of these models has ever been validated by comparison with the actual real life practice of recycling. An international project was organized in order to validate some of the assumptions made in these calculation models, and, thereby, better assess the radiological consequences of recycling on a practical large scale.

  7. HP-41 Calculates Dykstra-Parsons permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, B.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new program for the HP-41 programmable calculator has been written which will calculate the often used Dykstra-Parsons permeability variation factor, V. No longer must numerous individual permeability values be plotted on log probability paper as a first step in determining V. Input is simply these same permeability values selected at equal spacing along the interval in question. For most core analysis this spacing will be 1 ft. This program is labeled ''KVAR'' (for permeability variation) and is listed here, along with its bar code for those with optical wands. It requires only nine registers for program storage (since it uses HP built-in statistical functions) and eight registers for data storage. Also, it can be stored on one track of the standard two-track magnetic card. Data entry is terminated by entering ''O''. Lastly, it will run with or without a printer.

  8. Calculations of Heat-Capacities of Adsorbates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LAWRENCE, WR; Allen, Roland E.

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 14, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOBER 1976 Calculations of heat capacities of adsorbates W. R. Lawrence and R. E. Allen Department of Physics, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 2 September 1975) The phonon... the substrate has a perfect (100) surface and the adsorbate goes down as a solid monolayer in registry with the substrate. The quasiharmonic approximation was used, and the results for Ne adsorbates were considerably different from those obtained...

  9. Analytic calculation of properties of holographic superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Siopsis; Jason Therrien

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate analytically properties of holographic superconductors in the probe limit. We analyze the range $1/2 3/2$. We also obtain the frequency dependence of the conductivity by solving analytically the wave equation of electromagnetic perturbations. We show that the real part of the DC conductivity behaves as $e^{-\\Delta_g /T}$ and estimate the gap $\\Delta_g$ analytically. Our results are in good agreement with numerical results.

  10. Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation #12;Basic Thermodynamics Helmoholtz free energy A = U ­ TS + i Ni dA = wrev (reversible, const N V T) eq (22.9) McQuarrie & Simon Gibbs free energy G = U;Implication of Free Energy A B Keq = [A]/[B] Keq = exp (-G0 /RT) G0 = -RT ln Keq G = G0 + RT ln Q G > 0

  11. Diffusion Simulation and Lifetime Calculation at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam lifetime is an important parameter for any storage ring. For protons in RHIC it is dominated by the non-linear nature of the head-on collisions that causes the particles to diffuse outside the stable area in phase space. In this report we show results from diffusion simulation and lifetime calculation for the 2006 and 2008 polarized proton runs in RHIC.

  12. Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  13. Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, Ronald J. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hensen, Danielle L. [Risk and Reliability Department Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  14. Cosmology calculations almost without general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas F. Jordan

    2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Friedmann equation is derived for a Newtonian universe. Changing mass density to energy density gives exactly the Friedmann equation of general relativity. Accounting for work done by pressure then yields the two Einstein equations that govern the expansion of the universe. Descriptions and explanations of radiation pressure and vacuum pressure are added to complete a basic kit of cosmology tools. It provides a basis for teaching cosmology to undergraduates in a way that quickly equips them to do basic calculations. This is demonstrated with calculations involving: characteristics of the expansion for densities dominated by radiation, matter, or vacuum; the closeness of the density to the critical density; how much vacuum energy compared to matter energy is needed to make the expansion accelerate; and how little is needed to make it stop. Travel time and luninosity distance are calculated in terms of the redshift and the densities of matter and vacuum energy, using a scaled Friedmann equation with the constant in the curvature term determined by matching with the present values of the Hubble parameter and energy density. General relativity is needed only for the luminosity distance, to describe how the curvature of space, determined by the energy density, can change the intensity of light by changing the area of the sphere to which the light has spread. Thirty-one problems are included.

  15. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  16. Calculation of cogging force in a novel slotted linear tubular brushless permanent magnet motor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Z.Q.; Hor, P.J.; Howe, D. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering] [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering; Rees-Jones, J. [Unilever Research Port Sunlight Lab., Bebington (United Kingdom)] [Unilever Research Port Sunlight Lab., Bebington (United Kingdom)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing requirement for controlled linear motion over short and long strokes, in the factory automation and packaging industries, for example. Linear brushless PM motors could offer significant advantages over conventional actuation technologies, such as motor driven cams and linkages and pneumatic rams--in terms of efficiency, operating bandwidth, speed and thrust control, stroke and positional accuracy, and indeed over other linear motor technologies, such as induction motors. Here, a finite element/analytical based technique for the prediction of cogging force in a novel topology of slotted linear brushless permanent magnet motor has been developed and validated. The various force components, which influence cogging are pre-calculated by the finite element analysis of some basic magnetic structures, facilitate the analytical synthesis of the resultant cogging force. The technique can be used to aid design for the minimization of cogging.

  17. NSRD-2015-TD01, Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NSRD-2015-TD01, Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric Dispersion at Onsite Locations for DOE Nuclear Facilities NSRD-2015-TD01, Technical Report for Calculations of...

  18. First-principles calculations of the electronic structure, phase...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    calculations of the electronic structure, phase transition and properties of ZrSiO4 polymorphs. First-principles calculations of the electronic structure, phase transition and...

  19. Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating Loads Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating Loads During this webinar, Building America Research Team IBACOS...

  20. Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline (IDIQ Attachment J-8) Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline (IDIQ...

  1. Beacon Training in a Water Maze Can Facilitate and Compete With Subsequent Room Cue Learning in Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Beacon Training in a Water Maze Can Facilitate and Compete With Subsequent Room Cue Learning experiments in which rats completed a water-maze blocking procedure, experimental groups were trained to use location. A Room Test (landmarks and background cues only) showed that Stage 1 training with a fixed

  2. Colloquium Series facilitated by Environmental Health & Safety (402-475-4925) and the Office of Research & Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Colloquium Series facilitated by Environmental Health & Safety (402-475-4925) and the Office or countermeasures Toxicology measures LD50 (lethal dose, 50% of population); generally given with tissue exposed and species tested LDLo (some lethal cases reported) LC50 (lethal concentration in air, 50% of population

  3. Facilitated transport of sodium or potassium chloride across vesicle membranes using a ditopic salt-binding macrobicycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Facilitated transport of sodium or potassium chloride across vesicle membranes using a ditopic salt or potassium chloride as a contact ion-pair, is shown to effect- ively transport either salt across vesicle membranes. Sig- nificant transport is observed even when the transporter : phospholipid ratio is as low as 1

  4. Spatially Heterogeneous Dynamics and Dynamic Facilitation in a Model of Viscous Silica Michael Vogel* and Sharon C. Glotzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    this behavior. The mode coupling theory [1] describes many aspects of dynamical behavior at high T- stood as a simple activated bondbreaking process. Here, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simula- tionsSpatially Heterogeneous Dynamics and Dynamic Facilitation in a Model of Viscous Silica Michael

  5. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  6. The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V. [Calculation Dept., Skoda JS plc, Orlik 266, 31606 Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV and RPV cavity of the VVER-440 reacto rand located axially at the position of maximum power and at the position of the weld. Both of these methods (the effective source and the adjoint function) are briefly described in the present paper. The paper also describes their application to the solution of fast neutron fluence and detectors activities for the VVER-440 reactor. (authors)

  7. A crosstalk and non-uniformity correction method for the Compact Space-borne Compton Polarimeter POLAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Hualin; Wu, Bobing; Produit, Nicolas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POLAR is a space-borne Compton polarimeter desired to measure linear polarization of 50 -- 500 keV gamma rays arriving from prompt emission of of gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Reconstruction of energy deposition produced by gamma rays on scintillator bars is required to determine modulation curves, from which the linear polarization can be revealed. However, crosstalk between neighbor scintillator bars and non-uniformities of multi-anode photomultipliers (MaPMT) make the energy reconstruction complicated. We present a model to describe relation between recorded energy signal and visible energy deposited (real deposited energy) on detector modules and energy response matrix is de- duced from the model. According to the model, crosstalk and non-uniformities can be corrected by performing a linear transformation of recorded energy de- position with inverse matrix of the response matrix, whose elements can be also obtained by measuring Compton edges and analyzing crosstalk between recorded signal produced by gamma ray...

  8. Highly uniform, multi-stacked InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatebayashi, J., E-mail: tatebaya@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Ota, Y. [NanoQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ishida, S.; Nishioka, M.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y. [NanoQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a highly uniform, dense stack of In{sub 0.22}Ga{sub 0.78}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures in a single GaAs nanowire (NW). The size (and hence emission energy) of individual QD is tuned by careful control of the growth conditions based on a diffusion model of morphological evolution of NWs and optical characterization. By carefully tailoring the emission energies of individual QD, dot-to-dot inhomogeneous broadening of QD stacks in a single NW can be as narrow as 9.3?meV. This method provides huge advantages over traditional QD stack using a strain-induced Stranski-Krastanow growth scheme. We show that it is possible to fabricate up to 200 uniform QDs in single GaAs NWs using this growth technique without degradation of the photoluminescence intensity.

  9. Seed priming of native ornamental species to improve the rate and uniformity of germination in modern greenhouse operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finnerty, Terry Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and assistance with this research; and for the pleasure and privilege of working with such courteous, professional people. Thanks to Mr. Stan Akagi and Native Plants, Inc, of Salt Lake City, Utah; to Mr. Michael Schupe of Containerized Plants in Independence... and Uniformity of Germination in Modern Greenhouse Operations (August 1990) Terry Lee Finnerty B. S. , Utah State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr, Jayne M. Zajicek Many wildf1ower species have complex dormancy systems that cause sporadic...

  10. Excited state contamination in nucleon structure calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Green; Stefan Krieg; John Negele; Andrew Pochinsky; Sergey Syritsyn

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the sources of systematic error in nucleon structure calculations is contamination from unwanted excited states. In order to measure this systematic error, we vary the operator insertion time and source-sink separation independently. We compute observables for three source-sink separations between 0.93 fm and 1.39 fm using clover-improved Wilson fermions and pion masses as low as 150 MeV. We explore the use of a two-state model fit to subtract off the contribution from excited states.

  11. Calculation of Neutral Beam Injection into SSPX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearlstein, L D; Casper, T A; Hill, D N; LoDestro, L L; McLean, H S

    2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The SSPX spheromak experiment has achieved electron temperatures of 350eV and confinement consistent with closed magnetic surfaces. In addition, there is evidence that the experiment may be up against an operational beta limit for Ohmic heating. To test this barrier, there are firm plans to add two 0.9MW Neutral Beam (NB) sources to the experiment. A question is whether the limit is due to instability. Since the deposited Ohmic power in the core is relatively small the additional power from the beams is sufficient to significantly increase the electron temperature. Here we present results of computations that will support this contention. We have developed a new NB module to calculate the orbits of the injected fast fast-ions. The previous computation made heavy use of tokamak ordering which fails for a tight-aspect-ratio device, where B{sub tor} {approx} B{sub pol}. The model calculates the deposition from the NFREYA package [1]. The neutral from the CX deposition is assumed to be ionized in place, a high-density approximation. The fast ions are then assumed to fill a constant angular momentum orbit. And finally, the fast ions immediately assume the form of a dragged down distribution. Transfer rates are then calculated from this distribution function [2]. The differential times are computed from the orbit times and the particle weights in each flux zone (the sampling bin) are proportional to the time spent in the zone. From this information the flux-surface-averaged profiles are obtained and fed into the appropriate transport equation. This procedure is clearly approximate, but accurate enough to help guide experiments. A major advantage is speed: 5000 particles can be processed in under 4s on our fastest LINUX box. This speed adds flexibility by enabling a ''large'' number of predictive studies. Similar approximations, without the accurate orbit calculation presented here, had some success comparing with experiment and TRANSP [3]. Since our procedure does not have multiple CX and relies on disparate time scales, more detailed understanding requires a ''complete'' NB package such as the NUBEAM [4] module, which follows injected fast ions along with their generations until they enter the main thermal distribution.

  12. Calculator program trilogy characterizes comingled gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, R.

    1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of programs has been developed for the HP-41CV that allows a quicker and more accurate approach to commingled stream calculations. This avoids the margin of error that the representative method introduces. The alpha-numeric capability of the HP-41CV will prompt for the inputs of an 11-component stream. The program series comprises: gas analysis; gas gathering/gas analysis; and flash vaporization. Each of these programs has its stand-alone use; but their true worth is in their integrated capability.

  13. Nucleotide capacitance calculation for DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jun-Qiang [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a first-principles linear response theory, the capacitance of the DNA nucleotides, adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine, are calculated. The difference in the capacitance between the nucleotides is studied with respect to conformational distortion. The result suggests that although an alternate current capacitance measurement of a single-stranded DNA chain threaded through a nano-gap electrodes may not sufficient to be used as a stand alone method for rapid DNA sequencing, the capacitance of the nucleotides should be taken into consideration in any GHz-frequency electric measurements and may also serve as an additional criterion for identifying the DNA sequence.

  14. Simple method for calculating island widths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, J.R.; Hanson, J.D.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for calculating magnetic island widths has been developed. This method uses only information obtained from integrating along the closed field line at the island center. Thus, this method is computationally less intensive than the usual method of producing surfaces of section of sufficient detail to locate and resolve the island separatrix. This method has been implemented numerically and used to analyze the buss work islands of ATF. In this case the method proves to be accurate to at least within 30%. 7 refs.

  15. Simple method for calculating island widths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, J.R. (Department of Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0391 (USA)); Hanson, J.D. (Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (USA))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for calculating magnetic island widths has been developed. This method uses only that information obtained from integrating along the closed field line at the island center. Thus, this method is computationally less intensive than the usual method of producing surfaces of section of sufficient detail to locate and resolve the island separatrix. This method has been implemented numerically and used to analyze the buss work islands of ATF (Fusion Technol. {bold 10}, 179 (1986)). In this case the method proves to be accurate to at least within 20% even though the islands are within a factor of 2 of overlapping.

  16. Hybrid Car Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project JumpHyEnergy Systems IncCar Calculator

  17. Distributed Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilariaDirectDirectCalculator Jump to:

  18. Cool Roof Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Exploration Technique:Illinois: EnergyRoof Calculator

  19. Sensitivity analysis of coupled criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perko, Z.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Applied Physics, Dept. of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perturbation theory based sensitivity analysis is a vital part of todays' nuclear reactor design. This paper presents an extension of standard techniques to examine coupled criticality problems with mutual feedback between neutronics and an augmenting system (for example thermal-hydraulics). The proposed procedure uses a neutronic and an augmenting adjoint function to efficiently calculate the first order change in responses of interest due to variations of the parameters describing the coupled problem. The effect of the perturbations is considered in two different ways in our study: either a change is allowed in the power level while maintaining criticality (power perturbation) or a change is allowed in the eigenvalue while the power is constrained (eigenvalue perturbation). The calculated response can be the change in the power level, the reactivity worth of the perturbation, or the change in any functional of the flux, the augmenting dependent variables and the input parameters. To obtain power- and criticality-constrained sensitivities power- and k-reset procedures can be applied yielding identical results. Both the theoretical background and an application to a one dimensional slab problem are presented, along with an iterative procedure to compute the necessary adjoint functions using the neutronics and the augmenting codes separately, thus eliminating the need of developing new programs to solve the coupled adjoint problem. (authors)

  20. Multicavity SCRF calculation of ion hydration energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diercksen, B.H.F. [Max-Planck-Institut Fuer Astrophysik, Muenchen (Germany); Karelson, M. [Univ. of Tartu (Estonia); Tamm, T. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydration energies of the proton, hydroxyl ion, and several inorganic ions were calculated using the multicavity self-consistent reaction field (MCa SCRF) method developed for the quantum-mechanical modeling of rotationally or flexible systems in dielectric media. The ionic complexes H{sub 3}O{sup +}(H2O){sub 4}, OH{sup {minus}}(H2O){sub 4}, NH{sup +}{sub 4}(H2O){sub 4}, and Hal{sup {minus}}(H2O){sub 4}, where Hal = F, Cl, or Br, have been studied. Each complex was divided between five spheres, corresponding to the central ion and four water molecules in their first coordination sphere, respectively. Each cavity was surrounded by a polarizable medium with the dielectric permittivity of water at room temperature (80). The ionic hydration energies of ions were divided into specific and nonspecific parts. After accounting for the cavity-formation energy using scaled particle theory, good agreement between the total calculated and experimental hydration energies was obtained for all ions studied.

  1. Calculations of composition boundaries of saturated phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, L.; Hahn, S.

    1983-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A program for the HP-41CV calculator is presented for calculating the equilibrium composition boundaries of pairs of saturating solids, liquids, or a combination of a solid and liquid. The activity coefficients must be represented in the form ln ..gamma../sub 1/ = (b/sub h//T - b/sub s/)x/sub 2//sup 2/ + (c/sub h//T - c/sub x/)x/sub 2//sup 3/ where h refers to an enthalpy contribution and s refers to an excess entropy contribution. For solid-liquid equilibria, enthalpies and entropies of fusion are required. For all equilibria, provision is made for use of hypothetical standard states such as the Henry's Law standard states. For example, in treating solid solutions of molybdenum in face-centered cubic metals such as Ni, Rh, or Pt, it is sometimes convenient to use a hypothetical fcc standard state of Mo which represents the limiting Henry's Law behavior of Mo in the fcc metal and has much different properties than a real fcc molybdenum solid.

  2. Electron mobility calculation for graphene on substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirai, Hideki; Ogawa, Matsuto [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Hideaki, E-mail: tsuchiya@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Kamakura, Yoshinari; Mori, Nobuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    By a semiclassical Monte Carlo method, the electron mobility in graphene is calculated for three different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The calculations account for polar and non-polar surface optical phonon (OP) scatterings induced by the substrates and charged impurity (CI) scattering, in addition to intrinsic phonon scattering in pristine graphene. It is found that HfO{sub 2} is unsuitable as a substrate, because the surface OP scattering of the substrate significantly degrades the electron mobility. The mobility on the SiO{sub 2} and h-BN substrates decreases due to CI scattering. However, the mobility on the h-BN substrate exhibits a high electron mobility of 170?000?cm{sup 2}/(V·s) for electron densities less than 10{sup 12?}cm{sup ?2}. Therefore, h-BN should be an appealing substrate for graphene devices, as confirmed experimentally.

  3. ANALYTICAL APPROACH TO TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION IN COOLING LOAD CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Duška; Martin Barták; František Drkal; Jan Hensen

    equation in cooling load calculations. The performance of nine different procedures (the four methods and

  4. Facilitating Oil Industry Access to Federal Lands through Interagency Data Sharing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Jehn; Ben Grunewald

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the environmental and technical data useful to the oil and gas industry and regulatory agencies is now contained in disparate state and federal databases. Delays in coordinating permit approvals between federal and state agencies translate into increased operational costs and stresses for the oil and gas industry. Making federal lease stipulation and area restriction data available on state agency Web sites will streamline a potential lessors review of available leases, encourage more active bidding on unleased federal lands, and give third-party operators independent access to data who otherwise may not have access to lease restrictions and other environmental data. As a requirement of the Energy Policy Conservation Act (EPCA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is in the process of inventorying oil and natural gas resources beneath onshore federal lands and the extent and nature of any stipulation, restrictions, or impediments to the development of these resources. The EPCA Phase 1 Inventory resulted in a collection of GIS coverage files organized according to numerous lease stipulation reference codes. Meanwhile, state agencies also collect millions of data elements concerning oil and gas operations. Much of the oil and gas data nationwide is catalogued in the Ground Water Protection Council's (GWPC's) successfully completed Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS). The GWPC and the states of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Montana are implementing a pilot project where BLM lease stipulation data and RBDMS data will be displayed in a GIS format on the Internet. This increased access to data will increase bid activity, help expedite permitting, and encourage exploration on federal lands. Linking environmental, lease stipulation and resource inventory assessment data and making a GIS interface for the data available to industry and other agencies via the internet represents an important step in the GWPC strategy for all oil and gas regulatory e-commerce. The next step beyond mere data sharing for facilitating the permitting process is to make it possible for industry to file those permit applications electronically. This process will involve the use of common XML schemas.

  5. Calculating LHC Tuning Knobs using Various Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittmer, W; Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By measuring and adjusting the beta-functions at the IP the luminosity is being optimized. In LEP this was done with the two closest doublet magnets. This approach is not applicable for the LHC due to the asymmetric lattice and common beam pipe through the triplet magnets. To control and change the beta-functions quadrupole groups situated on both sides further away from the IP have to be used where the two beams are already separated. The quadrupoles are excited in specific linear combinations, forming the socalled “tuning knobs” for the IP beta functions. We compare the performance of such knobs calculated by different methods: (1) matching in MAD, (2) inversion of the response matrix and singular value decomposition inversion and conditioning and (3) conditioning the response matrix by multidimensional minimization using an Adapted Moore Penrose Method.

  6. Numerical calculations of ultrasonic fields. [STEALTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.A.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A code for calculating ultrasonic fields has been developed by revisng the thermal-hydraulics code STEALTH. This code may be used in a wide variety of situations in which a detailed knowledge of a propagating wave field is required. Among the potential used are: interpretation of pulse-echo or pitch-catch ultrasonic signals in complicated geometries; ultrasonic transducer modeling and characterization; optimization and evaluation of transducer design; optimization and reliability of inspection procedures; investigation of the response of different types of reflectors; flaw modeling; and general theoretical acoustics. The code is described, and its limitations and potential are discussed. A discussion of the required input and of the general procedures for running the code is presented. Three sample problems illustrate the input and the use of the code.

  7. Random number stride in Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes use a sequence of pseudorandom numbers to sample from probability distributions. A common practice is to start each source particle a predetermined number of random numbers up the pseudorandom number sequence. This number of random numbers skipped between each source particles the random number stride, S. Consequently, the jth source particle always starts with the j{center dot}Sth random number providing correlated sampling'' between similar calculations. A new machine-portable random number generator has been written for the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP providing user's control of the random number stride. First the new MCNP random number generator algorithm will be described and then the effects of varying the stride will be presented. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  8. On the calculation of mutual information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Tyrone E.

    1970-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as follows: (1) d Yt Zt dt + dBt, where the n-dimensional process Z is independent of the n-dimensional standard Brownian motion B, [0, 1], Yo =- 0 and (2) f,f ZTt Zt dP dr< where the superscript T denotes transpose. We wish to calculate the amount... was supported by the United States Air Force under Grant AF-AFOSR 814-66. 215 D ow nl oa de d 09 /1 0/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a...

  9. A primer for criticality calculations with DANTSYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, R.D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Criticality Safety Group

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the closure of many experimental facilities, the nuclear safety analyst has to rely on computer calculations to identify safe limits for the handling and storage of fissile materials. Although deterministic methods often do not provide exact models of a system, a substantial amount of reliable information on nuclear systems can be obtained using these methods if the user understands their limitations. To guide criticality specialists in this area, the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group at the University of New Mexico (UNM) in cooperation with the Radiation Transport Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has designed a primer to help the analyst understand and use the DANTSYS deterministic transport code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. DANTSYS is the new name of the group of codes formerly known as: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, TWOGQ, and THREEDANT. The primer is designed to teach bu example, with each example illustrating two or three DANTSYS features useful in criticality analyses. Starting with a Quickstart chapter, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for DANTSYS input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with DANTSYS. Each chapter has a list of basic objectives at the beginning identifying the goal of the chapter and the individual DANTSYS features covered in detail in the chapter example problems. On completion of the primer, it is expected that the user will be comfortable doing criticality calculations with DANTSYS and can handle 60--80% of the situations that normally arise in a facility. The primary provides a set of input files that can be selective modified by the user to fit each particular problem.

  10. Accurate and Approximate Calculations of Raman Scattering in the Atmosphere of Neptune

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sromovsky, Lawrence

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman scattering by H$_2$ in Neptune's atmosphere has significant effects on its reflectivity for $\\lambda 0.5 $\\mu$m, producing baseline decreases of $\\sim$ 20% in a clear atmosphere and $\\sim$ 10% in a hazy atmosphere. Here we present the first radiation transfer algorithm that includes both polarization and Raman scattering and facilitates computation of spatially resolved spectra. New calculations show that Cochran and Trafton's (1978, Astrophys. J. 219, 756-762) suggestion that light reflected in the deep CH$_4$ bands is mainly Raman scattered is not valid for current estimates of the CH$_4$vertical distribution, which implies only a 4% Raman contribution. Comparisons with IUE, HST, and groundbased observations confirm that high altitude haze absorption is reducing Neptune's geometric albedo by $\\sim$6% in the 0.22-0.26 $\\mu$m range and by $\\sim$13% in the 0.35-0.45 $\\mu$m range. We used accurate calculations to evaluate several approximations of Raman scattering. The Karkoschka (1994, Icarus 111, ...

  11. Zero-tension lysimeters: An improved design to monitor colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.L.; Scharf, R.L.; Shang, C.

    1995-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing evidence that mobile colloids facilitate the long-distance transport of contaminants. The mobility of fine particles and macromolecules has been linked to the movement of actinides, organic contaminants, and heavy metals through soil. Direct evidence for colloid mobility includes the presence of humic materials in deep aquifers as well as coatings of accumulated clay, organic matter, or sesquioxides on particle or aggregate surfaces in subsoil horizons of many soils. The potential for colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants from hazardous-waste sites requires adequate monitoring before, during, and after in-situ remediation treatments. Zero-tension lysimeters (ZTLs) are especially appropriate for sampling water as it moves through saturated soil, although some unsaturated flow events may be sampled as well. Because no ceramic barrier or fiberglass wick is involved to maintain tension on the water (as is the case with other lysimeters), particles suspended in the water as well as dissolved species may be sampled with ZTLs. In this report, a ZTL design is proposed that is more suitable for monitoring colloid-facilitated contaminant migration. The improved design consists of a cylinder made of polycarbonate or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) that is placed below undisturbed soil material. In many soils, a hydraulically powered tube may be used to extract an undisturbed core of soil before placement of the lysimeter. In those cases, the design has significant advantages over conventional designs with respect to simplicity and speed of installation. Therefore, it will allow colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants to be monitored at more locations at a given site.

  12. The effects of unconfined slow uniform heating on the mechanical and transport properties of the westerly and charcoal granites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Stephen Joseph

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), max thermal crack development and widen1ng 1s attributed to the differen- tial thermal strain of quartz and feldspar. For T & ToB, differen- max tial thermal expansion of either neighboring feldspar grains or feld- iv spar-maf1c grains appears to...-be the primary cause for the continued "loosening" of the aggregate. The effects of uniform temperature are similar for both rocks, differing only in detail. As indicated by acoust1c emission, thermal cracking initiates for both rocks upon exceeding a...

  13. Rural electrification, climate change, and local economies: Facilitating communication in development policy and practice on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casillas, Christian E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of income poverty, and  standard of living (cooking fuel, poverty metrics presented in Chapter 1.    Description of fixed parameters used in calculations  Diesel fuel 

  14. Recent PQCD calculations of heavy quark production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitev, I

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the results of a recent study of heavy quark production and attenuation in cold nuclear matter. In p+p collisions, we investigate the relative contribution of partonic sub-processes to $D$ meson production and $D$ meson-triggered inclusive di-hadrons to lowest order in perturbative QCD. While gluon fusion dominates the creation of large angle $D\\bar{D}$ pairs, charm on light parton scattering determines the yield of single inclusive $D$ mesons. The distinctly different non-perturbative fragmentation of $c$ quarks into $D$ mesons versus the fragmentation of quarks and gluons into light hadrons results in a strong transverse momentum dependence of anticharm content of the away-side charm-triggered jet. In p+A reactions, we calculate and resum the coherent nuclear-enhanced power corrections from the final-state partonic scattering in the medium. We find that single and double inclusive open charm production can be suppressed as much as the yield of neutral pions from dynamical high-twist shadowing. ...

  15. Development of a Roof Savings Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Erdem, Ender [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Huang, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned and can provide estimated annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof types at arbitrary inclinations. There are options for above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, and low-emittance surfaces. The tool also accommodates HVAC ducts either in the conditioned space or in the attic with custom air leakage rates. Multiple layers of building materials, ceiling and deck insulation, and other parameters can be compared side-by-side to generate an energy/cost savings estimate between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, CA.

  16. Development of a Roof Savings Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Huang, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Erdem, Ender [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned and can provide annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof types at arbitrary inclinations. There are options for above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers and low-emittance surfaces. The tool also accommodates HVAC ducts either in the conditioned space or in the attic with custom air leakage rates. Multiple layers of thermal mass, ceiling insulation and other parameters can be compared side-by-side to generate energy/cost savings between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft Irwin, CA.

  17. Visual Analytics for Roof Savings Calculator Ensembles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Chad [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Kwan-Liu [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for DOE as an industry-consensus, web-based tool for easily running complex building energy simulations. These simulations allow both homeowners and experts to determine building-specific cost and energy savings for modern roof and attic technologies. Using a database of over 3 million RSC simulations for different combinations of parameters, we have built a visual analytics tool to assist in the exploration and identification of features in the data. Since the database contains multiple variables, both categorical and continuous, we employ a coordinated multi-view approach that allows coordinated feature exploration through multiple visualizations at once. The main component of our system, a parallel coordinates view, has been adapted to handle large-scale, mixed data types as are found in RSC simulations. Other visualizations include map coordinated plots, high dynamic range (HDR) line plot rendering, and an intuitive user interface. We demonstrate these techniques with several use cases that have helped identify software and parametric simulation issues.

  18. Calculating Costs for Quality of Security Service Evdoxia Spyropoulou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    utilization costs. The estimated costs can be fed into a resource management system to facilitate the process the design of the QoSS costing demonstration, which we believe is suitable for incorporation into a resource resource availability. As part of the process of estimating efficient task schedules, the RMS must balance

  19. Green Functions For Wave Propagation on a 5D manifold and the Associated Gauge Fields Generated by a Uniformly Moving Point Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Aharonovich; L. P. Horwitz

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge fields associated with the manifestly covariant dynamics of particles in (3,1) spacetime are five-dimensional. We provide solutions of the classical 5D gauge field equations in both (4,1) and (3,2) flat spacetime metrics for the simple example of a uniformly moving point source. Green functions for the 5D field equations are obtained, which are consistent with the solutions for uniform motion obtained directly from the field equations with free asymptotic conditions.

  20. Evaluation and Parameter Analysis of Burn up Calculations for the Assessment of Radioactive Waste - 13187

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, Ivan; Aksyutina, Yuliya; Tietze-Jaensch, Holger [Product Quality Control Office for Radioactive Waste (PKS) at the Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Research, IEK-6, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)] [Product Quality Control Office for Radioactive Waste (PKS) at the Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Research, IEK-6, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Burn up calculations facilitate a determination of the composition and nuclear inventory of spent nuclear fuel, if operational history is known. In case this information is not available, the total nuclear inventory can be determined by means of destructive or, even on industrial scale, nondestructive measurement methods. For non-destructive measurements however only a few easy-to-measure, so-called key nuclides, are determined due to their characteristic gamma lines or neutron emission. From these measured activities the fuel burn up and cooling time are derived to facilitate the numerical inventory determination of spent fuel elements. Most regulatory bodies require an independent assessment of nuclear waste properties and their documentation. Prominent part of this assessment is a consistency check of inventory declaration. The waste packages often contain wastes from different types of spent fuels of different history and information about the secondary reactor parameters may not be available. In this case the so-called characteristic fuel burn up and cooling time are determined. These values are obtained from a correlations involving key-nuclides with a certain bandwidth, thus with upper and lower limits. The bandwidth is strongly dependent on secondary reactor parameter such as initial enrichment, temperature and density of the fuel and moderator, hence the reactor type, fuel element geometry and plant operation history. The purpose of our investigation is to look into the scaling and correlation limitations, to define and verify the range of validity and to scrutinize the dependencies and propagation of uncertainties that affect the waste inventory declarations and their independent verification. This is accomplished by numerical assessment and simulation of waste production using well accepted codes SCALE 6.0 and 6.1 to simulate the cooling time and burn up of a spent fuel element. The simulations are benchmarked against spent fuel from the real reactor Obrigheim in Germany for which sufficiently precise experimental reference data are available. (authors)

  1. Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments.

  2. Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange Call Normalizing Weather Data to Calculate Energy Savings Peer Exchange Call February 26, 2015 3:00PM to 4:3...

  3. TDHF fusion calculations for spherical+deformed systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline a formalism to carry out TDHF calculations of fusion cross sections for spherical + deformed nuclei. The procedure incorporates the dynamic alignment of the deformed nucleus into the calculation of the fusion cross section. The alignment results from multiple E2/E4 Coulomb excitation of the ground state rotational band. Implications for TDHF fusion calculations are discussed. TDHF calculations are done in an unrestricted three-dimensional geometry using modern Skyrme force parametrizations.

  4. Chiral and parity symmetry breaking for planar fermions: Effects of a heat bath and uniform external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayala, Alejandro [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico Distrito Federal 04510 (Mexico); Bashir, Adnan; Gutierrez, Enif; Raya, Alfredo [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Ciudad Universitaria, Morelia, Michoacan 58040 (Mexico); Sanchez, Angel [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Ciudad Universitaria, Morelia, Michoacan 58040 (Mexico); Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study chiral symmetry breaking for relativistic fermions, described by a parity-violating Lagrangian in 2+1-dimensions, in the presence of a heat bath and a uniform external magnetic field. Working within their four-component formalism allows for the inclusion of both parity-even and -odd mass terms. Therefore, we can define two types of fermion antifermion condensates. For a given value of the magnetic field, there exist two different critical temperatures which would render one of these condensates identically zero, while the other would survive. Our analysis is completely general: it requires no particular simplifying hierarchy among the energy scales involved, namely, bare masses, field strength, and temperature. However, we do reproduce some earlier results, obtained or anticipated in literature, corresponding to special kinematical regimes for the parity conserving case. Relating the chiral condensate to the one-loop effective Lagrangian, we also obtain the magnetization and the pair production rate for different fermion species in a uniform electric field through the replacement B{yields}-iE.

  5. Numerical simulation of operation modes in atmospheric pressure uniform barrier discharge excited by a saw-tooth voltage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xuechen; Niu Dongying; Yin Zengqian [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Fang Tongzhen; Wang Long [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of dielectric barrier discharge excited by a saw-tooth voltage are simulated in atmospheric pressure helium based on a one-dimensional fluid model. A stepped discharge is obtained per half voltage cycle with gas gap width less than 2 mm by the simulation, which is different to the pulsed discharge excited by a sinusoidal voltage. For the stepped discharge, the plateau duration increases with increasing the voltage amplitude and decreasing the gas gap. Therefore, uniform discharge with high temporal duty ratio can be realized with small gap through increasing the voltage amplitude. The maximal densities of both electron and ion appear near the anode and the electric field is almost uniformly distributed along the gap, which indicates that the stepped discharge belongs to a Townsend mode. In contrast to the stepped discharge with small gas gap, a pulsed discharge can be obtained with large gas gap. Through analyzing the spatial density distributions of electron and ion and the electric field, the pulsed discharge is in a glow mode. The voltage-current (V-I) characteristics are analyzed for the above mentioned discharges under different gas gaps, from which the different discharge modes are verified.

  6. Generation of uniform large-area very high frequency plasmas by launching two specific standing waves simultaneously

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hsin-Liang, E-mail: hlchen@iner.gov.tw; Tu, Yen-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Chang; Lin, Deng-Lain [Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Longtan, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China); Leou, Keh-Chyang [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With the characteristics of higher electron density and lower ion bombardment energy, large-area VHF (very high frequency) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has become an essential manufacturing equipment to improve the production throughput and efficiency of thin film silicon solar cell. However, the combination of high frequency and large electrodes leads to the so-called standing wave effect causing a serious problem for the deposition uniformity of silicon thin film. In order to address this issue, a technique based on the idea of simultaneously launching two standing waves that possess similar amplitudes and are out of phase by 90° in time and space is proposed in this study. A linear plasma reactor with discharge length of 54 cm is tested with two different frequencies including 60 and 80 MHz. The experimental results show that the proposed technique could effectively improve the non-uniformity of VHF plasmas from >±60% when only one standing wave is applied to <±10% once two specific standing waves are launched at the same time. Moreover, in terms of the reactor configuration adopted in this study, in which the standing wave effect along the much shorter dimension can be ignored, the proposed technique is applicable to different frequencies without the need to alter the number and arrangement of power feeding points.

  7. Optical diagnostic instrument for monitoring etch uniformity during plasma etching of polysilicon in a chlorine-helium plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hareland, W.A.; Buss, R.J.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonuniform etching is a serious problem in plasma processing of semiconductor materials and has important consequences in the quality and yield of microelectronic components. In many plasmas, etching occurs at a faster rate near the periphery of the wafer, resulting in nonuniform removal of specific materials over the wafer surface. This research was to investigate in situ optical diagnostic techniques for monitoring etch uniformity during plasma processing of microelectronic components. We measured 2-D images of atomic chlorine at 726 nm in a chlorine-helium plasma during plasma etching of polysilicon in a parallel-plate plasma etching reactor. The 3-D distribution of atomic chlorine was determined by Abel inversion of the plasma image. The experimental results showed that the chlorine atomic emission intensity is at a maximum near the outer radius of the plasma and decreases toward the center. Likewise, the actual etch rate, as determined by profilometry on the processed wafer, was approximately 20% greater near the edge of the wafer than at its center. There was a direct correlation between the atomic chlorine emission intensity and the etch rate of polysilicon over the wafer surface. Based on these analyses, 3-D imaging would be a useful diagnostic technique for in situ monitoring of etch uniformity on wafers.

  8. STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG Master of Science Thesis Carlo reactor physics criticality calculations. This is achieved by optimising the number of neutron for more efficient Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations, giving results with errors that can

  9. The melting lines of model systems calculated from coexistence simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xueyu

    rapidly as a function of the potential cutoff, indicating that long-range corrections to the free energies of the solid and liquid phases very nearly cancel. This approach provides an alternative to traditional methods them. Tradition- ally, these calculations have been made using free energy calculations: by calculating

  10. Full Core, Heterogeneous, Time Dependent Neutron Transport Calculations with the 3D Code DeCART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hursin, Mathieu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for multi- dimensional reactor calculation." Atomkernenergiein Light Water Reactor calculations, which are processedlight water reactor diffusion calculations." Nuclear Science

  11. Numerical calculation of wave refraction by digital computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orr, Terry Edwin

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF REFRACTION COEFFICIENTS Geometric Aspect of Wave Refraction. Energy Aspect of Wave Refraction I1I. ADAPTATION TO COMPUTER METHCDS IV, PROGRAM INPUT AND OUTPUT V. ANALYSIS AND RESULTS VI. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS. 6 8 19 30 33 44 BIBLIOGRAPHY... that the wave does not advance at a uniform rate. With more nearabout e structures being built in coastal regions, ''t is imperati ve that the design engineer be able to estimate wave characteristics in shallow water. Wave height is a prime criterion...

  12. Integration of health into urban spatial planning through impact assessment: Identifying governance and policy barriers and facilitators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Laurence, E-mail: Laurence.carmichael@uwe.ac.uk [WHO Collaborating Centre for Healthy Urban Environments, University of the West of England Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Barton, Hugh [WHO Collaborating Centre for Healthy Urban Environments, University of the West of England Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Gray, Selena [University of the West of England, Bristol, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Blackberry Hill, Stapleton, Bristol BS16 1DD (United Kingdom); Lease, Helen [RPS Planning and Development, 2420 The Quadrant, Aztec West, Almondsbury, Bristol BS32 4AQ (United Kingdom); Pilkington, Paul [University of the West of England, Bristol, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Blackberry Hill, Stapleton, Bristol BS16 1DD (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents the results of a review of literature examining the barriers and facilitators in integrating health in spatial planning at the local, mainly urban level, through appraisals. Our literature review covered the UK and non UK experiences of appraisals used to consider health issues in the planning process. We were able to identify four main categories of obstacles and facilitators including first the different knowledge and conceptual understanding of health by different actors/stakeholders, second the types of governance arrangements, in particular partnerships, in place and the political context, third the way institutions work, the responsibilities they have and their capacity and resources and fourth the timeliness, comprehensiveness and inclusiveness of the appraisal process. The findings allowed us to draw some lessons on the governance and policy framework regarding the integration of health impact into spatial planning, in particular considering the pros and cons of integrating health impact assessment (HIA) into other forms of impact assessment of spatial planning decisions such as environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environment assessment (SEA). In addition, the research uncovered a gap in the literature that tends to focus on the mainly voluntary HIA to assess health outcomes of planning decisions and neglect the analysis of regulatory mechanisms such as EIA and SEA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Governance and policy barriers and facilitators to the integration of health into urban planning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Review of literature on impact assessment methods used across the world. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knowledge, partnerships, management/resources and processes can impede integration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HIA evaluations prevail uncovering research opportunities for evaluating other techniques.

  13. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

  14. Calculation of molecular free energies in classical potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhi, Asaf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free energy calculations in molecular simulations are used to predict the strength of molecular processes such as binding and solvation. We present an accurate and complete calculation of molecular free energies in standard classical potentials. In this method we transform the molecule by relaxing potential terms that depend on the coordinates of a group of atoms in that molecule and calculate the free energy difference associated with the transformation. Then, since the transformed molecule can be treated as non interacting systems, the free energy associated with these atoms is analytically or numerically calculated. We suggest the potential application of free energy calculation of chemical reactions in classical molecular simulations.

  15. Modification of alkaline pulping to facilitate the isolation of aliphatic acids. Part 1. Sodium hydroxide pretreatment of pine wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alen, R.; Niemelae, K.; Sjoestroem, E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pretreating pine chips (Pinus sylvestris) with sodium hydroxide prior to the alkaline delignification kraft, kraft-anthraquinone, and soda-anthraquinone) can facilitate the recovery of the carbohydrate degradation products from alkaline pulping liquors. Under suitable pretreatment conditions large amounts of carbohydrate degradation products (alipahtic acids) were formed relative to lignin. The lignin fraction was composed of comparatively low-molecular-weight fragments. Although the delignification was considerably retarded and the yield (based on wood) was decreased by 1-3%, the properties of the resulting pulp were essentially maintained despite pretreatment. Finally, data are given for the composition of aliphatic acids in liquors resulting from pretreatments.

  16. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup and the Expert Regional Technical Group, Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the annual report for fiscal year 2014 for the project called Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) and the Expert Regional Technical Group (ERTG). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the project for the Bonneville Power Administration. The EOS and ERTG are part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation and habitat restoration efforts, respectively, developed by the Action Agencies (BPA, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System and implemented under the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program.

  17. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY09 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the annual report for fiscal year 2009 (FY09) for the project called Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Corps or USACE], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS).

  18. Micellization Coupled with Facilitation of J-Aggregation for Poly(1,3-Cyclohexadiene) - Based Amphiphilic Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiaping [ORNL; Ding, Weiwei [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Xu, Zhongde [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China; Yuan, Yizhong [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-assembly and its influence on the photophysical properties of polystyrene-b-sulfonated poly (1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PS-b-sPCHD) were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), laser light scattering (LLS) technique, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The amphiphilic PS-b-sPCHD copolymers can associate to form micelles with insoluble PS segments as the core surrounded by soluble sPCHD segments in aqueous media. J-aggregation of the chromophores in sPCHD segments is significantly facilitated in the micellization, resulting in a remarkable change in the photophysical properties of PS-b-sPCHD.

  19. Helical Tomotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Whole Pelvis Irradiation in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients: Dosimetric, Normal Tissue Complication Probability, and Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widesott, Lamberto, E-mail: widesott@yahoo.it [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, Trento (Italy); Pierelli, Alessio; Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Medical Physics, St. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Lomax, Antony J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Amichetti, Maurizio [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, Trento (Italy); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, St. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Soukup, Martin [Section for Biomedical Physics, Universitatsklinik fur Radioonkologie, Tubingen (Germany); Schneider, Ralf; Hug, Eugen [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiotherapy, St. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Department of Medical Physics, St. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Schwarz, Marco [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, Trento (Italy)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) treatment plans for high-risk prostate cancer (HRPCa) patients. Methods and Materials: The plans of 8 patients with HRPCa treated with HT were compared with IMPT plans with two quasilateral fields set up (-100{sup o}; 100{sup o}) and optimized with the Hyperion treatment planning system. Both techniques were optimized to simultaneously deliver 74.2 Gy/Gy relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) in 28 fractions on planning target volumes (PTVs)3-4 (P + proximal seminal vesicles), 65.5 Gy/Gy(RBE) on PTV2 (distal seminal vesicles and rectum/prostate overlapping), and 51.8 Gy/Gy(RBE) to PTV1 (pelvic lymph nodes). Normal tissue calculation probability (NTCP) calculations were performed for the rectum, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was estimated for the bowel cavity, penile bulb and bladder. Results: A slightly better PTV coverage and homogeneity of target dose distribution with IMPT was found: the percentage of PTV volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 95%}) was on average >97% in HT and >99% in IMPT. The conformity indexes were significantly lower for protons than for photons, and there was a statistically significant reduction of the IMPT dosimetric parameters, up to 50 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the rectum and bowel and 60 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the bladder. The NTCP values for the rectum were higher in HT for all the sets of parameters, but the gain was small and in only a few cases statistically significant. Conclusions: Comparable PTV coverage was observed. Based on NTCP calculation, IMPT is expected to allow a small reduction in rectal toxicity, and a significant dosimetric gain with IMPT, both in medium-dose and in low-dose range in all OARs, was observed.

  20. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring and Evaluation FY08 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, GE; Diefenderfer, HL [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In fiscal year 2008 (FY08), EOS project accomplishments included (1) subgroup meetings; (2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; (3) project management via BPA's project tracking system, Pisces; (4) quarterly project status reports; and (5) a major revision to the Estuary RME document and its subsequent regional release (new version January 2008). Many of the estuary RME recommendations in this document were incorporated into the Biological Opinion on FCRPS operations (May 2008). In summary, the FY08 EOS project resulted in expanded, substantive coordination with other regional RME forums, a new version of the federal Estuary RME program document, and implementation coordination. This annual report is a FY08 deliverable for the project titled Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup.